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Full text of "The New York Clipper (January 1917)"

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&3k> NEW YORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 
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THE NEW YORX CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



THE HOUSE OF OPERETTAS 

VIENNA ••• NEW WK V BERLIN 




Another Tosti's "Goodbye" Another "1 Hear You Calling Me'* 

A Tear. A Kiss. A Smile 

Wards by DARL MacBOYLE ORCHESTRATIONS IN ALL KEYS Music by OTTO MOTZAN 

Artists Are Welcome to Our Professional Department 

KARCZAG PUBLISHING CO., 62-64 W. 45th St New York, (7th floor) 



hits ALBERT VON THIERS hTts 



HITS 



Words by CHAS. McCARRON 



Music by ALBERT VON TILZER 



EVE WASN'T MODEST TILL SHE ATE THAT APPLE 



(We'll Have to Pass the Apples Again) 



Watch them flock in for this one. The biggest riot in years. 



Word* by LEW BROWN and CHAS. McCARRON 



Music by ALBERT VON TILZER 



THE HONOLULU H1CKI BOOLA BOO 



A new one by the boys who wrote "Oh, How She Could Yacki Hacki." A cl 



tor anv act 




Music by ALBERT VON TILZER 



ANY GIRL 



The greatest novelty march song in years. Not even excepting "My Little Girl,'" by the same writer. 



Words by WILL DILLON 



I ■',;.■' 



Music by ALBERT VON TILZER 



IT'S THE IRISH IN YOUR EYE 



(You've Got Me Going With Your Irish Ways) 



Don't -><■ 'ei'look this ureal novelty Irish sons:. Pure sentiment; elean comedy lines; wonderful melody, and it's different. 



BROADWAY MUSIC CORP., WILL VON TILZER, Pres. 145 W. 45th St., N, Y. C. CHICAGO, 145 N. Clark St. 




Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QCTEF.N. 18S3 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 3, 1917 



VOLUME LXIV— No. 
Price, Ten Ctnti 



BRADY HEADS 

CO. TO BUT 

GARDEN 

RINGLING AND WEBER IN DEAL 



There ia a well defined report, which, in 
the absence of most of the principals 
could not be verified, that William A. 
Brady, L. Lawrence Weber and the Ring- 
ling Brothers are to head a syndicate 
which will purchase Madison Square 
Garden and continue it as New York's 
biggest amusement resort. 

It is well known that the Ringlings have 
a strong desire to have this big resort 
continued, as it ia the only place in the 
city- in which a big circus can be given. 
Its demolishment would - mean that it 
would probably be many a year before the 
Barnum & Bailey Circus would be seen in 
the city limits and this, from the view- 
point of these circus kings, would be a 
catastrophe. 

Mr. Brady has always been an admirer 
of exponents of the manly art and in his 
time -has managed some of the biggest 
events ever pulled off In the squared 
circle. It is knows that both he and Mr. 
Weber would not be averse to directing 
high class fistic exhibitions -and thus be- 
tween the circus and boxing the gentle- 
men mentioned see a way of making, a 
paying enterprise out of the Garden for 
part of the year. 

Then there is the horse show, which can 
only be held, in this resort, as well as food, 
automobile, poultry, motor boat and other 
big shows and sporting contests. 

Edward L Devlin, controller of the New 
York Life Insurance Co., present owner 
of the building, when seen would not dis- 
cuss the report and Mr. Weber would 
neither affirm nor deny it. 



RAYMOND LEAVES HOSPITAL 

Joe Raymond, the vaudeville agent who 
has been under the care of Dr. Gregory at 
Bellevue, was discharged from that in- 
stitution last Saturday and turned over 
to friends who will make arrangements to 
have him placed in a private institution. 



COCOANUT GROVE OPENING SET 

January 15 is now given as the definite 
date of the opening of the Cocoanut Grove 
at the Century. 



RUSH HOUSE NAMED VANDERBTLT 

The new theatre which Edward F. Rush 
is building on West 48th Street is to b« 
called the VanderbBt. 



JOHN RAFTERY PRODUCING 

John -fraitery, globe trotter, painter, 
litterateur, music critic and theatrical pro- 
ducer, has again decided to try his fortunes 
in -the theatrical field and has begun the re- 
hearsing of a new play, entitled "The Vic- 
tim,", with Oliver Bailey as an associate. 
After about three weeks, the piece will take 
up the latest sport of looking for a Broad-, 
way theatre. . 



"STUFFY" DAVIS IMPROVING 

. Glenmour (Stuffy) Davis, who has been 
confined in Bellevue hospital as the result 
of a stroke of paralysis, is improving 
slowly and probably will be able to leave 
the institution within a month. Several 
of Davis' theatrical friends called upon 
him New Year's day. 



KEITH OPENS NEW HOUSE 

Dayton, O., Jan. 1. — B. F. Keith has re- 
opened the Strand Theatre here as a first- 
class picture house. The Strand was de- 
stroyed by fire about a year ago and has 
been completely rebuilt by the Keith in- 
terests. The house has a seating capacity 
of 1,400. 



FLORENCE PARKER ACT CANCELS 

The act of Florence Parker, billed as the 
American prima donna, with Lew Pollack 
at the piano, was cancelled last week at 
the Eighty-first St. Theatre on account of 
Miss Parker's illness. Frank Morrell, is 
blackface, was substituted. 



BUOU FERNANDEZ ILL 

Bijou Fernandez is confined to her home 
with the grip. She contracted a cold while 
trimming the trees for the children's cele- 
bration at the Cohan Theatre last Sunday. 



PHILIP KLEIN ON WAY HERE - 
Philip Klein, son of the late Charles 
Klein, is on bis way to New York from Eng- 
land on the Steamer St. Paul. In London 
Klein is A. H. Wood's representative. 



MOROSCO HOUSE OPENING SET 

Taking all possible delays into considera- 
tion, Oliver Morosco bas decided that 
February 5th will be the date on which 
his new theatre, to be called the Morosco, 
will open, with "Canary Cottage," now on 
the road as the attraction. 



BLAIR AHEAD OF FOX PICTURE 

Samuel Blair has gone on a trip in the 
South in the interests of the Annette 
Kellermann picture, "A Daughter of the 
Gods." 



NANCY BOYER SHOW HALTED 

Hobneix, N. Y., Dec 27. — The Nancy 
Boyer Co. missed the matinee today, owing 
to the baggage car not arriving in time to 
jrive a show. The house was sold out and 
money had to be refunded. . ;.'.'.*• 



RATS FAIL TO 

STRIKE, AS 

RUMORED 

MANAGERS HAD ACTS READY 



The White Rat strike against theatres 
that are members of the Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Protective Association which was 
scheduled, according to statements made 
at the Rat headquarters, to take place on 
New Year's day, did not materialize. 

Theatre managers throughout the coun- 
try, however, were alert to the situation, 
and fortified themselves with double bills 
to meet any such contingency. From 
Thursday of last week on, acts were being 
dispatched to Boston, Hartford, Buffalo 
and Atlanta by the managers, to await 
further instructions. 

At the New York headquarters of the 
Rats, little information could be obtained 
as to the situation. 

Mountford is still in Chicago while Fitx- 
Patrick is said to be in Connecticut. He 
was in New Haven last Saturday and left 
there for Waterbury to spend New Year's. 

It was believed, according to rumors 
circulated along Broadway Monday, that 
Fitzpatrick's presence in that section 
might signify the intention of the White 
Rats calling a strike on the Poll Circuit. 
There have been a number of White Rats 
agitators playing on bills in the vicinity 
of New York "who, during the past week, 
have been trying to agitate a strike among 
performers on the bill. Word was con- 
veyed by the house managers to V. M. 
P. A ., headquarters and a representative 
of the association was immediately dis- 
patched to the place, where he im- 
mediately got rid of the troublemakers on 
the bill by cancelling them. 



CHICAGO SITUATION QUIET 

Chicago, Jan. 1. — Trouble in the form 
of a strike of White Rat actors was ex- 
pected here today, but did not materialize, 
although preparations were made by the 
United Booking offices to combat the 
Mountford adherents. It bad been said 
that the Great Northern show would be 
stopped, but aa the day wore on the report 
was. proved to be false. 



NO TROUBLE IN BOSTON 

Boston, Jan. 1. — Although trouble had 
been expected here between the White Rats 
and the theatre managers today, nothing 
developed. At the local headquarters of 
the Rats it was said that word was being 
awaited from Mountford in Chicago, and 
would have to be forwarded by him before 
the walkout could take place. 



— BENWAY JOINS O'BRIEN 

A. P. (Happy) Ben way has signed up 
for the balance of the season with Neil 
O'Brien's Minstrels, opening at Newport 
News, Va. 



LOUISE HARRIS ILL 

Springfield, O., Dec. 30.— Louise Har- 
ris, one of the cast of "The Blue Paradise," 
is seriously ill in the City Hospital, suffer- 
ing with rheumatism. 



BARNUM ENGAGES PHYSICIAN 

Dr. Robert L. Keith, of Seattle, Wash., 
has been engaged as the physician for the 
Barnum & Bailey circus next season. 



NORA BAYES TO TOUR 

Nora BayeB will add three vaudeville 
acts to her show and go on tour under the 
direction of Dan Slattery, the latter part 
of this month, opening in Chicago. 



REHEARSE "MY HERO" 

"My Hero," the new George M. Ander- 
son piece, goes into rehearsal at the Long- 
acre Theatre this morning. In the cast 
are Carter De Haven, Leona Thurber and 
Will Danforth. 



C. * H. HAVE NEW PLAY 

Cohan and Harris are to produce a new 
play entitled "A Tailor-Made Man," a 
comedy by Harry James Smith, from the 
German of Gabriel Doelger. Grant Mit- 
chell will create the more important role. 



FORMER MINSTREL DIES 

Joplis, Mo., Jan. L — Tommy Murray, 
a former clog dancer, drum major and end 
man in the minstrel field, was found dead 
sitting in a chair in his room at a hotel 
here. 



MRS. FISKE'S TIME EXTENDED 

Prm.Ann.rHiA, Dec. 20. — The engage- 
ment Of Mrs. Fiske in "rlrutwhile Susan" 
at the Broad Street Theatre bas been ex- 
tended for a week. 



LICENSE LAW HITS THEATRES 

Baltimobk, Jan. 2. — A city ordinance 
takes effect today, compelling any person 
or company using adrertudng signs of any 
kind to take out a license, coating one hun- 
dred dollars a year. 



CORT SHOW HAS PREMIER 

PrrTSBUORH, Jan. 2. — "Johnny! Get 
Your Gun," the new offering of John Cort. 
a three-act comedy with a prologue, opened 
at the Dnquesne Theatre, yesterday. The 
principal members in the cast are Louis 
Derner, Grace Valentine, Edwin Mordant, 
Lorraine Frost and Antoinette Walker. 



KAUFMAN WELL AGAIN 

S. Jay Kaufman has weathered • siege 
of tonsilitis and ia again out on tha Rial to.- 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



FOX TO BUILD 

ANOTHER BIG 

THEATRE 

BUYS HUGE SITE IN BRONX 



William Fox has purchased the seventeen 
ond one-half lota at the northwest corner of 
Grand Concourse and Fordham Road, The 
Bronx, where he will erect a theatre Beat- 
ing 3,500 persons to be devoted to vaude- 
ville acd moving pictures. The new show- 
house will be one of the largest in the city. 
The theatre, designed by Thomas W. 
Lamb, is of the Adams style of architec- 
ture. It will have a system of hidden 
lights, so arranged that the entire color 
scheme of the house can be changed in- 
stantaneously. The lobby will have a 
marble finish, while all the staircases are 
to be of Italian marble, as will also be the 
orchestra, mezzanine and balcony floors. 
All of the walls will be covered with im- 
ported tapestry with a French gray and 
gold finish. 

Fox was represented in the transaction 
by Rogers & Rogers, his attorneys, while 
the Level Realty Corp., who held the land, 
was represented by Attorney Sternberg, of 
Sternberg, Jacobson & Pollack. 

Mr. Fox recently sold the Riverside The- 
atre, at Broadway and Ninety-sixth Street, 
to the Keith interests. 



INVESTIGATING ACTORS' INCOMES 

Agents of the United States' Treasury; 
Department are making an investigation in- 
to the incomes of actors and actresses, with 
a view of checking up their income tax re- 
turns when they are filed this year, as there 
have been complaints that many have failed 
to comply with the law. 



DALY CLOSING AT FULTON 

This is the last week of Arnold Daly in 
"The Master" at the Fulton Theatre. The 
play will go on tonr. 



COHAN & HARRIS HAVE NEW ONE 

Cohan and Harris will soon produce a 
comedy by Henry James Smith. "A Tailor- 
Made Man." It will have its premiere out 
of town this month. 



FLORA BELLA ATTACHED 

Newark, N. J., Dec. 30.— A writ of at- 
tachment was issued at the sheriff's office 
yesterday, against the "Flora Bella" Co., 
Inc., now playing at the Broad Street The- 
atre. The writ was issued to cover a bill 
of about $500, said to be owing John H. 
Meister, of New York, for posters, and will 
hold the company here until payment is 
made. 



CENTURY HOLDS FIRST CONCERT 

The first Sunday concert at the Century 
Theatre filled the theatre to capacity with 
a representative New York New Year's 
Eve audiei.ce. The performance lasted 
until after midnight. 



0UTD00RSH0WS 
FORM BIG 

ASS'N. 

TO FIGHT DISCRIMINATING LAWS 



BALL TICKETS SELLING 

Sam Reider, who is in the South ahead 
of the Messrs. Shubert's "Blue Paradise" 
company, has taken orders for over one 
thousand tickets in the South alone for the 
next Inter-State Theatrical Ball, which 
will be held in New York this, season. 



LONERCAN TO LEAVE CAST 

Lester Lonergan is to leave the cast of 
"Major Pendennis" when that play goes 
on tour to look after the production of a 
French adaptation in wMch he is in- 
terested. Edward Phelan will succeed 
Lonergan. 



WILL ARCHIE AT CENTURY 

The Cocoanut Grove has signed Will 
Archie, the atom comedian, for a part in 
"Dance and Grow Thin." 



WALDRON JOINS FOX CO. 

William Waldron, formerly manager of 
Proctor's Twenty-third Street Theatre, has 
joined the Fox forces. 



MOTHER'S JEWELS TO FAIRBANKS 

According to the will of the late Mrs. 
Fairbanks, Douglas, the actor, receives 
several pieces of jewelry, including a 
valuable opal and diamond ring. His son 
receives a sixth part of her residuary 
estate, which is said to amount to ap- 
proximately $10,000. 



TAIT SIGNS MARGARET CALVERT 

Margaret Calvert will leave San Fran- 
cisco for Sydney January 9, where she will 
act the role of mother in the Australian 
production of "Turn to the Right." 



MELROSE DIED IN DAVENPORT 

Much curiosity which has surrounded' the 
death of Wilson Melrose, who has often 
appeared throughout New England, was 
cleared up when it was learned that Mel- 
rose died in Davenport, la., and not Athol, 
Mass. He was known in Davenport under 
his real name of Loys W. Peale. 



BEATRICE ALLEN OPERATED ON 

Beatrice Allen of the Century Theatre 
has recently underwent a surgical opera- 
tion at the Woman's Hospital. She will 
resume her activities in a few days. 



MOROSCO ENGAGES DANCERS 

Melisa Ten Eyck and Max Weily have 
been engaged for the Morosco production, 
"The Canary Cage," to do their special 
dances. 



LUCY HUFFAKER IN CHICAGO 

Lucy Huffaker, press representative of 
the Washington Square Players, is spend- 
ing a few weeks in Chicago directing the 
affairs of their number two company, 
which is playing a seven weeks engage- 
ment at the Plavhouse there. 



DeMARLO BUYS FARM 

MnroxxTOir, N. Y., Dec 29. — Harry .De 
Mario has purchased the W. S. Fuller 
faun near here, consisting of 640 acres, in- 
cluding 340 head of stock and equipment- 



MURDERER OF ACTRESS TO DIE 

Trenton, N. J., Dec. 28. — The murderer 
of Mrs. Elizabeth Dunbar, a vaudeville 
actress, Wilson Ashbridge, will be electro- 
cuted at the State Prison here this week. 
Ashbridge is said to have been infatuated 
with the actress, whom he shot to death in 
Camden. 



BEATRICE ALLEN ILL 

Beatrice Allen of the "Century Girl" 
company is at the Woman's Hospital re- 
covering from a minor operation. 



CHANGE "THE VICTIM" TITLE 

The title of the new Oliver D. Bailey 
play, "The Victim,"'-is to be changed to 
"The Innocent Sinner," because the first 
title has been applied to a Fox film pro- 
duction. 



Realizing the necessity of banding to- 
gether for the mutual protection and the ad- 
visability of a closer union at interests, the 
circus, fair and carnival men, together with . 
those engaged in kindred enterprises, have 
formally organized The Association of the 
Outdoor Showmen of the World. 

This organization, probably the most aus- 
picious in the history of the outdoor show 
world, received its impetus at the showmen's 
banquet at the Hotel Astor last week. At 
the dinner, an organization along the lines 
of the new association was hinted at with 
the result that a meeting of prominent cir- 
cus and carnival men was called for the 
following day when a heart-to-heart talk 
resulted in the birth of the organization. . 
At the meeting the impositions that the 
outdoor showman must shoulder under pres- 
ent conditions were brought to light by the 
speakers and it was agreed that co-opera- 
tion was the only means of stamping out 
"shake-downs," excessive licenses and dis- 
criminating laws against the outdoor show. 
The formation of the Association came 
about after the morning session when a com- 
mittee, consisting of Harry Pollok, F. P. 
Spellman and Clarence A. Wortham was 
appointed to submit plans for a permanent 
organization. The afternoon assemblage 
adopted the committee's report in short 
order, and an executive committee — repre- 
senting the various departments of the out- 
door amusement field — was elected. This 
committee in turn elected' the following offi- 
cers, who will hold office until the next 
meeting of the Association, which will be 
held in Chicago in' early February : Presi- 
dent, Frank P. Spellman; vice presidents, 
Albert E. Brown, Louis E. Cooke, Oscar 
C. Jurney, and C. A. Wortham; secretary, 
Albert E. Kiralfy; treasurer, Louis E. 
Cooke. 

The personnel of the Executive Commit- 
tee is made up as follows : Expositions, 
Albert Kiralfy and Harry F. McGarvie; 
parks, Oscar C. Jurney, Michael Heim, T. 
Schmidt and P. McSquiggene ; fairs, Albert 

E. Brown, Frank Fuller, G. Dickinson and 

F. T. Corey ; circuses, Frank P. Spellman, - 
Louis E. Cooke, J. Augustus Jones, Ed. 
Ballard and AI. G. Barnes ; carnivals, 
Clarence A. Wortham, Harry R. Pollok, 
Victor D. Leviee and J. George Loos ; con- 
cessions, AI. Lotto, George Harmon, Felice 
Bernard! and Samuel Reich ; manufacturers 
and supply houses, Andrew Donaldson, 
Walter F. Driver, Louis E. Bend, C. W. 
Parker, Henry B. Aucby, Win. F. Mangels, 
Fred Clarke and G. Lowe ; booking agents, 
Henry Meyerhoff, E. F. Carruthers and 
Fred M. Barnes. 

Plans for publicity are now under way 
and it is expected that the support of every 
responsible outdoor showman will be ob- 
tained by the new association. 

The organization has, as its prime pur- 
poses, the calling to time of the "suitcase" 
carnival man, the abolition of the "'49 
show," and a general uplift of the outdoor 
show business. 

The association expects to appoint com- 
mittees in each state of the Union to aid 
bi obtaining favorable legislation. 



PORTMANTEAU PLAY HALTED 

The contemplated performance of the 
Portmanteau Players at the Bossert Hotel 
in Brooklyn Sunday night was halted by 
the police. The play was given after 12 
o'clock. 



BLANCHE SHIRLEY CREMATED 

Union, Hiix, N. J., Dec. 24. — The body 
of Mrs. Blanche S. Crane, known on the 
stage as Blanche Shirley, and wife of James 
L. Crane, an actor, was cremated here. She 
met death by falling from a window of her 
apartment in New York. 



HAWKS AHEAD OF BALLET 

Mary Pickford'a representative, Wells 
Hawks, is to act for a short period as gen- 
eral advance agent for the Ballet Basse, 
now on tour, being specially loaned for the 
work by Miss Piekford. 



"THE SIMP" IS RENAMED 

"Heads Up," a play formerly entitled 
"The Simp," was produced last week at the 
Lincoln Theatre, Union Hill. The drama 
was written by Zellah Covington. It prob- 
ably will have a Broadway production in 
the near future. 



HAMILTON DUE JAN. 16 
San Fbancisco, Cal., Jan. 2. — Hale 
Hamilton and his wife, Myrtle Tannehill, 
are expected to arrive here from Australia. 
January 16, when they will proceed at 
once to New York. 



STORK AT JOE BROWN'S HOME 

A Christmas present extraordinary was 
left at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
E. Brown Dec 25 in the form of Don Evan 
Brown, a new arrival and addition to the 
family. Brown was formerly of Prevost 
and Brown. 



CUBAN DANCERS ARRIVE 

Madge Moore and Mrs. Carroll Kelo, 
erstwhile members of the Havana Opera 
Company, have arrived here from Cuba 
and will be seen shortly on the local 
boards. 



HIP. GETS MME. CRONIN 
Mme. Morris Cronin will open January 
22 at the New York Hippodrome with elec- 
trical novelties. The "Merry Men" still 
continue on tour. 



HARRY KLINE ILL 

Owing to an attack of grippe Harry 
Kline, of the Dillingham forces, has been 
absent from the office for several days. 



FROHMAN. INC.. PAYS DIVIDENDS 

The Board of Directors of Charles Froh- 
man, voted a special dividend of $12.50 a 
share, payable January 2. 



ERIC BUND, DEAD 

Reading, Pa., Dec 31. — Eric Blind, the 
English actor, died here today of pneu- 
monia. He had been touring with Cyril 
Maude in "Grumpy." 



GAIL KANE TO LEAVE CAST 

Gail Kane in "The Harp of Life" is to 
be replaced- by Marguerite Lesie. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



5- 



TICKET AGENTS 

LOST HEAVILY 

SAT.JJIGHT 

PUBLIC GOT CUT-RATE ADMISSION 



Expecting to reap a harvest from the 
sale of theatre tickets last Saturday night, 
the agencies tried to obtain all the choice 
scats at the various houses for the per- 
formance that evening, paying a premium 
of from 26 to 50 cents a ticket at the box- 
office. 

But, it seems they were double crossed 
by the theatre going public in this in- 
stance, as patrons felt it was sufficient of 
an imposition on the part of the theatres 
to increase the cost of orchestra seats from 
50 cents to $140 a ticket without being 
compelled to go to the agencies and pay 
another premium for the seats. 

When the regular customers applied at 
the agencies for seats, they were informed 
that a choice pair would cost them $10. 
This is just double the price that is usual- 
ly charged by the agencies for the tickets, 
and patrons forsook the pleasure of go- 
ing to the theatre on Saturday night. 

As a result the agencies were top heavy 
with tickets and, as there seemed no 
possibility of getting rid of them, they 
immediately got into touch with Joe Le 
Blang, the cut-rate ticket man. They 
asked him to make them an offer on their 
whole stock of tickets and Le Blang was 
able to buy them at about half of their 
cost, he in turn selling them at a shade 
less than the box-office price, but making 
a handsome profit. In this way he had 
several thousand tickets for the various 
shows in the city. 

In obtaining these seats the various 
agencies practically cleaned out the thea- 
tres of their orchestra seats and when the 
patrons went to the theatres looking for 
seats and willing to buy despite the ad- 
vance, they were informed that everything 
had been sold. At some of the theatres 
they were told by the box-office men to 
go to a certain agency, which would sup- 
ply them with the choice seats at a small 
premium. It seems as though the patrons 
did not take this suggestion, as the agen- 
cies were unable to dispose of their seats. 

Even though most of the theatres had 
increased their . price of admission last 
week, Le Blang was in a position to sup- 
ply them with seats at a reduced price 
for practically all of the Shubert theatres 
and other houses not in that combine for 
all performances during the week. His 
matinee sale was unusuaUy heavy, as he 
disposed of all seats that he had on hand 
for those performances. However, in the 
evening, there was a marked falling off in 
patronage. 

The Winter Garden for the Sunday 
show charged $5 a seat for the first ten 
rows in the orchestra and $3 for tie bal- 
ance of the seats on the lower floor. The 
house did capacity business. The Hippo- 
drome, Century and several other of the 
houses had their scale running up to 
82.50 for choice seats. The Palace charged 
S2 for the entire lower floor. 

However, at the Astor, Casino and other 
houses which had the special performances 
business was very light. A top of $250 
Wai charged in these houses, and those 
that did not do so regretted their over- 
sight. 



• • MB. WEISS DEAD 
Tampla, Fla,, Dec. 27. — M. B. Weiss, 
of San Francisco, CaL, manager of the 
"Elizabeth" show with the Leon W. Wash- 
burn's Mighty Midway Shows, and well- 
known in bis profession, died here at the 
Majestic Hotel this morning, after an ill- 
ness of several months. He is survived by 
his wife and one son. The funeral will, 
take place on Sunday afternoon and will 
lie in charge of the Masonic Lodge of this 
city. 

Mr. Weiss in 1905 made a tour of Ger- 
many, France, Russia, Italy, England and 
Belgium, exhibiting "Elizabeth," considered 
to be the smallest perfect-formed woman on 
exhibition. Mr. Weiss's attraction at the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition 
in 1915 was awarded the Gold Medal Prize. 



TO CHOOSE FOX PRIZE WINNER 

The selection of the winners of the Wil- 
liam Fox prize for art students for draw- 
ings and models of Annette Kellermann, 
will take place at the Hotel Astor to- 
morrow afternoon. More than 300 offerings 
have been submitted to the judges. On 
Monday night the artists that competed 
will be the guests of Miss Kellermann at 
a performance in the Lyric Theatre of "A 
Daughter of The Gods." Tne announce- 
ment of the winner and award of prizes 
will be made then. 



GRACE FIELD QUITS SHOW 

Grace Field is to remain with the 
"Have a Heart" company only through its 
preliminary tour. She states the part as- 
signed her has not been embellished in ac- 
cordance with the author's promise. 



STRAND SANTA LIBERAL 

The bonus checks which were awarded 
to the employees of the Strand Theatre as 
a Christmas Gift were apportioned accord- 
" ing to the' amount of their yearly salary. 
All employees receiving $2,000 a year. or 
lc-ss received 10 per cent, of their annual 
salaries, and those earning over that 
amount were given 5 per cent, of their 
yearly stipend. There were 116 employees 
to receive these gifts. 



CALVERT TO BE MANAGER 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 30. — George 
Calvert, who is temporarily managing Pan- 
tnges Theatre, this city, during the absence 
of Harry Cornell, is slated for a regular 
managerial job with Pantages and will 
probably have charge of one of the new 
houses now building. 



KEITH GIVES UP THEATRE 

Philadelphia, Dec. 30. — The B. F. 
Keith's interests relinquished last week 
their lease on the Allegheny Theatre, a 
big vaudeville house at Frankford and 
Allegheny Avenues, in the northeastern 
section of the city. The Keith lease has 
still a year and a half to run and the own- 
ers announce that they received $15,000 
to accept the annulment of the lease. 

Joseph E. Cohen, manager of the Broad- 
way Theatre, and a quarter owner of the 
Allegheny Theatre, will take over the man- 
agement and continue the same vaudeville 
policy. 



FILMS GET MAXINE ELLIOTT 
Maxine Elliott has been engaged by the 
Goldwyn Corporation for motion pictures. 
She returned to this country recently after 
a five years' absence abroad. 



ACTS ON SMALL 
TIME SCARCE, 
AGENTS SAY 

MANAGERS FORTIFY FOR STRIKE 



The vaudeville booking agents who book 
the small theatres, playing three, four and 
more shows a day, in the local territory 
and New York State, have been consider- 
ably handicapped in getting standard acta 
for these houses in the past week or two. 
They attribute it to several sources, one 
being that the vaudeville managers on the 
larger circuits are fortifying themselves in 
case of a White Bats' strike and have en- 
gaged acts at various points to replace any 
that may walk out. 

None of these acts is actively engaged 
in work, simply being paid a salary to stay 
at a given point. Then, too, a good many 
of the acts that are in the habit of work- 
ing on these circuits do not care to work 
the holiday weeks and go to their homes. 

A visit to several booking offices revealed 
the fact that there was no shortage of ac- 
tors as far as applying for work is con- 
cerned, as these offices are crowded all day 
by applicants for work. But, according to 
one of the managers, the majority of these 
are performers whose acts are not consid- 
ered up to the Circuit standard. 

Walter Plimmer, who books about thirty 
houses around New York, declared that the 
greatest shortage was in "two" acts, espe- 
cially those which work in "one." He 
stated that in making up his bills for the 
current week he experienced considerable 
difficulty in getting song and dance teams. 
He claims that the majority of these people 
were either out of town for the V. M. P. A. 
on emergency call or that they were work- 
ing private clubs. 

Very few of the managers that book 
through these offices are members of the 
Vaudeville Managers' Association, and 
they feel they will be equally affected by 
a strike on the Circuit houses. Tbey be- 
lieve that if a strike occurs other managers 
will scarry around and sign up any sort 
of an act. . 

Byrne & Kirby and Joe Eckl, who also 
book a number of these houses, also report 
a scarcity of acceptable acts. They claim 
that if this condition of the so-called 
"strike odor" is not squelched or settled 
shortly they will be seriously handicapped 
in arranging bills for theatres tbey are 
booking. 



HE MAY BE ANOTHER ROTHAPFEL 

Bert Ennis, former press agent of Vita- 
graph, Keystone and Eclair, has been ap- 
pointed managing director of The Japanese 
Gardens, picture palace de luxe atop of 
Win. Fox's Riviera Theatre, at Ninety- 
seventh Street and Broadway. Ennis has 
inaugurated a unique publicity campaign 
to attract out-of-town visitors to the 
Broadway show place. 



ARUSS TO FOLLOW WARFIELD 

George Arliss in "The Professor's Love 
Story" is scheduled to appear at the 
Knickerbocker for an extended run, begin- 
ning Jan. 29. Molly Pearson is his leading 
lady. David Warfield will conclude his 
engagement in "The Music Master" Jan. 
27 and go on tour. 



AVERY PLAY FOR FULTON 

"In for the Night," a. play by Jamea 
Avery, will have its New York premiere at 
the Fulton Theatre Jan. 11. The Empire 
Producing Company has leased the house 
at a weekly rental of $3,500. "The Mas- 
ter," in which Arnold Daly is appearing at 
that theatre, will go on the road next 
Monday. 



SUNDAY SHOWS IN MAJESTIC 

The Majestic, Brooklyn, started playing 
Sunday vaudeville shows Dec. 3. The 
house plays legitimate attractions during 
the week booked by the Shuberts. The 
Sunday vaudeville bills which will be con- 
tinued for the rest of the season are 
booked by the U. B. 0. The Majestic, al- 
though booked by the same office, becomes, 
through its Sunday vaudeville policy, op- 
position to the Orpheum directly across 
the street. 



NEW PLAY AT CORT HOUSE 

Pittsburg n, Dec. 30. — On Monday John 
Cort will produce at the Duquesne The- 
atre a new farce entitled, "Johnny Get 
Your Gun." The cast includes Ray Coch- 
rane, Lorraine Frost, Ralph Nairn, Kate 
Mayhew, Rose Winter, Grace Valentine, 
Behlin Gayer, Edward Poland, Edward 
Mordant, Robert iiomans, Louis Bennison, 
Everett Butterfield, Billie Scott, Adelaide 
Rodrigues, Carl Massey and Tom K. Car- 
lias. 



ACTRESS LEAVES SHOW 

Lillian Lee Anderson will leave "The 
Heart of Dixie," now playing in Chicago, 
after Saturday night's performance to 
journey back to New York to begin re- 
hearsals in a new production that is 
scheduled for Broadway. 



SHUBERTS PICKING CAST 

The Shuberts have been busy the past 
few weeks in procuring the cast for 
the summer show at the Winter Garden. 
Those already engaged include Chick Sales, 
Dolly Connolly, Moran & Weiser, and 
Harry Tighe and Sylvia Jason. 



LAURENCE FOSTER MARRIED 

Mebiden, Conn., Dec. 24. — Laurence 
Foster, of Chicago, leading man, and 
Donna Wilbnr, of Kent Water, Mich., 
leading woman of the "Shepherd of the 
Hills" company were married while the 
company was playing here. 



ELMAN'S SISTER MARRIES 

Buffalo, N. Y., Dec. 31. — Mm Ehnan, 
sister of Mischa Elman, was married here 
today to Dr. Maurice Bernstein, of 
Kenosha, Wis. The violinist acted as best 
man, with Miss El man's two sisters aa 
bridesmaids. 



EDOUARD STRAUSS DEAD 

Vienna, Dec. 29. — Edouard Strauss, the 
composer, died at his home today in bis 
eighty-second year. He had composed 
more than two hundred pieces of dance 
music. 



MAX HART WINS SUIT 

According to a decision handed down by 
the Appelate Division of the Supreme Court 
last week, which reverses a previous judg- 
ment of the Supreme Court, Max Hart, the 
vaudeville agent, will not have to pay At- 
torney Max D. Steuer $5,000 for fixing up 
Hart's trouble with bis wife. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



THEATRES' HOLIDAY BUSINESS 
IS BIGGES TjIN B'D W'Y HISTORY 

Many Houses Charge Extra Price for Performances, While Mat- 
Were the Rule During Yuletide Week; Business 
During All of December Much in Excess of Corre- 
sponding Months in Previous Years 



The New York theatres enjoyed the big- 
gest Christmas to New Year business last 
weak in their history. With Christmas 
falling on Monday, every house gave an 
extra, matinee that day and the majority 
of them played three other afternoon per- 
formances. 

The business, however, was a bit freak- 
ish to the extent that all of the houses 
were sold ont at the matinee perform- 
ances, while in the evening the average of 
attendance was not so good. 

Many booses, taking advantage of the 
holiday week, raised their holiday schedule 
of prices, some of them getting $2.50 and 
S3 for seats that are ordinarily sold for 

<§ . 
On the whole the business during the 

month of December was far in excess of 

that done in the corresponding month in 

previous years. Those houses where the 

"hits" were playing were practically sold 

out at almost every performance during 

the entire month. 

Thz Clippeb has gathered box office 
figures and estimates - for the various 
Broadway theatres last week as follows: 
Astor, "Her Soldier Boy," 4th week. 

In the neighborhood of $15,000 with 
choice seats selling at $2.50 and $3 on 
Monday and Saturday. 
Belasco, "Little Lady in Bine," 1st week. 

With four matinees and Francis Starr 
played to $13,740. . 
Booth, "Getting Married," 8th week. 

In the neighborhood of $12,000, the 
heaviest business being at the matinees. 
Century, "The Century Girl," 8th week. 

Reported as close to $43,000 on the 



Casino, "Follow Me," 5th week. 

The name of Anna Held still draws, the 
house being sold out at all of the matinees. 
The evening performances, however, were 
a bit light with a $SJK) top every evening 
but Christmas and Saturday when $3 and 
$3.50 were the prices of orchestra seats. 
$15,000 was the approximate receipts for 
the week. 
C. * 1L, "Captain Kidd, Jr.," 7th week. 

This show is running along smoothly, 
and showed a return of $8,000 on the week. 
George M. Cohan, "Come Ont of The 
Kitchen," 10th week. 

Miss Chatteiton is the drawing card for 
this attraction and the matinees were all 
sold out during the week, the evenings 
holding op their end to a total of $14,000. 
Cort, "Dp-Stairs and Down," 14th week. 

With the extra matinees as boosters 
$8,200 was the return. 
Comedy, "Washington Square Players." 

With the cut rate agencies handling a 
good part of the seating capacity, in the 
neighborhood of $3,000 was the return. 
Criterion, "Major P— Stash " 

John Drew could not overcome the lack 
of appeal of this play with his personality 
and as a result the box office suffered 
throughout the week, the show doing 
about $8,000. 



Eltinge, "Cheating Cheaters," aist week. 

With the. aid of Joe Le Blan this at- 
traction is holding up remarkably well. 
The returns for the week were in the vi- 
cinity of $7,000. 

Empire, "A Kiss for Cinderella," 1st week. 
Maude Adams' return to her "old home" 
was enough to bring in $15,000 to the 
coffers of her managers. 
48th Street, "The 13th Chair," 6th week. 
This show is considered one of the sea- 
son's hits. With a $3 top Christmas and 
Saturday about $14,000 was taken in, dur- 
ing the week. 
Fulton, "The Master," 4th week. 

This show has been playing on a rental 
of $3,300 a week and will conclude its "en- 
gagement Saturday. With the aid of the 
cut rate offices about $6,400 was realized 
at the box office. 

Gaiety, "Turn to the Bight," aoth week. 
Still doing a phenomenal business, play- 
ing to capacity at every performance. 
Showed a return close to $10,000. 
Globe, "The Harp of Life," stb. week. 

Miss Taylor still has her following, 
which was demonstrated by the matinee 
business. In the vicinity of $11,500 was 
the week's receipts. 

Maxine Elliott "Gertrude Kingston Neigh- 
borhood Flayers," and week. 
Played the house on a rental basis. 
Did about $6,500 on the week. Left on 
Saturday night to be followed by "Gamb- 
lers All," which probably wil have a short 
run at this house. 
Harris, "The Yellow Jacket," ist week. 

There ia still much interest manifested in 
this play, the box office returns showing 
$7,500 on the week. 

Hippodrome, "The Big Show," 18th week. 
More than recovered its balance with the 
holiday week and a heavy attendance of 
children at the matinees. The house was 
sold out at every performance during the 
week, bringing a gross total estimated at 
about $60,000. 
Hudson, "Shirley Kaye," ist week. 

Elsie Ferguson is another strong 
matinee favorite and with her extra per- 
formances did between $12,500 and $13,000 
on the week. 

Knickerbocker, "The Music Master," rath 
week. 
Still doing a capacity business at all 
performances. With three matinees did 
$18,500 on the week. '-- 
Little, "Pierrot the Prodigal," 17th week. 
Jogging along nicely and playing to ca- 
pacity at almost every performance. 
Showed a return of $3,800. 
Longacre, "Horning But the Truth." 

Collier still keeps things moving and 
the returns at the box office accumulating. 
The week with three matinees showed a 
return of $10,200. 

Lyric, "A Daughter of the Gods." 

With a children's performance each 
morning, a gross total of- $12,500 was 
realized on the week. 
Liberty, "Intolerance," aist week. 

Playing the honse on a guaranteed 
rental did a little over $7,000. 



Manhattan, "Ben Hur," 8th week. 

At popular prices, even though the 
house is off the theatrical "lane," about 
$10,000 wsa the week's returns. . 
New Amsterdam, "Miss Springtime." 

The holiday week was of great help to 
this attraction, which baa been gradually 
falling off in business. With the extra 
matinees, between $13,000 and $14,000 was 
take n in. . 

Park, "Little Women," and week. 

Giving daily matinees, which were well 
attended, with a marked falling off on the 
evening business, about $5,500 was the 
week's returns.;. 
Playhouse, "The Man Who Came Back." 

Still holding up, playing to $9,800. 
Princess, ''Washington Square . Players." 

Are playing the house on a rental basis, 
this being the final week. With the aid 
of the cut-rates did about $3,000.. 
Punch & Judy, "Treasure Island." 

Did around $3,000 on the week. 
Republic, "Good Gracious Annabelle." 

The cut-rate offices are getting a good 
share of the Beats for this attraction and 
help toward keeping up the business. 
About $7,000 was last week's return. 
Shubert, "So Long Letty," 10th week. 

Ticked up considerably last week, play- 
ing to over $10,000. 
Thirty-ninth Street, "Old Lady No. 31." 

The matinee business was unusually 
heavy during the week, the show doing 
close to $7,500. ' ' 
Winter Garden, "The Show of Wonders." 

With the holiday prices prevailing most 
of the week in the neighborhood of $32,000 
was the week's return. 
Broadway, "Twenty Thousand Leagues." 

With .extra performances during the lat- 
ter part of the week, about $10,000 was 
the total of the receipts. 
Forty-Fourth Street, "Joan The Woman. 1 * 

The honse ia obtained on a rental. With 
the favorable reviews in the dailies after 
the opening on Monday there was a heayy - 
demand for seats. About $7,000 was 
taken in during the week. 
Standard, "The House of Glass." ..'_■ 

Did in the neighborhood of $4,500. 
Bialto, "The Americano.". : 

Douglas Fairbanks is still a box-office 
magnet, the house doing capacity business 
at all performances, playing to over $15,- 
000, the biggest week's receipts in its 
history. \3k\$?'. 

Strand, "Snow White." S;'" 
■ Did about $12,000. 



■-'J 



TICKET WAR TAX m 'MONTREAL 
MOBTBEAX, Can., Pec. 30.— A special war 
tax will be imposed on all theatres in the 
Province of Quebec, as ;_aas already, been 
levied in the Province of 'Ontario. It will 
be from one cent' to ten cents 'on each the- 
atre ticket sold, according to bo x^o nice price, 
and the tax will have to be collected from 
the public. A system of- coupons will be 
arranged. ■ ■ -' : •'- '-' - ■ 

DANCER SUES STEAMSHIP CO. 

Maria' Cartel, a dancer, is suing the 
French line for $100,000 fori injuries al- 
leged to have been, sustained on -the Roeh- 
ambeau, in mid-ocean November 21 , while 
on her way to this country from France. 
The dancer was on her way here to fulfill 
a contract with the Metropolitan Opera Co. 



WILSON MIZNER IS A 

LEATHER MAKER 

Playwright Swears There's Nothing Fishy 
About the Story Evan Though He 

Will Make Product From 
Fish Skin, 
■ Wilson Mizner, creator of bad men on 
the stage and aid to them off of it, is now 
a leather manufacturer, and, though the 
material from which be turns out his prod- 
uct is fish hide, he gives his solemn, Broad- 
way word of honor that there is nothing 
fishy about his: entrance into another busi- 
ness except gathering in box office royal- 
ties. 

- "Yes, I've been in the leather manufac- 
turing business for two months now," said 
the author of The Deep Purple' when 
questioned about the matter. ."The name 
of the company is the Passaic Leather 
Company and there are eighty men work- 
ing in our plant at 33 New York Avenue, 
Newark We're going to make leather out 
of fish skins, you know, and have already 
received offers of fabulous Bums for the 
secret of how to do it. But, we won't sell 
. the process." 

"What will the leather be used for?" 
"Well, I should say that shark skins 
would make good shoes and cod skins good 
caps r but whether they do or not, we have 
received staggering offers for the secret. 
Its going to be a great thing." 



Rl ALTO EMPLOYEES DINED 

Over a hundred and fifty, employees of 
The Rialto, with their wives, sweethearts, 
and friends, sat down last Wednesday 
night to a holiday dinner given- by the Bi- 
alto Theatre Corp. When the house had' 
emptied at the conclusion of the final per- 
formance all the guests were relegated to 
the.Ioges and balcony while long tables 
were set up in the foyer, between the main 
entrance and .the glass-enclosed orchestra 
seats. A half hour's extra entertainment 
was given for, the guests and at midnight 
they filed down the two big staircases to 
a six course dinner with liquid incidentals. 
When the banquet, was fairly under way 
eight huge arc lights which had been con- 
cealed in the decorations, were turned on 
suddenly and two camera men surprised 
the diners by recording the event on a few 
hundred feet of film. 



LYNCHBURG GUARANTEES MAUDE 
Lykchboeg, Va., Dec. 29.— C. M. Gug- 
genheimer, president of the Academy of 
Music Corporation, has guaranteed to re- 
fund the price of admission to any patron 
who does not enjoy the performance of 
Cyril Maude in "Grumpy," Jan. 18. 



■ GRAU SAILS FOR HAVANA 

Matt' Gran hopes to establish a musical 
stock company in Havana, and has sailed 
for that purpose. He will try to raise a 
fund by subscription. 



*' MRS. FLETCHER ILL 

Mrs. Lillian Fletcher, mother of Marty, 
Ted and Florence Fletcher, and of the 
act. of Fletcher, Levee and McCabe, i» 
seriously, ill. 



PARIS, TEX., THEATRE OPENS 

McAasns, Okla., Dec 30. — The Grand 
Theatre, which has just been completed at 
a cost of $60,000, -exclusive of the ground, 
was opened December 26 by Manager W. 
B. Wise, at PsLria,-Tex. 



WALTON COMES BACK TO STAGE 
Alfred H. Wslton is to return to the 
drama, after an absence of six yean from 
the stage. His most recent appearances 
were. in. the "Auctioneer" and "Mrs. Wizg» 
of the Cabbage Patch." 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



A U D E V I L L E 




H. FITZGERALD 

BEATS OLIVER 

INTUIT 

COURT DISMISSES CHARGES 



In the Bronxville Court last Saturday, 
Magistrate Groehl dismissed the charges 
against Harry J. Fitzgerald, charged with 
conducting a theatrical agency without a 
license. 

In dismissing the case the court held that 
the evidence submitted was not sufficient 
to prove that the defendant had violated 
the agency law on which the action was, 
based, as there was no evidence to prove 
that be conducted an agency within the 
meaning of the law. 

The "Fitzgerald-Oliver Case," as it was 
best known, has been before the courts for 
months and created widespread interest 
among all members of the amusement pro- 
fession, including managers, agents, and 
performers. It was considered a test case, 
as it was the first real opportunity the 
White Rats had of bringing an action 
against an agent since the passing of the 
present agency law by the New York State 
Legislature several years ago, and for the 
passage of which the White Rats were re- 
sponsible. 

About three months ago James A. Tim- 
ony, then attorney for the White Rats, 
i.rought an action against Fitzgerald, who 
was charged by James Oliver with con- 
ducting an agency without a license. Oliver 
was proprietor of a tronpe of acrobats 
known as the Six Tumbling Demons, and 
had secured bookings for his tronpe 
through Fitzgerald. • 

Timony brought the matter to the atten- 
tion of License Commissioner Bell and 
thus the Bureau of licenses became chief 
prosecutor. Inspector Duffy, of that De- 
partment became the complainant and the 
City of New York was called upon to fight 
a battle between a performer and the man 
through whom he secured employment. 
James S. Kleinman, attorney for Commis- 
sioner Bell, became chief prosecutor, with 
James A. Timony as assistant, while Arthur 
S. Barnes and Charles Harwood looked 
after the interests of Mr. Fitzgerald. 

At the first hearing, about three months 
ago, counsel for the defendant placed in 
evidence a manager's agreement, which ex- 
isted between Oliver and Fitzgerald, under, 
the terms of which counsel for the latter 
averred he (Fitzgerald), acted for Oliver, 
and it was this instrument that Messrs. 
Timony and Kleinman fntilely endeavored 
to prove a subterfuge which was used by 
Fitzgerald to evade the law. 

The complainant- placed almost their sole 
dependence upon James Oliver himself, but 
be proved to be no star witness, suffering 
from frequent lapses of memory and in the 
re-direct examination contradicted testi- 
mony he had previously given. 

At the hearing on December 28 the tes- 
timony of Walter C. Kelly, "The Virginia 
Judge," given at a previous hearing, was 
stricken from the record, In spite of the 
fact that counsel for the complainant re- 
garded Mr. Kelly as a leading witness. 



The case has been adjourned many times 
on the request of Timony, who assigned 
as his reason that he was unable to sub- 
poena J. J. Murdock, of the United Book- 
ing offices, whom be considered a material 
witness. However, Mr. Murdock did 'not 
appear at any of the bearings and the case 
dragged along' for months. 

In the ' meantime, Oliver and his Six 
Tumbling Demons have not been playing 
for the reason that Oliver had to be in 
New York City to be on hand when the 
court proceedings required his presence. 



BENEFIT FOR MRS. MICHEL 

This evening an entertainment and ball 
uill be held at' the Manhattan Casino, 
Eighth Avenue and One Hundred and Fifty- 
fiftth Street, for the benefit of Mrs. Charles 
Michel, wife of the agent who is serving 
with the French army. 

For a time Mrs. Michel looked after her 
husband's business here, but the odds were 
heavily against her and she finally allowed 
friends to give the affair, which will be 
held tonight. Michel was known as a for- 
eign vaudeville agent. 



TANGUAY AT MAJESTIC 

Chicago, Jan; 1. — Eva Tangnay is head- 
lining the Majestic bill. this week. She 
has had a short rest and has undergone 
treatment for her throat. Harry Weber 
plans to book further time for the comedi- 
enne. ■ ■ • 



SHEEDY TO BOOK NEW STRAND 

St. John's, N. B., Jan. 2. — The new 

■ Strand here is to be booked by the Sheedy 

agency. The house will open in February. 

This agency also plans the bills at the 

Strand, Halifax. 



VAUDE. SHOW TO TOUR CUBA 

Sylvester Schaeffer is heading a vaude- 
ville show to be sent to Cuba. It will con- 
sist of seven acts and the company will 
play a four weeks' engagement in Havana 
and later South America. 



KATE ELINORE HAS TREE 
Montgomery:, Ala., Dec 25. — Kate 
Elinore presented her company of players 
with a tree loaded with presents. Sam 
Williams and Ghiqulta came in for a big 
share. 



NO FORD AID FOR RATS 

Detroit, Jan. 2.— Henry Ford denies the 
rumor to the effect that he was to give 
financial aid to the White Rats in order 
to carry on their strike. 



BERNSTEIN SIGNS DARCY 

Freeman Bernstein, vaudeville booking 
agent and all-around promoter, signed a 
contract with Lea Darcy, the . Australian 
pugilist, for his services for a period of 
fifteen weeks in vaudeville, Bernstein 
declared that he was paying Darcy $75,000, 
while from Darcy '8 personal manager a 
statement was forthcoming that $45,000 
was the amount involved. Bernstein is 
negotiating with several vaudeville man- 
agers to obtain engagements for Darcy, 
who will deliver a monologue and do a 
sparring exhibition. 



MORRIS AND WALTERS TO SAIL 

DecaTDB, HL, Jan. 1. — Eddie Morris, of 
this city, and his partner, Tom Walters, 
sail January 6 for England to play vaude- 
ville engagements. They are booked for a 
year in London and the English provinces. 



ALMA MOORE STARTS SUIT 
St. Linns, Jan. 2.— A |20,000 suit for 

alleged defamation of character is being 
started here by Alma Moore, wife of Fred 
Moore, of Moore, Gardner and Rose. 



MERIDEN SEES POU VAUDE. 

Meriden, Conn., Dec 27. — Instead of the 
regular stock shows at the Poli Theatre 
this week, a vaudeville bill was on the 
boards. 



TEAM BACK AFTER TOUR 

After completing a world's tour, Mildred 
Grover and Dick Richards returned to New 
York last week. They were gone more 
than two years. 



NEW SKETCH FOR BERNARD 
"Who Is She?' the Willard Mack play- 
let on the Orpheum Circuit as the vehicle 
of Joseph E. Bernard and Hazel Herring- 
ton, win be discarded next season. A new 
Mack sketch, entitled "Bob's Blooming 
Banc," will replace it 



DIVING MODELS CANCEL 

Cincihnati, O., Dec 28. — Because, their 
tanks reached here too late. ConroyV Div- 
ing Models canceled at Keith's and Bob 
Dailey and Co. filled In. 



SKETCH FOR DOROTHY REGEL 

"The Girl Who Made Good," a playlet 
by Tom Barry, has been accepted by 
Dorothy Regel for her next vaudeville 
sketch. It will be produced under the di- 
rection of Joseph Hart and the cast wOI 
include five people 



DE VR1ES HAS NEW ACT 
Henry de Tries, the Dntch protean 
actor, is to appear in vaudeville soon in a 
new act. 



SILBER AND NORTH CANCEL 

Chicago-, Dec 27.— Because of illness, 
Silber and North left the bill at the Ameri- 
can for the last half of last week. 



MISS WATSON READY FOR VAUDE. 

LnoHe Watson will shortly appear in 
vaudeville in a vaudeville sketch of. which 
she is the author, entitled, "Lotus." 



LOUIS REINHARD MARRIED 

Louis Reinhard, orchestra director of 
the Orpheum Theatre, Brooklyn, was mar- 
ried last week to Helen M. 8ykes. 



ISADORA DUNCAN TO CUBA 

Isadora Duncan has abandoned her trip 
to the Coast and has sailed for Cuba. 



MABEL BERRA Df NEW ACT 

Mabel Berra, vaudeville prima donna, 
will open with an entirely new offering 
after the first of the year, assisted by a 
concert pianiste. W. J. MeKenna Is re- 
sponsible for the arrangement of the sing- 
er's r eper toi re, also contributing two 
special numbers to the new torn. 



PATSY'S PATTER 



The skeptical public who think because 
Houdini performs his marvelous exhibitions 
so quickly and deftly that there is no dan- 
ger in them should know that he had a 
narrow escape at the Palace Theatre last 
Saturday afternoon. The heavy lid for his 
Chinese water torture ceU in which his feet 
are firmly clamped, and which is lowered 
with him dangling into the water head first, 
refused to lock. The attendants were about 
to give the signal to flyman to raise the lid 
again, when it caught, and the rest of the 
routine of fastening bolts, drawing curtain 
for a couple of seconds, and his release, 
were accomplished in breathless suspense 
by all. Houdini came off the stage, how- 
ever, laughing at his narrow escape from 
strangulation. 



Little Frances White had a dandy Christ- 
mas tree this year all her very own, with 
mother there to add the real touch of happi- 
ness required at this season of the year. 
Some wonderful silver pieces from Mr. 
Rock, lots of original and expensive gifts 
from father, mother and her many friends, 
and lastly, but most important of all— a 
large collection of dolls of every size and 
nationality. If any one thinks this clever 
little artist is grown up, they should have 
seen her sitting on the floor of her apart- 
ment in the Somerset, playing with those 
dolls. Her big success In New York City 
seta as lightly on her severely dressed 
little head, as that black crow she wears on 
her back sometimes. 

Those two frail delicate girls. Truly 
Shattuck and Marts Golden lay off Janu- 
ary 8 and 16 and are going to hie them- 
selves to West Baden, Ind., for a rest and 
general bracing np. Incidentally they wUl 
spend a little time on their new act for 
next season, which they have Just received 
from s well-known author. They assert 
that Santa Clans was very nice to them 
and that they are having a dandy time. 
Everyone don't abuse the Middle West yon 
see. Western Vaudeville Association please 
send thanks. 



Adeline Francis has just made two new 
original stories for the phonograph records. 
She conceived the idea sometime ago of 
recording fireside and fairy tales to enter- 
tain the children as -wen as the grown ape, 
The phonograph people are delighted witn 
the result of the experiment— Christmas 
orders being particularly big. 

It is not generally known that Lola Went- 
worth has more than "fused around" an 
aeroplane She has made several flights and 
as she says herself, is "Just crazy" shoot It 
She Is featuring a miniature machine la her 
new single vaudeville specialty for an ex- 
clusive number, "Yon Have to Behave la a 
Flying Machine." 



Madison ft Winchester at the H. O. H. 
last week need the Gangs Din recitation 
to syncopated time. They may not know ft, 
but Ames and WInthrop have been using 
it an season, and It might look to some as 
if they had deliberately purloined it. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 




PALACE 

Another splendid bill greeted another 
Holiday crowd Monday at this theatre. 
The "lion's share" of honors went to Rock- 
well and Wood, reviewed under New 
Acts. 

Median's Canines, contrary to' their 
usual custom of closing shows, opened the 
till. Always a clean cut, interesting act, 
it is safe to say no animal act in the 
country could have duplicated their suc- 
cess in any position. The small dogs are 
a whole show in themselves and the work 
of the leaping hounds is incomparable. 

Marion Weeks, that delightful little 
American coloratura soprano, continues a 
rare novelty for vaudeville — her person- 
ality and voice being so delicately refined 
that she stands quite alone in her style of 
work. The program calls attention to 
her G above high C reached in Mme. Sem- 
brich's famous waltz song, "Voci di 
Primavera," but it is in a Scotch number 
that she scores greatest. 

"The Night Boat" was a round of merri- 
ment. Out of a suggestive plot is evolved 
a lot of genuine comedy. 

Alex Carr and company, in "An April 
Shower," demonstrated the possibility of 
making an audience laugh and cry almost 
at the same time. 

Gladys Clark and Henry Bergman, with 
two girl proteges and accompanied by 
Cliff Hess at the piano, opened after the 
Intermission. Miss Clark, in nurses' uni- 
form, wheels Mr. Bergman on in an in- 
valid chair and he sings an original ver- 
sion of Yaddie Kaddie, a popular Hawai- 
ian melody, in which Miss Clark assists. 
In a song about girls growing bolder when 
they get older, he is assisted by a little 
dark haired girl who sings, then with a 
tall dark haired girl who dances, and 
finally by blonde Miss Clark who sings 
and dances. A Chinese number, a Ha- 
waiian number and one about a fiddler 
having to be paid followed in quick suc- 
cession. 

Eddie Foy and the Seven Foy children, 
with Mother Foy there for the bow, gave 
their comedy version of "The Old Woman 
Who Lived in a Shoe." The girl who sings 
and next-to-the-tallest boy who dances 
with her held the act up. For a closing 
number they use the song John L. Golden 
wrote, culled from expressions used by 
President Wilson in his preparatory cam- 
paign addresses. 

Anna Wheaton and Harry Carroll en- 
tertained in their usual refined, pleasing 
manner. Miss Wheaton always looks spic 
and span in the daintiest of frocks and 
has* an irresistible winning way. They 
work delightfully together, each one pay- 
ing the moBt complimentary attention to 
the other's work, bespeaking the artist. 

"Pinkey," a name applied to a singing 
and dancing act, because the scenery, cos- 
tomes and decorations are all in pink, 
closed the show. The act consists of Miss 
Gladyngs (formerly of Gladyngs and 
Cummings) and a clever little midget. 
Miss Glayngs features high kicking and 
dancing and excels anyone in that line the 
reviewer has seen in years. She also does 
some wonderful hand springs for a 
woman. The little fellow is a clever 
dancer, besides having a really big voice. 



SHOW REVIEWS 



(Continued on pag« 17) 



RIVERSIDE 

New Year's night, this most recent ad- 
dition to the Keith Circuit of first class 
vaudeville theatres, was packed from pit 
to dome. The audience, besides being 
notable in numbers, was one of the clas- 
siest assemblages ever seen in a metro- 
politan variety house. At least one- 
quarter of those present were clad in 
evening dress. The atmosphere and gen- 
eral characteristics of the Riverside, seem 
to be attracting the best class of theatre- 
goers in the vicinity. 

That grand old woman of the stage, 
Mrs. Thomas Whiffen, met with a royal 
reception in Edgar Allan Woolf's sketch 
"The Golden Night," closing the first half. 
Mrs. Whiffen very wisely has secured a 
highly efficient company to support her. 

Milo struck soft going and also regis- 
tered a twenty-four calibre hit. His im- 
itations went over like wildfire and his 
vocal solos caught the fancy of the house 
immediately. 

The Schmettans were on a trifle too 
early for a reviewer to form an opinion 
of their worth. The turn is well costumed 
and staged in a manner that betokens a 
good knowledge of showmanship. The 
Durkin Girls render a nicely arranged 
routine of songs. They were accorded ap- 
plause quite in line with their entertain- 
ing abilities. These young ladies will be 
heard from before many vaudeville moons 
have passed. 

Billie Montgomery and George Perry re- 
peated the bit they made over in Brooklyn 
last week. 

Clark and Verdi received a big reception 
the moment their card was placed in the 
frame. The dialogue regarding the qual- 
ifications of the smaller chap for the job 
his political friend promises to secure for 
him is really legisimate comedy that 
would not be out of place in a three-act 
play. The songs made a huge hit. 

It wouldn't be a bad idea for Clark and 
Verdi to try a more serious turn next 
season. With their present material they 
cannot advance much further, . admitting 
that they have reached the top of their 
the audience counted for anything. 

Horace Wright and Rene Dietrich pre- 
sented their refined singing specialty with 
excellent results. Wright sings with dis- 
cretion and a real idea of expression. In 
as much as Wright apparently is of Irish 
extraction it is peculiar that he does not 
include a song or two of the Emerald Isle 
in his repertoire. The numbers now being 
sung by the act all seem to hit the mark 
perfectly and possibly Wright feels in- 
clined to let well enough alone. Still 
there does seem to be an excellent open- 
ing for an Irish song, of the "mother" 

type- 

The Girlies' Gambol closed the show. 
The big act went very weB Monday eve- 
ning. Felix Adler carries the comedy 
burden of the act acceptably. His best 
bit is the ventriloquial absurdity he used 
to such good purpose in vaudeville. 



COLONIAL 

A program made np of well known 
names in vaudeville, was responsible for a 
capacity house at the Monday matinee. It 
also resembled a dancing carnival, six out 
of the nine acts making the dance a fea- 
ture. 

Retter Brothers with gymnastic feats 
started things off in a lively manner. Paul 
does a double somersault from the ground, 
perhaps the only man doing it* in vaude- 
ville. The other brother does the comedy 
end, getting numerous laughs. 

Nonette and her violin, on rather early, 
didn't have any trouble in walking away 
with her usual big success. Number two 
spot at this house is getting to be a fine 
position for aotB to "clean up." 

Charles Cartmell and Laura Harris, in 
r. singing and dancing skit called "Golfing 
With Cupid," have some wonderful mate- 
rial but ' need someone to reconstruct It 
for them. It lacks snap and ginger, too 
many waits being noticeable. With the 
act properly put together it will make one 
of the finest offerings of its kind. Miss 
Harris is a clever dancer and Cartmell 
can get results out of songs. 

Paul McCsrty and Elsie Faye, in their 
musical travesty called "Suicide Garden," 
by Herbert Moore, held the boards for 
eighteen minntes, a trifle too long. The 
couple are versatile and do singing, danc- 
ing and piano playing successfully.. The 
idea of the skit is cleverly worked out, 
making it entertaining from start to 
finish. 

Bert Leslie, with another one of his 
slang sketches of the Hogan series called 
"Hogan in Mexico," had them "holding 
on." Bert handed out some of the best 
material of this kind that has been heard 
at this house this season. His supporting 
company was good and proved good feed- 
ers. 

Bert Handon, opening intermission, 
working similar to Dave Ferguson, and 
one or two other single men put over a 
fair size hit His line of talk is of the 
lnngh variety and didn't fail here. 

Stella Mayhew, and her hubby, Billee 
Taylor, talked about themselves, sang sev- 
eral songs, did some comedy stunts, and 
found an audience in front who liked their 
work. Stella is still featuring her "drunk" 
song and Billee follows her with a heart 
ballad. 

For a laugh producer, "The Belle of 
Bingville," as shown by Fred Whitfield 
and Marie Ireland, assisted by Lew Mur- 
doek, is the goods. It is billed as a rustic 
blend of song, dance and mirth, and judg- 
ing from the way the andience received it 
they can be credited with almost walking 
away with the show. 

Mosher, Hayes and Mosher, whose repu- 
tation is almost as well known as the 
bicycles they ride, had no difficulty in hold- 
ing them in their seats in closing position. 

Paths News Weekly, with interesting 
views, pleased and interested the audience 
with its current event films. 



ORPHEUM 

Roland Trovers opened the proceedings 
with a well staged magical turn. His act 
bears all the earmarks of a high class num- 
ber. 

Boudini Brothers play sccordeons with 
a skill that betokens long and arduous 
practice. The range of their selection!! 
covers everything from grand opera to 
ragtime. 

Moon and Morris are dancers who can 
lay a genuine claim to originality. The 
Persian costumes puzzled the audience for 
a moment or two, but as soon as the back 
to back stepping started the success of the 
turn was assured. A comic song and 
dance of English vintage proved a decided- 
ly likeable innovation. Moon and Morris 
are quite in a class by themselves in 
American vaudeville. 

Edna Goodrich, looking ravlehly beauti- 
ful, wore an odd half dozen costume crea- 
tions, each one seemingly more expensive 
and tasteful than the rest. "The Manne- 
quin," the Edgar Allen Woolf playlet in 
which she is appearing, offers her ample 
opportunities,, not only for the display of 
gowns and physical charms but likewise 
to prove that she possesses acting ability 
ns well. 

France Bendtsen, playing the principal 
comedy role in support of Miss Goodrich, 
secures about a laugh a minute and then 
some. He makes a part that in less skill- 
ful hands might have become slightly of- 
fensive, legitimately entertaining. 

"Oklahoma" Bob Albright simply exudes 
personality. He. has a sweet and sym- 
pathetic baritone voice which he knows 
how to nse to perfection. Albright sung 
seven or eight songs at the Monday 
matinee, and had he so desired could have 
put over as many more if the attitude of 
the audience counted for anything. 

The California Boys' Band, an aggrega- 
tion of youngsters from the coast, gave n 
brass band concert, indulged in some ex- 
cellent ground and lofty tumbling and dis- 
closed a couple of youthful comedians who 
can surely hold their own with the best. 
The youngster who impersonated Charlie 
Chaplin is immense. He has a great fu- 
ture before him. 

Aveling and Lloyd discussed the phil- 
osophy of a ten-dollar bill with customary 
comedy results. 

Dolly Connolly and Percy Wenrich have 
a very pretty stage setting as a back- 
ground for their latest singing act. Miss 
Connolly was a bit hoarse at the matinee, 
but nevertheless managed to put over 
everything she attempted.* The songs are 
nicely varied and Miss Connolly's costumes 
help matters along materially. Wenrich 
ventured a little close harmony toward the 
finish. Percy fooled the bunch by uncov- 
ering a sweet tenor voice. What he termed 
as his latest song hit made a corking clos- 
ing number for a. singing turn of real 
merit 

Maryon Vadie, a toe dancer and a gen- 
uine artiste in her line, assisted by Ota 
Gygi. programmed as the Court Violinist 
to the King of Spain, comprise a duo that 
for "class" is quite unapproachable. It is 
an act that win very shortly become the 
vaudeville j-ersation that it deserves to be. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




ALHAMBRA 

The names of Billy Montgomery and 
George Ferry did not apear in electric 
lights in front of the theatre, but, never- 
theless, this team — with the aid of an ob- 
scure darky and his harmonica — stopped 
the show on New Year's night in spite 
of the fact that they followed a headline 
act. The pair do a "nut" musical act and 
are very clever, although they can thank 
the negro for much of their success. 
Despite the fact that the next act had al- 
ready been announced by the card-boys 
the aplause of the audience continued, and 
the team finally allowed the darky to re- 
spond with an encore. 

The show had a slow start, Frank and 
Tobie proving rather dull in their series of 
dances, although the Jockey dance showed 
originality. 

George Lyons, with his harp, made the 
best of a difficult spot for hia sort of an 
act and would have gone over better fur- 
ther down the bill. 

Harold Woolf and Helen Stewart pre- 
sented 'Tn Two Flats," a mediocre play- 
let acted in a mediocre way. 

Charles Olcott offered his 'Comic Opera 
in Ten Minutes" and won a big hand, as 
he deserved. 

"Kisses," with William Gaxton, closed 
the firBt half. This clever offering was 
acted well. Gaxton puts his personality 
across the footlights, as few can do. 

Jim Toney and Ann Norman followed 
the intermission. Their work does not 
warrant them a position on the second 
half of the bill. 

Melville Ellis and Irene Bordoni had no 
difficulty in pleasing. Miss Bordoni's 
dresses and quaint manner, coupled with 
Kills* piano playing and eye for the ar- 
tistic, makes this a headline act anywhere 
at any time. 

The Gladiators closed the bill and per- 
formed well in the last spot. 



ROYAL 

It was clear that the New Year matinee 
audience at the Royal came to see Rock & 
White. The chorus of one of Miss White's 
songs took fifteen encores, and the au- 
dience would have enjoyed more, but the 
hour was getting too late. This team 
played the Royal in November, but that 
did not seem to lessen the wonderful re- 
ception tendered them upon their return. 
In fact, their popularity seems to have 
increased. 

Jimmy and Kitty De Maco opened the 
show in an artistic scenic novelty and acro- 
batic act. They received a good hand for 
their work in the initial spot. 

Hildegarde Mason and George Murray 
in "Right or Wrong, She's Right," pleased 
in their whimsical way. Their opera 
travesty is particularly worthy of men- 
tion. 

The Doris Wilson Trio is reviewed un- 
der New Acts. 

Hunting & Francis still get a lot of fun 
out of their old material. 

Following intermission, came Grace De 
Mar, reviewed under New Acta. 

Rock & Fulton closed the vaudeville 
show, followed by Chas. Ray in the Tri- 
angle feature, "The Honorable Algy." 



AMERICAN 

Brandt and Andrey were the openers of 
a fair bill at this house Monday after- 
noon. Their skating act put the audience 
in the right humor and Gillette's monkeys 
in a bowling alley hit them right above 
the laugh-and-applause belt. 

Mabel Harper, with her "nut" stuff, 
kept the fast clip going. The lyrics of her 
songs were good and she interjected 
just enough gags and business between 
them. 

The Tyrolean Troubadors offered a rus- 
tic dance a little out of the ordinary. 
Their entire act was in keeping with their 
scenery, which was good, but the yodling 
ought to be improved. 

Devere and Malcom opened after inter- 
mission. One of these men does a "drunk" 
that , pleased the New Year's crowd and 
the other did as well with a song. 

The late Paul Armstrong's playlet, 
"Woman Proposes," with its comic situa- 
tions, was cleverly done. The plot is built 
on the statement that it is the woman 
rather than the man who proposes mar- 
riage. A surprise ending has the neces- 
sary punch for an act of this kind, and 
the audience is "let in" just enough on 
what is going to follow the early exposi- 
tion. 

The versatile Eddie Borden, supported 
by "Sir Charles Dwyer," has a turn that 
covers a wide and a fertile field. Borden 
makes the best of it, for he can do a 
character and sing and dance. He. simply 
had to come back time after time and the 
house rocked with applause. 

Carl Damann's Troupe closed with their 
excellent acrobatic work. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

The YoungerB, in a posing act, with 
feats of hand balancing as a climax, 
opened. Both appear in white tights and 
perform some finely arranged statue 
work. 

Grenlee and Drayton, two colored boys, 
do a little singing, closing with an ec- 
centric dance that brought them plenty of 
applause. 

Les Valdas, in a magic performance, 
stalls along for about twelve minutes do- 
ing exactly one trick. 

Maybelle Best, a very pretty little miss, 
offered a singing and piano act and was 
one of the bright spots on the bill. Scarce- 
ly out of her teens Miss Best has a big 
future before her. 

Eugenie Blair and Company presented a 
dramatic playlet with a surprise finish 
that could be called "A Woman's Honor." 
Miss Blair does some very capable acting 
as does also her support. 

Hal and Francis showed class with a 
singing and dancing act. Both are clever 
and make a fine appearance. 

The Musical Gormans, five people, gave 
ane xcellent musical programme. 

Antrim and Tale, with singing, danc- 
ing and cat impersonations, held down the 
feature spot in good shape. 

The Connolly Trio, two young women 
and a man, gave a demonstration of the 
up-to-date dances and were the real hit 
of the bill. The act is handsomely cos- 
tumed. 



JEFFERSON 

Every seat occupied and every bit of 
available standing room taken, was the con- 
dition at this house at the first perform- 
ance on New Year's Day and the reception 
accorded the various acts was evidence that 
the show was well liked. 

Jack Morrissey and Co. opened the bill 
and presented a meritorious act, consisting 
of work with the lasso and whip and ex- 
pert rifle shooting. Mr. Morrissey proved 
himself equally clever in all three and the 
company, consisting of one man, was a 
good assistant. 

The Clover Leaf Trio, two men and a 
woman, received approval for the singing. 

Baker and Moore followed in their act 
called, "At the Soda Fountain," made up 
of talking and singing. 

D'Leir proved himself to be a clever ac- 
cordionist and won a good band for his 
playing. 

Cole and Denahy, clever exponents of 
terpsichore, were heartily received for their 
whirlwind dancing. 

Harry Breen, a prime favorite at this 
house, scored one of the big hits of the bill. 
He was so well liked that the audience 
forced him to respond to several encores 
and stretched his act beyond the usual 
monologue limit. 

Singers Midgets, the big feature act of 
the program, carried away first honors in 
closing position. They are clever perform- 
ers and fully earned the recognition ac-. 
corded them. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued on page 18.) 



CITY 

When the Erst show started at 1 :30 on 
New Year's afternoon, there was not a seat 
or bit of standing room unoccupied and the 
order to "stop selling" went to the box of- 
fice. 

Hill and Ackerman, two men and a 
woman, started the performance and, with 
their comedy and burlesque acrobatic stuff, 
won favor. 

Chabot and Dixon walked away with one 
of the big hits of the afternoon. Chabot 
is an unusually clever performer on the 
violin and piano. His playing of an air on 
the latter instrument, with hia left band 
is little short of remarkable, as it is given 
with the same effect as though played by 
two hands. Miss Dixon makes a pleasing 
appearance. 

The Metropolitan Trio, two women and 
a man, were well liked for their singing 
and a piano solo. 

Nat Carr, in his Hebrew monologue, was 
a favorite. 

Fiske, McDonnongb and Scott, two men 
and a woman, were seen in the Irish com- 
edy sketch. 

Lillian Mortimer and Co., three men and 
two women, were seen in this 'crook" 
sketch. Miss Mortimer did good work as 
Diamond Molly, but the members of her 
company had little opportunity to show 
what they could do. 

Ashley and Allman, in their act, "The 
Dawn of a New Day," consisting of some 
clever dialogue and two songs, pleased. 

Karl Emmy's Pets closed the bin and 
scored their usual good success with an 
act that has a chance to become of real 
feature quality. 



ROCKWELL AND WOOD 

Theatre— Pa lace. 

Style — Xut comedy. 

Time — Ttco minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

This is the first appearance in New 
York City of George Rockwell and Al 
Wood since their return from Australia. 
Tbey ore billed as "Two Noble Nuta 
Navigating the Ocean of Nonsense." 

If "Noble Nuts" means they are a 
little greater than the rest of the "nut" 
comedinns, it is aptly applied. George 
Rockwell can safely be dubbed "The 
King Pin of Nuts." He talks a steady 
stream from the time he comes onto the 
stage until he leaves, does practically 
all the talking in the act, but Al Wood, 
who plays an almost silent, straight man, 
does it so well you never lose interest in 
him. 

After fire miuutes of nonsense, which 
has five continuous minutes of laughter, 
Rockwell made an announcement about 
a wonderful quick change of scene and 
the stage was darkened for a moment 
while they brought out a card easel, n 
banjo and a tin whistle. Tbey ask for 
selections from the audience and play 
popular songs or operas, it makes no 
difference to them — making such an- 
nouncements as "The National Air of 
Scotland" and n card on the easel show- 
ing "Haig & Haig" appears. 

These boys can be congratulated on a 
big hit It was one of the biggest con- 
tinuous laughs the Palace audience has 
bad this season. 

This act is destined to play all the big 
time. 



| 



GRACE DE MAR 

Theatre— Royal. 
Style — Monologue. 
Time — Twenty minute$. 
Setting— One. 

Grace De Mar presents "The Eternal 
Feminine." That is, she gives impres- 
sions of different types of her sex. 

First, there is the woman who haunts 
the divorce courts to drink up the latest 
scandal. Then, there is the married 
woman traveling alone. Next, she de- 
picts the lady strap-hanger. The switch- 
board operator is also depicted. 

Miss De Mar la clever, but twenty 
minutes is a long time for this sort of 
an act unless interspersed with dance, 
song or novelty — which this is not. 

The impressions arc good, especially 
the girl at the telephone board. 

The orchestra is kept busy throughout 
the act, playing pianissimo. Their play- 
ing U not only unnecessary but rather 
out of place. There is no reason why 
caricatures of types from life need a 
musical accompaniment — especially when 
the music has not the remotest connec- 
tion with the type portrayed. 

On the whole, the act is good, but 
needs trimming down before it can bo 
accepted aa fit. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



DRAMA 




''GAMBLERS ALL" AT 

MAXINE ELLIOTT'S 
FAIR ENTERTAINMENT 



"OAliBLEKS ALL."- 


-A four act play 


by Mar Martln.lale. 


Presented Moo-" 


day afternoon. January 1. it Marine 


Elllolt'a Theatre. 


',; 


CAST 




Sybil Campbell 


.Mona Flungeriord 






Blcbarda (Butler) 








Sir Qcorae Langworthy. 


Arthur Cbeaney 




Muriel Starr 


MltUceot Hope 








Major Stocka 






. .Charles CnappeU 




.Harold De Becker 














Police Constable 


w. J. Parker 


Batea (Ldchtoo'a Man) . 


.Franklyn Hnrlelgh 



THEATRE TO CHANGE HANDS 

St. John, Can., Jan. 1. — On February 
1 the lease of the present lessee of the 
Opera House, F. A. Spencer, expires, and 
on that date the house win cease to be a 
borne for traveling companies. J. M. Frank- 
lin, manager of the Strand Theatre, Hali- 
fax, & S., will take over the bouse, and 
the new policy will be fine acts of vaude- 
ville and pictures to be run in conjunction 
with the Strand Theatre, Halifax. The 
interior will be redecorated, new chairs will 
be installed on the lower floor, and the first 
performance under the new management 
will be given February 10. 

W. C. McKay, who for the past three 
yean has been resident manager of the 
Opera House, has been engaged by Mr. 
Franklin to continue in this position. 



Eliminating an entirely needless first 
act, as far as the story of the play ia con- 
cerned, and an unrealistic gambling hotue 
scene in the second with the usual police 
raid at its finish, "Gamblers All," pre- 
sented at Maxine Elliott's theatre on Mon- 
day afternoon is a play of considerable 
merit and was well presented by a com- 
pany of excellent players. 

In the story. Sir George Langworthy 
believes that stock market operations are 
legitimate business speculations, but cards, 
horse racing and other games of chance 
are abominable and all who practise them 
are social outcasts. 

Aa usually occurs in cases of this kind, 
his family do not share his views, and his 
wife is an inveterate card player, a pas- 
time which she practises in secret, under 
the guise of attending musicales. 

At the beginning of the play she is hope- 
lessly in debt on account of her gambling 
losses. Through her endeavors to raise 
money to pay off the most pressing claims 
the plot ia developed, beginning with her 
attempt to recoup her losses by one last 
night's play in a gambling bouse, where 
her husband, believing a musicale is be- 
ing given, calls just in time to become 
the central figure in a raid, where all pres- 
ent are hauled to the police station. An 
estrangement follows, and her brother 
upon whom she has called far financial ' 
aid forges the name of a family friend to 
a note for one hundred and fifty pounds. 

The friend, John Leighton, ia in love 
with lady Langworthy and in the midst 
of her troubles begs her to leave her bus- 
band and come with him, Knowing that 
within a few hours her brother's crime will 
become known she gives her consent. 

Upon learning that her consent baa been 
given to save the brother and that in 
spite of her estrangement she still loves 
her husband, Leighton refuses to accept 
the sacrifice, burns up the forged note and 
sends her home to her husband. Then all 
ends happily. 

Muriel Starr, as Lady Langworthy, did 
excellent work in a role not particularly 
suited to her talents, while John Miltern, 
as Leighton, gave his usual finished per- 
formance, and the balance of the cast was 
adequate. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAT. 
World — P e r f or m ance fairly effective. 
Timea — "OutmooW' English melodrama. 
Herald — Good acting saves the day. 
Sun — Tico stirring sets. 
'American — No* a dull moment. 



JULIA ARTHUR IN * 

ROMANTIC DRAMA 
OF BY-GONE DAYS 



■SEBEMOVDA." — A. fonr act drama 
by ■ William Iindaey. presented Mon- 
day eTenlna. January 1, at the Cri- 
terion Theatre. 

CAST. 

Tidal Robert Oottacbalk 

Clara. Sonia Marcelle 

Berguedan.. Brlgham Boyce 

Golda It Troutman 

Ermengarda Katnerlne De Barry 

Guilhem Robert W. Frazer 

Seremonda Julia Arthur 

Raimon .Alpbonx Etnier 

Barral Benjamin Eauaer 

Almar.... .....Cbarlen N. Greene 

Felre William J. Kane 

Adelle Louis*. Waller 

Amfoe. . ..Frederick Dnnworth 

Ugo. ..................... .Herman Levine 

Tlffion William Slngerman 

Marine Margaret Colllnge 



"Seremonda" is a poetic drama which 
harks back to the troubadours of the 
twelfth century, written in blank verse 
with beauty and dignity and it was doubt- 
less these attributes that induced. Miss Ar- 
thur to select this work as her initial offer- 
ing as manager. 

Seremonda is a young matron whose 
amours bring disaster. ' We learn that 
Count Raimon, her husband, had some time 
previously murdered a favored lover of 
Seremonda and dragged her to his own 
castle. He then went on a crusade to the 
Holy Land, and returned after he had been 
reported dead. He learns that Guilhem, his 
friend, had supplanted him in. the affections 
of Seremonda. Raimon kills Guilhem in a 
fight, artfully arranged by Seremonda, and 
shows her the heart of her dead lover, see- 
ing which she leaps to her death. 

Miss Arthur gave a convincing portrayal 
of Seremonda. It is a role well suited to 
her as the lines give full opportunity for 
the use of her delightfully melodious voice. 

Alphonse Ethier was probably the best 
of the supportinc cast. His work in the 
banquet scene was particularly excellent. 

Robert W. Frazer was as good as Guil- 
hem. The other prominent roles were cap- 
ably played.. 

The production is one of splendor. Ap- 
parently there has been a lavish expendi- 
ture of money in its preparation. 

WHAT TBS DAILIES SAT. 

World— Hat dignity and beauty. 
Timea— WeU played and ttaged. 
Sun— Picturesque. 
American — Miss Arthur splendid. 



"SHIRLEY KAYE" WITH 
ELSIE FERGUSON IS A 
CHARMING COMEDY 



"SHIBLEY KATE"— A foor-act com- 
edy by HnlBert Footner, produced 
Monday evening. December 25, at tbe 
Hudson Theatre. 

CAST 

T. J. Macen WHltam Holden 

John Bawsoa Lee Baker 

Srokeley WlUlam Lenox 

Mrs. Magen.- Mra. Jacqnea Martin 

Daiay Magen Kitty Brown 

Paul D'Anchlae Victor Benolt 

Shirley Kaye Elale Ferguson 

Egerton Kaye George Backus 

Mr. Dingwall Douglas Patterson 

Mra. Baylls.... Ethel Wlnthroii 

Peters Lawrence Wood 

'The Earl of Rosselvln Ronald Byram 

Carol VaJlon Corlnne Barker- 
Mabel Helen ErsUne 

Joseph.. Albert Brown 



NEW "TREASURE ISLAND" 

Another dramatic version of "Treasure 
Island" was produced last week at the 
Elsmere Theatre in tbe Bronx by George 
Poultney. The new version is by Theo- 
dore Bart Ssyre and he has incorporated 
in a love story by giving Jim Hawkins, a 
fiancee in tbe daughter of Ben Gunn. , The 
daughter is with Jim throughout nis" ad- 
ventures. 



On Christmas Night at the Hudson The- 
atre, Elsie Ferguson came back to New 
York, where she is always warmly wel- 
comed, and scored a big success in a new 
comedy entitled "Shirley Kaye," by Hul- 
bert Footner. A large and distinguished 
audience attended the premiere, and Miss 
Ferguson was forced to acknowledge their 
plaudits with a little speech at the end of 
the third act. Tbe play is quite unlike her 
more recent successes in that it is an inter- 
esting comedy of today. Miss Ferguson, in 
the title role, is shown as the spirited daugh- 
ter of an old New York family, with a will 
of her own and the knack of achieving what 
sbe sets out to accomplish. The part is rich 
in opportunities for the beautiful star, and 
Miss Ferguson proved herself a real artist 
iii comedy as in the more serious roles with 
which she has hitherto been more promi- 
nently identified. 

The scenes of the play are on Long Is- 
land, and tbe story deals with high finance. 
Miss Ferguson delighted with her portrayal 
o f the care-free society girl whose ambition 
it was to save her father from financial 
ruin, at the same time winning the love of 
the man intent on accomplishing his down- 1 
fall. Needless to say, she succeeds in her 
ambition, and all ends happily. 

Miss Ferguson is surrounded by a most 
capable cast, and the play promises to be, 
seen on Broadway for many months to come. 

WHAT THE BAILIES SAY. 
Sun — Elsie Ferguson in part suited to 

intents. 
Tribune — An agreeable performance. 
Herald — Elsie Ferguson delights. 
Times — Elsie Ferguson pleases. 
World' — Elsie Ferguson pleases. 
American — Elsie Ferguson is sweet. 



TO RESTORE OLDEST THEATRE 

Annapolis, M<L, Dec. 29. — TK» city is 
planning to restore what was the first 
theatre in the United States and will estab- 
lish therein a company that will follow 
closely the repertory policy of the various 
community and civic playhouses in towns 
throughout the United States. 



NEW HOUSE FOR TOM'S RIVER 

Philadelphia, Pa, Dec 29. — Fred A. 
Nathan and T.. M Dougherty have taken 
a lease of the new playhouse being built 
at Tom's River, N. J. The house will seat 
600 and will play available attractions. 



TO PRESENT "THE ASSASSIN" 

Holbrook Blinn has signed contracts 
with Eugene Walters whereby he will take 
out "The Assassin" the play Mr. Walters 
wrote several years ago founded on in- 
cidents in the career of the late Italian de- 
tective Petrosini. Mme. Auguglia will be 
Mr. Blinn'B leading support. Rehearsals 
will soon be under way and the company 
will start out at an early date. 



"THE WANDERER" REHEARSING 

"Hie Wanderer," a Biblical play, will be 
the next production at the Manhattan 
Opera House. It is to be produced by 
William Elliott, F. Ray Comstoek and 
Morris Gest Rehearsals nave already be- 
gun. The play was written by Maurice V. 
Samuels' and is founded upon William 
Schmitbonn's "Der Yerlorener Sohn," be- 
ing tbe parable of the Prodigal Son as 
narrated in the gospel of St Luke, chapter 
fifteen. 



'TOOLS LAUGHTER" 

CAST COMPLETE 

The cast of "The Laughter of Fools" has 
been completed. It includes Jeanne Eagles, 
Eva Le Gallienne, Edna S. Brans, Kate 
Sergeantsen, Hassard Short, Vernon Steel 
and Edward Douglas. 



"HEARTS OF ERIN" SEEN 
Cleveland, O., Jan. L — Joe Weber's 
big musical production, "Hearts of Erin," 
was given here tonight before a typical first 
night audience. The music by Victor Her- 
bert is tuneful and catchy and Henry Blos- 
som's book and lyrics are good. There is 
a long cast of principals and a large 
chorus. 



SKINNER'S DONKEY BREAKS LEG 

Lynchbtjbg, Va., Jan. L — The donkey 
which plays the role of "Capitano" in 
"Mister Antonio," slipped and fractured a 
leg before the performance in Norfolk re- 
cently, and Otis Skinner was forced to 
secure another. 



"PALS FIR ST " OPENS 
"PalB First," J. Fred Zimmerman, Jr.'s 
production founded upon the novel of the 
same name, opened in Hartford and came 
to a dose in Syracuse Saturday night. It 
probably will reach New York a little later. 



REHEARSE "LOVE MUX" 
"The Love Mill" is now in rehearsal with 
an all-star cast, It will be produced in 
February by Andreas DippeL Gustav von 
Seyffertitz will stage the play. 



"BEN- HUR" TO CLOSE JAN. 13 

Tne present engagement of "Ben Hur" 
at the Manhattan Opera House will end 
Saturday, Jan. 13. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




Fo un ded in 1SS3 by Frank Qumd 

Published by tbe 

CUPPER CORPORATION 

Orland W. Vsughan.. .President and Secretary 

John F. Edwards Vice President 

Frederick C Huller Treasurer 

lfiW Broadway, New York 
Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 
ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 
Paul C Sweinhart, Managing Editor 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 3, 1917 



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MANAGERS AND CUT RATES 

What has become of the agreement be- 
tween New York theatre managers con- 
cerning the selling of tickets at cut-rate 
prices? 

This agreement was made several seasons 
ago, and after one or two attempts to en- 
force it, was side-tracked. A few months 
ago, it was revived with the intention of 
putting it into force again this season, but 
once again has it succumbed to a severe at-" 
tack of inactivity. 

It is the exception at the present time 
rather than the rule, that tickets for a 
particular attraction can not be purchased 
at the various cut-rate offices at half, or 
very little more than half, the box-office 
price printed on their face. 

This being so, it would seem that the- 
atre tickets are obtained by the "cut-rate 
agencies" with the full knowledge and con- 
sent of the managers. The tickets are 
sold to the public too regularly and plenti- 
. fully for them to be obtained any other 
way. 

Did the several managers who bonded 
themselves together to fight the cut-rate 
"evil" find themselves unable to cope with 
the situation and come to the decision that 
it would be better to allow the matter to 
drift along and take what course it would? 
Or did they come to the conclusion that it 
was better not to antagonize the public by 
taking from it a privilege it has come to 
regard as a right, even though they broke 
a managerial agreement made with the 
avowed intention of preventing the theatre- 
poing public from being demoralized 
through purchasing cut-rate theatre tickets. 



ABANDONS THEATRE PLAN 

Helen Freeman has finally decided to 
abandon her plans for a toy playhouse in 
^est Fifty-eighth St. She is said to have 
"een hampered by the police and license 
burean officials. 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

A. F. R., St. Louis.— Yes, Olga Nether- 
sole played in your city in "Sapho" week 
of Nov. 13, 1899, at the Olympic Theatre. 
Harry Miner built the London Theatre 
about 1875. 

• • • 

W. R. S-, San Antonio. — There are many 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" companies on the 
road — several in England. 

• « • 

A Friend — If you wish to obtain informa- 
tion from the Query column of The 
Cupper, you must sign your name and 
address to your communication, not neces- 
sarily for publication, but as a guarantee of 

good faith. 

• • * 

A. L., Toronto, Can. — Duatin and Will- 
iam Farnum are both connected with the 
Fox Film Corporation. 

• • • 

A. F. C Chicago. — "Trilby" was origi- 
nally produced March 11, 1895, at the Park 
Theatre, Boston, Mass. We have no rec- 
ord of the stage manager. Julia Marlowe 
was born in the village of Caldbeck, Eng.. 
but came to this country with her parents 
when only five years old. She was christ- 
ened Sarah Frances Frost. She made her 
first stage appearance at the age of twelve 
under the stage name of Fannie Brough. 



ACTOR IN JAIL 

Editor, The New Yore Clipper: 

Dear Sir. — Will you please publish the 
following notice in the personal column of 
the Cupper,' 

"C Norman Hammond, for twenty-two 
years a member of the theatrical profes- 
sion, is in the County Jail at Los Angeles 
on a felony charge. He is without funds. 
If the members of his profession will come 
to his assistance 'financially he will be able 
to secure his release. Money may be sent 
to him direct." 

If you will publish the above notice in 
your valuable paper you will help me to 
roach a lot of my friends. 

Thanking you, I am, 

Yours sincerely, 

C. Norman Hammond. 
Los Angeles County Jail. Dec. 20, 1916. 



THE LATE-COMERS 
Editor The New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir : Why can't something be done 
to do away with "Mr. and Mrs. Latecomer" 
tit the theatre. 

It makes no difference bow early or 
late the performance begins, this well 
known pair of nuisances always manage to 
arrive five or ten minutes after the cur- 
tain goes np. 

They invariably have inside seats and 



icoiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiiiniiinfflJiiiiiiflBiiiini 

m!!ittrai!iT!!iH3!amTOiii:ninnumirjraM 



Correspondents Wanted 

THE CLIPPER 
Wishes Live, Wide-Awake Representatives 

Everywhere 

NEWSPAPER MEN PREFERRED 



F. W., St, Louis — "The Greatest of 
These," a play in. four acts by Sydney 
Grundy, was produced for tbe first time in 
America, Feb. 13, at Powers' Theatre, Chi- 
cago, by Kendal and company; originally 
produced at the Garrick Theatre, London, 
June 10, 1896, by the same players. The 
scene of the play is laid in an English 

village. 

• • * 

R. T., Albany — Dion Boudcault died in 
New York, Sept. 18, 1890. 

• • « 

Old Timer. New York.— "Brother John" 
was originally produced March 20, 1893, by 
Wm. H. Crane, at the Star Theatre, New 
York City. It ran six weeks and was after- 
ward played upon the road. 



they edge their way in front of you, just as 
you are getting interested, causing unneces- 
sary commotion. They are never in a 
hurry and take twice as long, getting to 
their seats as any one else, conversing all 
the while. 

Any one who can devise means for rid- 
ding the suffering theatre-goers of these star 
nuisances will have the eternal gratitude of 
us all. A Playgoer. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, 

Frank Melville organized "The Circus" 
Co. 

Kittie Wells was .with tbe May Howard 
Co. 

"A Dark Secret," the original tank 
drama, was at N'iblo's Garden, New York. 

J. J. Nathans died in New York. 

Horace McVicker was the advance agent 
for Mme. Bernbardt's American tour. 

Wm. J, Scanlou was taken ill daring his 
performance of '"Mavourneen" at the Four- 
teenth Street Theatre, New York, ending 
his theatrical career. His death came as 
a great surprise to thousands of persons. 



WANTS STARS IN FILMS 
Editor, The New York Cupper. 

Dear Sir. — I notice that many followers 
of the legitimate stage consider it an almost 
irreparable loss to lose a star through in- 
roads made by the "movies." It seems to 
me that this is all wrong. I believe it 
would be a good thing if all our stage stars 
could take their fling at the silent drama. 
Personally it would do tbem a world of 
good, not only in an educational way, but 
also in a more selfish way — that of personal 
advertisement. Furthermore, it would be a 
good thing for the people. Persons who 
live outside the big cities, and they are in 
the majority, see these stage players only 
on the backs of magazines and in Sunday 
supplements. 

Thanking you very kindly for publishing 
this hnmble thought, I remain. 
Yours truly, 

Joh.v H. Sawyer. 

Boise, Idaho. 
Dec. 13, 1916. 



RIALT0 RATTLES 



INDOOR WINTER SPORTS 

Forming million-dollar film corporations. 
Starting burlesque and vaudeville cir- 
cuits. 
"Walking out" 
Getting charters. 
Hanging oat S. R. O. signs. 
Building theatres. 

HE'S AN OPTIMIST 

Marry Steinfeld, the theatrical lawyer in 
the Fitzgerald Building, has a father who 
is an optimist He called at his son's of- 
fice the other day just at tbe time when 
the afternoon tea was in full swing at tbe 
Claridge, fully expecting to find his son in. 



BOTH FANS 

There are just two persistent theat v 
goers : The man who always buys his tr x- 
eta of a ticket speculator, at exorblti it 
prices, and brags about it ; and the man 
who always gets in on a pais, and brags 

nliout it 



IN THE BEANERY 

A former Essanay star strolled along 
Broadway Sunday, recognized a Thompson 
hennery, donned his "cheaters," entered, 
Mr bis fill, walked out. and was not rec- 
ognized by anybody but a few press agents. 

OH, BEATRICE FAIRFAX! 

"Beatrice Fairfax, at first banned in 
Cnnada, finally permitted to be shown by 
authorities." (Headline)— And we have al- 
ways liked to think of Beatrice as a model 
young lady! 



IT HAS A CHANCE 

"Her Husband's Wife," which is sched- 
uled to open at tbe Lyceum next Monday, 
is receiving tbe highest kind of praise on 
the road, but Is said to be a good show 
nevertheless. 



U. S. TO SUFFER 

After all the U. S. must suffer some from 
tbe European war. Darcy, tbe Australian 
diamp, is now in our midst and is about 
to invade vaudeville. 



LENGTHLESS FILM •» 

Now that the General Film Co. has de- 
rided to govern the length of each film by 
the story value, many films will possess no 
lr-ngth. 



EXCESS BAGGAGE 

As long as Mary Garden remains in 
opera she won't miss the lingerie that is 
ln'ing held by the authorities in Paris.- 



THERE'S A REASON 

Has anyone noticed that the price of cus- 
tard pies has kept pace with the growing 
popularity of tbe slap-stick comedy film? 



AN EASY ROLE 

There is one role any thespian can al T 
ways play and get away with it — that of 
Santa Claim. 



WHAT'S IN A NAME? 

Commissioner Bell refused to allow New 
Year's to be rung in with midnight shows. 



QUIET ON THE HUDSON 

And the New Year did not moke a dra- 
matic entrance. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 




'GN NMWS 



BERLIN 



SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



VAN BONE'S SON TO J O IN ARMY 

London, Eng., Dec. 27. — Karal vau 
Biene, son of the late August van Biene. 
and himself a prominent producer here, is 
about to join the colon. 



London, Eng., Dec 23. 
Rowland Hill, bavins been engaged by 
Alfred Butt for the leading comedy role in 
"High Jinks," will not appear in panto- 
mime this year. 



The Royal Crests close tonight a week 
at the Palace, WaHhamstow, and jump to 
Aldershot for Christmas week at the Hip- 
podrome. 



The Dumaia, who are finishing tonight 
• week at the Empire, Bugby , spent Christ- 
mas week at the Palace, Southampton. 



Bob Anderson and his Polo Pony open 
next Monday a fonr weeks* stay at the 

Olympia, Liverpool. 



Little Tlcb ia the same old favorite at 
the Hippodrome where he is appearing ia 
"Flying Colors." 



Alfred Butt will present "Vanity Fair" 
twice daily at the Palace, during Christ - 



The Bed, White and Bine ate fln'rt'ne 
tonight a week at the Empire, Cshaw 
Moor. 

Mr. Hymack is scoring a success in "At 
Bogey Villa," which he calls a protean per- 
plexity. 



Captain de VUliers* Airship will be «t 
the TivoIL New Brighton, for Christmas 



lily and Madge Williams are closing to- 
night a week at the Metropolitan, London. 



The film "Troth and Justice" is at the 
Hippodrome, Brighton, week of January 8- 



Charlie Payne is at the Queen's Theatre, 
HotUnwood, Lancashire, Christmas week. 



Dainty Connie Browning has been doing 
well this week at the Palace, Grimsby. 



Kitchen and Boy will remain at Mar- 
seilles, France, nntO December 29. 



Harry Gribbin pleased the audiences at 
the Palace, Bradford, this week. 



Down and Hasel play Christmas week 
at the Westminster, Liverpool. 



The Shareholders' Meeting Boom, at 
Euston Station, was transformed into a 
variety theatre last Saturday. Among 
those on the bill were: Sir George Alex- 
ander, Wilkie Bard, Louise Dale, Joseph 
Hollman, Ernest Shand, Fred Emney, 
Claude Golden, Tom Clare, Hope Chatteris, 
The Grumblers, Grock and Partner and 
Van Dock. The program was in aid of the 
War Seal Foundation. 



Clarence Hurst has resigned his position 
as manager of the Palace. 



F. V. St. Clair has been this week at the 
Hippodrome, Norwich. 



Little Caprice will be at the Palace, 
Bradford, next week. 



The Kavanaghs have just had a week in 

Edinburgh. 



George Bass is the principal comedian in 
"Go to Jericho-" 



The London Opera House reopens to- 
night with "Cinderella," after two weeks 
of darkness, due to rehearsals of the pan- 
tomime. "Cinderella" has been staged by 
A us ten Hurgon and the cast includes : Fred . 
Emney, Ella Bitaford, Edith Drayson, Tom 
Foy, Florence Harrington, Louie Tinsley 
and the Brothers Egbert. There will be 
two performances daily. 



W. S. Kennedy has been elected Chair- 
man of the Council of Management of the 
Stage Society for the new season. The 
Executive Committee includes: W. T. 
Kennedy, W. Lee Matthews, H. A. Hertz, 
T 8. Moore, Dr. C. E. Wheeler and Mag- 
dalen. Allen Wade has resigned the po- 
sition of secretary and has been succeeded 
by Alice Friedman. 



Charles Bush, for the past eighteen years 
manager of the Queen's Theatre, Leeds, 
has retired from that position to become 
manager for Francis Laidler at the Royal 
Mr. Bush starts in on his new duties on 
Christmas Day when Mr. Laidler starts 
his pantomime. 



Arthur Collins' revival of "Puss in 
Boots" on Boxing Day at the Drury Lane 
will present a novelty in the form of a new 
scene called "The Hall of Fantasy." 



Audre Charlos's new musical show at the 
Comedy, which was produced last week, 
bids fair to win a good share of public 
favor at holiday time. 



The Messrs. Stedman win revive "Alice 
in 'Wonderland," for a Ave weeks' run 
(matinees only) at the Savoy; b eginnin g on 
Boxing Day. 



The Christmas treat for the poor chil- 
dren of the profession win be given by the 
Guild next Tuesday, at the Horns, Ken- 
nington. 



"Poor Little. Eddie," by Harry M. Ver- 
non, win be produced early next mouth. 
Mr. Vernon win be bis own producer. 



"Charley's Aunt" Club held its fourth 
annual social last Sunday at the Prince's 
Rooms, Criterion Restaurant. 



J. B. Howard is associated with Jose 
Levy in the Christmas season at the Strand. 
"The Bene of New York," which wUl be 
given at the night performances, opened 
last Wednesday. "Babes in the Wood" 
began this afternoon and will be offered 
afternoons only. 



C. B. Cochran has abandoned bis guinea 
staU idea and returned to the regulation 
price of a half -guinea. 



Wilson and Waring have sailed for 
South Africa to play on the L V. T. A. 
rime. 



Percy Hutchinson, having arranged for 
a special Christmas season for "A Kiss 
for Cinderella" at the Kingsway, opened 
this afternoon. During the holiday sea- 
son there will be two performances a day. 



The old "Vic," which has been dark this 
week for rehearsals, reopens Boxing Day 
with a matinee of "She Stoops to Con- 
quer." Ben Greet will direct the perform- 



Mark Blow's "Tots" company opens 
Boxing Night at the King's Theatre, Sun- 
derland, for a two weeks' stay. It will 
then tarn to provinces till Easter. 



P. Whitton has been appointed acting 
manager of the Grand, Birmingham. He 
comes from the Empire in the same city. 



Griff, the "Clown Johnnie," spends 
Christmas week at Hford and New Year's 
week at the Empire, Nottingham. 



During Christmas week, matinees will be 
given on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs- 
day afternoons at an theatres. 



"Bundle Wakes," which opened at the 
Court Theatre this afternoon, wfH remain 
for Christmas week. 



John Armstrong, with a new act of the 
character type has just started a tour of 
the Moss Tours. 



A play competition has been started by 
Agnes Piatt in connection with her school 
for dramatists. 



Sybil Arundale has been re-engaged by 
John Hart for principal boy at the Royal, 
Manchester. 



Tne revival of "The Thief" at the Croy- 
don Hippodrome has proved popular. 



The Sisters Sprightly are at the Empire, 
West Hartlepool, for Christmas week. 



Neil Kenyon is appearing In Scottish 
character comedies in the provinces. 



BOWLES COMING HOME 

Sydney, Aus., Dec. 26. — George Bowles 
sails for America to-morrow. He has been 
here for a year in the interests of D. W. 
Griffith and is being replaced by Albert 
Cray, who has just arrived. 



"High Jinks" is doing a tumaway busi- 
ness at the Adelpbi. 

The Repertory Theatre, Birmingham, is 
doing good business. 

Tne Two Boses are at the Palace, Dun- 
dee, next week. 



Nellie Coleman has opened a school for 
dancing. 



DAPHNE POLLARD IN LONDON 

London, Eng., Dec. 28. — Daphne Pol- 
lard, who sailed from the States last week. 
is due to-njorrow. She comes over here ou 
a long contract with the management of 
the Loudon Hippodrome, at which resort 
she is billed to appear Jan. 29. 



WANT PAY FOR LAY-OFF 

Paris, Ft., Dec 30. — The musicians of 
the local music halls and cinematograph 
theatres have put in claims for compen- 
sation for the day-off, on which all amuse- 
ment places in France have to dose by or- 
der of the authorities. With few excep- 
tions the managers refused to accede to the 
musician's demands. In a few isolated cases 
the managers agreed to pay half salary for 

the day off. 

TO GIVE ONE SHOW NIGHTLY 

London, Eng., Dec. 29.— There is a move- 
ment on foot among the managers of 
bouses in the smaller provincial towns to 
return to the one perform ance-a-night 
policy. This action is prompted chiefly be- 
cause of the necessarily enforced curtail- 
ment of local traveling facilities in many 
towns throughout the provinces. . . 



LONDON TO SEE "UNDER COVER" 

London, Eng., Dec 26.— The English 
rights to "Under Cover" have been secured 
by Grossmith & Lanrillard and Matheson 
Lang who will, give it a London production 
January 17 at the Strand Theatre. The 
play wOl have a week's presentation at the 
Grand, Blackpool, prior to its being seen 
in this city. 



ETHEL LEVEY MAY VISIT V. S. 

London, Eng, Dec 30. — Ethel Levey, 
who recently became the wife of Grahame- 
White, the aviator, contemplates a trip to 
the United States. It is possible she may 
appear in a production in New York. 



GABY WORKING AGAIN 

London, Eng., Dec 28. — Gaby Deslys, 
who, owing to illness was not able to ap- 
pear for two weeks, has recovered her 
health and is now appearing with Harry 
Pileer in "Zu Zu." 



"FAIR AND WARMER" FOR LONDON 
London, Eng., Dec 28. — "Fair and 
Warmer" win be presented at the Globe 
Theatre here the latter part of next month 
under the direction of Alfred Butt. 



ALL PARIS THEATRES MAY CLOSE 

Paris, France, Dec 20. — The Associa- 
tion of Theatre Managers of this city bas 
notified" the government that if the pro- 
posed new tax on theatres is imposed all 
the local theatres win be dosed. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




ST. LOUIS CO. 

MAY LOSE 

HOME 

PRESENT THEATRE MAY BE SOLD 



Sr. Louis, Dec. 30. — If plans which are 
at present under way to sell the Park The- 
atre owing to the alleged failure of the 
stockholders to make payments on a sec- 
ond mortgage are carried oat, the Park 
Players, who have been appearing at the 
house for the last two years, will be forced 
out of their home.. 

According to the report, the stockholders 
have failed to make payments on the mort- 
gage since August and the house with its 
furnishings and equipment will be disposed 
of January 10 at trustee's Bale, if these 
payments are not forthcoming. 

An effort is being made by one of the 
stockholders to refinance the theatre and 
to keep the present company at the house. 
He said that the company has made money 
and is doing all in his power to retain it 
nt the Park, even going so far as to as- 
sume the responsibility of maintaining the 
theatre by paying rent np to February 18. 

He has called a meeting of the stock- 
holders for early next week in order to 
make plans for the refinancing and in their 
decision whether or not they will tide over 
the trouble and stop the sale, lies the fate 
of the Park Players. 



RALPH CLONINGER RECOVERING 

Spokane, Wash., Dec. 29. — Ralph 
Cloninger, leading man of the American 
Players, at the American Theatre, is con- 
valescing from an operation performed re- 
cently. He is making rapid progress 
towards recovery and expects to leave the 
hospital in about two weeks. 



MISS MeCRATH IN BRIDGEPORT 

Bridgeport, Conn., Dec 30. — Frances 
McGrath, who was scheduled to open with 
the Lyric Co. several weeks ago, bat had 
(o cancel owing to the illness of her mother, 
will open Monday at the head of the com- 
pany in "To-Day." 



WILKES PLAYERS NOT TO QUIT 
Seattle, Wash., Dec 26.— In a tele- 
gram from San Francisco Tom Wilkes de- 
aied that the Wilkes Players, now at the 
Orpheum here, were to disband. Hie 
rumor started when Wilkes changed the 
management of the house, bringing Dean 
Worley from Salt Lake to take charge. 
Ben Ketcham, who was in charge of the 
Orpheum, is to take over the Salt Lake 
house. 



MAUDE LEONE AVERTS ACCIDENT 

Euceakt, Ind., Dec 30. — At the open- 
ing of The Ed Williams Players in "Ari- 
zona," Maude Leone, the leading woman, 
demonstrated here ability as a horse woman 
and averted an accident by her cleverness 
in quieting a crazed horse on which she 
made her entrance The horse was evidently 
afraid of the lights. 



SEVERN DE DEYN CO. OPENS 

Masatunk, Phila., Dec. 30. — The 
Severn DeDeyn Players opened here at the 
Dixie Theatre on Christmas Day with 
"Within the Law." The company includes 
Pauline Raffe and Smyth Wallace in the 
leading roles and George MaeEntee, the 
company's director, Forest Zimmer, Beverly 
Bruce, ingenue, and Virginia Elwood. Next 
week the company will present "Alias 
Jimmy Valentine," which will be followed 
in rotation by "Under Cover," "Officer 666," 
and "Bought and Paid For," 



NELSON BURNS DEAD 

Nelson Burns, manager of the Elsmere 
Theatre and president of the Elsmere 
Stock Co., died at his mother's home in 
The Bronx, last week. He was at one 
time manager of the Poli circuit. Death 
was due to heart and kidney complications. 



ORPHEUM, PHILA., NOT FOR STOCK 

t> tttt . a nvr.vtn a , Dec. 30. — The manage- 
ment of the Orpheum Theatre, German- 
town, a suburb of Philadelphia, denies that 
there is any intention to install a stock 
company in that bouse. The house is still 
on the International Circuit and intends 
to continue to play attractions furnished 
by that organization. 



OLIVER OPENS IN LAFAYETTE 

Lafayette, Ind., Dec 30. — Otia Oliver, 
who recently closed his stock company at 
the Warrington, Oak Park, 111., is bring- 
ing the company here for an indefinite run 
beginning New Year's Day. 



MILWAUKEE CO. REOPENS 

Milwaukee, Dec 29. — The stock, com- 
pany at the Shubert Theatre reopened 
Christmas afternoon with a "Pair of 
Queens" and introduced Alice Bentley, the 
new leading woman. 

HIMMELEIN IN CHICAGO 
Chicago, Dec 30. — John Himmelein, 
who has two touring attractions and op- 
erates the Majestic Theatre, at Evansville, 
Ind., and the Sandusky Theatre, Sandusky, 
O., was a Chicago visitor, last week. The 
Himmelein company, which wag at the 
Majestic at Evansville for some time, took 
to the road three weeks ago. 



ELLEN G1ERUM FOR PICTURE 
Ellen Gierum, leading lady with the 
Warbnrton Theatre Stock Co., Yonkers, 
made a contract by cable last week whereby 
she will go to Copenhagen July 1 and play 
the leading role opposite Benjamin Chris- 
tie, who has prepared a film scenario 
based on the story of "The Wandering 
Jew." 



NUTT PLAYERS GIVEN DINNER 

Orange, Tex., Dec 28. — Frank Delmaine 
and John S. Garver tendered a complimen- 
tary dinner to the members of the Ed C. 
Nutt Comedy Players, December 24. 



DINGLE JOINS UNION HILL CO. 

Charles Dingle replaces Jack Roseleigh at 
the Hudson Theatre, Union Hill, in "Just 
a Woman." 



CLEVELAND TO 

HAVE GLASER 

STOCK 

COMPANY WILL OPEN JAN. 8 



Cleveland, O., Jan. 1. — Cleveland will 
once more be among the list of stock towns 
when Vaughan Glaser will return to this 
city with a new company, opening Janu- 
ary 8 at the Duchess Theatre. 

Mr. Glaser had a company here last 
Spring and arrived in town today to make 
preparations for the opening of the new 
organization next Monday. 

Fay Courtenay, who has played opposite 
Mr. Glaser for several years in his various 
companies, will head the cast and in their 
support are included Wilda Mari Moore, 
Carolyn Kenyon, Will D. Corbett and Ber- 
nard J. MeO wen. 

The opening attraction will be "Rich 
Man, Poor Man," in which Miss Courtenay 
will be seen in the role originally played 
on Broadway by Regine Wallace. 



RUBIA DE FARRAS IN COLUMBUS 

Columbus, O., Dec 30. — Rubia de Far- 
ms spent Christmas here visiting her hus- 
band. Ralph Menzing, who is playing in 
stock at the Southern Theatre. Miss de 
Farms will return to New York after New 
Year's Day. 



STOCK PLAYER KILLED IN WAR 

Milwaukee, Wia., Dec 28. — News has 
been received here that Curt Stark, 
formerly in stock at the Pabst Theatre, 
.has been killed in action while with the 
German army. For many years he played 
juvenile roles here. He left Milwaukee to 
join one of the large theatres in Berlin. 



STOCK ACTOR DIVORCED 

Ft. Watke, Ind., Dec 30. — Charles A. 
Snyder, last year with Norman Hackett 
and T. C. Gleason's Stock at the Empress 
Theatre, was granted a divorce from 
Bertha Eckles, a non-professional. 



NEW PLAYERS FOR SHUBERT CO. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Dec 30. — Mr. and 
Mrs. H. L. Willets and Eugenie Young 
have been placed with the Shubert stock 
here. 



DUBINSKY'S GIVE NEW PLAY 

St. Joseph, Mo., Dec 30. — This week 
the Dubinsky Bros. Stock Co. is present- 
ing for the first time on any stage a play 
written by two St. Joseph men, entitled 
"Down at the Ten-Cent Store" 



STOCK ACTRESS IN VAUDEVILLE 

Chicago, Dec 30. — Jessie Faber, for- 
merly leading lady in stock, made her vau- 
deville premier at the Marlowe last week. 

DILL WITH OAK PARK CO. 

Oak Park, hi., Dec 30. — George Dill 
has joined the new stock company at the 
Warrington Opera House to do leads. 



MISS ST. CLAIRE GETS GIFTS 

Patebson, N. J., Dec 30. — The Empire 
Theatre, where Winifred St Claire is ap- 
pearing in stock, was the scene of a bril- 
liant gift-giving spectacle during the pres- 
entation of "The Wolf on Christmas Eve, 
when Stage Director Reid presented Miss 
St Claire with a handsome loving cnp. the 
gift from members of her company. The 
boys "back stage" gave their charming 
little leading lady a gold fountain pen. Miss 
St. Claire responded with a nice speech of 
thanks. 



VOTING CONTEST AT FIFTH AVE. 

Manager Jack Horn of the Fifth Avenue 
Stock Co., Brooklyn, is holding a voting 
contest this week, the patrons to vote for 
their choice of play a The play receiving 
the most votes will be produced at the Fifth 
Avenue Theatre. 



HALL LEADING MAN IN SPOKANE 

Spokane, Wash., Dec 29. — Henry Hall, 
leading man of the Alcazar Players, San 
Francisco, joined the American Players at 
the American Theatre Monday for a five 
week's engagement, replacing Ben Ervay, 
who has been playing leads during Ralph 
Cloninger's illness. He joined in "Ths 
Misleading Lady." 



NEW STOCK CO. AT OAK PARK, ILL. 
Chicago, Dec 30. — Claude Allen Lewis 
is directing the new stock company at the 
Warrington Theatre, Oak Park, III. Marian 
Glbney beads the cast The opening play 
is "Jerry," with "Seven Keya to Baldpate" 
to follow. 



TOWNSEND WITH ALL STAR CO. 

New Bedford, Mass., Dec 30. — W. J- 
Townsend joins the cast of the All Star Co. 
at the New Bedford Theatre next week, 
as second man. 



DE FORREST CO. Of OMAHA 

Omasa, Neb., Dec 29. — Marjorie Mor- 
gan has joined the DeForrest Players, 
which moved here from Joplin. Mo., open- 
ing Xmas Dsy. 



KNICKERBOCKER CO. AUGMENTED 

Philadelphia., Jan. 1. — Francea Wood- 
bnry and Eugene Frasier join the Knicker- 
bocker Stock Co. this week 



FORMER STOCK ACTRESS WEDS 

Salt Laks Crrr, Utah, Dec 30. — A 
wireless from Idltarod, Alaska, states that 
Ruby Lindsay, former actress here and 
leading woman of a stock organization 
which played the northwest, was married 
October 28 to Karl Tbiele. 



SHUBERT-W1LUAM CO. RETURNS 
Waltham, Mass.. Jsn. 1. — The Shubert 
& Williams Stock Co., which recently 
closed its engagement here, returns Thurs- 
day to the Scenic Theatre, presenting 
"Nearly Married." 



LEAH WINSLOW WITH DENVER CO. 

Denver, Cole, Dec 30.— Leah Winslow 
is on her way here to open Jan. 8 with the 
Denham Stock Co. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 




SHOWMEN BALL 

IS A HUGE 

SUCCESS 



ALL OUTDOOR FOLK PRESENT 



Circus men, and men representing all 
outdoor stow interests of the world were 
fathered last Wednesday evening in the 
ballroom of tbe Hotel Agtor for the banquet 
and' ball of the Outdoor Showmen of 
America. This was the first time that all 
outdoor entertainment representatives came 
together in New York and they decided to 
make the best of it by indulging in the 
joys of feasting and dancing. The purpose 
of the gathering, however, was to organize 
these interests and create a better feeling 
between them. 

There were about six hundred exhibitors 
present, responses to the invitations coining 
from all corners of the globe. The recep- 
tion formally began at 7:30 and lasted 
until 8 and then followed an enjoyable 
program of dining, speaking, entertain- 
ment and the ball. 

License Commissioner Bell was the first 
speaker, having attended in place ot 
Mayor Mitohel, whom an important con- 
ference kept away. 

In the entertainment was represented 
even Metropolitan Opera House forces. 
Those performing were Mclntyre and 
Heath in "When We Trooped With the 
Big Tops," and the Berber Troupe of ten 
people. Al. Holstein was official an- 
nouncer. The operatic bill, nnder the per- 
sonal direction of Ottokar Bartik and 
Henry Meyerhoff, was rendered by Helen 
Goff, Clementina Huebscb. Torcom Beza- 
ziau, Paolo Martncci, Carl Jorn and Mile. 
Dasie. 

Lack of space forbids mention of all 
those present, but the following list of 
honorary vice presidents, including as it 
does, an excellent representation of men 
actively engaged in outdoor amusements, is 
of interest. 

John Ringling, Frederick Thompson, Ed- 
ward M. Ballard. H. H. Tammen, Crawford 
Fairbanks, C. E. Bonfils, Sam Scribner, 
E. P. Albee. Pat Casey, B. E. Wallace. 
John G. Robinson. Colonel W. F. Cody. 
Joseph Scheack. Morris Beifeld. AI. G. 
Barnes. Leon W. Washburn. Dr. J. O. Orr, 
C. W. Parker. James T. Clyde, D. C. 
Rosa, A. Roy Knabenshue. Lawrence 
Solman. George Arlington. Percy Williams. 
Nicholas Schenck. Albert E. Brown. L. A. 
Thompson, J. W. Russwnrm, Frank 
Fuller, J. Augustus Jones. H. B. Gentry. 
J. B. Warren, Charles Downing. I. M. 
Martin. Charles Sparks, J. C. Miller, E. 
W. McConnell. C. A. Wortham. Edward 
Arlington. 1. S. Mahan. John F. Robin- 
sen. James Patterson. Fred Buchanan, W, 
R. Mellor. Con. T. Kennedy, Johnny J. 
Jones, H. F. McGarvie, Frederick T. Cum- 
mings. Michael Heim, P. J. Mundy. Jerry 
Musgivan, Bert Bowers. C. E. Corey. H. 
S. Row*, William P. Hall, Harry S. 
Harknese, W. R. Margerum, F. F. Proc- 
tor. A. P. Sandels, William H. Pickens, J. 
W. Fleming, 



CIRCUS MEN IN HOT SPRINGS 
Hot Springs, Dec 30. — This city is 
crowded with outdoor showmen, some of 
whom have made their winter quarters here 
and others here just for the holidays. 
Among those here are X W. FlHrbrrnin , the 
three Deterellas, the two Casinos of the 
Ringling show, Dick Jeffars, Chester Muna- 
han, George Ryan, Slim Rogers, of Howe's 
London attraction, Jake Feirn, Campbell 
Brothers, Walter Monahan, Sells-Floto; 
Harry Sells, with John Robinson attrac- 
tions ; Albert Davis and Joe Murphy, circus 
promoters: Charles Tenny, Casada Sisters, 
Dick Richardson and Jake Faust. 



WORT-HAM'S BUSINESS STAFF 

For the business staff of his various or- 
ganizations for next season, C. A. Wortham 
will have Steve A. Woods, Bill Rice and 
Dick Collins with him again, while Barney 
Gerety, Homer Jones, Harry Hofer, Harry 
B. Potter, A. A. Powers, C. M. Casey and 
ethers of his old staff will probably be 
found enlisted under his standard. 



SNAKE CHARMER BITTEN 

Pattebson, La., Dec. 30. — Mabel, the 
snake charmer, whose right hand was hit- 
ten by one of her own reptiles, while per- 
forming her part in the street carnival 
which showed here recently, returned to her 
work, after being innoculated at the hospital 
for the poison and treated for laceration 
in the hand. 



MICHIGAN CHANGES FAIR DATE 

DETROIT, Mich., Dec 29. — At the meet- 
ing of the directors of the Michigan State 
Agricultural Society recently, it was de- 
cided that next year's fair would not be 
opened on Labor Day, as in former years, 
but will open on Friday, Aug. 31, and con- 
tinue through Sept. 9. 



TOWNS MAY FORM FAIR CIRCUIT 

Reading, Pa, Dec 30. — The matter of 
having a fair circuit, consisting of Reading, 
AUentown, Lancaster and York, was dis- 
cussed at great length at a dinner given 
here by A. S. Deysber, of the Reading Fair 
Association. 



FAIR PUBLICITY BUREAU FORMED 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 30. — As an after- 
math of the convention of the American 
Association of Fairs and Expositions, at 
which publicity was discussed at length, a 
co-operative publicity bureau was formed 
and Roy P. Speer, publicity manager of 
the Minnesota State Fair, is in charge of 
the campaign. 



MAJOR BURKE IN WASHINGTON 

Washhtctox, Dec 29. — Major John 
Burke, better known as "Arizona Bill," and 
for years Buffalo Bill's most successful 
manager and noted press agent, is in the 
city and on Monday night was the honored 
guest of Manager Fred G. Bergen, of Poli's 
Theatre. 



JONES TO SEEK NEW QUARTERS 

Hot Springs, Ark., Dec 30. — J. Augus- 
tus Jones is expected here after the first 
of the year, to look over sites for perma- 
nent winter quarters for the attraction he 
controls, 'known as the Cole Brothers' cir- 
cus, which is now wintering in California. 



BARNUMS HUNT 
FOR MISSING 
PERFORMER 



OLGA DE MAR LEFT IN ENGLAND 



After Louis De Mar and his three chil- 
dren, performers in the Barnnm & Bailey 
Circus, have exhausted all means in their 
efforts to locate Mrs. Olga De Mar, the 
management of the Barnnm & Bailey Cir- 
cus have taken np the matter and will con- 
duct a world-wide search for the missing 
woman. 

About a year after the war- broke out, 
Mr. De Mar signed the circus contract, 
which included his entire family, and se- 
cured passage for the United States, on a 
steamer at Liverpool. Mrs. De Mar 
arrived at the pier too late, just as the 
vessel, carrying Mr. De Mar and the chil- 
dren, -was about to depart. She was left 
on the pier and trace of her has been lost 
from that time. 

Mr. De Mar has broken down under the 
strain of constant worry for his wife and 
has been removed to a sanitarium. Now all 
hope is centered on the powerful effort the 
circus management is making to find Mrs. 
De Mar. 



CLYDE SIGNS KILTIES BAND 

James T. Clyde, owner of the World at 
Home Shows, has just contracted with tbe 
Famous Kilties. Band for next season and 
announces that his dates are practically all 
closed for 1917. 



RUTHERFORDS ENGAGE FLORIDA 

Geo. Alabama Florida has been re-en- 
gaged by Harry and Irving Polack to go in 
advance of the Rutherford Greater Shows 
for tbe coming season. 



HOWE AND ROBINSON COMBINE 

The Howe Circus and Robinson Show 
will be combined next season and will be 
taken out as the John Robinson Show. 



VICTOR LEE WITH ROBINSON 

Victor Lee, annonncer. opener and lec- 
turer, will be with the John Robinson 10 
Rig Circus tbe coming season. 



WORTHAM ENGAGES BECKMAN 

Fred Beckman has been engaged by C. 
A. Wortham as manager of the Great 
Wortham Shows for next season. 



HUNTER SHOWS IN QUARTERS 

Pockett, Miss., Dec 29. — The Hunter 
Shows are in Winter quarters here, where 
work of repairing and repainting is already 
begun. The 1917 season will open about 
April 1. 



SHOWMAN LOVE CHRISTMAS TREE 
Sak Antotoo, Ter, Dec 28.— The 
showmen gave their annual Christmas din- 
ner and tree and circus in the lobby of the 
Gunter Hotel, on Christmas Day. 

Most of the acts for the circus were 
donated by Jno. T. Backman. Jno. A. Pol- 
litt was chairman general, Jas. R. Mann, 
ring master, and Harry C. Wilbur, an- 
nouncer. The candy butchers consisted of 
the following showmen : C. A. Wortham, 
Bill Rice, Ivan Snapp, Barney Garety/S. 
W. Brundage, Rodney Krail, Leon W. 
Marshall, Smith Turner and J. Morgan 
Jamison. 



MeJNTYRES TO GO WITH CIRCUS 
The Mclntyres, will open with Ringling 
Brothers' Circus some time in April. 



JOSEPH HERBERT CONVALESCING 

Joseph C. Herbert, owner and manager 
of the Herbert Greater Shows, is conva- 
lescing after an operation which he under- 
went for appendicitis. He will be in New 
York shortly for the purpose of ordering 
paraphernalia for his next season's car- 
nival. 



HEBERS TO HAVE NEW SHOW 

Columbus, O., Dec 29. — The Heber 
Bros. Tent Show in the Spring will be en- 
tirely new in every respect. 



PROFESSIONAL FAT MAN DIES 

Gbeensbubo , Pa., Dec 29. — Lloyd F. 
Findley, a professional fat man, died in his 
home here Sunday. He formerly conducted 
a restaurant here, but left that business to 
go on exhibition in carnival shows. At the 
time of his death he weighed- 420 pounds. 
and formerly he weighed more than that. 



PARK PLANS IMPROVEMENTS 

New Brighton, Pa., Jan. L — The Beaver 
Valley Traction Co., owners of Junction 
Park, is spending about $45,000 in improv- 
ing this popular resort for next season. The 
work will commence shortly. 



HEBER FAMILY RE-UNION 
Columbus, O., Dec. 29. — Arriving from 
the north Dec 24, the Heber Bros, circus 
prepared a Christmas Tree and tnrkey 
dinner for the entire troupe and the occa- 
sion was the re-union of the Heber family, 
relatives arriving from New York and San 
Francisco. Their complete circus band and 
orchestra furnished music for the occasion. 
Presents were distributed. 



ALLEN TO TAKE OUT CARAVAN 

J. A. Allen, who has been secretary and 
treasurer of the Morrison United Shows 
resigned his position Monday to devote his 
time to the organization of his own cara- 
van, to travel under tbe title of tbe Greater 
Alpha Shows. 



CAMPBELL HAS TEN-CAR SHOW 

Hot Speings, Ark., Dec. 29. — H. W. 
Campbell, after closing his .regular season 
here, has organized a ten-car carnival to 
play for several weeks in Arkansas, Louisi- 
ana and Mississippi. 



HIPPO SHIPPED TO CIRCUS 

Congo, the baby hippo recently pur- 
chased from the Central Park Zoo by the 
Robinson Ten Big Shows, has been shipped 
off to join the circus. 



PEERLESS AMUSE. CO. FORMED 
TOLEDO, 0„ Dec 30. — G. W. Johnston 
and W. J. Torrens have formed a carnival 
to take' to" the road on or about Feb. 1, as 
the Peerless Amusement Co. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



WESTERN OFFICE, 
• Room 210 
35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



•<•"> ■ 




FOR ADVERTISING 

Rates, Phone 

RANDOLPH 5423 



NICOLAI JOLTS 

NEW CIRCUIT 

PRODUCERS 

DEMANDS BETTER PLAYS, ACTORS 

On bis way to Oshkosh, Wis., to pay his 
annual Christmas visit to bis mother, 
George Nicolai, secretary-treasurer of the 
International Circuit, stopped off in Chi- 
i\igo and gave the circuit one of the most 
important overhauling^ it has experienced 
since its opening last September. 

At the recent meeting in French Lick, 
Ind, it had been determined by those in 
authority that if they expected to make a 
success of the enterprise, better shows 
would have to be the rule and accordingly, 
the various managers were notified. Several 
changes were made in old shows and one 
or two were replaced by new shows, and to 
many members of the circuit it looked as 
if all the necessary changes bad been, 
made. 

Nicolai's appearance in Chicago, was 
therefore like a thunderbolt from a clear 
sky. On reaching this city he located at 
the Hotel Morrison and the "meeting 
chamber" was filled with international 
pioducing managers, among whom were, 
Gazzolo, Gatts and Clifford, Rowland aad 
Howard, Robert Sherman and George 
DUt 

Mr. Nicolai convinced his hearers of the 
fact that those who had disregarded the 
orders for better shows would have to 
carry them out at once and to impress them 
with the idea of what was wanted, said : 
"We want better plays, with real actors." 

The immediate effect of the Nicolai visit 
will be the closing of the Harry Blaney 
show at Kansas City, week of Jan. 1. This 
show, which started out last September as 
"In Walked Jimmy," soon proved its weak- 
ness and some minor alterations were made 
and its name changed to "The Blindness of 
Youth." It takes more than a change of 
names and a few alterations to make a 
good play out of a poor one, however, and 
hence the closing of the Blaney show. 

"How Hearts are Broken," a Leffler and 
BrattOD production, is another play which 
it has been decided the International Cir- 
cuit can do without. It closes, week of 
Jan. 8, at the Imperial, Chicago. 



COLEMAN REHEARSING NEW PLAY 

"When a Girl Loves," a new play by 
Harry Hamilton, which is being sent out 
by Hamilton Coleman, is now in rehearsal 
here and the tour will open about the mid- 
dle of January. 



MOORE HAS NEW REVUE 

A new act is to go out shortly under the 
auspices of Menlo Moore, Inc., called "The 
Tick Tock Girl." It will be a revue and 
will feature Betty Caldwell. 



MARY GARDEN HERE 

Mary Garden, fresh from France, came 
to Chicago last week to join the Chicago 
Grand Opera Co. at the Auditorium for 
the last ten days of its ten weeks' run. 



CLAIM PANTAGES DIDN'T SIGN 
Because of the statement that Alexander 
l'antages refused to sign the V. M. P. A.' 
agreement, both here and in New York, 
the White Rats are pinning a great deal of 
faith in the Western manager. Union offi- 
cials believe the Pantages circuit will 
readily agree to a closed shop if a strike 
situation ensues. It is claimed that most 
of the acts playing Pantages' time make 
'to effort to conceal White Rat affiliations. 



CHILD GAINS FAME AS DANCER 

Johann Peers, daughter of Frank O. 
I'eers, who is remembered in Chicago as 
manager of the Whitney Opera House, has 
gained fame as a dancer seldom awarded 
a child of ten years. She will shortly be 
the featured attraction at one of Chicago's 
biggest Winter amusement resorts. 



MOORE CO. HAS NEW ACT 

Menlo Moore, Inc., opens a new act 
January 22 which will have the title "Miss 
America." The book is by Will Hough 
and the music by Lewis Fuiks. Jean Wal- 
ters, formerly of Faber &. Waters, and 
Frank Ellis, late of William B. Friedland- 
er*8 "The Night Clerk," will be featured. 



. BERNSTEIN STOPS OVER 

Louis Bernstein, of Shapiro-Bernstein & 
Co., was in Chicago, last week, on his way 
to the Far West, conferring with Sig Bos- 
ley, local manager, regarding the new sea- 
son's campaign. 



NEW ONE NIGHTER READY 
Rowland & Howard are sending "Every- 
man's Castle" to the one-night stands and 
open the company shortly, having secured 
the rights of the play from William An- 
thony Maguire. 



BUCK WITH ROSSITER 

Ray C. Blick, formerly in charge of the 
Billy Smythe Music Co.'s Chicago affairs, 
is now a member of Will Rossiter's sales 
force. 



VAN BUREN AT OLD JOB 

Burrell Van Buren has returned to his 
old desk in the Shapiro-Bernstein Chicago 
office, after a season's connection with the 
T-ydiard company as chief composer of high- 
class ballads. 



DATE SET FOR "CHILD UNBORN" 

Gaezola, Gotts & Clifford have in re- 
hearsal a new play, based on the birth con- 
trol question, called "The Child Unborn." 
It will receive its premiere January 21 at 
the National Theatre, Chicago. This is a 
new International Circuit Show. 



BLOCK'S BROTHER DEAD 

S. W. Block, whose brother Jack was a 
solicitor attached to the Chicago office of 
The Cupper last season, died in Chicago. 
Dec 13. 



"DONT TELL WIFE" TO OPEN 
"Don't Tell My Wife" opens January 4 
at South Bend. Ind. 



TO OPEN WITH "NYMPH" 

Elizabeth Hamilton Johnson will open 
with "The Fountain Nymph," January 12. 



MANY CHANGES 

IN THEATRE 

FORCES 

RIALTO OPENING CAUSES CHANGE 



Managers of Chicago theatres face a big 
shake-up in their forces now that the new 
Rialto Theatre, Chicago's best vaudeville 
house, is to open Jan. & 

Harry Earl, who has been manager of 
the La Salle, will take charge of the 
Rialto. He was once manager of the 
Masonic Temple Roof Garden in the old 
halcyon days of variety. Mr. Earl will 
have as assistant, William Rosenblum, who 
moves from McVicker's Theatre, where he 
nas been assistant manager. Louis J. 
Jones will remain manager of the Stude- 
baker and Lyric Theatres, but will also 
act as treasurer of the new Rialto. 

Norman E. Field, manager of the Colonial 
Theatre, will retain direction of that house 
end assume temporarily the management 
of the La Salle Theatre. Mike Simons, for 
several years assistant manager of the 
Colonial, will become Mr. Field's assistant 
at the La Salle. Benjamin Anderson, 
assistant manager of the Studebaker, will 
lw assistant to John G. Burch at Mc- 
Vicker's. 

Chester Amborg, manager of the Williard 
Theatre in its vaudeville days under the 
management of Jones, Linick and Schaefer, 
will become assistant manager ' of the 
Stndebaker. The general staff will remain 
the same. 



FROST AT WINTER GARDEN 

Jack Frost and other members of the 
"Marigold Review," at Bismarck Garden. 
Chicago, are now entertaining at Weiss's 
Winter Garden. 



CARROLL TAKES "SLEIGH BELLS" 

"Sleigh Bells," tried out as a vaudeville 
act by Rowland & Howard, is now being 
rehearsed in Chicago by James Carroll, the 
author, for his own production. 



"BREWSTER'S MILLIONS" IN VAUDE. 

"Brewster's Millions" is to be condensed 
for vaudeville and will be produced shortly 
by Rowland 4 Howard, who have secured 
the rights. 



NEW SISTER ACT FOR FOX 

Harrington and Lamster, a new sister 
act, will make their debut on Fox time next 
week. 

HOWARD AND BOYLE JOIN 

Billy K. Howard and Jack Boyle are 
serving under a common banner again and 
they are booked solid over Western cir- 
cuits for the entire season 1917. 



GRAND GETS "TURN TO RIGHT" 
"Turn to the Right" will follow "Hit-the- 
Ttail Holliday" at Cohan's Grand, Janu- 
ary 14. 



BENNETT HAS TWO PLAYS 

Virgil Bennett is producing "Maid to Or- 
der" and "The Katzenjammer Kids." 



"BIRTH CONTROL" FEATURED 

Chicago producers, from the straight 
dramatic kind to those interested In mov- 
ing pictures, have suddenly seised upon 
"birth control" as the one live theme likely 
to prove most profitable. There are two 
moving pictures dealing with this subject 
shown in the Loop and at least two shows 
along this line are planned by men inter- 
ested in the Internatinal Circuit 



CLARK IN NEW YORK 

Frank Clark, Chicago manager of Water- 
sou, Berlin & Snyder, went to New York 
over the holidays. 

WIZARD GREEN'S SON KILLED 

Galt, Ont., Dec. 2a— The body of the 
late Joseph Milton Green, which was 
brought here from Erie, Pa., for burial, was 
interred in Mount View Cemetery. The 
deceased, who was a motion picture opera- 
tor, was the son of John C. Green, well 
known as a magician and a theatre man- 
cger. For some time prior to bis death he 
bud been working in a munition factory in 
Erie and was killed in that city, December 
20, in a street car accident. His father, 
mother and sister survive. 



McCarthy wins brooch 

Daniel McCarthy, auditor for Cohan and 
Harris, has won the diamond brooch raf- 
fled off by Zelda Sears and a number of 
other theatrical friends. The brooch, 
which belonged to Elita Proctor Otis, was 
offered for sale to raise funds. Mis* Otis 
is ill in a sanitarium. 



FRANK ROGERS INJURED 

Frank Rogers, seventy-two yean old, a 
motion picture actor, author and play- 
wright, is confined in St. Vincent's Hos- 
pital suffering from a broken bone in the 
right leg and a smashed heel, as a result 
of an accident in an elevator at the Edison 
studios, Decatur Ave., Bronx. Rogers 
was working in a scene when the accident 
is said to hare happened. 



GREENWICH THEATRE PLANNED 

Mrs. Margaret Howard Lewis has an- 
nounced plans for the construction of a 
three-story theatre for the Greenwich 
Village Players, on the northwest corner 
of Fourth and Christopher streets, to coat 
$75,000. 



HOPWOOD TO CIRCLE GLOBE 

Avery Hopwood is to start soon on a trip 
around the world, starting from Vancouver, 
B. C. and going from there to Yokohama. 
He will be in London next Spring for the 
opening of "Fair and Warmer." 



McCUTCHEON TO FIGHT AGAIN 
Major Wallace McCutcheon, who came 
back from the front a short time ago, is to 
return shortly to rejoin his colors. 



HURST TO JOIN ALLIES 

Brandon Hurst, a well-known English 
actor, will sail for England shortly to join 
the British forces. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 








VOGUE OF POPULAR 

WRITER A BRIEF ONE 



Composer of Popalar Hits Richly De- 

itnit Whatever Financial Rewards 

He May Earn 

The large rami of money paid to the writ- 
en of successful popalar songs have long 
been a favorite subject for magazine and 
newspaper writers, and especially daring 
the holiday season when considerable space 
in the theatrical and musical publications 
is given over to special articles. It is an 
undisputed fact, considering the amount of 
study or training required and the actual 
time necessary to complete the words and 
music of a popular song, there are few, if 
any, professions that bring such large mone- 
tary returns. There are in New York to- 
day over a score of writers of the popular 
order whose incomes are far in excess of 
' the average bank president, and at least a 
half-dozen are earning considerably more 
than the President of the United States. 

From the above facts one would be led 
to believe that the song-writing profession 
is a particularly pleasant and attractive 
one, but to the initiated the reverse is really 
the truth. The song-writer, to succeed, 
today, must possess an almost inexhaustible 
fund of new and original ideas. He must 
be able to almost overnight adapt himself 
and his writings to meet new and constantly 
changing whims of the public, and the 
Bckle public's taste is responsible for the 
scores of aspiring writers who appear every 
few years, contribute a few successes to the 
world of popular music, then <srop out of 
sight and are forgotten. 

No better proof of the short vogue of the 
average popalar song-writer is needed than 
a glance through the titles of the big pop- 
lar successes of six or seven years ago. 
Fewer than half a dozen of the successful 
writers of that period are contributing any- 
thing to the list of successful songs of to- 
day, and of this few a majority are fast 
losing their ability to hold the public inter 
eat. Big reputations made in the past count 
for nothing in the field of musical composi- 
tion. The popular writer, to hold his grip 
on the public's taste, must hit the bull's- 
eye with clocklike regularity. Let one sea- 
son go by without a hit to bis credit, and 
the rumor that be is slipping is quickly 
heard. 

The position of a public writer, no mat- 
ter how successful, is not an enviable one. 
Bach season may be his last, so far as the 
ability to turn out successful compositions 
is concerned. And daring his comparatively 
few years of success, he is surely entitled 
to whatever returns the sale of his compo- 
sitions may bring. 



BRYAN LEE'S NEW ACT" 
Bryan Lee, who during his engagement 
with Primrose A Dockstader's minstrels 
was known as Fred Gladdish, has a new 
act, in which he is singing a number of the 
Wttmark song successes. 



A VON TILZER NOVELTY 
Harry Yon Tilzer, who has scores of nov- 
elty song successes to his credit, has jost 
launched a new one entitled "Just the Kind 
Of a Girl You'd love to Make Your Wife." 



WITMARK BALLADS 

The entertaining Honey Boys Minstrels, 
who appeared at the Colonial Theatre last 
week, made several changes in their pro- 
gram during the last half of their engage- 
ment, and as a result two new songs fonnd 
a place in .the repertoire of this popular 
organization. Will Thompson, baritone, 
sang "Somebody Loves Yon. Dear," and 
gave a splendid account both of himself 
and the song. He was materially aided by 
the ensemble effect of the chorus. The 
whole thing was received with en- 
thusiasm. Then that international hit, 
"There's a Long, Long Trail," was sung by 
"Jimmy" Meehan, whose engaging tenor has 
seldom been employed to better advantage. 
Both these numbers were encored repeat- 
edly. Both the songs mentioned add much 
to the general excellent tone of the act, and 
are from the catalog of M. Witmark & Sons. 



THE BET CALLED 

Jack Mendelsohn of Boston bet a hat 
with Walter Wilson of Chicago that "In 
the Sweet Long Ago" would be a hit in Bos- 
ton before it would in Chicago. Milt Ste- 
vens heard about the bet and wired both 
that they were slow. "I've made it a hit 
in Kansas City, St. Louis, Omaha, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis, Cincinnati, Louisville 
and New Orleans already and Pve only 
been working on it two weeks." Milt is 
the traveling representative for the Joe 
Morris Mimic Co. 



LARGE ROYALTIES 
According to one of the officials of a 
large mechanical reproducing company, the 
music publishers in January will receive a 
forger amount of money in the shape of 
royalties from the phonograph companies 
than ever before in the history of the busi- 
ness. 



CENTURY ROOF SHOW 

Blanche Merrill is writing the lyrics and 
music for "Dance and Grow Thin," the 
new production which is to be seen at the 
Cocoannt Grove atop of the Century The- 
atre. 



NEW ORIENTAL SONG 

Chan. K. Harris has instructed bis pro- 
fessional manager, Louis Cohen, to begin 
work on "My Little China noil," written 
by Joe Yan, Gas Scbenck and Jack Yel- 
len. 

Louis has already placed it with several 
vaudeville headliners. ' 



NEW LOVE SONG 

Jos. W. Stern & Co. have a new high- 
class number called "Dearest Eyes." There 
are always love songs, bat it is seldom that 
one comes to us with such genuine charm 
or "Dearest Eyes" possesses. 



NEW SPELLING SONG 

"Mississippi," the new spelling song by 
Frances White, is published by the William 
Jerome Music Co. The' number is re- 
stricted to the use of Miss White, who in- 
troduced it with remarkable success at 
the Riverside Theatre, last week. 



A CHRISTMAS GIFT 

Leo Feist sat in his office the day after 
Christmas smoking a cigarette stack in an 
elaborate gold mounted amber holder at 
least six inches in length. 

"What's the idea of the torch?" asked 
Win Teller who happened in at that time, 
"I never saw yon with one of those things 
before." "Wen, you see," said Mr. Feist, 
"this Is a Christmas gift, and I think a 
great deal of it. It came from Rocco 
Voeco and the boys in our Chicago office." 

"Oh! that's different," said Will, "use it 
all you want. I thought at first you were 
putting on airs." 



NEW BERLIN SONG 

Henry Bergman introduced at the Co- 
lonial Theatre last week a new oriental 
ballad written by Irving Berlin. 

Max Winslow, professional manager for 
the Watenon, Berlin & Snyder Co., will 
make it his feature song for the new year. 



BERNSTEIN'S CAMPAIGN 

Louis Bernstein of the Shapiro-Bernstein 
Co. before he left for- a two weeks' trip 
through the South mapped out a strenuous 
campaign for the new year. 

Mr. Bernstein has a splendid list of new 
songs to select as his leaders, those prin- 
cipally composed by Harry Carroll being 
first choice. 



THE BETTER GRADE 

The Broadway Music Corp.. who re- 
cently opened a high-class song department 
under the management of Albert Von Til- 
ier, are in a position to offer the concert 
singers a variety of unpublished songs. 



BROADWAY'S NEW SONGS 

The Broadway Music Corp. are making 
the first announcement in this issue of sev- 
eral of their new 1917 songs, principally 
from the pen of Albert Yon Tilzer, their 
feature writer. 



IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Phil. Kornheiser, professional manager 
for the Leo Feist house, spent a short holi- 
day vacation in Atlantic City, returning 
early this week. 



FEU X MEYER IN CUBA 

Felix Meyer of the Karcxag Publishing 
Co. is spending a short vacation in Havana, 
Cuba. 



NEW KARCZAG BALLAD 

Otto Motzan has a new ballad with the 
Karczag Publishing Co., entitled "A Tear, 
A Kiss, A Smile." It is decidedly of the 
better class of songs, and is being success- 
fully featured by scores of the leading vau- 
deville singers. 



FEATURES VON TILZER'S SONG 
Dorothy Meuther, who is presenting a 
new and clever singing act in vaudeville, 
is making a feature of Harry Von Tiller's 
song, "There's Someone More Lonesome 
Than You." From all sides come glowing 
reports of the popularity with which it has 
been received. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



Henry Lewis, who has helped so much 
to put over the Anna Held show, had au 
announcement put in all the New York 

papers, that Charles McCarron would 
write all his material hereafter. And just 
think that little, thin-faced (then) Mc- 
Carron was hanging around only three 
short years ago, begging the publishers for 
a chance. Now Charlie weighs easily 200 
and gets more than a dollar for every 
pound he weighs every week. 

F. P. A., the smartest Columnist of all. 
says there seems to be some hullabaloo 
about trusting the man from prison. He 
remarks that ont of twenty convicts that 
money was loaned to, every one made good 
and returned same. But the twenty 
friends to whom he loaned money; well, 
not a darned cnss of 'em attempted a aUgbt 
return. We're for the convicts, you bet 



We are thankful to 1916, very thankful, 
indeed. Especially bo, are we, for 1917, 
also that nothing serious has happened, so 
far, to us since "Sharping and Flatting," 
that our rent is paid for January, that we 
don't Uve further uptown, that our royal- 
ties can be no smaller, and well, that we're 
living, that's all. How about you? 

William Penn, not the publisher, but 
the -fellow who put the Penn in Pennsyl- 
vania, said in a speech 260 years ago: 
"Why are you so fond of that Ufe which 
begins with a cry and ends with a groan?" 
Now what Song Plugger did Billy hear? 



The first six musical notes were invented 
by a Benedictine Monk of Arezzo, named 
Guy Aretino, in 1025 A. D. AU of which 
goes to explain the fondness of anyone at 
all musical for that fetching after dinner 
cordial, Benedictine. 



Tom Burke says it beats gunning for n 
singing job all the time. He's running the 
elevator in the Exchange Building, 145 
West 46th St, and gets a club date once 
in awhile. Tom's not too proud to fight. 



Did you get a peep at those pantalettes 
the girls are wearing? Leave it to the 
little darlings for something sensational alt 
the time. One day they let you see 'em, 
and the next day they don't. 



In 1857 M. Bord, of that dear Paris. 

France, invented a small upright piano and 

caned it "Pianette." 
Oh, Pianette, I say it yette, 
You've made me awette, yon Pianette! 



New York City's latest census gives ft* 
population as 5,602841. See that lone "1" 
after the "4"? . That's the only gink in law 
big city that hasn't written a song. 



Here's hoping 1017 slips along like the 
bestest, cutest, nicest little year ever. Here'< 
hoping. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 

(La.t Hmlf) 

Tuscano Brothers, the battle-axe jug- 
glers, opened and sot an exceptionally good 
band for this spot They do some throw- 
ing and receiving with the axes that al- 
ways verges on the dangerous. A part that 
went big was the one where they did 
juggling in the dark, with the exception of 
the lights on what appeared to be the battle 
axes. They went through their entire 
tontine without a slip. Both have a good 
stage appearance, yet have no tendency to 
be pleased with themselves. 

Frank MorreU, in blackface, followed. 
About the only big thing about this act is 
MorreU himself, and half his gaga are 
buUt around this very fact. He over- 
works this phase of his talk. He opened 
by telling how he had pleased them in the 
afternoon and about the middle of his act 
he got a laugh out of his name. MorreU 
makes no attempt to foUow the negro 
dialect, although by so doing he would prob- 
ably appear much funnier than he does. 
He sang an old-time war song which went 
big. 

Florence Roberts and company were in 
number three spot, rather an unusual place 
for this sort of an act, due, probably, to 
the short program. Miss Roberta offers a 
play in one act by J. Hartley Manners, 
"The Woman Intervenes." She won her 
way into the heart of the audience from 
the very start and got tremendous applause 
at the 6niab. The acting in this short 
play is all that could be desired. "The 
woman" in the case is an old "lover" of 
Paul Winthrope, who, since leaving bis old 
haunts, has taken a fancy to the wife of 
Colonel Brent. 

"The woman" comes to warn Winthrope 
and while in the room Colonel Brent ap- 
pears, also to warn Winthrope — and with » 
revolver. "The woman," who is Miss 
Roberts, rises to the occasion, stating that 
she and Winthrope are engaged and that 
she has been encouraging bim to be a friend 
of the Colonel's, because the Colonel's wife 
Is lonesome. In the end the Colonel goes 
home abashed. It seems a little out of 
the ordinary that a woman engaged to a 
man would encourage that man to make 
friendship with another woman. 

Willard Simms and company, in decorat- 
ing a room, proved as busy as the proverbial 
one-armed paper banger with the hives. He 
gets into the wrong flat with his paste and 
accessories and when he finishes np the 
room looks as though a Kansas cyclone 
had gone through It With the slap-stick 
stuff Simms throws the audience into con- 
vulsions. He and the woman close in one, 
to good effect. Simms is good. 

The Choy Ling Heep Troupe, Chinese 
jugglers and magicians, are billed as being 
direct from Canton, which they apparently 
are not However, they have an act that 
is long and intensely interesting through- 
out so it doesn't make any difference 
whether, they hail from Canton or PuaUnp, 
Wash. The leader of the troupe does some 
fire eating which is hard to fathom, inas- 
much as he blows smoke ont of his month 
for five initiates afterwards. By using a 
little more Chinese talk and "whooping her 
up" once in a while, they might get some 
much needed comedy. 



SHOW REVIEWS— Continued 



HAMILTON 

(Last Half) 

The Tuletide atmosphere prevailed about 
the bouse daring the last half of the week 
and Manager Blockhouse with his usual 
smile, remarked to the patrons upon leav- 
ing the house, "some show, hah." It was. 

Starting off with Cunningham & Marion, 
the tallty acrobats, who do stunts different 
from the ordinary, the audience assumed a 
cheery demeanor which prevailed through- 
out the performance. 

"Two of a Blind," which is an amusing 
skit based on "two inmates of an insane 
asylum, taking French leave," held the 
second spot Despite the fact that the act 
is a little talky, there was sufficient punch 
in the dialogue to put it over at a fast clip. 

Roselda, with a repertoire of song selec- 
tions coming next, at Brat had a hard time 
following this act, but toward the end of 
her turn "swung the audience toward her," 
and she finished quite a favorite. It might 
be suggested, however, that the lady 
change her variety of selections a bit as 
her program is one not any too appropriate 
for "neighborhood" theatres. 

"An Innocent Bystander," a comedy 
playlet with a touch of pathos, was the 
next offering. This act has been presented 
about the city for the past three years, 
and even though it has repeated In most of 
the houses it always manages to get the 
indulgence of its audience, the story being 
unique and true to life. 

BiUed as "Italian Street Musicians," 
ParUlo A Frabltto, held the next to clos- 
ing spot These youths have a novel offer- 
ing with a touch of "nut" humor in their 
character portrayals. 

The show closed with "A Day in Dog- 
vllle," deliniated by Barnold'a Dogs. 



NATIONAL 

(Last Half ) 

The National bnng out the S. R. O. 
sign early Thursday afternoon. 

The audience seemed more interested in 
the feature picture "The Masque of Life" 
and in the latest episode of "The Crimson 
Stain Mystery" than in the dull vaudeville 
bUl rendered. 

Lady Snda Noy — who, according to the 
billing, is a Japanese — has a very pretty 
voice. However, she renders her selections 
in a rather colorless way and seems planted 
to one spot on the stage. 

Allen & Francis do some nifty dancing 
bnt would do well if they would get away 
from their very conventional entrance. 

Jimmy Flynn pleased with several popu- 
lar songs. There is no reason for employ- 
ing the spotlight throughout his act 

Rawles and Von Kanffman, with their 
old material, registered the Mt of the bill. 

Walter James, "the War Hum," sang a 
very clever medley. His last parody con- 
cerning Hughes getting more thsn his 
share is not original as Jack Wilson has 
been using it in his act for some time. 

The Cromwell* joggled the show to a 
close and went over well in the closing 
spot 



PROCTOR'S 23rd ST. 

(Last Half) 

Bob, Tip and company opened a bill St 
this house, which went slow for several 
acts, but finally picked up and went big. 
The dog does some balancing stunts that 
are out of the ordinary and the man and 
woman are quite entertaining. 

The girl in number two spot of the team 
of Wood and MandeviUe, ia a big help to 
this act She has a good appearance and 
can dance. The "coon" song by the man 
was poor. 

Fred Thomas and company in "Mrs. 
Sippi Nightmare" got a lot of laughs. This 
act is unmotivated and jumbled up. Right 
at the start a "cop" is called, but this part 
seems to have been left dangling in the 
air, for he fails to appear. Other Inci- 
dents are nearly as bad aa far as logical 
reasoning is concerned. Thi man does a 
poor "drunk." 

Hager and Goodwin have a good piece of 
business in the "county fair" bit which 
brought them back for a number of bows. 
The man at the piano should be given more 
of a chance. An Italian character song 
by the other man is poorly done, although 
the material seems excellent 

Norton and Ayres have one gag that 
must have been pulled back in the stone 
age when safety razors were made of flint 
It ia the one about "having to come out of 
a saloon some time." The stuff used in 
kidding the girl is sure-fire. 

FarreU and Taylor, In blackface, have a 
two-act that is hard to beat The song is 
a sort of an anti-climax and should be 
dropped. 

The Five Emigrants in "From the Old 
World to the New," are excellent singers, 
and pull at the heart strings with their first 
scene. It is hardly necessary for them to 
propose a toast to America to get 
applause. They couldn't help but hit the 
applause belt 

Harry Tate's five English comedians 
■topped the show in "Motoring." A motor 
car stalled on a country road and the 
attempts to get it started form rather a 
trite subject, bat it is handled so cleverly 
throughout that it is excruciatingly funny. 

The Five Pandors, with their Interesting 
acrobatic turn, pleased. 



"SOME WARRIORS" FOR PALACE 

The Lipman-Shipman playlet "Some 
Warriors," will begin its vaudeville career 
Jan. 15 at the Palace, New York. Loots 
Mann and Robert Fisher will be seen in 
leading roles. 



HYMER HAS NEW ACT 

John B. Hymer is the author of a new 
act "The Night Boat" It is a flirtatious 
comedy played by a company of five. 



DAISY JEROME STARTS TOUR 

MHVKEAF0TJ8. Minn., Dec. 31. — Daisy 
Jerome, the English singing comedienne, is 
in this country after a three years* stay 
in Australia. She opened today at Pan- 
tages Theatre, this city. She ia booked for 
a toor of the Circuit 



AUDUBON 

(Last Half) 

There were only four acta on this bill, 
owing to the length of one of the acts. 

The Reed trio opened the show. They 
present a very high class dancing act with 
a highly artistic set. Their skating dance 
is a novelty and is done well. 

Johnny Ford and Billy Smith had no 
trouble in getting over big. The success 
of the act is due to Johnny Ford, who is 
funny in his own Inimitable style, Billy 
Smith plays the piano well bnt wears too 
much of a bored-at-the-audlence expression 
to be popular with the crowd. 

Franklyn Wallace 4 Co. — a male quar- 
tette — sing with a lack of color. Their 
selections are, on the whole, poorly chosen. 
The act lacks "pep." 

Singers Midgets — billed ss twenty-five, 
although only fifteen could be counted — 
closed the show and scored the biggest kind 
of a hit They do a little of everything— 
from ukeleies to elephants and from 
"flirt" songs to acrobatics. Here and 
there the act needs speeding op. The girl 
on the horse, for instance, holds the stage 
too long and does too little, while the first 
singing duet with a doable quartette 
chorus dragged. Particularly worthy of 
praise was the elephant trainer and the 
little hula dancer. On the whole, the 
midgets look too serious. They should re- 
member that occasional smiles do much to 
brighten an act 



APPEAL IN RIVERSIDE CASE 
Warns Plains, Dec 27. — A. Pan! 
Keith, the Keith and Proctor Amusement 
Co., and the other defendants is the in- 
junction salt brought by the Hammersteln 
Amusement Co. to prevent the opening of 
the Riverside Theatre, have filed notice of 
appeal to the Appellate Division of the Su- 
preme Court. Simultaneously Justice 
Arthur S. Tompkins filed his formal order 
granting the injunction, providing the 
Hammersteln corporation flies a $10,000 
Indemnity bond. 



GORMAN GIRLS IN NEW ACT 

The three' Gorman girls, of the Five 
Musical Gormans, are to appear in a new 
act at the termination of the quintette's 
present bookings. 



CELEBRATE 2BTH ANNIVERSARY 

Lawrence and Harrington celebrated the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of their wedding 
Dec. 20 at their home in Long Island City. 



BOOKING AGENT DEAD 

John H. Alpnente, n booking agent, died 
in Peterson, N. J., the Saturday before 
Xmas. He was a member of the booking 
firm of Gottschalk and Alpuente. 



POL1 BOOKS CONUN TRIO 
The' Conlin Park Trio will start over 
thn Poll Circuit after completing their en- 
gagement on Proctor time. 



NEW ACTS FOR PANTAGES 

Joe Michaels has secured extended book- 
ings for Herbert and Dennis and Tabor 
and Green on the Pantages circuit 



1$ 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 




HOOPER AND MARBURY 
Theatre — Royal. 
Style — Dancing. 
Tim* — Ten minute*. 
Setting— Special. 

Hooper and Marbury — boy and girl — 
do some very neat dancing interspersed 
with book. A special brilliant red ploah 
drop sets their act off to good advantage, 
giving it a tone of refinement. 

Their dancing is rather original, par- 
ticularly" a Tommy Atkins dance closing 
the act. Their singing is ordinary bat 
what it lacks is covered by the neat danc- 
ing accompanying it. 

Particular mention should be made of 
the dashing costnmes worn by the girl 
— stylish and full of color. 

The act is rather abort, and another 
dance conld be added to advantage. At 
the Royal, this tarn was given the open- 
ing spot bnt was accorded a fair band 
despite appearing in number one. 



THE FOUR CHICKS 

Theatre-^/e/f erion. 

Style— Singing and dancing. 

Tims— Twelve minute*. 

Setting— .Home scenery set in one. 

The Four Chicks are four girls of the 
"pony" size. They do an act consist- 
ing of songs and dances and do it in 
such clever style that they score well. 
They are pleasing singers and graceful 
dancers. One of the girls possesses a 
contralto voice of excellent quality and 
knows how to use it to good effect. If 
cultivated further and rightly handled 
it will be the means of advancement. 



JOE FANTON A CO. 

Theatre — Colonial. 
Setting— Garden icenc. 
Time — Nine minutet. 
Style — Tropeze. 

"The Garden of Surprises" is a new 
style of trapeze acts, showing feats of 
strength that Joe Fanton and Company 
introduced at the Colonial last week. 

For an act of its kind it lacks nothing 
in the way of novelty, and as the name 
implies, offers one surprise after an- 
other. 

The comedy is also well handled by 
all three men. 

Fanton himself does a good share of 
the work, and with the assistance of his 
two partners executes many feats that 
have heretofore been unknown to vaude- 
ville. 

The act opened intermission and the 
spot just suited it 



CAREW AND BURNS 

Theatre — Proctor'* Fifty-eighth. 

Style — Jfon and girl. 

Time — Foiirteen minutes. 

Setting; — Special. 

The drop represents a hospital office. 
The doctor at his desk exchanges witti- 
cisms with a nurse, who is as willing as 
ahe is incapable. The dialogue is, for 
the most part, fairly fanny. He invites 
her to the Physicians* Ball. She accepts 
and retina to dress. 

Ae house drop then falls and the rest 
of the act is done in one. 



NEW ACTS— Continued 



FAY TEMPLETON 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Song* and piano. 
Setting — Full stage. 
Time — Fifteen minutet. 

While this splendid artist of bygone 
days has still a great following, it is 
rather a pity that she should risk their 
great admiration by appearing before 
them in such a crude offering as she 
showed at the Palace. 

In her first number she denied the 
statement that song makes the singer 
and said the singer makes the song, 
using as an illustration, "Sally in Our 
Alley" and gave an impression of Lillian 
Russell singing, "Come Down My Eve- 
ning Star." A song about Mary Rowe 
coming to the city and making a for- 
tune was neither new nor pretty. 

Then the orchestra played "So Long 
Mary" and everyone sat up and took 
notice. Rut Miss Tern pic ton, too fat to 
do the old business, waddled about and 
bored the patient audience that mildly 
applauded. While Jimmy Clark played 
a selection on the piano and tried to pull 
the act up. Miss Templeton blackened 
up. 

She came on again later as an old 
"Ma mm y," with a basket of clothes and 
told how she bad just been fired by her 
Missus. With some good comedy ma- 
terial she might have made good with 
this number, but what she did, which 
was not much, was sadly lacking in 
humor. Holding a couple of large 
bouquets that came over the footlights, 
she received a round of applause when 
she stepped out of her character for a 
few seconds and said, "Here would be 
a good place to spring that old success of 
mine, 'Rosy, Ton Are My Posy.'" She 
didn't sing it, however, and the audience 
was grateful. 

If Miss Templeton were in need finan- 
cially it would be another story. But 
she has made much money and much 
success and ifs not fair to ask a present- 
day audience for both their money and 
sympathy _^____ 

THE UNEEDA GIRLS 

Theatre — City. 

Style — Musical comedy tabloid. 

Time — Sixteen minutet. 

Setting — Special scene . representing a 
grocery store. 

"The TJneeda Girls" is no better and 
no worse than the average musical tab- 
loid, although it shows novelty in the 
way some of the score of "U Trovatore" 
is introduced. 

Seven girls and two men are in the 
cast, and after the usual opening with 
chorus and a number by the prima 
donna the piece works up to the novel 
introduction of certain of the musical 
numbers of the above-named opera. 
These numbers are made to fit new 
lyrics, which are all of a burlesque 
order, and aa the one woman and two 
men principals have good singing voices 
the numbers are rendered to good effect. 
The chorus work was good. 



HENRY E. DIXEY 

Theatre — Poface. 
Style — Entertainer. 
Setting — In one. 
Time — Fifteen minutet. 

Henry Dixey stepped on the stage as 
sprightly and dashing as in the days 
of Adonis. . 

As a matter of fact, be had new ma- 
terial for his Mono-drama- Vaudo-log-ue, 
but it would have made very little dif- 
ference if he had not, for, with his man- 
ners, style and diction, he could make 
yon laugh at the oldest yarns or cry 
at the silliest melodramatic bit he chose 
to present. 

In blank verse he tells you that man- 
agers these days are looking for "types" 
for their plays — a poor compliment to 
the actor, since with powder and paint 
he can create any type. He deplored 
an inactive life and sights the awful 
monotony of being a ticket chopper in 
the Subway. As further illustration, be 
spoke of the monotonous marching of the 
soldier and recited Kipling's 
Roots, boots, boots, boots. 
Moving up and down again." 

For an encore, be mumbled an awk- 
ward speech — then said he hated speeches 
— that they were as interesting to the 
public in general as babies' first words, 
and about as intelligible. 

In' parting, he hoped everybody was 
happy, and said if they were not, it was 
their own fault. In simple phraseology 
— by giving happiness to others "we be- 
come better than oar day and equal to 
the peaks of our desire." he said. 



CAMILLE PERSONI & CO. 

Theatre — Bou levari. 

Style — Japanese. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

The name of this musical sketch is 
"Butterfly Love." 

It deals with a moving picture actress 
— "made up" as a fetching Geisha girl — 
and a cameraman, both stranded in 
Japan. A lieutenant of an American 
man-o'-war has been flirting with the 
actress, believing her to be a real 
product of Nippon. 

She conspires with the cameraman 
to take a moving picture of the lieuten- 
ant making love to her; and by thN- 
scheme the conspirators hope to extract 
enough blackmail money to return home. 
All seems to go well until the girl 
suddenly loses heart and reveals her real 
identity to the lieutenant who, of conrse, 
immediately falls in love with her. 

Several interspersed musical numbers 
are rendered pleasingly by Miss Personi 
and her lieutenant-lover. 



WHITNEY GRANTED PERMIT 

Toronto, Ont, Dec. 28. — B. C. Whit- 
ney, owner of the Klaw 4 Erlanger fran- 
chise for Toronto, has been granted a 
special permit for the construction of the 
entrance and lobby to the new Princess 
Theatre here, to cost $40,000. . . 



LOLA WILSON 

Theatre — Audubon. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Thirteen minute*. 

Setting — One, House. 

Lola Wilson sings a number of original 
songs in a rather original way. She 
makes a good impression upon her en- 
trance and does not belie it during her 
act Her voice is sweet and musical. 
If she would only pay a little more at- 
tention to her articulation, there would 
be nothing whatever to criticise. 

Her costumes are very striking and 
her changes are made in surprisingly 
quick time. 

For one of her numbers — an aero- 
plane song — she uses a full stage and is 
discovered seated in a miniature brown 
aeroplane in a dashing brown costums 
of an afiatrix. This was the feature of 
her act 

Lola Wilson will score a hit on any 
bill. 



KENNY AND WALSH 

Theatre — Grand. Brooklyn. 
Style — Singing and dancing. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

This is an act above the average as 
both members of the act have excellent 
voices and know how to use them. They 
offer four numbers all going over big. 

Their dancing is graceful and they do 
just about enough in this line. 

It's a good act for number two spot on 
the big time, but will hardly do for a 
position requiring top notch quality on 
the big route. 



COLEMAN GOETZ 

Theatre — WiUon Avenue, Chicago. 

Style — Straight singing. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

Coleman Goetz, "America's youngest 
song writer," has framed a neat little 
singing act that could find a comfortable 
spot on any bill. 

Goetz has an astonishing comprehen- 
sion of singing requirements, which 
makes him equally at home singing a 
ballad, a comic song or a rag, all of 
which he uses, and most of which he 
writes. 

At the piano he has Leon Flatow, who 
collaborated with him in many songs, 
and his playing has the precise quality 
necessary to make Goetz's work appre- 
ciated. Goetz has interpolated just 
enough gags to hold interest The act 
is one that will probably keep going in- 
definitely. 



CHARGE FOR CENSORED PAPER? 
Toronto, Ont., Dec 30. — Toronto 
theatre managers have received an intima- 
tion from the city that a charge of five 
cents per sheet will be made in future for 
censoring an poster paper by police offi- 
cials. The fee for the examination of a 24- 
sheet under the proposed regulation, will 
be $1.20, or practically equal to the cost 
of the poster. Local theatre and moving 
picture men are preparing to oppose the 
measure. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



WOODRUFF LEFT 93,500 ESTATE 

An application filed last week in the 
Surrogate's Court by the brother of the 
late Henry Wyckoff Woodruff, actor, re- 
veals the fact that the deceased left but 
$3,500 worth of property in this State. 



MORRIS LEAVES "CHEATERS" CO. 

William Morris has retired from the east 
of "Cheating Cheaters" at the Eltinge 
Theatre, and has been succeeded by Martin 
Alsop. 



ASSOCIATION INSURES PATRONS 

Lynchburg, Va., Dec. 30. — The Ameri- 
can Playgoers Protective Association, with 
headquarters in Blnefield, W. Va., is mak- 
ing a bid for insurance business in a field 
as yet unexplored. It inspects theatres and 
if found to be in safe condition will issue 
an accident policy which covers each pa- 
tron against accidental loss of life, limb 
or sight, through accidental means. 



A. S. FREEMAN DIRECTS SHOW 

Decatub, 111., Dec. 28.— Allerton S. 
Freeman, an old-time musical comedy fa- 
vorite, has been engaged to direct the an- 
imal musical show of the Knights of Co- 
lumbus. This will be the fourth show 
which Mr. Freeman has directed for the 
K. of C.'s. 



CHRISTY ILL IN BOSTON 

Hamilton Christy, who went to Boston 
recently to play the leading role in "Peg o' 
My Heart," is now ill with appendicitis 
and an operation probably will h&va to be 
performed. 



TREE AT ACTORS' HOME 

The Theatre Assembly journeyed to the 
Actors' Fund Home on Staten Island, 
Christmas, and held a celebration for the 
guests of the home. A tree was in evidence 
and each of the guests received a present. 



VINALS WITH "HANS AND FRITZ" 

Edgar and Dell Vinal opened up with 
Gus Hill's new "Hans and Fritz" Co., De- 
cember 18. The company will play four 
weeks before going on the International 
Circuit. D. E. Vinal was formerly musical 
director with Max Speigal's attractions. 



YVONNE GARRICK IN COMEDY 

Yvonne Garrick was given a hearty wel- 
come on her return to the Theatre Frnn- 
cais company in the comedy "PatacLon" 
Christmas night at the Garrick Theatre. 



JUDGMENT AGAINST KRAUSE 

Judgment has been obtained through 
attorneys Ader and Ader against Lee 
(King) Krause, vaudeville booking agent, 
in favor of the C. A. Taylor Trunk Works, 
for $99. 



MOVIE PRICES TO BE RAISED 

San Fbancisco, Dec. 30. — It is rum- 
ored that moving picture magnates are con- 
templating a rise in movie prices here. 



JAMES ROME ASKS DIVORCE 

James E. Rome, of Sam Sidman's Show, 
has filed a bill for divorce. 



PRODUCING COMPANY FORMED 

Lea Henick, Ezra Eddy and Joseph 
Noel have joined forces and formed the 
Plymouth Producing Co. The organiza- 
tion will shortly produce several dramatic 
plays. 



COURT FAVORS REARDON 

Halifax, N. B„ Dee. 28. — The case of 
Frank Reardon against J. M. Franklyn to 
determine the ownership of 20 per cent, 
of the shares of the Strand Theatre Co., 
of this city, has been decided in favor of 
Mr. Reardon. Mr. Franklyn win continue 
to manage the Strand and becomes man- 
ager of the Opera House, St. John, on Feb- 
ruary 1. 



ONE-ACT PLAYS FOR BROOKLYN 

January 18 the Art Drama Players will 
begin a series of performances in Brooklyn 
under the auspices of the Bayridge Com- 
munity Center. The first performance will 
consist of the following one-act plays : 
"Charming Leander," by Theodore de Ban- 
ville ; "the Far-Away Princess," by Herman 
Suderman ; "Recollections." by Malcolm 
Morley aud "The Finger of God," by Perci- 
val Wilde. 



OLD TIME MANAGER DEAD 

Louis Kiermaier, who was assistant 
manager for Charles Andrews, the actor, 
:it the time of the Brooklyn Theatre fire, 
and escaped with other stage folk, died 
recently at his home in Brooklyn. 



SHERMAN DONATES RATS HOME 

At Sherman Lake, New York, will be 
erected a home for White Rats and mem- 
bers of the A. A. A. Dan Sherman has 
donated the plot at Davenport Centre and 
will furnish the timber and stone for the 
building. 



SARA TRUAX ADDRESSES LEAGUE 

San Francisco, Dee. 28. — Sara Truax 
recently addressed the San Francisco 
branch of the Drama League of America 
at the Palace Hotel concert hall. 



APPOINTS OPERA CO. RECEIVER 

Supreme Court Justice Greenbaum has 
appointed Edward Ash temporary receiver 
of the assets and effects of the Werba-Lu- 
escher Opera Co. in connection with the 
suit brought by David Bispham, who re- 
ceived a judgment against the opera com- 
pany for $576 on May 11, 1915, for moneys 
advanced. 



FLORENCE GARLAND REJOINS CAST 

Florence Garland has rejoined Cbas. W. 
Benner'g "Peck's Bad Boy" Company. 
This is her fourth season with Mr. Ben- 
ner. December 10 she received many beau- 
tiful presents from members of the com- 
pany, it being her nineteenth birthday. 



EDWARD LYNCH IN MANCHESTER 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 29. — Edward 
D. Lynch and his wife, known professional- 
ly as Grace Belle Dale, are appearing at 
the Palace Theatre, this week, in a one- 
act playlet touching on the Mexican situa- 
tion. Manager O'Neill secured Mr. Lynch 
and his company through his connection 
with the King-Lynch Players, who played 
a -very successful season of stock at the 
Park Theatre some years ago. 



WALLACES ACQUIRE U. T. C. CO. 

The "Uncle Tom's Cabin" company, 
which opened the current season some ten 
weeks ago as Miller Brothers', under the 
management of George M. Miller, has 
been re-named Wallace Brothers' "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin" Company, and W. J. Dunn 
replaces Mr. Miller as manager. 



FIGHTS WILL OF STRAKOSCH 
Winsted, Conn., Dec. 29. — Alleging un- 
due influence, Julia Claire Harris Stra- 
kosch of New York, adopted daughter of 
Carl Strakosch, who survived his wife. 
Clare Louise Kellog Strakosch, the singer, 
but a few months, hag appealed from the 
probating of her father's will. The estate 
is valued at $100,000, of which the 
daughter, under the will, received $20,000. 



HALIFAX THEATRE OPENS 

Halifax, N. S., Dec. 28.— Under the dis- 
tinguished patronage of His Honor the 
T.ieut.-Govemor, Major General Benson, 
CapL Martin, R. N., Hon. Premier Mur- 
ray and Mayor Martin, the new Casino 
Theatre on Gottingen Street opened its 
doors to the public 



THEATRICAL CHAPLAIN NAMED 

Toronto, Ont., Dec. 28. — The Bishop of 
the Toronto Diocese has informed The 
New York Clipper representative that 
Rev. T. A. Sherman of St. John, N. B., 
will be the clergyman to succeed the late 
Rev. Canon Powell as Theatrical Chaplain 
of Toronto. 



SHUBERTS GET MONTREAL HOUSE 

Montreal, Can., Dec. 29.— The Can- 
adian United Co. has purchased the lease of 
riie Princess Theatre, now the home of 
the Shnbert attractions, from the Messrs. 
Shubert, and the Sbuberts have taken over 
the Orpbeum, located opposite the Princess 
Theatre. This will be known as the Shu- 
bert Theatre, commencing next season, and 
nil Shubert attractions will be shown there. 



TICKET SELLER UNDER ARREST 

Monroe, La., Dec. 28. — Deputy Sheriff 
Curtis went over to Shreveport last week, 
where Richard Burns, ticket seller for the 
Crawford Comedians, wanted here on an 
embezzlement charge, is under arrest. It 
is alleged he left after the performance 
here with $15 of the show's money. 



TO HANDLE BRADY FILM 
Toronto. Ont., Dec. 28. — Regal Films, 
Ltd., has been organized with headquarters 
in Toronto to handle the distribution of 
World-Brady made pictures throughout 
Canada. The president of the new com- 
pany is E. L. Ruddy, head of the bill- 
posting company of Canada and owner of 
the Regent Theatre. 



IRENE CASTLE SUES BAILEY 
Oliver D. Bailey is named as the de- 
fendant in a suit brought by Irene Castle 
to recover $3,200, the amount due her, 
she alleges, on two promissory notes. One 
of the notes, for $2,200, was drawn in her 
favor, she says, and the other, according 
to the complaint, was drawn to her hus- 
band's favor. 



SIPE WANTS TO BUY THEATRE 
Patebbon, N. J., Dec. 30.— Winifred St. 
Claire has made such an unprecedented 
success with her stock company at the 
Empire Theatre here, that Earl Sipe, her 
hnsband and manager, is considering buy- 
ing the house to keep the company here 
permanently. 



QU1NN AND DAVIS JOIN TAB. 
Marietta, O., Dec. 30. — Jack Quinn and 
Etta Davis joined the Colonial Maids Co. 
here this week, Mr. Quinn doing comedy 
and Miss Davis soubrette. 




IF you have a good 
voice, here's a high 
class ballad that you 
can sing in vaudeville 
and "make 'em sit up 
and take notice" — 

Another "JUST A 
UTTLE LOVE, A 
LITTLE KISS," and 
by the same composer. 

LOVE, 
HERE 
IS MY 
HEART 

A Hit in France, Ger- 
many, England and 
now it's a Hit in the 
greatest country on 
earth — America! 



LEOFEIST.IncrTrkElNewYork 

BOSTON CHICAGO 

Id T i nt St, G. O. H. BUff. 

ST. LOUIS PHILADELPHIA 

7th «md CHW St.. Bnarf aa4 Cb 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PubiM Thsstrs Bid*. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 




STARS SIGNED 

BY KAHN FOR 

SUMMER 

STOCK SEASON TO START MAY 14 



An all-star aggregation of sixty princi- 
pals, including comedians, prima donnas, 
soabrettes and character people, has been 
encaged by Ben. F. Kahn for a summer 
stock season to be inaugurated at the 
Union Square and Daly's Theatre begin- 
ning May 14 Each of the performers has 
been engaged for a two weeks' period, play- 
ing one week at each house. This style of 
entertainment will continue until Aug. 18, 
when Kahn will again install his regular 
stock company. 

It is the intention of Kahn to cast the 
comedians, who will pnt on their own feats 
together, in each offering, so that their 
work will blend. In this way he will, dur- 
ing the summer season, practically have a 
majority of the most popular burlesque 
stars appear at his houses. 

The musical numbers are to be staged 
by a musical comedy producer, who, dur- 
ing the season, will offer novelties and en- 
sembles, which, he promises, will be new 
to burlesque. The chorus contingent will 
be enlarged to twenty-four girls and 
twelve chorus men, who are to be per- 
manent members of the company, not in- 
terchanging as wilt the principals. There 
will be from forty-five to fifty people in 
each show, altogether. 

When seen regarding the staging of his 
summer shows, Kahn appeared a bit re- 
luctant to talk relative to the people he 
had engaged. He declared that the 
majority of them were, at present, mem- 
bers of burlesque companies and that their 
positions might be jeopardized if their 
identity was revealed. 

"I have not, as a matter of fact, en- 
gaged all the people I win require," said 
Kahn. "I will need, altogether, about one 
hundred principals to carry out the sched- 
ule that I have arranged. Most of these 
that I have engaged are at present with 
shows playing through the West, having 
played here early in the season. At pres- 
ent I am looking over the various shows 
around this section and within a few weeks 
I will have the full complement of my com- 
liany. 

"In engaging these people for the two 
week periods, I can be assured of offering 
the best of shows, as all of the principals 
will play parts with which they are per- 
fectly familiar and will not be compelled to 
experiment with any new books or the 
portrayal of character types that they are 
unfamiliar with." 



EDMUND HAYES ARRESTED 

Edmund J. Hayes, a member of the bur- 
lesque, "Some Show," was arrested at Hur- 
tig and Seamon's Theatre in West One 
Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street last week 
for non-payment of alimony. Hayes' ar- 
rest was caused by the Illinois Surety Com- 
pany, which was on his bond for $4,000, and 
was made only after legal proceedings in- 
stigated by the wife of the burlesquer. 



SADTLER MANAGING PALACE 

Baltimore, . Md., Jan. 1. — Charles 
(Buck) Sadtler, treasurer of the Palace 
Theatre, this city, has been appointed man- 
ager of that house. The appointment takes 
effect today when be relieves Tom Henry, 
who has been acting manager since the 
death of William Ballauf last month. Saldt- 
ler has been treasurer of the Palace since, 
the opening of the house on Christmas Day, 
five years ago. John Sadowsy, assistant 
treasurer, has been promoted to treasurer 
of the Palace. 



RACING TERMS 
IN FORCE WITH 

"THE PACEMAKERS" 

Just to prove to himself that a show 
devoid of one suggestive look, line or ac- 
tion can go over at the Olympic, Frank 
Damsel pnt on that sort of a product at 
that bouse last week, and had a bouse full 
of appreciative and demonstrative patrons 
at each show. 

The Woman Haters Club rapidly 
formed and dissolved again nearly • as 
quickly. The women's appearance in the 
offiing, was one of the funny bits in the 
first part, entitled "Running to Form," and 
the ladies all live up to that title, principals 
as well as the chorus. 

Dainty France's Farr, plump and pretty, 
was handicapped by a bad cold, as to 
singing and speaking, but it did not inter- 
fere at all with her sprightly manner of 
action and she got all there was out of 
her scenes. 

Lillian Smalley, prima donna, led in the 
singing division and her soprano solos, 
earned repeated encores. She also was 
weU equipped in the way of costumes. 

Nellie Montrose and Ionian Crawford 
are two valuable members in the cast, also 
in their singing and dancing specialty, for 
which they showed several novel suits. 

Frank Damsel appeared thoroughly at 
home in the full dress suit, and lounging 
attire and his familiar "My Dear Brother- 
in-law" rang oat clear in the bracegame 
bit, with Miss Farr as the decoy. 

Manny King as the "Izzy" was there 
with the fun in word and action and got 
as many laughs as any comedian. He has 
many original ways of his own. His 
opposite. Jack (Mickey) McCabe, as the 
little weazened Irisher, worked' up to him 
in good style with happy results. 

Jack Pearl was a funny Dutchman, with 
distinctive make-up and material, and bis 
work with Harold Whalen in a talking 
act went over nicely. He also helped the 
chorus girls number to get many recalls. 
Mr. Whalen is a good dancer and had 
several interludes of footwork with Miss 
Farr. 

"In the Stretch" is the title of the 
burlesque. A sleepwalking scene by Miss 
Smalley, the "must not go to work" weep, 
and Mr. Kings' bit with the fiddle were 
well presented. 

Harry Rose is the manager; Bert Me- 
Kensie, advance; Joe Laudis, musical di- 
rector; Jack Knauff, carpenter; James 
Murphy, electrician ; Otto Hunt, electrician. 



WM.V. JENNINGS 

TO SUCCEED 

LEONI 

OFFERED POSITION BY A ft C. 



William Y. Jennings, weU known for 
many years as manager of the Columbia 
Wheel Attractions, will, in all probability, 
succeed the late Harry Leoni as assistant 
general manager of the American Burlesque 
Circuit. 

Owing to the importance of this position, 
the world of burlesque has shown unusual 
interest in speculating who the new assist- 
ant general manager will be. 

General Manager George Peck of the 
American Burlesque Circuit is very favor- 
ably disposed toward the appointment of 
Jennings to the position, believing him to be 
well qualified to assume the duties of that 
office. 

In the event of Jennings' acceptance, it 
is likely that Dick Rider will be tendered 
rhe position' of manager of "The Sight- 
seers," which Jennings now holds. 

Peck has made Jennings an offer to which 
a favorable reply is expected within the 
next few days. 



"WIDOWS" CELEBRATE 

At Peterson, N. J., Ruth Lockwood, of 
the Sporting Widows, was banqueted on 
Christmas night at the Peterson House, by 
Mrs. Fitzpatrick, the proprietress. Harry 
Cooper and Lillian Moretti and others en- 
tertained. Mrs. Fitzpatrick was presented 
with a handsome dinner set. 

Among those who attended were Leo 
Hayes, Harry Gordon, Annette Moretti, 
Helen Lockwood, Beatrice Gibson, Dorothy 
Dunbar, DoUy Gibson, Grace Keeler, 
Margaret Grieves, Alice Russell, May 
Wood, Elva Carlin, Pauline DeWitt, Hilda 
Arnott, -Alice McCann, Frances Russell, 
Gertrude Baker, BiUie Han-en, Catherine 
Doyle, Mabel Caron, Fritzie DeRoss, Iola 
Hixon, Maud Russell, Ruth Maltess, Helen 
Miller, Mary Noonan, Dixie Hatfield, 
Dorothy Smith, Irvin Brown, George New- 
man, Frank Jones, Wallace Hale, Harry 
Curtfes, Harry Roman, Arthur Litchner, 
Albert Nelson, Jack Miller, George Caron, 
Edward Dunbar, J. W. Sawyer, Eddie Jer- 
mon and Archie McCann. 



HARRY LEONI BURIED 

Masonic services were read over the re- 
mains of Harry Leoni at Holly rood 
Church, New York, last Wednesday after- 
noon and the body was interred at - Mt 
Hope Cemetery the same day. Charles E. 
Barton, Phil Sheridan, Ed Reder, George 
Peck and Harry Strouse were the pall- 
bearers. J. Herbert Mack, Sam Scribner, 
Harry C. Bryant, Fred Irwin, Charles 
Franklyn, Gas Hill and W. H. Lindsey 
were among those who attended the serv- 
ices. 



DIXON GIVES DINNER 
Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 1. — To show his 
appreciation to his "Big Review" company, 
Henry P. Dixon tendered its members a 
New Year's dinner last night at the Hotel 
Vendig. A number of invited guests also 
attended. 



ROSE ADDS TO COMPANY 

New Orleans, La., Dec SO. — Manager 
Lew Rose of the Lyric burlesquere has ad- 
ded Al Warren and Edith Graham to his 
company. 



XMAS DINNER FOR "BABIES" 
A Christmas dinner was tendered to the 
"Grown Up Babies" by Billy Bail and Em- 
ory Titman at St. Louis, Mo. Harry 
Koler, Jack Strauss, Emil Casper, Billy 
Armstrong, Gertrude Lynch, Madlyn 
Worth, George Mack, Walter Balk, Anna 
Mack, Fred Strauss, Paul Riley and Frank 
Farber were among those who partook. 



HENRIETTA PELZ WINS RING 

Henrietta Pelz was the lucky holder of 
the winning ticket in the contest for the 
diamond ring offered by the Burlesque 

Club. 



FLORIDA PUBLISHING PAPER 

Geo. Alabama Florida, in advance of 
"The Spiegel Revue," for Max Spiegel, pub- 
lishes a four-page, seven-column newspaper 
at every stand played. 



AMATEURS IN VAUDEVILLE 
Hamilton, Can., Dee. 23. — A novelty in 
vaudeville was offered this week aa a head- 
liner at the Temple, in the musical and 
dancing sketch, The Fifteen Tea Room 
Girls, written, arranged and rehearsed by 
the Temple's manager, James Wall, and 
produced by local talent, under the 
auspices of Paardebury Chapter, Daughters 
of the Empire. The act was paid a liberal 
salary, and the proceeds went to the 
Chapter's Soldiers' Comfort Fund. 



NEW FILM HOUSE FOR NEW YORK 

Messrs. Steiner, Wesiner and Schwartz 
have leased for a term of forty-two years 
the property at 139 to 143 Houston Street, 
where they will erect a theatre. The house 
win seat 1,600 and will be devoted to mo- 
tion pictures. The cost will be approx- 
imately $225,000. 



THOMAS SNYDER MARRIED 

Thomas Snyder, known as "Bozo," with 
Edmund Hayes in Barney Gerard's "Some 
Show" company, was married in Philadel- 
phia, December 19 to Fannie Palmer, a 
chorus girl with the same show. Miss 
Palmer was a member of the "Maids of 
America" company last season. 



RENAVENT IS RECOVERING 

George Renavent of the French Theatre 
is recovering from an operation for appen- 
dicitis. 



JESSONS JOIN NEW SHOW 

Jesson and Jesson joined, the Mischief 
Makers, January 1. 



FOLLIES AT TRENTON A WEEK 

Rube Bernstein's Follies of Pleasure, are 
putting in a full week at the Grand, Tren- 
ton, this week. 



HELEN BECK ENTERTAINS ; 

Helen Beck, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin Beck, gave a dance last Wednesday 
evening to friends at the home of- her 
parents, 135 Central Park West. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



BILLPOSTERS HAVE MEETING 
Baltimobe, Dee. 24. — The annual meet- 
ing -at Local No. 36 of the International 
Alliance of Billposters and Billera was held 
Sunday, December 17. The meeting was 
followed by a smoker. The following offi- 
cers were elected: Wm. E. Myers, presi- 
dent; William Fnrman, vice-president; 
Thomas Colburn, business agent; Dan 
Marks, treasurer; Charles Clark, financial 
secretary; Edward Raysinger, recording 
secretary, and Walter Redgrave, sergeant- 
at-arms. Mr. Raysinger was elected a 
delegate to the National Convention of Bill- 
posters and Billers in Boston, December, 
1817. 



ANITA STEWART AT Ri ALTO 
Anita Stewart will be seen at The Rialto 
this week in "The Girl Philippa," a Vita- 
graph Bine Ribbon feature taken from the 
novel by Robert W. Chambers. The the- 
atre will open its doors at 10 o'clock each 
morning. 



NEW THEATRE FOR DAYTON 

Dayton, O., Dec 30.— A new theatre la 
to be erected here by theatrical men of In- 
dianapolis. Mark Gates, who was instru- 
mental in the promotion and erection of 
the Circle Theatre, Indianapolis, is the 
leading figure in the promotion of the new 
house. 



TAYLOR SERIOUSLY INJURED 

Detroit, Mich., Dec 28. — Specks Taylor, 
former electrician of the Zeldman & Pollie 
Shows, was seriously injured while at work 
for a light company. Mr. Taylor is in a 
hospital here, and it is feared he may not 
recover. 



"LIBERTINE" APPEAL DISMISSED 

Philadelphia, Dec 30. — Judges Patter- 
son and Shoemaker of the Common Pleas, 
Courts, dismissed last week the appeal 
taken by the producers of the film entitled 
"Libertine," from the decision of the State 
Board of Censors. After viewing the film 
the court decided that it was offensive to 
public morals. 



GIFT FOR PORTLAND MANAGER 

Portland, Me., Dec 24. — Clifford S. 
Hamilton, manager of the B. F. Keith 
Theatre, was presented with a parlor drop 
lamp for Christmas in behalf of tbe em- 
ployees. He was called to the rear of the 
theatre and saw visions of a strike until 
Stage Manager Harry Hupper made tbe 
presentation. 



ANNA HELD SUED FOR Si, 500 

Anna Held appeared in tbe Supreme 
Court last week for examination before 
trial by Attorney Max Monfried, whose 
client, Eugene II. Kauimann, recently be- 
gan an action against Miss Held for $1,- 
528.14. The plaintiff claims be performed 
services in connection with the formation 
of the Anna Held, Inc. Tbe defendant 
stated she thought Kaufman was acting u» 
a friend. 



AMELIA SUMMERVILLE QUITS 

Amelia Summerville has withdrawn 
from Fritzi Scheffs Company and will re- 
sume her interrupted vaudeville tour. 



CABINET SET FOR MANAGER 

Portland, Me., Dec. 27.— Charles W. 
MacKinnon, manager of Greeley's Theatre, 
was given a mahogany cabinet and smok- 
ing set by the employees of the theatre 
Christmas. 



LEASES NEW THEATRE SITE 

The new 1620 Broadway Corporation 
has leased from the Barney Estate Co. the 
plot of 100x148, Nos. 1614-1620 Broadway, 
for tbe site of a new moving picture the- 
atre to be built by them, as stated ex- 
clusively recently in The Clipper. Work 
on it will be started about April 1. 



WHITNEY TO PRODUCE AGAIN 

Fred C. Whitney is to produce "Boys 
Will Be Boys," Oscar Strauss's latest 
operetta. The original book was by 
Ferdinand Stallberg and has been adapted 
for the American stage by Edward Paulton. 



SAVOY, FALL RIVER, REOPENS 

Fall River, Mass., Dec 30. — The Sa- 
voy Theatre opened on Christmas Day, un- 
der .new. management, after being closed 
more than a month. The policy of the house 
will be tbe same as before, showing Keith's 
vaudeville and feature films. Walter Bige- 
low is the manager and Jobn Canole tbe 
treasurer. 



EARL METCALFE MARRIED 

Earl Metcalfe, moving picture director, 
was married December 23, to Ethel Tully, 
of Flatbush. She has been appearing in 
Vitagraph pictures and recently has been 
acting with Metcalfe for a new picture. 
Metcalfe is a member of the Lambs Club, 
Screen Club and several other theatrical 
organizations. 



KLAW AND ERLANGER GENEROUS 

A full week's salary was given by Klaw 
and Erlanger to their performers at the 
Manhattan Opera House, where "Ben 
Hur" is playing, and at the New Amster- 
dam, the home of "Miss Springtime," as a 
Christmas present. 



EDESON TO WRITE PLAYS 

Hereafter Robert Edeson is to devote 
himself to writing plays. It is now stated 
that he is the author of "His Brother's 
Keeper,", which will begin a tour in the 
South, Jan. 15, in which Mr. Edeson had 
the principal role. At first the authorship 
of this play was credited to Robert Porter. 



BOB DALE GIVES PARTY 

A Christmas party was held at the borne 
of Bob Dale and Libby Dupree in Brook- 
lyn, Sunday afternoon and evening, De- 
cember 24. After the festivities a vaude- 
ville program was given, those who enter- 
tained being Tom Devene, Minnie Shurtz, 
Geo. W. Reynolds, Lon Teller and Libby 
Dupree. 

Fluhrer&Fluhrer 

-Alnjt werkte* duo* jmtr 



STARS OF THE BURLESQUE WORLD 



MURRY LEONARD 

Making Comical from Hebrew People 
WITH 

Blutch Cooper's Roseland Girl* 



LYNNE CANTER 

PRIMA DONNA LEADS 
ROSELAND GIRLS 

ZND SEASON UNDER MANAGEMENT 
BLUTCH COOPER 



JIM McCABE 

Doing Comedy 

With STONE & PILLARD in 

Ragdoll in Ragland Co. 



GRACE LEWIS 

Personality Prima Donna 

With BEN KAHN'S 

UNION SQUARE STOCK 



ALICE LAZAR 

Management 

JACOBS AND JERMON 



JEAN LEONARD 

FEATURED 

W.th FRED IRWIN'S BIG SHOW 

Sonbretto different from the others 
Re engegeil with New Show. 



FEATURED 
With Charming Widows 



Bigger and Better Than Ever 

JIM BARTON 

STAR 
20TH CENTURY MAIDS 



DOC DELL 

Eccentric But Different 

Signed for 2 More Years with 

Fred Irwin's Majesties 



BOB 



TONY 



ED. 



Calvert, Shane and Bisland 

Mirth, Melody, Dance, 

with the 

MAIDS OF AMERICA CO. 



HARRY 



PATRICIA 



MANDEL and BAKER 

Straight Prima, Donna 

Million Dollar Dolls 



Direction AL SINGER 



FAY 



Alvarez and Martell 

SCORING WITH 

HARRY HASTINGS BIG SHOW 



JACK DUFFY 

"Alias" King Versatile 

with 

Molly Williams' Own Show. 



BILLY CARLTON 



German Comedian 

HELLO GIRLS 



TEDDY DUPONT 

Ingenue 

With STONE St PILLARD in 

Ragdoll in Ragland Co. 



BOBBY BARRY 

with 

MAIDS OF AMERICA CO. 



MAY McCORMACK 

With 
BROADWAY BELLES CO. 



CORTELLI 

Playing Characters 

WTTH 

SAM HOWE'S BIG SHOW 



GEO. P. MURPHY 

With BARNEY GERARD'S 

FOLLIES OF THE DAY 



GEO. LEON 

WITH 

MONTE CARLO GIRLS 
DOING DUTCH AND MAK- 
ING GOOD 



GRACE L ANDERSON 

PRIMA DONNA 
BOWERY BURLESQUERS 

MANAGEMENT HURTIQ A SEAMON 
UIS-17-U-U-a 



BEN BARD 

Straight 

With STONE at PILLARD in 

Ragdoll in Ragland Co. 



NORMA BELL 

Winning Success 

with 
MAIDS OF AMERICA CO. 



CLIPPER 

Representatives 

Wanted Everywhere 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



Ivaudeville stars! I VAUDEVILLE FEATURE ACTS I 



EDWIN ARDEN 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



KATHARINE DANA'S 



UNITED TIME 



FISHER FOLKS" 



MARIE STODDARD 



Direction 



The "Bud Fisher" of Song 



Max Hayes 



TRULY 



MARTA 



SHATTUCK & GOLDEN 



Direction ARTHUR KLEIN 



BIG TIIVI 

REPRESENTATIVES 




PAUL DURAND 

MGR. & PRODUCER 1005 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



1VIAX HART 

Room 902 Palace Theatre Bldg. 



gene HUGHES "itS SMITH jo-paige 



VAUDEVILLE MGRS. 



1004 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



MAX HAYES 

VAUDEVILLE BROKER 1001-1002 Pikct Theatre Bid,. 



XE MACK 

Palace Theatre Bid*. 



JOHN C. PEEBLES h^ cu« c vJdJ!?ai r . 

JOHN L. GORMAN, ASSOCIATE 



Act, 

PaUe. It— tre Bid,. 



VAUDEVILLE REPT. 



804 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



MAURICE H. ROSE and CURTIS JACK 

1102 Palace Theatre Bid,. 



STOKER •»« BIERBAUER 

Palace Theatre Bid,. 



HARRY FITZGERALD 

Room 902 Palace Theatre Buildtnj 



LEWIS & GORDON PRODUCING CO., Inc. 

Al_ LEWIS, General Manager Tim*. 

MAX GORDON, Boatta*- Manager Palace Theatre 



JAS. 



GRACE AND EDD IE 



CONLIN — PARKS 



"Three Utile Pals" 

Direction THOS. FTTZPATRICK 



KELLER 



ANNA 



MACK & EARL 



Direction 
MAX HART 



VODEVILLING 



Private Sec 
NORMAN MANWAJUNO 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 

AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 

U. a O— BIG TIME 



VICTOR 



ADELE 



FOSTER & FERGUSON 

BEAU BRUMMEL and the DEBUTANTE 

Direction G. F. BRO WN-WM. HENNESSEY 



JACK 



HAZEL 



U. B. O. Ta 



DALY & BE R LEW 

Whizzing Whirlwind Wizards 

aa Direction, WENONAH M. TENNEY 



EDDIE 



ROSA 



DE NOYER & DANIE 

le Their Lat»« CC /-* t> J3 /"k C f "T f ^"» T\J »» Wrfflen b, 

Laocb Provoker KJ IT XT \_701 1 IVJIN John P. Mtdbury 

A ComHaation of del Comedy and Lfltinj Tunes by Eddie De Noyer 

SPECIAL SCENERY Direetiaa CENE HUGHES and JO PAIGE SMITH 



FRED 

ANDREWS 

NEW NOVELTY Direction JO PAIGE SMITH 



THE WONDER ACT 



(Greetings) 



SHERLOCK SISTERS 

DIRECTION OF GEO. CHOOSE— UNITED TIME. 



HUSH! BIT OF SCANDAL 

™»FOLEY-LETURE>« 



WITH 14 PEOPLE 



ALWAYS A HEADUNER 



KLEIN BROS. 

THE 

"NOOTRAL ADMIRALS" 

r. S.-W. Dea't Step Steve. We Kan* Them Cola*. 



JOHN C PEEBLES PRESENTS 

WILLIAM SISTO 

AJLHAMBRA, NEW YORK CITY 






maurice BRIERRE » nd KING GRACE 

Direction ARTHUR KLEIN 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 




la ardrr to avoid m La tales ud to bum-* th. faapl iJIsMj of tha letters aatvareJaad 


l_ tile •!»». ■ PiVlTAI. CARD ***»♦ h* *««* r*H»(M>f •»• ««» sWareorel yeaas- letter. It mult 


ba ilraed with your full un sad the addraao to which to* letter to to ha mt. ud tha 


Its* ef hoafaiaw followed by tha leader sbsuM be mentioned. 


riMH mention tha data (or number) af tha CUPPER in which tha let tar* aaat far 


wara aaVarttoed. 



GENTLEMEN 



Anderson, F. 
Adanla. Mr. * 

fit 

AiUarton. E. 
Brian, Tom B. 
Bertelaa, A 
Billing,, J. J. 
Brooks, Geo. V. 
BUlillf. h. a 
(Pit. IZe) 
Boeers. 0. Mitt. 
Berry. C. 0. 
grace. Albert 

Brower, Tom I. 

Bran. Walter 
Brill. Ned 
Biarr, Geo. V. 
Blaljine. Harry 
Corwtu. Tony 
Crawford. Barton 
Cox. Prink 
Cohan, Q. M. 

CoolOO, W. 



enflt. Marfan 
Abbott. Edith 
Austin. Adelaide 

Blaoey. Jic 

Beroia. Btbe 
Bennett, Victoria 
Bvrd, Adelaide 
Blitz. Louisa 
Belaod. Millie 
Barbour, Ada L. 
Bimer, Violet 
Barry, Florence 
Braine. Heleoe 
Carriele, Miss 
Connell. Mr. a 

Mn. 0. 
Clausen Sirters 
Costello. Marxaret 



Castle. Harry B. 
CaralK. P. a 
Cocaiy. Jack 
Conrad. Arco 
Carroll. Seattle 
Canrteld. Wat. F. 
Ctmnlasnun, 

Billy 
Dolsn 1 Dolm 
Be Lord, Arthur 
Dwley. Mr. A 

MR. F. J. 
flenrer, Murray 

De Bue, Billy 

Eliyn. Lame 
Eeonomon. Therm 
Ernest. Ted 
Pranlmore. Jas. 
Francis. C 
Famnjn. Nat 
Florer. Geo. A. 
Francis. Jas. 
Frlcdell. Sroltle 



Carman. F rankle 
County, Gertrude 
Clay. Bessie 
cl]i>, Ota 
Clarke. Dolly 
Chanard, Teresa 
Cllrton. Mrs. J. 

D. 
Courtney. GeonrJe 
Chase. Dorothy 
Du Barry, Estelle 
Draper, Vema 
Elstnx. NeU 
Baric, Julia 
Florence, Naomi 
Forrest, Dorothy 
Franks. Myrtle 
Gay. Harriett A. 



Fields. Nathan 
Gero. Larry 
Gregory, Mr. k 

tin. John J. 
Georre. Bex 
Golaeobart. J. 
Glutmr, Jas. 
Gllmore, Lew 
Gurley. Geo. H. 
Gallacner, Lew 
Could. Al 
noises. Ned 
ITuston. Walter 
Harrlll. E. H. 
miutton, Arthur 
HolllDCsbead. Boy 

K. 
Harris. Jos. 
Huntley. J. H. 
HankrrU. W. W. 
nail. Eujr-ne J. 
Hoaard. Jas. H. 
Hanson. Joan T. 



Hudgtos. T. 0. 
Heary. Frank 
Johnson. Wm. S. 
Jaeasoo. G. E. 
King. Tbos. 
Kennedy. W. 
Kim. Chas. 
Klna. B. W. 
Kissell. Bobble 
Laarence, John 
Killey. Ed. C. 

Lester. H. A. 
Le Clalrr. Billy 
Link. Harry 
Lee. Jack 
Le Tan. Ed H. 
McDootall. J. H. 
Martell. Fred J. 
Mirtln. Fred 
Moelier. Ed A. 
MacClariT. J. T. 
MaeArthur. Eda. 
Mokelke. Ed. 



LADIES 



Gunn. Beulah 
Gordon. Grace 
Garrlek. Edna 
Gorrell, Goldle 
Doberty. Margaret 
Hickman, Estelle 

W. 
Holcomn, Grace 
Hamilton. Maod 
Hines. Palmer, 

Mrs. 
Holcomb. Grace 
HayoVn. Vlrian 

Johnson, Grace 

U. 
Jeavoos, Irene 
Kramer. Ella 
Keyes, Helen 



Lesee, Carmen 
Lee. Rita 
Lea. Emllle 
Leaiitt, Kathryne 

Le PeUetrean 

Learltt, Kathrroe. 
Lyons, Jessie 
Morettl. Carmen 
Marston. Lottie 
Marshall. Marian 
Morgan, Base 

Hilda 
Morgan. Marjorte 
Mltrtiell. Cora L. 
McBee. Bally 
May. AGeen 
Morgan. Marjorie 



Mardo. Jess 
Moore. Scott 
Murray. Thos. E. 
Morris. Harry 
McGotern. John 
Mack. Bob 
Ort. Fred 
O'Day. Billy 
Olesons. The 
Phlpos, Chas. B. 
Poaer. H. H. 
Both. Eddie 
Boot. Frank L. 
Baceford. Dr. 

Royal 
BodtnotT. M. 
Rabdall. Harold 
Sehati. Sol 
Rteppe. H. 

Sidney. Geo. 
Staroes. Ellck 
Thompson, E. F. 

Trapleton. Boy 



McAdao, Wini- 
fred 
Murray, Mabel 
MaMn. En 

Phaser. Hoe. 
Bsenardaon, A. 

E.. Mrs. 
Bukryser, Beatrice 
Boatelle. Marie 
Blekaby. Jeanette 
Beld. Sis 
Ramsey Sisters 
fold. MlbeUe 
Esmond. Jessie G. 
Redmond. Monica 
Hirers. Margaret 
Russell. Marti 
Bapoo Sisters 



Tuten. Jos. t ' 

Leslie 
Vamey. V. A. 
Vauchan. Cbaa. 

E. 
Walte. Bill? E. 
Wetter, Edwin 
Whltebouse. Chas. 
Williams. Barney 
Wood. Harry 
Whitney. H. 8. 
Wilson. Knox 
West. Henry 
Whitney, Flany 
Wlllard. Clarence 
Waterbury, E. M. 
Wealherby. H. L. 
Warner. Jack 
Waldron. J. L. 
Well. Mai 
Wilson. Geo. A. 
Warren c Conly 
Young. Bert 



Robinson. Minnie 
8tooer. Jessie 
shrpird. Eielyn 
Speneer. Edith 
Stone. Pearl 

Seeback, Harriett 

Stafford. Ben 
Stone. L.. Miss 
Therriault. Bllliee 
Tricey, Nellie C. 
Vincent. Miss G. 
Winifred. Julia 
Wills. Estelle 
Wbitesides. Ethel 
Whitney. Mrs. W. 

B. 
Wufleld. Marie 
Wright. -Geraldlnr 



PLAYERS ENGAGED 



Nance O'Neill, Florence Reed, Beverly 
Sitgreaves, Clara Blandiek, Lottie Pick- 
ford, Ethel Mantell, Elza Frederic, James 
O'Neill, William H. Thompson, Charles 
Dalton, William Eliott, Lionel Braham, 
Pedro de Cordoba, Slacey Harlam, Freder- 
ick Lewis, Sydney Herbert, Frank An- 
drews, Frederick Burton, Henry Duggan, 
Walter Cibbs, Edward Martyn and John 
Morrissey for "The Wanderer." 



SHOW HOLD-UP HALTED 

Trot. N. T., Dec. 30. — Commissioner of 
Public Safety, John F. Cnhill, was served 
with an injunction restraining him from 
interfering with the opening of theatres 
<,n Sunday night, Dec. 24. The order was 
returnable Jan. 13, at Kingston, N. T. 



Nanette Flack, Lucile Saunders, Samuel 
Ash, Franz Egenieff, Dolly Castles, Harry 
Braham, Calvin Tibbets, May Alameda 
George, James S. Murray, Edward Paulton 
and James W. Castle, for "Boys Will Be 
Boys." 



TESTIMONIAL FOR CLARK 

Last week at New Amsterdam Hall the 
song writers gave a testimonial entertain- 
ment and ball in behalf of Dave Clark, 
author of numerous popular ballads. The 
affair was arranged by. Irving Berlin, 
George M. Cohan and other friends. 



' Herbert Yost, Percy Ames, Lally Cahill, 
Irene Ozier and Marie Haines, by the Em- 
pire Producing Co. for "In for the Night." 



i SOUTHERN GIFTS NOW $17,000 
The donations of E. H. Sothern to the 
British Red Cross have now reached 
$17,564. 

NEWTON TRUNKS 

AN IDEAL CHRISTMAS GIFT 



Melissa Ten Eyck and Max Welly by 
Oliver Morosco for "The Canary Cottage." 



Zoe Barnett for the specially organized 
company of "Miss Springtime." 



Edward Reese and Nat Griswold for 
"How Hearts Are Broken." 



Fuller Mellisn by Sylvio Hein for 
"Merry Wives of Windsor." 



Alma Chester by A. H. Woods for "Com- 
mon Clay." 




Gertrude Hoffman for the Cocoanut 
Grove. 



Honestly built for tha profession 

$28.50 to $75.00 

Mo adtftocc In prices jet. Hindaome C>ulogi» on TVjattL 

NEWTON & SON, 20 Elm St., Cortland, N. Y. 

■. Y. cirjr *4w*y:.r»d Rite. S00 W. 41at St, 



DETROIT HAS SUNDAY SHOW 

Detroit. Mich., Jan. 1. — The Detroit 
Opera House for the first time in its his- 
tory presented a Sunday performance of 
a play here New Tear's evening, the play 
being "Common Clay." 



CLIFT WRITING FOR LASKY 

Oakland. Cal., Dec. 30. — Denison Clift 
has accepted an offer from Jesse L. Lasky, 
to write feature plays for the company's 
stars on the Paramount program. 



GOTHAM ON INTERNATIONAL 

Charles Daniels, who recently acquired 
the Gotham Theatre, Brooklyn, has opened 
the house with an International Circuit 
Show and will continue with this policy. 



BRACALE OPERA FOR FRISCO 

San Francisco, Dec. 30. — Frank W. 
Healy promises to bring the Bracale Opera 
Co. to San Francisco early in 1017 for a 
run of from four to six weeks. The com- 
pany is now singing in Havana. 



ANN MURDOCK QUITS FROHMAN 
Ann Murdock has confirmed the report 
that sbe has left the Frobman manage- 
ment. She has not been satisfied with the 
choice of plays Mr. Hayman has been mak- 
ing for her, she says. 



TO PLAY "LIFE OF MAN" 

Andreyev's "The Life of Man" will be 
given by the Washington Square Players 
for the first time in America. Sunday, Janu- 
ary 14, in the Comedy Theatre. 



CITY HOME SEES ACTS 

Portland, Me., Dec. 27. — Through the 
kindness of Manager Hamilton, of the B. 
F. Keith Theatre. Christmas brought un- 
expected joy to those at the City Home. 
An entertainment was offered \>v Bert 
Lamont's cowboys and Harry De Costa and 
Ellen Orr. 



DEATHS 



RICHARD C. WRIGHT, at one time i 
member of the old Primrose Quartet, died 
Dec. 6 In Baltimore. Md. His last engage- 
ment was In 1909, with the Hastings Show, 
alter which he retired and -went Into the 
wholesale paint business in Baltimore. 

CLARA LOUISE RAMSEY, known on 
the vaudeville stage as one of the Ramsey 
Sisters, died Dec. 23, at her apartment In 
New York City, from heart trouble. 



IN FOND AND LOVING MEMORY 

of 
My Devoted Husband 

MORRIS CRONIN 

Who departed this life Jan. 8, 1916 
HIS WIDOW 



LOUIS OE SCHMIDT, old-tlroe musician, 
acior, singer and author of playlets and 
music, died last week. Mr. De Schmidt was 
born In Belgium seventy-five years ago. 

CORA BELLE GREEN, an actress, and 
wife of Jeoffrey Heath, an actor, who had 
appeared In character parts with Knbert 
Mantell and Richard Mansfield, died last 
week. 

FRANK W. MARTINEAU, business man- 
ager for Klaw & Erlangcr and one of the 
best known and most popular advance man- 
agers, died Dec. 22. at his home In this city. 
For many years he had been recognized as 
one of the foremost publicity managers of 
the Klaw & Erlanger establishment and had 
handled some of the foremost successes. At 
the time of his death he was business man- 
ager of "Ben Hur," at the Manhattan Opera 
House. 

COLUMBIA THEATRE 

BWAi. 4ft* STatEET. N. Y. 

THE BOSTONIANS 



GAIETY 



THSATBB. B'war as ««tk 
St. Brae, it 8.20. UtbJ. 
Wed. <a Bat. at :.20. 
SJCTH and JOHN L. GOLDEN 

TURNTO THEWGHT 

By atiini. fcalU sad HaaaaJa. 

Rt a t ml\ B'WAT * oa arZataUaT 

i\NITA STEWART 

IB 

"THE GIRL PHIUPPA" 

JZBRT SUTAU, VINCENT BALUUTEX 

Soloists, Topical Slcaat, Cbmedy sad laoomparaMa 

Rialto Orchestra. 



CORT 



Wait 4Stk BL, rasaa krut «a. 
tn. it S.ta. Uata Wai. * aaX I. M 



TKXATSX 

rarmarlr 

OandlaT 



lasm'i Ose ■aMamtial 

UPSTAIRS i DOWN 

BY rHEDEKIC A FANNY HATTOW 

COHAN & HARRIS 

Photu Bryant 6344 

Bras. s.». Mats. Wad. ft Bat. uo. 

O0HAX ft RASXia prwrat 

CAPTAIN KIDD, JR. 

A Farcical Adrsntnrs by Bid* Joaasaa Tea—. 

REPUBLIC 85SR. 

■aaa. « J0. M ats. Wad, ft Sat. 1:10. 
AJiTis.ua. HOncm feasants 

GOOD GRACIOUS ANN ABELLE 

A »rw Play tir CUra Kmraer. 



b. r. mm 

PALACE 

Broadm* ft 4TU It. 

Mat. Dally at 1 P. M. 

fS. 10 aad Tie. 

■very Ilfal 

»»>7)|1|1.K 



SSDIX FOT AND TKZ 
SEVEN FOYB, W. H. 
Eaton sad Carroll. Dor- 
othy Shoamakar. Clark ft 
lutrau. "Tka Blast 
Best." Geo. Beekwill ft 
Al Woodl. Marlon Waekl. 

ataahsn'a Data, Palaoa 
Xeai Pictorial. 



BELASCO 



Wast 44tk ST. Btss. l.B* 
Uttt. Tbora. ft Bat. at f ,M 

DAVID BaOASCO BCaSSBta 

FRANCES STARR 

Di a lafrasMsaiy new oomady, "IJTTXZ UtDY 
ra" BLTJE," by Horace Hadsaa sad X. WlfBay 
Perurval. author* of "Qrumpr." 



KNICKERBOCKER 



Klaw A 



Thostra, ■'way ft Mtk 
St. Erca. at 8.15 

lilts. Wed. * Bit. 2.15 
JlaDiarr* 



BrlanaTPT. 
DAVID BELASCO present! 

DAVID WARFIELD 

la US werid-renrsroed saaaaaa 
THE MUSIC MASTER 



ELTIN6E 



TBBATBB. ». (M it. Bra. st I.H 
Mits. Wad. ft Bit. 



A. B. WOODS pnaaaU 



CHEATING CHEATERS 



B/ MAX MABCIN. 



HIPPODROME 

KAKAOOfaDrr OHARDa* DILUNQHaV 
Mltkts st B.16: Mat srsrr day. l.U. 
••THE BIG SHOW" 

BTAOBD By a. H. BDKN8IDB 

With tot Ineomparsbl. PAVLOWA 

BafWICB I MAMMOTH I tOOMOTBaVrna 

BAIXBT I MINSTBBLB I 1000 PBOPLB 

Warld'i Mnrttt show st lawttt ptteta. 

NEW AtBTERDAM^^V^ri^'ih. 

KLAW ft BRLANOBB'B DorlTsUtd Mudesl 
Corned/ WW 

MISS SPRINGTIME 

Uoale by KM— i Book by Boltot. 



HUDSON 



W. 44th St. Eaal. I.I*. 
Mau. Wed.. Sst. ft *aw 
Yeir-t. 

BXAW ft EXXASOEB present 

ELSIE FERGUSON 

la s bow oomady of today 

SHIRLEY KAYE 

By MStanS rOOTVEB. 
GEO. M. THEATBE. B'WAT ft 4M 

COHAN'S HT - *"£?*£*■ w,a - 

KUW ft aBLA>1«BB Maaasan 

BaWBT MlIJJtB j i i i siatt 

RUTH CHATTERTON 

sod Conpaay. isrlodlns Itraea MeRa*. Is 

"COME OUT OF THE KITCHEN" 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 



Route. Mut Reach This Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

Adams, Maude (Chae, Frobman, Inc., nigra.) 
— Empire. New York, lndef. 

Arthur, Julia — Criterion, New York, 1, lndef. 

Arllss. Geo.— Nixon, Pittsburgh, 1-6. 

Aborn Opera So. — McAleater, Okla, 6. 

"Alone at Last" — AlTln, Pittsburgh, 1-6. 

"Ansa and the Girl" — Grand, Cincinnati, 1-C. 

"Big Show, The" (Chaa. B. Dillingham, 
mgr.) — Hip., New York, lndef. 

"Ben Uur" — Manhattan O. H., New York, ln- 
def. 

"Boomerang. The" (David Belaaco, mgr.) — 
Powers', Chicago, lndef. 

"Blue Paradise, The"— Lyric, Cincinnati. 1-6. 

"Broadway After Dark" (National Prod. Co., 
Inc., mgra.) — Youngatown, Pa., S; Corry, 
4 : Salamanca, S : Emporium, 6 ; Olean, 

N. I, 8i John sonbury, Pa., 9 ; Clearfield, 
to ; Du Bola, 11 ; Bamesboro, 12 ; Johns- 
town, 13. 

"Belle of Are. A" (C. H. Maxwell, mgr.)— 
Greenville, O., 3 ; Tiffin, 4 ; New Corners- 
town, S : ByesvUie. 6 ; Marietta, 9 ; Spen- 
cer, W. Va, 9 ; Carlo, 10 ; West Union, 11 : 
Pennsboro, 12 ; Oakland, Md., 13. 

Collier. Win. (H. H. Fnuee, mgr.)— Long- 
acre, New York, lndef. 

Clarke, Harry Corson and Margaret Dale 
Owen — Empire, Calcutta, India, lndef. 

"Cheating Cheaters" (A. II. Woods, mgr.) — 
Eltlnge. New York, lndef. 

"Come Out of the Kitchen" (Klaw A Er 
langpr ft Henry Miller, mgra.) — Cohan's, 
New York, lndef. 

"Century Girl, The" — Century, New York, 
lndef. 

"Capt Kldd, Jr." (Cohan A Harris, mgra.) — 
Coban ft Harris. New York, lndef. 

"Cohan Berne 1916" (Coban ft Harris, 
mgra.) — Forrest, Pblla., lndef. 

"Common Clay," with John Mason — Detroit. 
1-6. 

Dunn, Emma (Lee Kugel. mgr.) — Thirty- 
ninth Street, New York, lndef. 

Daly, Arnold (Henry B. Harris Estate, 
mgra.) — Kulton, New York, lndef. 

Dltrlchsteln. Leo (Cohan ft Harris, mgra.) — 
Park Sq.. Boston, lndef. 

"Daddy Long Legs" — Montauk, Brooklyn, 1-6. 

Eltlnge, Julian— Sbubert. Brooklyn, 1-6. 

"Bverywoman" (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — 
I jtramle, Wyo., 3 ; Boulder. Colo., 4 : 
Greeley, S; Fort Collins, 6; Denver, 7-13. 

"Experience" (Elliott, Comstock A Gest, 
mgra.) — Fords, Baltimore, 1-6. 

"Experience" (Elliott, Comstock ft Gest. 
nigra.) — McAleater. Okla, 4. 

Faversbam. Wm. — Booth, New Tork, lndef. 

Ferguson, Elsie — Hudson, New York, lndef. 

Flake, Mrs. (Corley ft Biter, Inc., mgra.) — 
Broad. Pblla., lndef. 

Kl.-ids, Lew— Albany, N. Y., 1-3. 

"Blair and Warmer" (Selwyn ft Co., mgra.) — 
Cort, Chicago, lndef. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn ft Co., mgra.) — 
Bronx, New York, 1-6; National, Wash- 
ington, 8-13. 

"Freckles," Western Co. (Broadway Amnse. 
Co.. mgra.) — Akron, Colo., S; Wray, 4; 
McCook, 8 : Cambridge, 9 : Holhrook, 10 ; 
lloldredtre, 13; Franklin. 13. 

"Freckles," Eastern Co. (Broadway Amnse. 
Co., mgra.) — Crlafleiu, Md., 3, Princess 
Anne, 4 ; Chestertown, B ; Port Deposit, 6 ; 
oxford. Pa., 8; Coatesvllle, 9; West Grove, 
10: Red Uon. 11; Waynesboro, 12; Front 
noyal. Va., 18. 

<;eunce, Grace — Plymouth, Boston, 1, lndef. 
"Good Grnrlous Annabelle (Arthur Hopkins, 
mgr.) — Republic, New York, lndef. 

"Gambler's All" (Percy Barton, mgr.) — 
Maxlne Elliott, New York, 1, lndef. 

"Go To It" (Comstock A Gest, mgra.) — Chi- 
cago, Chicago, lndef. 

"Gypsy Love" — Milwaukee, 1-6. 

"Girl Without a Chance," Western Co. 
I Robert Sherman, mar.)— Joliet, 111., 8; 
MontlceUo,' S ; Alton, 6. 

"Girl Without a Chance," Eastern Co. 
(Robert Sherman, mgr.) — Pomeroy. O., 8; 
Cassopolls, 4 ; Huntington, W. Va., 5 ; 
Lancaster, O.. 6. 

Hitchcock, Raymond — Academy, Baltimore, 
1-6. 

Holmes, Taylor — Majestic, Boston, lndef. 

Held. Anna — Caalno, New York, lndef. 

Ha Jos. Ml til (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — 
Rochester, N. v., 1-3; Schenectady, 4; 
Albany, 5 6: Colonial. Roston. 8-20. 

Hodge, wm. — Princess. Chicago, lndef. 

"Her Soldier Boy" (The Sbuberts, mgra.)— 
Astor, New York, lndef. 

"His Bridal Night." with Dolly Sisters (A. 
H. Woods, mgr.) — Olympic, Chicago, lndef. 

"Honae of Glass, The," with Mary Ryan 
(Coban A Harris, mgra.) — Standard, New 
York. 1-6. • 

"Her Husband's Wife" (Henry Miller, mgr.) 

■ — Lyceum, New York. 8, lndef. 

"Human Soul, The" (Schwenk A Murray, 
mgra.) — Warren, <>.. 3; Akron, 4-6. 

"Justice" (John D. Williams, mgr.) — Albany, 
N. Y., 13. 

"Katinka" (Arthur Hammerateln, mgr.) — 
Indianapolis. 1-6. 

"Utile Peggy O'Moore," Eaaton Co. (Na- 
tional Proa. Co., Inc., mgra.) — Idaho Falls, 
Idaho, 3; Bexbury, 4; Ash ton. B: St. An- 
thony, 6 : Jerome, 7 : American Falls, S : 
Oakley, 9: Twin Falls. 10; Bnbl. 11; 
Preston, 12: Downey, 13. 

"Little Cafe, The" (Philip II. Nlven. mgr.) — 
Frankfort, Ky.. 3 : Lexington, 4 : KnoxrlUe, 
T.-nn.. 5: Ashevllle. N. C, 6; Greenville, 
8: Charlotte, N. C. 9; Salisbury, 10; 
Greensboro, 11 ; Durham. 12 ; Petersburg. 
Va.. 13. 

"Love O'MIke" (Elizabeth Marbory, mgr.)— 
Detroit, 31-Jan. e. 

Mantell. Robert — Belaaco, Washington, 8-13. 



ROUTE L,I 




Montgomery ft Stone — Tremont, Boston, 1-6. 
"Man Wbo Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 

mgr.) — Playbonse, New York, lndef. 
"Miss Springtime" (Klaw A Erlanger, mgra.) 

— New Amsterdam, New York, lndef. 
"Montana" (Bonkaon ft' Morris, mgra.) — 
Granite, Okla., 8; Sentinel, 4; Hay re, B; 
Erick, 6; Canyon, Tex., 8; Texlco, N. Max, 
9 ; Portales, 10 ; Borwell, 11 ; Artesla, 12 ; 
Carlsbad, 13. 
"Maid to Order" (Castle Prod. Co., Inc., 
mgra.) — Aiken, 8. C, 3: Camden, 4; Dar- 
lington, 5; Charleston. 6. 
"My Home Town Girl" (Perry J. Kelly, mgr.) 

—Indianapolis. 1-8. 
"Million Dollar Doll," Eastern Co. (Harvey 
D. Orr, mgr.) — Gettysburg, 3 ; Hanover. 4 ; 
Chamberabnrg, 5 ; Waynesboro, 6 ; Fred- 
erick. Md.. 8: Martlnsburg, W. Va.. 9; 
Winchester. Va., 10; Hagerstown, MU., l' ; 
Cumberland, 12-13. 
O'Hara, Flake. — Walnut, Philadelphia, 1-6. 
Patton, W. B. (Frank B. Smith, mgr.) — 
Farmington, la., . 3 ; Bloomfield, 4 ; M t. 
Pleasant, S; Muscatine, 6; Burlington, 7. 
"Pierrot the Prodigal" (Wlnthrop Amea and 
Walter Knight, mgra.)— Little, New York, 
lndef. 
"Princess Pat, The" — 8t. Louis, 1-6. 
"Polly anna" — Hollls, Boston,' 1-6. 
Starr, Frances (David Belasco, mgr.) — Be- 
laaco, New York, lndef. 
Stab], Rose (Cbas. Frobman, Inc., mgr.) — 
Nashville. Tenn., 3-4 ; < Chattanooga, S ; 
Knoxvill*. 6; Aahevllle, N. C 8: Colom- 
bia, 8. C, 9; Augusta, Ga., 10; Atlanta, 
11-13. 
Sanderson-Bryai-Cawthorn — Louisville, Ky., 
1-8; Indianapolis, Ind, 4-6: Grand, Cin- 
cinnati, 8-13. 
Sothern, E. H. — Blackatone, Chicago, lndef. 
Skinner, Otis (Chaa. Frohman, Inc mgra.) — 
Colonial. Boston. 1-6; Worcester, 8; Pitts 
field, 9 ; Springfield, 10 ; New Haven, Conn., 
12: Hartford, 13. 
"So Long Letty" (Oliver Moroaco. mgr.) — 

Sbobert, New York, lndef. 
"Show of Wonders, The" (The Shnberta, 
mgra.)— Winter Garden, New York, lndef. 
"Seven Chances" — Garrlck, Philadelphia, ln- 
def. 
"Sunny South" (J. C. Rockwell, mar.) — 
Vlcksburg. Mich.. 4 : Cassopolls, S ; Nlles, 
6 ; Harvard, 111., 8 : Kvansvllle, 9 ; Edger- 
ton, 10; Stoughton, 11; Elkhorn, 12; 
Brodhead, 18. , _ 

Taylor. Lanrette (Klaw A Erlanger A Geo. 
C. Tyler, mgra.) — Globe, New York, lndef. 
Tree, Sir Herbert. — Bt. Louis, 1-4; Thurston. 
International Circuit, New Orleans, 31-Jan. 
6 ; Birmingham, Ala., 8-18. 
"Turn to the Bight" (Smith A Golden, mgra.) 

— Gaiety, New York, lndef. 
"Treasure Island" (Chaa. Hopkins, mgr.) — 

Punch A Judy, New York, 1-13. 
"The 13th Chair"— Forty-eight Street, New 

York, lndef. _ 

"This la the Life" (Independent Amnse. Co., 

mgra.)— Hot Springs. Ark., 3; Chadron. 

4; Hot Springs, S. IX. 0; Bpearfiah, 6: 

Belle Fourcne. 8; Deadwood, 9; Lead, 10; 

Rapid City, 11 ; Bdgemonb 12 ; Crawford, 

Neb.. 18. 

"Twin Beds" (A. 8. Stern A Co., mgra.) — 

Oakland, Cal., Sl-Jan. 6; San Francisco. 

7-18. . , 

"Twin Beds" Special Co. (A. 8. Stein, mgr.) 

— Grand Rapids, Mich., Sl-Jan. 6. 
"Tbelma" (Lee Orland, mgr.) — Morcnel, 
Mich., 4 ; Hudson, B ; Hillsdale, 6 ; Union 
City, 8; Allegan, 9. 
"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 

—Cort New York, lndef. 
"Unchaatened Woman, The" (OUver Mor- 
oaco, mgr.) — Wilbur. Boston, 2, index. 
"Very Good Eddie" Marbory, Comstock Co.. 
mgra.)— Adelpbl. Phlla., I, lndef. _ . 
Washington 8q. Playere— Comedy, New York, 

lndef. 
Warfleld. David (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

Knickerbocker, New York, lndef. 
Wilson. Al. H. (Sidney B. Ellis, mgr.) — 
Richmond, Va* 3; Newport News, 4; 
8 ; Altoona, Pa- 9 ; Johnstown. 10 : Taren- 
tum, 11; Franklin, 12; Oil City, 13. 
"When Dreams Come True" (Contta ft Ten- 
nla, mgra.) — Lewlstown, Pa.. 8 ; Hunting- 
don, 4 ; Tyrone, 5 ; Johnstown, 6 ; Houtx- 
dale. 8 : Bellefonte, 9 ; Emporium. 10 : St 
Marys, 11: HIdgeway, 12; Warren, 18. 
"YeUow Jacket, The" — Harris, New York, 

"Ziegfeld's Follies" — Illinois.* Chicago, lndef. 

International Circuit 

"Broadway After Dark" — Grand O. H., 

Brooklyn. 1-6. 
"Blindness of Youth" — Kansas City, Mo., 1-6. 
"Bringing Dp Father" — St. Louis, 1-6. 
"Bringing Dp Father" — Castle Sq., Boston, 

1-6. 
"Come Back to Erin" — Bronx, New York, 1-6. 
"Dream Qlrl of Mine" — Birmingham, Ala., 

1-6. 
"Daughter of Mother Machree" — National, 

Chicago, 1-6. 
Emmett, Gracls — Lyceum, Pittsburgh, 1-6. 
KUnore. Kate — Richmond, Va., 10. 
"For the Man She Loved"— Buffalo. N. Y.. 

1-6. 
"Girl Without a Chance" — Lexington, New 

York, 1-6. 
"Girl He Couldn't Boy" — Omaha. Neb* 1-6. 
"Qua HlU's Folilea" — Toledo. O, 1-6. 
"Hour of Temptation" — Nashville, Tenn-, 

1-6: Memphis, 8-13. 
"How Hearts Are Broken" — Indianapolis, 

1-6. 
"Jerry" — Orpheom, Phlla,, 1-6. 
•■Little Girl God Forgot" — Cleveland. O, 

1-6; Toledo, 7-13. 



"Mutt A Jeff's Wedding" — Jersey City, N. J, 
1-6. 

"Mutt A Jeff's Wedding" — Louisville, Ky., 
1-6. 

"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" — 
Peterson. N. J* 1-6. 

"My Mother's Rosary" — Gotham, B'klyn, 1-6. 

"Old Homestead, The" — Auditorium, Balti- 
more, 1-6. 

"Pedro, the Italian" — Worcester, Mass* 1-6. 

"Pretty Baby*' — Memphis, Tenn.. 1-6. 

Thurston — New Orleans, La., 1-6. 

"That Other Woman"— Detroit, 1-6. 

Welch, Joe — Imperial, Chicago, 1-6. 

"Which One Shall I Marry" — Poll's, Wash- 
ington, 1-6; Auditorium, Baltimore, 8-18. 

STOCK AND REPERTOIRE ROUTES 

Permanent and Traveling 

Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass., lndef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, lndef. 

American Players — Spokane, Wash., lndef. 

Academy Players — Halifax, N. 8., Can., ln- 
def. 

Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass., lndef. 

All Star Stock— New Bedford, Mass., lndef. 

Angell Stock ,Joe Angell, mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, lndef. 

Angell Stock No. 2 (Ike Jutraa, mgr.) — 
Sharpaburg, Pa., lndef. 

Austin. Mildred, Stock — Birmingham, Ala., 

Broadway Players — Spooner, Bronx, N. Y.. 
lndef. 

Hainbridge Players — Minneapolis, lndef. 

Burnank Players — Los Angeles, lndef. 

Broadway Players — Portsmouth. O., lndef. 

Bayley. J. WlUard, Players — Racine, Wis.. 
lndef. 

Blye, Browne, Rep. Co. (Jack Moore, mgr.) — 
Newark, O., lndef. 

Coburn-Pearaon Players — St. Cloud, Minn., 
lndef. 

Denham Stock — Denver, lndef. 

Dublnsky Stock (Ed. Dublnsky, mgr.) — St. 
Joseph. Mo., lndef- '•> 

Dally, Ted, Stock — Hutchinson, Kan., lndef. 

Homing, Lawrence, Theatre Co. — Sheridan, 
Wyo., lndef. _ 

Elamere Stock — Elamere, Bronx, lndef. 

Eckbardt, Oliver, Playere — Reglna, ■ Bask., 
Can., lndef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell, Mass., lndef. 

Empire Players — Salem, Mass.. lndef. 

Empire Players (C. A, McTlghe, mgr.) — 
Pittsburgh, Pa., lndef. 

Fifth Ave. Stock (Jacques B. Horn, mgr.)— 
Fifth Ave., Bklyn., lndef. 

Fleming, Alice, Stock — Portland, Ore., lndef. 

Gardiner Bros. Stock— Ft. Dodge, la., lndef. 

Hyperion Players — New Haven. Conn., lndef. 

Hathaway Players — Brockton, Mass., lndef. 

Hippodrome Players (Dave Hellman, mgr.) — 
Falrmonnt, W. Va., lndef. _ 

Harper Flayers, No. 2 Co. (Robert J. Sher- 
man, mar.) — Pt- Huron, Mich., lndef. 

Jewett, Henry, Players— Copley, Boston, ln- 
def. 

Keith's Hudson Theatre Stock — Union Hill. 
N. J., lndef. .„, .. 

Kelly Bros. Btock— Lansing, Mich, lndef. 

Knickerbocker Stock (Geo. Barbier, mgr.) — 
Knickerbocker, Pblla., lndef. ....,.- 

Lawrence. Del., Btock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Ludlow, Wanda, Players— Covington, Ky., ln- 
def. 

Lyric Theatre Stock— Bridgeport, Conn., ln- 
def. 

Lorch. Theo.. Stock— Phoenix, Aria., lndef. 

Logsdon, Oily, Stock — Lancaster, Pa., lndef. 

Lonergan Players (E. V. Pbelaa, mgr.) — 
Lynn, Mass., lndef. 

Morosco Stock— Los Angeles, lndef. 

Moaart Players (Jay Packard, mgr.)— Elmlra, 

Morrill," Elisabeth, Stock (Chaa. A Morrill, 

mgr.)— Bibbing. Minn., 1-7. 
National Musical Stock (C. B. Hagedorn, 

mgr.) — Detroit. Mich., lndef. _ 

National 8tock (F. B. Cole, mgT.)— Mlnne- 

Neet3lPlayer»— Jefferson City, Mo., lndef. 
Northampton Flayers — Northampton, Maaa, 

lndef. 
Orpheum Players — Reading, Pa, lndef. 
Oliver, Otla, Players (Harry J. WaUace, 

mgr.)— Lafayette, Ind., 1, mdef. 



Overnoise 



Williams, Ed., Stock— Omaha, Neb., lndef. 
Williams. Ed, Stock — Elkhart. Ind., lndef. 
Wight Bros. Theatre Co. (Billiard Wight, 
mgr.) — Lyons, Neb, 1-6; Decatur, 8-13. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

Deloy's Dainty Dudlnes (Eddie Deloy, mgr.) 
— -Bowie, Tex.. 1-6. 

Enterprise Stock (Normand HUyard, mgr.) — 

Enterprise Stock, No. 2 Co. (Norman HU- 
yard, mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. 

Hyatt A Le Nore Miniature M. C. Co. (L. H. 
Hyatt, mgr.)- — London, Can, lndef. 

Hall, Billy, M. C. Co.— Lowell. Mass., 1-6. 

Kllgare'a Comedians — Cincinnati, O., lndef. 

Lord A Vernon M. C. Co. — Clarksbnrg, . W. 
Va, lndef. 

Maxwell ft Sbaw Tab. (Bob Shaw, mgr.) — 
Model, Phlla., 1-0 ; Chester. 8-13. 

Sub-Marine Glrla (Meraereau Bros., mgra.) — 
. AmarUlo, Tex., 1-13. 

Shaffer's, AL, Boys and Girls — Nassau, Ba- 
hama Islands, 1-13. . ■" 

Stewart, Walter J_ Stock (Stewart A Good- 
win, mgra.) — Chicago, lndef. 

Thomas M. C. Co. — Sanford, Me, 1-16. 

Tabartn Girla (Dave Newman, mgr.) — Dur- 
ham. N. C, 1-6. 

Walker Musical ft Lady Minstrels — Rocky 
Mount, N. C, 1-4; Wilmington, 8-13. 

Zarrow's American Girl — Chattanooga, 
Tenn., 1-6; Aahevllle. N. C, 8-18. 

Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Fuquay, 
mgr.) — Petersburg, Va, 1-6;. Newport 
News, 8-13. 

Zarrow's Variety Review (D. J. Lynch, mgrj 
— Morgantown, Pa, 1-6; Falrmonnt, W. 
Va, 8-18. 

BURLESQUE 
Columbia Wheel 

Al Beevea' Big Beauty Show— Gaiety, St. 

Louis, Jan. 1-6; Columbia, Chicago, 8-13. 
Behman 8how — Olympic, Cincinnati, Jan. 1-6 ; 

Star ft Garter, Chicago, 8-13. 
Ben Welch's — Gaiety, Buffalo, N. Y, Jan. 1- 

6; Corinthian. Rochester, N. Y, 8-18. 

Bon Tons— Corinthian, Rochester, N. Y, Jan. 

1-6; Baatable, Syracuse, N. Y, 8-10; L*m- 

berg, Utlca, 11-18. 
Bostonians — Columbia. New York, Jan. 1-6 ; 

Caalno. Brooklyn, 8-18. 
Bowery Burlesquera — People's, Philadelphia, 

Jan. 1-6: Palace, Baltimore, 8-18. 
Burlesque Review — Palace, Baltimore, Jan. 

1-6; Gaiety, Washington, D. C, 8-18. 
Follies of the Day — Gaiety, Boston, Jan. 1-6 ; 

Grand, Hartford. Ct.. 8-13. 
Globe Trotters — Columbia, Chicago, Jan. 1-6; 

Berchel, Des Moines, Iowa. 7-9. 
Golden Crooks — Gaiety, Montreal, Can, Jan. 

1-6; Empire, Albany, N. Y, 8-13. 
Hastings Show — Jacques, Waterbury. Conn., 

Jan. 1-6; Cohen's, Newbnrg, N. Y., 8-10; 

Cohen's, Poughkeepale, 11-18. 
"Hello, New York"— Open Jan. 1-6; Gaiety. 

Kansas City. 8-13. 
Hlp-IIip-Hooray Girls — Casino, Brooklyn, 
. Jan. 1-6; Empire. Newark, N. J, 8-18. 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

Frees Ubarty at, T JlL at. as nj p. M. 

anal at afatalght with ai sspa rs 

It MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

Freaa W. ZM St, 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P. Acsast 
Mat BROADWAY. NEW YORE 

Bal's Dreadnaught 



vrveruoiser oiuva — v»»» ^-'v* w^.»-, ■ 

Princess Stock — Sioux City, la, lndef. 

Park Opera Co. — Park, St Louis, lndef. 

Players Btock— Players, St. Louis, lndef. 

Para, Edna, Stock — Tampa, Fla.. lndef. 

Poll Stock — Scranton, Pa, lndef. 

Spooner, Cecil. Stock — Lawrence. Mass., ln- 
def. 

Sbubert Stock — Milwaukee, lndef. 

Shubert Stock— St- Paul, lndef. 

Somervtlle Theatre Players — Somervllle, 
Maaa, lndef. 

St- Clair, Winifred, Stock (Earl Slpe, mgr.) 
— Peterson, N. J, lndef. 

Shubert A Wllllama Stock — Waltham. Maaa, 
- 4, lndef. 

Temple Stock — Ft- Wayne, Ind., lndef. - 

Turner-Hammond Players (Jim Hammond, 
mgr.) — New London. Conn, lndef. 

Trumbull Players — Dolgevllle, N. V, 1-6. 

Van Dyke A Eaton Stock (V. Mack, mgr.) — 
Tulsa, Okla, lndef. w - 

Wilkes Players — Seattle, Wash., lndef. 

Wilkes Players— Salt Lake City, Utah, lndef. 

Wallace, Cheater, Players — Sharon, Pa, ln- 
def. 

Wallace, Morgan, Players — Sioux City, la, 
lndef. 

WUcox Stock — Mt. Vernon, N. Y, lndef. 

Wlllls-Wood 8tock— Kansas City, Mo, lndef. 

Wadsworth Stock — Manchester, N. H, 1-6. 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 



.•tUJalM tech.. 
.. SB IB tech.. 



U tech..... 

M Itti IX 

«S Inch. 

WILLIAM B AL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th St., N. Y. 4 W. 22J St-, N. Y 
NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

MaR Ordan PBUa Saaaa Day RacalTad 
tl DstMoJt 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



Spiegel' 



Howe's Kissing Girls— Park, Bridgeport. 

Conn., Jan. 4-9; Colonial, Providence, B. 

U 8-13. 
Irwin's Bis Show — Orpheom, Paterson, Jan. 

1-6; Empire, Hoboken, N. J., 8-13. 
Liberty Girls — Empire, Albany, Jan. 1-6; 

Gaiety, Boston, 8-18. 
Maids of America — Star, Cleveland, O.. Jan. 

1-6: Umpire, Toledo. O., 8-13. 
Majesties — HurtiK ft Seamon'a, New York. 
„Jan. 1-6: Orpheum. Peterson, N. J., 8-13. 
Marlon's Big Show — Miners' Bronx. New 

York, Jan. 1-6 ; Empire, Brooklyn. 8-18. 
Merry Bounders — Lyric, Dayton, 0., Jan. 

1-8; Olympla, Cincinnati. 8 13. 
Midnight Maidens — Star and Garter, Chi- 
cago. Jan. 1-6; Gaiety, Detroit. 8-13. 
Million Dollar Dolls— Gaiety. Detroit. Mich., 

Jan. 1-6; Gaiety. Toronto. Out, 8-18. 
Mollle Williams' Show — Ponghkeepste, 4-6; 

Bronx, New York, 8-13. 
New York Girls — Empire, Newark. N. X. 

Jan. 1-6; Casino, Philadelphia, 8-18. • 
"Puss Puss"— Gaiety, Toronto, Ont, Jan. 

1-6. 
Rag Doll Id Ragland — Empire. Toledo. O.. 

Jan. 1-6; Lyric, Dayton, O., 8-18. 
Bosaland Girls — Grand, Hartford. Conn., 

Jan. 1-6; Jacques, Waterbnry, Ct, 8-18. 
Hose Sydell London Belles — Lumbers, Dtlca. 

N. Y.. 4-6; Gaiety, Montreal, Can., 8-13. 
SIdman's Show — Gaiety, Kansas City, Mo., 
_ Jan. 1-6; Gaiety, St. Louis, Mo.. 8-18. 
Sightseers — Bercbel, Des Moines, la., Jan. 

1-2; Gaiety, Omaha, Nebr.. 8-18. 
Some Show — Empire, Brooklyn, N. Y„ Jan. 

1-6; Park, Bridgeport, Cfc. 11-18. 

legel's Revue — Gaiety, Pittsburgh, Jan. 

1-8; Star, Cleveland. 0„ 8-13. 
Sporting Widows — Empire. Hoboken, Jan. 

1-6; Peoples, Philadelphia, 8-18. 
Star and Garter — Colonial, Providence, Jan. 

1-6: Casino. Boston, 8-13. 
Step Lively Girls— Casino, Phlla.. Jan. 1-6; 

11. ft S., New York, 8-13. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Gaiety, Omaha. 

Neb., Jan. 1-6; open 8-18; Gaiety, Kansas 

City, 15-20. - 
Watson's Beef Trust — Casino. Boston, Jan. 

1-6; Columbia. New York, 8-18. 
Watson-Wrothe — Gaiety, Washington, D. c, 

Jan. 1-6: Gaiety, Pittsburgh. 8-18. 

American Circuit 

Americans — Open. Jan. 1-6; Englewood, Chi- 
cago, Jan. 8-13. 
Auto Girls — Olympic, New York, Jan. 1-6; 

Majestic, Scranton, Pa., 8-13. 
Beauty, Youth and Folly — Gaiety. Phlla., 

Jan. 1-6 ; Mt. Carmel, Pa., 8 ; Shenandoah, 

0: Wllkesbarre, 10-13. 
Big Review of 101T — Trocadero. Phlla., Jan. 

1-6: Olympic, New York, 8-18. 
Broadway Belles — Springfield, 4-6 ; Howard, 

Boston, 8-13. 
Cabaret Girls — Wllkesbarre. 34; South 

Bethlehem, 1 ; Easton, 2 ; Wllkesbarre, 8-6. 
Charming Widows — Gaiety, Brooklyn, 1-6; 

Academy, Jersey City, 8-13. 
Cherry Blossoms — Penn Circuit, Jan. 1-6; 

Gaiety, Baltimore, 8-13. 
Darlings »f Paris — Open, Jan. 1-6; Century, 

Kansas City. 8-13. 
Follies of Pleasure— Trenton, N. J., 1-6; 

South Bethlehem, 8 : Easton, 8 ; layoff, 

11-13. '••"*.• 

French Frolics — Star, Brooklyn, N. J., Jan. 

1-6. ' 

Frolics of 1916 — Century, Kansas City, Mo., 

Jan. 1-6; Standard, St. Louis, Mo., 8-18. 
Ginger Girls — Akron, 4-8 ; Empire, Cleveland. 

O., 8-13. 
Girls from Joyland — Cadillac, Detroit, Jan. 

1-6; open, 8-13 ; Englewood, Chicago, 

15-20. '' 
Girls from the Follies — Gaiety, Milwaukee, 

Jan. 1-6; Gaiety, Minneapolis, 8-13. 
Grown Dp Babies— Terre Haute, Ind., Jan. 

1-3; Gaiety, Chicago. 8-13. 
Hello Girls — Academy, Jersey City, Jan. 1-6; 

Gaiety. Philadelphia, 8-13. 
Hello Paris — Buckingham, Louisville, Jan. 

1-6: Lyceum, Columbus. O., 8-13, 
High Life Girls — Gaiety, Baltimore, Jan. 1-6 ; 

Trocadero. Philadelphia, 8-18. 
Lady Buccaneers — Lyceum. Columbus, 0„ 

Jan. 1-6: Newark, O., 8; Zanesvllle, 9; 

Canton, 10; Akron, 11-13. 
Ltd Lifters — Standard, St. Louts, Jan. 1-6; 

Terre Haute, Ind., 8-10. 
Military Maids — Majestic, Indianapolis, Jsn. 

1-6; Buckingham. Louisville, 8-13. 
Mischief Makers — Worcester, 4-6; Amster- 
dam, N. Y., 8-9; Hudson, Schenectady, N. 

T.. iO-18. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Howard, Boston, Jan. 

1-6; New Bedford, Mass.. 8-10; Wor- 
cester, 11-13. 
Pace Makers — Majestic, Scranton. Pa., Jan. 

1-6; Gaiety, Brooklyn. N. Y., 8-13. 
Parisian Flirts— Ashtabula, O., Jan. 3 : 

Youngstown, 4-6; Penn Circuit. 8-13. 
Pat White Show — Gaiety, Chicago, Jan. .1-6; 

Majestic, Indianapolis, 8-13. 
Record Breakers — Star, Toronto. Ont., Jan. 

1-6: Savoy. Hamilton, Can., 8-18. 
September Morning Glories — Englewood, 

Chicago, Jan. 1-6; Gaiety, Milwaukee. 

8-13. 
Social Follies — Oneida, Jan. 8;.. Niagara 

Falls. 4-6 : Star, Toronto, Ont., 8-13. 
Tango Queens — Savoy, Hamilton, Can., Jan, 

1-6; Cadillac, Detroit, 8-13. 
Tempters — Star, St. Paul, Minn.. Jan. 1-6; 

open 8-13: Century, Kansas City, 15-20. 
Thoroughbreds — Hudson, Schenectady, N. Y„ 



3-6; Bingham ton,. N, Y„ 8-9; Oneida, 10; 

Inter National, Niagara Falls, 11-13. 
Tourists — Empire, Cleveland, O., Jan. 1-6; 

Erie. Pa., 8-0; Ashtabula. O.. 10: Park. 

Youngstown, O., 11-18. 
U. 8. Beauties — Gaiety, Minneapolis. Jan. 

1-6 ; Star. St Paul. Minn.. 8-13. 
Penis Circuit 
Opera House, Newcastle. Pa., Monday. 
Cambria, Johnstown, Tuesday. 
Mlabler, Altoona, Wednesday. 
Orpheum. Harrisbnrg, Thursday. 
Orpheum, York, Friday. 
Academy, Reading. Saturday. 



FOUR MADISON ACTS HERE 

The following quartette of acts, written 
by James Madison, are now swinging 
u round the local circuit of Keith houses: 
Hunting and Francis, Genaro and Gold, 
Cartinell and Harris and Emma Carua and 
Larry Comer. 



• RUSH THEATRE PLANS O. K. 

The Building Department has passed 
the plans for the new theatre to be built 
by the firm of Edward F. Rush and Lyie 
D. Andrews. 




Its. Theatrical Lawyer 

EDWARD J. ADER 

10 So. La Salle St. Chicago 

PractJca In Stata aad U. 3. Court. 

PARKER'S , CARRY US Al I 
JUMPING HORSE f tWl " ' Vi hUl 






The only snrriaafnl portable Cstrry Us AD va tin 
marks*. And ths grsatsst money nuxsr la th. 
amusement world, writ* for facts aad Bgarts. 

C. W. PARKER, Leavenworth, Kaa. 

OrE. 1. Tyler, Sth floor, Imuw ButKUac, ritt. 
burs* PL Oaaa. XsSonald, Boom «. ISO* " 
way, kTsw York City. 



SLAYM AN ALI 

it Producer of n 

ORIENTAL NOVELTIES 



W 



VAUDEVILLE 
CIRCUIT 

SOS DELAWARE BLDC CHICAGO 



Sketch©., Monologues, etc., written to order. 
All material guaranteed. Call or write 
for terms. ALBERT SWEDES, Vaudeville 
Author, Singer Bldg. (Room No. 7), 676 
Newark Ave.. Jersey City . New Jersey. 

D* TSs«« A asVs.' I'ABOMM. «««• Catalog 

Big lime Acts js^i-jj ag-g 

■tamp. Interrlfwm arranjrM for t>/ letter only. 
MABT THAYEB, AIM) Broad 01., PotJjUbo* B, I. 



SONGWRITERS 



f-ree: 



B.F. Keith's Circuit ot Theatres 

A. PAUL rxrm Prssllaal B. P. AUEI. Vkoa-Prea. a Osa. Mgr. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Maaagar of the UNITED 



OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 



NEW YORK cmr 



LOEW REPRESENTATIVES 



FRANK BOHM, Inc. 



Lou Edlaman, Gen. MgT. 



New York City 



MARK LEVY 

Va-odCTuU Manager S02 Putnam Blag. 



LOUIS PINCUS 

Artists' R«p r — .ii tatJ TO Ptttnnm Bldg. 



CHAS. J. FITZPATRICK 

VancfariPs) Managear 328 Pntnaaa MsTg. 



THE WESLEY OFFICE 

Phono 4362 Bryant 62g PsHnam Blstg. 



ABE I. FEINBERG 

Suit* 504 Putnam BUg. TeL Bryant 3864 



Now Playing Lo*w Circuit 

HARRY FLORRIE 

HOLMES & LE VERE 

"In Themselvea'* 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



JAS. B. STANFORD 

ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



PLAYING LOEW TIME 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



^■j, ' anai s»Ba su-Tugm grtasm- sf ni m otapyriah* aa«d xadticata 
— — a~- — — - .~~ -«.«"*-««. ".— —* *^ m.«.. u™««. ~sd «sf ronrwork to-day fcr FKEJC Exgmlaauifan. 

KNICKERBOCKER STUDIOS,i27 Gaiety Theatre Building, N. T. Gty 



SHOW PRINTERS, 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

ENGRAVERS 



National 



PRINTING 
ENGRAVINC 



SPECIAL DESIGNS 
FOR EVERY LINE 



HEW YORK - ;j **y* y: 'Cr1 1 C AGO OF AMUSEMENT' 

ST. LOUIS 



ARTISTS' REPRESENTATIVE A PRODUCER 



Palace Theatre BUg. 



WHICH OF THESE CATALOGUES SHALL WE SEND YOU ?, 

IMEATRICAL CATALOGUE ,;. No ,14 of Orapatx Rrpcrtve. Slot k Yrudf*illr:VCpmeo>; eti' 
f AIR CAIALOOUE 0( 'fatxzL'liwJpUon Aula Races. Motordrome. Stock; Auto. .Horse Shows, etc. 
MAI'.IC CAIALPGUE ot Mjpnollc. Mini) Reading aplrUualWm., Miqi< . r|and Cuff, etc; • 
MiKSfflEL CATALOGUE ol. White and ColorcO W.mtrel and Color'd Mii«C>> Comedf ot All Unas., 
MUSICAL COWEOT CATALOGUE «t 0;rr a vanrtXusn .tSr.tt~s.-ltK and »;thoi.l title 
•iVESlEHN PLATS CATALOG.UE «l Papar (or Mestern llrimn (or Opera Houvr 'jfr I»n' SHpWi. 
CARNUAi CA I ALQGUEo! Printing, tor, featuring Cami.alc Si' ret Fares anil i|Vr i.e-u 
C "CIS and WILD ir>E$\l CATALOGUE ol Complete line ot t-a-.rtie.rn. up >n<JH» Paper 
CarilOGUC 0F,.0ATE4, Price B.lli. StucV Letter*. Banners. l»pe aid Bloc'. Wnrk. elc 
rOLOESSOF ION ROiJaLTV PLAVS »i,h,Co.nplete Lineiot »aper All the old fj.prltes 
COUMPHCIAL CATALfJr.UEol Potters and Cut Ouisot Commercial Oe.lgnj. ;,.:'. 



l^ltE- F=? S GUARANTEED 
A^E-UP BEST MADE 



26 . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 




ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 



&BPJMHMMNF 




BY DR. MAX THOREK 



Surgeon-xn-Chief American Hoipital; Consulting Surgeon Cook 
County Hospital ; Consulting Surgeon Sheridan Park Hospital. 
Chicago; Surgeon White Rata and Actor* Fund, etc., etc 

Th«. sxticUs are written ssclosWsly for th. NEW YORK CLIPPER. 
Question* pertsinin* to hssJtfa, disease, bystens, seU-prsasrratssa, pre- 
TsatSoa of d ts — sso aad Button of gsaersl istsrost to hoslth will bo 
•n.-m-sd in this colmnm. ADDRESS ALL INQUIRIES TO THE NEW 
YORK CLIPPER HEALTH DEPARTMENT, 1CM Broadway, New York 
City. Wbsro spaes «U not permit or <B* subject U aet suitsble for aa 
open answer, letter* will be sent to to* applicant peraonally. Dr. Tbecek 

should not bo o sp o n od to d t sg nn ss or praocribs In thsso ~J~-~. for 
individual " 



ADVICE TO ARTISTS OVER FIFTY 



It is needless to emphasize that people 
who reach the age of fifty years should be 
more careful about their iihysical condi- 
tion, its need and care. For that reason 
they should know some facts which will 
aid them in the sustenance of good health. 

Now, what are the diseases that cause 
death after fifty years? Of the acute dis- 
eases pneumonia and influenza easily hold 
first place. Other acute diseases are com- 
paratively rare after that period. The 
cause of death is usually some chronic 
malady. On the other hand, chronic mal- 
adies usually begin insidiously, vaguely, 
without occasioning much distress or suf- 
fering. Yet they are pressing their fangs 
into the vital organs of the victim, pro- 
gressively and with precision. If we could 
teach the laity how to recognize the be- 
ginning of a chronic disease, a great deal 
of life could be saved. And they should be 
saved, because the diseased conditions can 
usually be recognized by a thorough phys- 
ical examination by an expert in diagnosis. 

The advice of trained men in that re- 
spect is : Every person who has reached 
the age of fifty should be examined once 
or twice a year, to determine the presence 
or absence of morbid conditions. This ex- 
amination should not be cursory but thor- 
ough and minute. ' A physical survey of all 
organs should be made, supplemented by 
painstaking microscopical and chemical 
analyses of urine, feces, etc. The blood- 
pressure should be taken, and by means of 
the electro-cardiogram the heart action 
should be 'accurately ascertained. The 
miouth and its contents — gums, tonsils and 
teeth — should be scrupulously searched for 
the absence or presence of pus pockets, 
which so often cause absorption of noxious . 
matters into the circulation, thereby caus- 
ing serious systemic deterioration. This 
is an amenable condition to treatment, pro- 
vided it is discovered early. 

It is striking how chronic invalids will 
begin to improve when the cause for their 
physical ailments is discovered and proper 
treatment instituted, You frequently meet 
individuals who will say, "If I have 
R right's disease or any other disease I 
don't want to know it until it bothers me." 
How foolish ! Such individuals, were they 
to be informed of the commencement of 
their decrepitude and were they to in- 
stitute proper hygienic measures, change 
perhaps certain phases of their life, do 
certain things, they could undoubtedly 
reap a rich harvest in the matter of re- 
gaining health and extension of life. 

For example :' The other day the mother 
<>f a well-known artist came to Chicago 
from quite n distance on account of cer- 
tain symptoms that developed in the last 
six months. An examination revealed that 
she has a markedly advanced case of can- 
cer of a certain organ which has so far 
progressed and invaded vital organs that 
the case was labeled "incurable." Just 
think of it! Had this woman been ex- 
amined — say a year ago— the beginning of 
the trouble could have been discovered, 
proper treatment instituted, and her life 
could have, perhaps, been saved. She is 
still young — somewhere around SO— and 
many years could have been added to her 



life had she only taken care of herself, as 
every woman should. 

Another example : A prominent actor 
left the office the other dny with a diag- 
nosis of advanced arterio-sclerosia (harden- 
ing of the arteries). He was still a young 
man and felt no ill sensations despite the 
calcification of his arteries, and was of the 
happy-go-lucky type. Notwithstanding all 
that, this man is playing important roles, 
and courts, I fear, the danger of a variety 
of chronic ailments which follow hardening 
of the arteries. 

To artists of both eexes who have 
reached the age of fifty, my advice is : 
Take an inventory of your physical self. 
Satisfy yourself as to the working condi- 
tion of your vital organs. If some repairs 
are needed in some portions of the vital 
machinery do not delay but attend to the 
matter at once. Do not permit conditions 
to progress to a point where repairs are 
impossible. Dissipate such thoughts as "I 
need not worry, for I feel well." We have 
learned through many years of arduons 
labors and experience that persons around 
fifty may feel well and yet be about with 
the beginning, or even an advanced form, 
of organic pathology. 

Artists are a negligent crowd in matters 
of health. At least my experiences have 
taught me that, and it applies to a majority 
of them. 

The inventory alluded to should be taken 
twice annually— once at least when every- 
thing is well, and twice when you have 
reason to suspect the approach of a phys- 
ical disorder. The assurance one gets from 
a thorough physical survey is of no small 
value. If you find that everything is well, 
do not neglect to live up to hygienic de- 
mands and correct errors of living as well 
as yon possibly can. This is rather more 
difficult in the case of the - average artist 
than in the case of the individual in other 
walks of life. However, by proper man- 
agement the desired results may be ob- 
tained. A great fault I find" with artists 
of advanced years is that some overdo 
things in matters of exercise. While, mod- 
eration in exercise is conducive to a great 
deal of good, over-exertion is responsible 
for many a broken down heart or nervous 
system. .Caution in that respect in in- 
dividuals over fifty is good advice. 

In conclusion I want to remind my read- 
ers that the large intestine is harboring a 
great many flora of germs which, accord- 
ing to the late Metchnikoff, are the cause 
of premature physical decay. He has 
pointed out that long life may be obtained 
by eradicating these germs. In order to do 
that he has prescribed the bacillus bul- 
garicus to be taken internally. This par- 
ticular germ-form when ingested neutral- 
izes the evil effects of the harmful Intestinal 
bacteria, and thereby a condition is done 
away with which is looked upon by prom- 
inent men as a menace to good health and 
longevity. Since the ingestion of the bacil- 
lus bulg&ricus is harmless, it is good prac- 
tice and well worth our while to avail our- 
selves of this wonderful scientific fact and 
take advantage of it. I recommend the in- 
gestion of bulgaxic bacilli by artists of all 
ages, especially those over fifty. The prep- 
aration can be obtained in any high-class 
pharmaceutical honse. 

Another word : Prevent the accumulation 
of too much fat after you have reached the 
age of fifty, » 



CANCER OF THE MOUTH 

C. W. 8., New York, writes: 

Dear Doctor : On the 2nd of October last 
I had a cancer removed from my mouth at 
a cancer Sanitarium in Rome, N. Y. The 
cancer was on the inside of my mouth, on 
the right cheek. It is all healed now and 
iu good condition, there being no signs of 
it any more. I have, however, several hard 
kernels or glands, aa they term tbem, at 
that point and under the jaw, besides a 
little swelling on the side of my neck and 
the cords running down to the collar bone 
and to the shoulder are quite stiff and sore. 
I wrote to the doctor who operated on my 
cheek, stating the condition I am in, and 
he answered me, stating that he could see 
nothing serious. He gave me no advice, 
and therefore I am turning to you for 
counsel. I am 62 years "of age. have been 
in the show business all my life and am 
enjoying exceptionally good health other- 
wise. Your early reply in The New Yobs 
Clippeb will be very much appreciated. 

REPLY. 

While the removal of a cancer is of great 
importance, it is of equal importance that 
recurrence should he guarded against. The 
enlarged glands may be due to a secondary 
infection of so-called "regional extension," 
by which is meant a tendency to spread. 
In cases like yours the X-rays. and radium 
have' given wonderful results. The latter is 
to be preferred. Do not delay. Get radium 
applications to the enlarged glands at once. 
See if they ..diminish in size under this 
treatment. If not, write me again. 



muscular rheumatism). Keep your bowels 
and kidneys active. Keep, away from too 
much nitrogenous foods (meat, eggs, fish, 
etc.) Live on a vegetable and cereal diet, 
drink lots of water, avoid sugars and fer- 
mented liquors; take moderately and care- 
fully the starches and fats. Turkish baths 
once a week. For local use. in combination 
with thorough massage of the affected 
muscles, use the following: 

Chloroform liniment. . . .3 ounces. 

Tinct. of iodine 2 ounces. 

Tinct. of aconite root. . .2 drachms. 



CHILBLAINS 

E. S, New York, N. Y, writes: 
Dear Doctor : For the past five years, as 
soon as the. first cold wave strikes the city, 
my feet begin to swell and itch. Presently 
they are not only swollen but raw. I have 
tried a number of remedies, such as paint- 
ing it with iodine,' bathing the inflamed 
parts with hot water, etc., but have thus 
far found no relief. When I am out in the 
air or in a cool place, my feet do not hurt, 
but the moment I am in a theatre or any 
room that is. warm, they begin to itch and 
throb. Thanking, you in advance for any 
advice you may give me, and asking for an 
early reply, I am, etc. 

REPLY. 

Constitutional conditions, interferences 
with the circulation; etc., are responsible 
for chilblains. Increase your resisting 
powers by hygienic measures, open-air ex- 
ercises, walks, etc. A method much lauded 
for the treatment of this condition is to 
immerse the affected parts once or twice a 
day in warm water; this is followed by 
gentle friction with spirits of camphor, and 
powdering with one part of salycilate of 
bismuth to nine parts of starch. Another 
method is to use hydrogen peroxide. This 
has been highly recommended. The affected 
parts are bathed in peroxide diluted with 
equal parts' of previously boiled water, still 
hot, for fifteen or twenty minutes twice a 
day. This treatment can be. carried out 
even if the chilblains are cracked and 
ulcerated, though it is well to diminish the 
strength of the peroxide if much pain and 
irritation la produced by the application. 
Two or three days of this treatment is said 
to be very effective. 



MUSCULAR RHEUMATISM 

Jfr. D. L. Princeton, Mo., writes : 
Dear Doctor : A little information on the 
following case, in The New York Clipper. 
would be highly appreciated. I am in the 
show business and enjoy good health in 
every way with the exception of muscular 
pains in various parts of my body. These 
pains are worse in the morning, especially 
across the kidneys and under the shoulder- 
blades. These pains shift to various posi- 
tions. After being about for about twenty 
minutes the pains leave me and I am all 
right again until next morning. I nave 
been bothered like that for the past four 
years. 

REPLY. 
Yon undoubtedly have myalgia (chronic 



LOSS OF APPETITE 

Mr. J. L. 1 1., Joplin, Mo., writes : 
Dear Dr. Thorek : I am in the theatrical 
profession, am thirty-three years of age, 
and am suffering from a lack of appetite. 
I cannot eat as much as I would like to. 
I think something serious is the matter 
with me, although I feel otherwise fairly 
well. Please advise me in The Clippeb 
what to do. Thanks. 

REPLY. 
Loss of appetite per se is seldom a se- 
rious proposition. In some cases it is a 
blessing. It is Nature's way of Baying that 
tbo imbibition of food would do harm, and 
man is the only nnimnUjvithout sense 
enough to heed this warning; Just reflect 
for a moment : When a dog or a horse is 
ill — when their appetite is gone — they will 
retire to some secluded spot, stop eating, 
no matter how much one urges them, and 
will give their intestinal tract a rest, -until 
hunger announces to their intellect that 
food may again be taken to supplant the 
. demands of the bodies. It is different with 
the human animal. When one of us is sick, 
our wives, mothers, and friends are at once 
out on a hunting expedition to round up 
something that will .appeal to the palate, 
and often they make us eat a lot of stuff, 
whether we want it or not. "If* good. for 
you," is their only excuse. You ask "why," 
and the usual answer is, "My Heavens, you 
can't expect to go on without eating; you 
simply have to eat, that's nil." Such fal- 
lacious arguments lead to trouble. You 
better wait and do not gorge yourself. 
When your system will need, food it will 
ask for it via the appetite route. 



SPANISH-FLY FIENDS 

Mr. D. C. B., Seattle, Wath'^ write* : 
Dear Doctor : A friend of mine has taken 
Spanish Fly by mistake. He was pretty 
sick for some time, bat is better now. What 
is best to do if one takes an overdose of 
the fly? An early reply in The Clippeb 
-will be highly appreciated by an admirer 
of The Clivper'b Health Dept. - 

REPLY. 

A great number of cases in which great 
harm resulted from taking Spanish-fly by 
professional people have in the past three 
years reached my observation. There seems 
to be a sort of superstition in the pro- 
fession about the virtues of Spanish-fly. It 
does a great deal of harm and positively no 
good. It may prove • dangerous. If taken 
in substantial doses it gives a burning sen- 
sation in the throat and stomach, pain and 
difficulty in swallowing, vomiting of muens 
and blood, diarrhoea with blood and slime, 
incessant desire to pass water, high tem- 
perature, quick pulse, loss of sensibility 
and convulsions, if an overdose is taken, 
enhance vomiting at once. Give white of 
egg, gruel, etc. Avoid giving fats and oil 
Later hot baths ; linseed poultices to 
abdomen. 



STRICTURE OF FOOD-PIPE 

Mr. B. J., Louisrillc, Ky.. writes : 
Dear Doctor: Some time ago I have 
written yon about a stricture of the eso- 
phagus, with which I have been afflicted. 
You advised me to have it dilated. I have 
been doing that for about six months. I 
am much improved. Would yon advise that 
I continue the dilatations? Please let me 
know through The Clipper- Thanks, etc. 

REPLY. 
Go right on dilating the constriction to 
prevent recontraction. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



BOSTONIANS SING 
RAGTIME OPERA 
AT THE COLUMBIA 

Frank Finney and his new "fan parade" 
opened to a packed holiday matinee, Janu- 
ary 1 at the Colombia, and pat in a day 
and evening of three shows, the last one 
starting at 11 :15 p. m. 

At the opening scene, the burlesque au- 
thor is pondering as to what to work, and 
the . devil advises him. to have "plenty of 

j -•» • * :3 l ' 

girls" first and the rest would follow. 

The successive scenes show Madison 
Square, the Battery at midnight, Mott 
Street, a roadhonse on the Hudson, the 
stage door, and Nero's Palace. 

Mr. Finney appears first as a "white 
wing" street sweeper, and later as a stage- 
door keeper and other characters. 

Geo. S. Banks as the gawky messenger 
with the crying voice gave valuable sup- 
port in the comedy line. 

Ida Emerson played the role of Mrs. 
Fryde, in search of a lost nephew, in her 
usual classy manner and her .voice retains 
much of its strength and charm. 

Florence Mills displayed her extensive 
wardrobe, and her array of gowns, which 
included at least twelve different creations, 
were real marvels, ranging from a very 
fetching chemise, which she dashed on but 
for a second to a full length black fur coat 
trimmed with ermine. All of them were 
novel and marvelous. 

Mae Holden played a newlywed in the 
soubrette role and fun length, knee length 
and no-length dresses kept her busy, get- 
ting in and out of them. 

John P. Griffith played the jolly old 
rounder in clever style and he sang and 
yodled in his effective manner. 

Emma Harris performed her part of the 
doings very satisfactorily, putting over one 
or two numbers nicely. 

Sam Lee and Al Shaw, the dancing boys, 
interpolated their widely varied exhibition 
of steps at appropriate times and their 
specialty was a pleasing feature. Murray 
Bernard was the other half of the newly- 
wed pair and had something to do with 
the plot, which the author lost somehow 
right at the climax of the burlesque on 
Virginius, in which Finney was a funny 
Nero and Griffith an energetic Virginius. 
Arthur Kelly and Eddie Brennan helped 
out. 

The principals also appeared in operatic 
roles, and at the Instigation of the door- 
keeper converted the regulation operatic 
solos into a big ragtime jamboree. Miss 
Mills as Carmen, Miss Holden as Margu- 
erite and Miss Emerson as Butterfly looked 
the parts. A Scotch number with Miss* 
Mills and Mr. Finney doing a fling made a 
big hit. A sightseeing auto caused a lot 
of fun by its balking, and finally got started 
by a moving picture effect. 

The chorus is composed of eighteen girls, 
including Patsy Gray, Dot Richards, Ollie 
Jania, Sylvia Tbbin, Roselle Myers, Elsie 
Mills, Anna Conway, Irma Bartoletti, Bay 
La Faver, Rose Reld, Ethel Sadler, Jackie 
Snnfield, Alice Seville, Vie Wlegand, Anna 
Harris Rose Glenwood Mae LaMont, Helen 
May. Their costumes were a bright suc- 
cession of novel designs applied to showy 
material 



PRICE MANAGES "SPRINGTIME" 
B. D. Price has been obtained by Klaw 
and Erianger to act as both agent and man- 
ager for the "Miss Springtime'* company 
organized for Boston. 



Y/S/SS/S//S//S/SSS//S/SS/S//S//////S///S//S///SSSS///S///S/////. 



6<fi 



They're QtT* 

For lOlT 



The gong has sounded — Let the beat song 
win. Chai. K. Harris, as usual, in the lead 
with a list of the best ballads and novelty 
songs ever turned out by any staff of 
Song Writers in this country. 

PICK THE WINNER 



** 



My Little China Doll 



»» 



ORIENTAL SERENADE 
A real Novelty number, for real singers, by 



VAN & SCHENCK and JACK YELLEN 



St" 



"Let Him Miss You 
Just a Little Bit 

(And He'll Think More of You) 

A catchy stasia or double number. A real bit, 
by three Hit writers— 

CHAS. K. HARRIS and VAN A 
SCHENCK 



"She Comes From 
a Quaint Little Town 
In Pennsylvania 

The most unique, ayncop-at-rd song •ucc«at In 
many y rwtrs, by tb« wfill-known writ err* 

BILLY VANDERVEER A WILL J. HART 



•» 



u 



You Came, You Saw. 
You Conquered" 

Too ballad beautiful In 12-s tuna. 

By CHAS. K. HARRIS. 

Comment upon tble eonar la unaecaaaary. 
It will speak for Itself. 

Also the reigning- eong succees of America 
VAN A SCHENCK'S 

knock-out bit— 

"It's a Long. Long Time 
Since I've Been Home" 

By JOSEPHINE E. VALE 

"Come Back" (Let's Be 
Sweethearts Once More) 

By CHAS. K. HARRIS 

A real "ll v." ballad that will n arer dta. 

Also the following blgsong hits, by tb. HH 

vntattr 

CHAS. K. HARRIS 

"All I Want Is a Cottage, 
Some Roses and Yon'* 
"The Story of a Soul" 
"Songs of Yesterday" 

And Joe. E. Howard's wonderful eong success. 



99 



"Love Me Utile, 
Love Me Long 

ALL PUBLISHED BY 

CHAS. K. HARRIS 

Broadway & 47th St., New York City 



Well Folks Here Comes the Circus 

Billy Watson 

Ts BEEF 
TRUST 



10 Tons of Girls 



A Cyclone of Laughter, That's All 



COLUMBIA THEATRE, Broadway and 47th St., N. Y. C, Week of Jaa. 8 
CASINO THEATRE, Fbtbosh Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y., Week of Jaa. IS 
EMPIRE THEATRE, Newark, N. J. . . . Week of Jaa. 22 



BREAKING RECORDS EVERYWHERE 



Want Healthy, Good-looking Girls Anytime. 



A REAL AGENT ERNEST PIRKEY 



Open for engagement balance of winter. Sober, experienced and honett. Know tbe buiincaa 
; height. 6 feet: weight, 200; blac * 
Per, atldrroa. Canton, Mitnouri. 



from A to Z. Age, 36 years; height, o leet ; weighty ^200; black hair, blue cyea and able-bodied. 
Can give beat of refercne 



VAN 



AT LIBERTY 



MARY 



MILLER and YOUNG 

Ail-Around Comedian Seubrett. end Ingenue 

Stock — Repertoire — Mutical-Comedy Rapid-Fire Specialists 

VAN V. MILLER, 371 Krupp St., Detroit, Mich. 

Wanted, for "Southern Beauties" 
Musical Comedy Company 

r. Baritone, or harmony trio, that can play parte. Send photo. State all £ 
yeara without layoff. Small Show. Make salary aame. Can u»e good cl 



Tab. Tenor, 

Out eeven years without layoa. 

write BARNEY T ASS ELL. Mar.. Strand Theatre. Cambridge. Ohio 



Grit letter, 
good chorua girl. 



WANTED FOR THE 



nth specialties, must be real one, capable of pla/lnf Ifttne juveniles; IngeStM with 
y p e H . ltl a a . Send photos, programmes and all. No time lor correspondence. Join on wire. 
Unlimited engagement to good people; two bills a week. Two matinees! He Sundays. Now in 
our twenty-first week. Address all mail to TED DALLEY. Home Theatre, rf.t^hjn.en, Kan. 

Wanted for Permanent Stock 

People in all lines. One bill a week. No fancy salaries. Must join on wire. 
Tickets if necessary. Wire lowest quick. 



American Theatre 



MARGARET DREW PLAYERS 



Billings, Mont. 



WANTED FOR ROY E. FOX'S 
POPULAR PLAYERS 

First Class Orchestra Piano Player, to doable baritone or some band instrument 
Join on wire. Rogers, Texas, until Tan. 13; Caldwell. Texas, until January 27. 
Other useful repertoire people, write for the Number Three Show. ROY FOX 

BROWN and McCORMACK 

■ In Vaudeville 



BERT 



GRACE 



America*. Youngest Colored Entertainer*. 



A. 

IM 
D 



Dfraetioai TOM JONES 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



U. B. O. CIRCUIT 

NEW YORK CITY. 
Palace— Bessie Clayton ft Co.— Cblc Sale— Claire 

Rochester- — Anna Wheston and Harry Carroll — 

Ishakawa Jack. (Foor more to fill.) 

Colonial— Mack * Walker— Bert Melroee-r-Bene 
Baker — Heckman, Shaw A Campbell — "Girl with 
1000 Ryes" — Frank A Toby — Moon A Morris. 

Royal — Joe Towle — Auatrallan Crelxbton.* — Mc- 
Shane ft Hathaway — "The Miracle.'* 

River-ride— Willie Weeton— Seven Bracka— Edna 
Goodrich Co. — Beale ft Patterson — Jack Wllaon 
Trio. 

AUuunbra — "RnbeTllle" — George Lyons — Mamie 
King 4 Co.— Nonette — Montgomery ft ferry — Mllo 
— Pletel 4 Cushlng — Deforest & Kearna — Van L4eu 
Trio — Raymond Wllbert — Harry Green ft Co. 

BROOKLYN. 

Buabwick — The Demacos — Harry Fern ft Co. — 
Chaa. Olcott — "Girlies' Gambol" — Roland Travers 
* Co. 

Orphenm — Better Bros. — Primre3« F our — R, 4 
G. Dooley — Jasper — Houdln! — a. 4 H. Temple — 
Clark 4 Bergman. 

ATLANTA. GA. 

Forsyth — Yvette — Frank Cromlt — Page, Back * 
Mack — Chung Wa Four — Rita Mario Orchestra— 
Cbaa. Howard 4 Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Keith's— Pinkie — ATellng 4 IJoyd — Brensan 4 
Powell — Jnllna Tanoen— Tbeo. Koaloff— The Lerel- 
loe— Meenan'e Dora. 



YRUDEWL. 




Lyrio (First Half)— Avellng 4 Lloyd— Carlisle 4 
Homer. (Last Half)— Bernle 4 Baker— Skipper, 
Kennedy 4 Riv es. 

BUFFALO. K. Y. 

Shea's— Locket 4 Waldron — Cartmell 4 Harris — 
Alf. Loyal— Dorothy Granville Co.— Avon Four— 
DeBIere. 

BALTIMORE, US. 

Maryland— WhlteOcld 4 Ireland— Herbert's Dogs 
— Kennedy 4 Bnrt — Edwin George — Venlta Flts- 
bugh — Lander Bros. — Wm. Caxton 4 Co. — Blossom 
Seeley 4 Co. — Connolly Trio— "California Boys' 
Bond." 

CLCVELAHD, OHIO. 

Keith's Ruth at. Denis— Loney Haskell— Alex- 
ander Bros. — S. Miller Kent Co. — Santley 4 Nor- 
ton — Weber 4 DIebl— Emma Cams— Bradna 4 
Derrick. 

' CTNCTHNATI, OHIO. 

Keith's- Bensee 4 Balrd— David Capirsteln— 
Edwin Arden — Cole. Rossell 4 Davis— Dainty 
Marie — Conroy's Models. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
Piedmont (First Half) — Warn 4 Van— American 
Comedy Foor. (Laat Half)— Kltner, Taylor 4 
McKay — Three Robs — Young 4 Brown. 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 
Keith's (First Half)— Kelly 4 Wilder Co.— 
Weston 4 Claire. (Laat Half) — Selma Braata — 
Ed. Morton Peggy Bremen 4 Co. 
COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
Keith's — la Argentina — Al Herman— Era Taylor 
4 Co.— Clark 4 Hamilton— Blcknell— Francla 4 
Boaa — Daisy Jean. 

CHARLESTON. B. 0. 

taajfapas- . (First Half)— Four Paldrone— Foor 
Entertainers — Ktbel McDooougb. (Last Half) — 
Cecil Weston 4 Co. 

DAYTON. OHIO. 

Keith's — Nan Halperla — "The Stampede" — Dyer 
4 Fay— Witt 4 Winter— Hull 4 Durkln— The 
Crisps— Lids McMillan. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Temple — Geo. N. Rosener — Brlce 4 King — Three 
Hlckey Bros. — Erne Antonio Trio— Johnson 4 
Harty— Ktrr 4 Nerko— Palfrey. Hall 4 Brown. 
ERIE. 74. 
Colonial— Gnnne 4 Alberts — E. B. Olive 4 Co. 
Toots Pake— Hayden 4 Hajden— Rouble Blmma. 
GRAND RAPIDS. MICK. 
Empreaa -Hugh Herbert 4 Co. — Jack 4 Bessie 

Morgan — Knapp 4 Cornelia — Nowaek — 0*0. Dam- 

erel 4 Co. 

HAMILTON, CAN. 

Temple— Gerard 4 Clark— Will Wart 4 Girls- 
Nolan 4 Nolan — Fay, Two Coleya 4 Fay— Llbo- 

•"--'• INDIANAPOLIS, 1ND. 

Grand— Hurley 4 Hurley -Capt. Anson 4 Daugh- 
ter — Marie Stoddard — Four Husbands — Leach Wel- 
len Trio— Chaa. E. Evans 4 Co. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Keith's (First Half) — The Berrens— Frank Mul- 
lane. (Laat Half) — Welae Troupe — Conroy 4 
O'Donnell— Henshaw 4 Avery. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Keith's— Pope ft Uno— World Dancers— Pariah ft 
Pent— Will Oakland 4 Co.— Alaska Trio— Sylves- 
ter 4 Vance. 

MONTREAL, CAN. 

Orpheus — Bonlta 4 Hearn — Moran 4 Wleser — 
"Follea D' Amour" -Mrs. Gene Hughes Co. 
NORFOLK. VA. 
Academy— Leipzig— Alex. O'Nell ft Sexton — 
Roeers Comedy Pets. (La it Half)— Kerr ft 
Weston — "What Happened to RnthT"— -Fern 4 
Davis — "Sport In Alps"— Lewis ft Walte. 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 
Prinoaaa (First Half)— Bernle 4 Bake-r— Skip- 
per. Kennedy ft Rives. (Laat Half)— Avellng ft 
Lloyd— Carlisle 4 Bomer. 

PROVIDENCE. B. I. 

Keith's— Bob Albright— "Garden of Surprise*'"' 
— DePace Opera Co. — Leo Been — Arthur Sullivan 
& Co. — "Five of Clubs" — Donovan ft Lee — Halen 
4 Hunter. "* 

F-TTSBUROH. PA. 

Davis — Lovenberg Sisters — Three Alex — Three 
Stelndel Bros.— Eddie Foy 4 Co.— J. C. Nugent 4 
Co.— Huaaey ft Woraley. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Keith's— Mildred Macomber Co.— Harris 4 
Uanlon — Dooley ft Rugel — Alex. Carr ft Co. — 



Renee Florlgny — Van 4 Bell — Three Rosaires — 
Bert Hanlon — Jas. J. Morton — The Pucks. 
ROCHESTER, N. T. 
i Temple — Dunbar's Darkles — Margaret Young- 
blood — Dong Fong Gue 4 Co. — Allan Brooks ft Co. 
— Fonzlllo Sisters — Dugan & Raymond — Mlrano 
Bros. — Five Florimonda. 

ROANOKE, VA. 
Roanoke (First Half)— Kltner, Taylor ft McKay 
—Three Bobs — Young 4 Brown. (Laat Half) — 
Ward ft Van — American Comedy Four. 

RICHMOND, VA. 
lyrio (First Half) — Kerr 4 Weston — "What 
Happened to Ruth" — Fern ft Davis — "Sport In 
Alps"— Lewis 4 White. (Laat Half)— Leipzig— 
Alex. O'Nell ft Sexton — Roaer'a Comedy Pets. 
8 AV ANN AH, G A. 
Savannah (First Half) — Welae Troupe— Conroy 
ft O'Donnel — Henahaw 4 Avery. (Laat Half)— 

The Berrens — Frank Mullauo. 

TOLEDO. OHIO. 

Keith's— Musical Johnsons— "Prosperity" — Frank 
Le Dent — Moore & Keager —Tom Edwards 4 Co. — 
Edna Aug— Bob Bailey ft Co. — Welch's Minstrels. 
TORONTO, OAK. 

Shsa's — Laurie 4 Bronsoo — Four Danube* — 
Dnnedln Duo— Howard . 4 Clark — Baby Helen — 
Holmes 4 Buchanan — Thos. Swift & Co. 
WASHINGTON, D. 0. 

Keith's— Marlon Weeks — Harry Bereaford ft Co. 
— Don Burke ft Girls — Smith ft Austin Co.— 
Valerie Bergere & Co.— Mellllo Sisters — Fay Tem- 
pleton — Hofford 4 Chain. 

YOUNGBTOWN. OHIO. 
Keith' 1— Rae E. Ball— Kelly ft Calvin— Jas. Car- 
son ft Co. — Gordon ft Rica — Georgia Earl ft Co. — 
Big City Four. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL, 
Majestic — Franklyn Ardell ft Co. — Orth ft Dooley 

— Arthur Dengon — Halllgan ft Sykea — Helene 
Davis — Kltaro Jape. 

Palace— Eva Tangnay — Llnne'a Classic Dancers 
— Lydell ft HIggins — Stuart Barnes — Ward Bros. — 
Duffy ft Lorenxe — Nedarveld'a Baboons. 
CALGARY, OAK. 

Orpheom — Mme. Chllson Ohrman — Foster Ban 
ft Co.— Farber Girls— Geo. Noah ft Co. — Howard's 
Ponlea — Mljarea — Harry L* Maaon. 
DENVER, COLO. 

Orpheum — Bert Levy — Louie London — Marie 
Fltaglbbon — Mullen 4 Coogan — Silver 4 Duval — 
Stone 4 Kallsa— Sarah Padden 4 Co. 
DULUTH, MINN. 

Orpheum — Morgan Dancers — Benny 4 Woods — 
Maurice Burkhart — Keane 4 Mortimer — Zeda ft 
Hoot — Ryan 4 Lee, 

x>ES leoiJTEfl, IOWA. 

Orpheum — "Forest Fire" — Clown Seal— Pat Bar 
rett— Williams 4 Wolfua— Edward Marshall— 
Rlcbe 4 Bnrt — Morton 4 Glass. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Orpheum — "Bride Shop" — Alice Lyndon Doll 4 
Co. — Everest's Monkeys — John Gelger— Maud Lam- 
bert — Ernest Ball— Dorothy Shoemaker ft Co. 
LOB ANOELES, CAL. 
Orpheum— Bankuff ft Girlie — Anna Chandler — 
Six Water Lilies— "Lots 4 Lots Of It"— Ernie 
Potts ft Co.— M. Lightner ft Alexander— Savoy ft 
Brennan. 

LINCOLN, XEB. 
Orpheum — Raymond ft Caverley — Ryan ft Bigga 
— "Cranberries" — Frank Carmen — "Flaning" — 
Sophie Tucker ft Co. — Bert Fltzglbbon. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Orpheum — Dorothy Jardon — Webb ft Burns — 
Corbett Sbeppard ft Donoghue — Maria Lo— Harry 
4 Anna Seymour — Hubert Dyer 4 Co. — Flanagan 
4 Edwards. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Orpheum— White ft Cavsnagh— Seven Honey 
Boys— Allen 4 Howard — Marshall Montgomery — 
Harvard Stafford ft Co. — Apdale's Animals — Dora 
ft Halperln. 



Orpheum— Els ft French — Chaa. Grapewln ft Co. 
— Kramer ft Kent — Brltt Wood — Florenae Duo— 
Frtscoe— Lunette Sisters. ■„ . ■ 

HEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Orpheum -Mm. Langtry— Willing, Bentley ft 
Willing— Walsh Lynch ft Co.— Alexander McFay- 
den — Bernard ft Scarth — Dancing Kennedys — Da 
Witt, Burns ft Torreoce.' 

OMAHA, NEB. 

Orpheum Laura Nelson Hall ft Co. — Whiting ft 
Bnrt — Scotch Lada ft Lassies — Musical Oeralda — 
Halloo ft Fuller- Joste Heather ft Co. — Three 
Ankers. 

OAKLAND, C A T .. 

Orpheum— Clayton White ft Co.— Mr. ft Mrs. 
Jlmmle Barry — Nellie Nichols— The Volunteers — 
Lottie Homer— Ollle Young ft Atirll— Fluke's 
Moles. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Orpheum — Phyllis Neilson -Terry — Donohne ft 

Stewart— Bnrdella Patterson — John ft Winnie Hen- 
nlng — Milt Collins — Flying H em ' s Irwin ft 
Henry. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Orpheum — Hermlne Shone ft Co. — Al ft Fannie 
Stedman — Oliver ft 01 p — Eatella Wentvrortb — 
Walter Brower — Foor -Readings— Wood 4 Wyde — 
Beeman 4 Anderson. 

RAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Orpheum— Muriel Worth ft Co.— Al Shayne — 
Ronalr, Ward 4 Perron — Parkea ft Conway — Stan 
Stanley Trio — "Age of Reason"— asoooey ft Bent — 
Mayo ft Tally. 



SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON AND FRESNO. 
Orpheum— Mason ft Keeler Co. — Rena Parker — 
Mario ft Duffy — "Miniature Revue" — Morris ft 
Campbell — Eddie Leonard 4 Co. — Russell ft Ward 
Co. 

ST. PAUL. MINN. 
Orpheum— Elsa Ryan ft Co. — "Tempest ft Sun- 
shine" — Cantwell ft Walker— Craig Campbell— 
Arco Bros. — The Brlghtous. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orphenm — Orvllle Harrold — Willing ft Jordan — 
Vallrclta's Leopards — Imhoff, Conn ft Coreene — 
Martin ft Fabrlnl— Creasy ft Dayne. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Orpheum— "Dancing Girl of DelhJ"— Five Bel- 
glum Girls — McKay 4 Ardlne — Nell O'Connell — 
Kenny & HoUla— Mme. Dorla 4 Co. — Bernard 4 
Harrington. 

VANCOUVER, OAK. 
Orpheum — PUcer & Douglas — Trovato— Odlva — 
Adair ft Adelphi— Myrl ft Delmar— Inez Macanley 
ft Co. — Alleen Stanley. 

WINNIPEG, CAN. 
Orphenm — Harnko Onnk — Nurseryland — Allan 
Dlncbart ft Co.— Ames ft Wlnthrop— Mile.- Deltxel 
— Beatrice Herford. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

NEW YORK CITY. 

American (First Half)— Belle ft Mayo— Auatra- 
llan Stanley— Penlkoff ft Rose— Bolger Bros. — 
Barry McCormack & Co.— Armstrong ft Ford — King 
ft King. (Last Half)— Luta Bros.— Lewis ft Nor- 
ton — "Ankles"— Hauley, Lum 4 Smith. 

Boulevard (First Half) — Harris ft Lyman — Bell 
Boy Trio— The CromweUa. (Last Half) — Comala 
ft Adele — Holmes ft LaVere— Morris ft Miller— Al 
Lawrence. 

Lincoln Square (First Half)— Hill ft Dale— Tay- 
lor & LeCompte — Clinton ft Rooney— "Bachelor 
Dinner" — Walter Jamea. (Last Hair) — John HIg- 
gins — Cooper ft Hartman — Frantic Rice — "The 
Harmless Bug" — Hoey ft Lee — Gliding O'Mearaa. 

Avenue B (First Half)— Joe Desly ft Sister- 
Burns ft Kissen. (Last Half) — Little Lord Roberta 

Greeley Square (First Half)— Three Norrle Sis- 
tors — Pcalson ft Rose — Lou Anger— Helen Page ft 
Co.— Cbaae ft La Tour. (Laat Half) — Reed ft 
Wright Girls — Dorothy Burton ft Co.— Eddie Borden 
ft Co. — Rose Schmettan ft Bro. 

Delanoey Street (First Half) — Comala ft Adele— 

Buch Bros. — "Ankles" — Hanley, Lum ft Smith 

Bose Schmettan ft Bro. Hast Half) — Carurny 
Bros. — Lebono ft Dupree— Adlrsn — Mabel Harper — 
Walter Perclval ft Co. — Clinton ft Rooney — Carl 
Pumsnn Troupe. 

National (First Half)— John HIggins— Williams 
ft Segal — "The Harmless Bog" — Hoey ft Lee — 
Hughes Musical Trio. (Last Half)— Stetson ft 
Hnber — Leonsrd ft Louie — Lou Auger — Breeu 
Fsmlly. ■ i 

Orpheum ( First Half) — Reno — Cooper ft Hartman 
— Lchoue & Dupree — Miller ft Kreako— Annie Kent 
— Waltor Perclval ft. Co. — Al Lawrence — Gliding 
O'M.arae. (Last Half) — George W. Moore-- 

Camllle Peraonl ft Co.— Walter Jamea— Harris ft 
Lymsn — "Bachelor Pinner" — Hughes Musical Trio. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half)— Cartway Bros. — 
Nevlns ft Gordon — Camilla Peraonl ft Co. — Mabel 
Harper— Carl Damann Troupe. (Last Hair)— 
Bolger Bros. — Belle ft Mayo — Helen Page ft Co. — 
Clark ft McCullongh — Pernlkoff ft Rose. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Bijou (First Half)— Swain's Rats ft Cats- 
Holmes ft LaVere — Frankle Rice — Dorothy Burton 
ft Co. — Lewie ft Norton — Lntx Bros. (Laat Half) 
—Hill ft Dale— Miller ft Kreako— "Truthful Liar" 

- Cbaae ft LaTonr — Buch Bros. 

De Kalb (First Half)— Brant ft Aubrey— Homer 
Llnd ft Co. — Maudie DeLong — Al Golem Troupe. 
(Laat Half)— Three Norria Sisters— Bums ft 
Kissen — Jessie Haywood ft Co. — Maud Muller — 
The Cromwella. 

Warwick (First Half)— Ethel Mae Hall ft Co.— 
Minetta Duo. (Last Half) — Nevlns 4 Gordon— 
Dulcle Hall ft Co. 

Fulton (First Half)— Stetson 4 Hnber— Cook ft 
Stevens — Hal Crane ft Co. — Maud Muller — Breen 
Family. (Last Half) — Reno — Mlnetto Duo — Annie 
Kent— Barry McCormack ft Co. — Armstrong ft Ford 
— Swain's Rats ft Cats. 

Palace (First Half)— Little Lord Roberts— Dul- 
cle HaU ft Co. 

ATLANTA, OA. 
O, 0. H.— Ben ft Hasel Mann — Hawthorne ft 
Leater — Six Stylish 8teppera. 

BALTIMORE, KD. 
Hippodrome — "Lamb's MannTktna" — O'Brien ft 
Buckley— Francla Renault— "Whirl of Song ft 
Dance — Cook ft Lorcnt — Anionics. 
BOSTON, MASS. 
Orpheum (First Half) — Mas Marvin— Sorority 
Girls— Rice ft - Francis — "Just for Inatance" — 
Gould ft Lewla — Barbour Troupe. (Laat Half) — 
BeTle ft. Eva — Archer ft Belford — Gray ft Klunker 
— Fascinating Fllrta— Jimmy Lyons. 

St. Jamea (First Half)— Flake ft Fallon— Salva- 
tion So* — Ferguson ft Sunderland. (Last Half) — 
P. George— Norwood ft Hall— Holland Romance — 
Percy Pollock ft Co. — Johnson, Howard ft Llaette. 
FALL RTVER, MASS. 
Bijou (Flrat Half)— Belle ft Eva— Grey ft Klnn- 
ker — "Fascinating Fllrta" — Jimmy Lyons — Archer 
ft Belford. (Last Half)— Mae Marvin— Rice ft 
Francis — "Jnat for Inatance" — Gould & Lewla — 
Barbour Troupe. 

NEWARK, K. J. 
Majestic (Flrat Half)— Leonard ft Louie— Mor- 
ris ft Miller— Lady Suda Noy— Truthful Liar- 
Eddie Borden ft Co. (Last Half) — Brandt ft 
Aubrey— Homer Unci ft Co.— Bell Boy Trio— King 

ft King. . _ 

HEW KOCHELLE, N. T. 
LoeWa (First Half)— Brown ft Jackson— Clark 
ft McCullongn. (Last Half)— Allen ft Francla— 
Maudie DeLong — Cook 4 Stevens. 



PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
Emery (Flrat Half)— P. George — Norwood 4 
HaU— Holland Romance — Percy Pollock 4 Co. — 
Johnson. Howard 4 Llaette. (Laat Half)— Flske 
ft Fallon— Salvation Sue — Ferguson ft Sunderland 
— Sorority Girls. 

BPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
Plaza (Flrat Half)— George W. Moore— Mer- 
cedes Clark ft Co. — "Cadets de Gascoyne." 
TORONTO, CAN. 
Yonge Street— White, Mullaly ft White— 
"Danny" Howard ft Sadler — "Parla Fashion Shop" 
— Laurie Ordway — Namna Foor. 

POLI CIRCUIT 

BRXDQEPORT, CONN. 

PolTa (Flrat Half)— Billy Rogers— Fentel, Stark 
ft Co. (Last Half)— Quinn ft Lee — Navaaaar Girls. 

Plaxa (First Half) — Blssett ft Scott— Sports In 
the Alps. (Three to fill.) (Laat Half) — Geo. 
Bart— Mr. ft Mrs. Alison. (Two to fill.) 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palace (First Half)— Neher ft Kapel— Berllo 
Sisters — "We, Ds ft Co."— Dahl ft Glllen— Larry 
Reluy ft Co. (Last Half)— Montrose ft Allen- 
Alice Nelson ft Co. — Fentel Stark ft Co.— Lewis 
Belmont & Lewis. 

Poll's (First HaU)— Chuck Haas— Foster ft Fer- 
guson — Van Bergen ft Coaler. (Last Half)— 
(To dll)— Brandell ft Bell— J. K. Kvnmett ft Co.— 
Gene Green ft Co. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Poll's (First Half)— Qulnn ft Lee — Navassar 
Girls. (Last Half)— Blssett ft Scott— Dahl ft 
Glllen. 

Bijou (Flrat Half) — Smith ft Farmer — Floren- 
tine Singers. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Palace (First Half)— Novelty Clintons— Mont- 
rose ft Allen— Musical Misses— Mr. & Mrs. Allison 
— Gene Green ft Co. — "Minstrel Revne." (Last 
Half)— Davie ft Walker— Florrle Millerahlp— 
Melody Monarcha ft Maids — Inglls & Reading — 
Kerslake's Pigs. 

8CRANTON, PA. 

Poli's (Flrat Half)— Norman Bros.— Stephens ft 
Brunnelle — Cbaa. Drew ft Co. — Joe Reed — "Fire- 
side Reverie." (Last Halt)— White Bros.— Bessie 
Lester — Mr. ft Mrs. Kelso — Lally Bros, ft Elesnor 
Johns — Msrcelle. 

WATEBSUBY, ,CONN. 

Poll's (First Half) — Emellna Troupe — "To Save 
One Girl" — Lewis Belmont ft Lewla — Florrle Mil- 
lerahlp — Melody Monarcha ft Malda. (Laat Half) 
— Novelty Clintons — Musical Misses— "We, Us ft 
Co." — Van Bergen ft Gosler — "Minstrel Revue." 
WTLKE8-BARRE, PA. 

PoU'e (Flrat Half)— White Broa.— Bessie Leater 
— Mr. ft Mra. Kelso — Lally Bros, ft Eleanor Johns 
— Marcelle. (One to All.) (Laat Half) Norman 
Bros. — Stephens ft Brunnelle — Cbaa. Drew ft Co. — 
Joe Reed— "Fireside Reverie." (One to Oil.) 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

Poll's (Flrat Half)— Davla ft Walker— J. K. 
Emmett ft Co. — IngUa ft Reading — Kerslake's 
Pigs. '(Laat Half) — chuck Haas— Smith ft Farmer 
—"To Save One Girl"— Berlin Slaters. 

Plaxa (First Half)— Geo. Bart— Brandell ft Belt 
— Alice Nelson ft Co. — Bruce ft Dunbar — Five Kan 
toni. (Laat Half)— Emnllna Troupe — Forater ft 

Ferguson — Bitty Rogers — Larry Rrllly ft Co. 

PAN! AGES' CIRCUIT 
CALOARY, OAK. 
Fantagee — Bellclalre Broa. — Elisabeth Cutty — 
Nan Gray — Bobble ft Nelson — "Telephone Tangle" 
— Australian Woodchopnera. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Pantages — Ollle ft J. Vanla — Jue Qnong Tat — 
Jamea Grady ft Co. — Warren ft Templaton— Lee 
Zimmerman. 

EDMONTON, CAN. 
Pantages— Berlo Glrla— Mack ft Velmar— Frank 
Fogarty— Dlx ft Dixie — Grace Edmonds — Mystic 
Bird. 

GREAT FALLS, MONT. 
Pantages — Pauline — Hugo B. Koch ft . Co. — 
Evelyn ft Dolly — Goldsmith ft Plnard— Marie Bus- 
sell. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Empress— Minnie Kaufman— Four Reneea — Cblu- 
ko ft Co. — Ward ft Faye — Neal Anel— Herbert 
Uoyd 4 Co. 

LOS ANOELES, OAL. 
Pantages — "Mr. Inquisitive" — Three Keatona — 
Burke 4 Broderick— Senator Francis Murphy— 
Bucker 4 Wlnnlfred. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Pantages — The Langdona — Reynolds 4 Doner.au 
1 — Klein Broa. — Maboncy ft Auburn — Four Casters 
—Elizabeth Otto. 

OQDEN, UTAH. 

Pantages— Horllck Ballet— Elale White— Frear, 
Bagett ft Frear— SantuccI — Howard 4 Fields— 
Scbepp'a Anlmala. 

OAKLAND, CAL; 
Pantages — "London BeUrlngera" — "Betting 
Bettys"— Smith 4 Kanfman— Sigbee'a Dogs — Olive 
Briscoe. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 
Pantages— Imperial Octette — CorelU 4 Gillette — 
Herbert Brooks & Co.— Wbott Four — Millard Bros. 
SAN DIEGO, OAL. 
Pantages — Izetta — Resists. 4 Co. — GUroy Haynes 
ft Montgomery— Geo. Primrose ft .Minstrels — Leo 
& Mae Jackson — Weber ft Elliott. . . 
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH. 
Pantages — O'Neal ft Watmaley ft Glrla — Plerera 
Sextette — Harry HInes — Dsle ft Faroaworth Trio— 

Adonis ft Dog — Valerie Slatera. 

BEATTLE UP* ASH. 

Pantages— "Bed Heads"— Verna Mercereao ft 
Co. — Raymond — Herbert ft Dennis — Jubilee Four. 
BAN FRANCISCO, OAL, 

Pantages — Hardeen — Oaakl Japs — Howard 4 
Rosa— John T. Doyle ft Co.— Joe Whitehead— 
Wood, Mel-due ft PMUIpe. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 
Pantagee — Great Leon ft Co. — Eckhoff ft Gordon 
— Trevltfs Canines — Klnkaid Kilties — Jones ft 
Johnson— Margaret FCgd. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



TACOSCA, WASH. 
FuUch — Winston's Seals — Sterling A Mar- 
guerite — Joe Roberts — Loscala Sextette — Lemalre 
A Dawson — Freddy James. 

VANCOUVER, OAK. 

Paatages — Gruber's Animals — Gaston Paimer — 

Metropolitan Fire— Wilson Bros. — Bay A Bmma 
Dean. 

VICTORIA, CAH. 

Fantasws — "Coortroom Girls"— Daniels A Con- 

■ rad— Poor Cook Sisters — Four Portia Suiters — 
Chlsholm A Breen. 

WINNIPEG, OAK. " 
Pantages — "Motor Madness" — Amoros A Mulvey 
— Daisy Jerome — Morton Bros. — "Jangle Man" — 
Harry Base. 

INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 

AUSTIN, TEX. 
Majoitio (Two Days).-D'Zlco— Wilfred Clark— 
— Foley tc O'Nell — Union A Lawrence — Adelaide 
A Hughes— Lorse A Sterling. 

DALLAS, TEX. 
Majeitio — The Faynes — Chief Caupollcan — Ray- 
mond Bond A Co. — Lew Madden A Co.— Leo Zarrell 
A Co. 

FT. WORTH, TEX. 
Byera (First Half)— Mary -Grace— Cbas. Elch- 
man — SI & Mary Stcbblas — Orton Troupe. (Last 
Half) — Karl Kerry — "Leap Year Glrla" — Two 
Kerns — White's Circus. 

GALVESTON, TEX. 
Majestlo (First Halt)— Togan A Genera— Voland 
• Gamble — S. Miller Kent— Brlerrk A King— "Tango 
Shoes"— Keeoe & Williams— Imperial Jlu Jltsu 
Troupe. 

JOPLIN, MO. 

Eleotrlo (First Half)— Three Bartoa. (Last 
Half) — Swain A Ostoun — Chas. Hendrlx. 
LITTLE ROOK, ARK. 

Majcitio (First Half)— Valentine A BeU— . 
Jesnoe — The Hyphen — Seven Lyric Dancers. (Last 
Halt)— Anita Arllss A Co. 

MUSKOGEE, OXXJL 

Broadway (First Half)— Wilson Aubrey Trio- 
Karl Kerry — "Leap Tear Olrla" — Two Kerrs — 
White's Circus. ' (Last Half)— Bollinger A Rey- 
nolds — Jack Polk— McDeavltt, Kelly A Lucy — 
Eckert A Parker— "Garden Of Aloha." 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA. 

Lyric- (First Half)— Adolpho— Miller A Balney— 
Edwin A Lottie Ford^Chas. Wayne & Co.— Ln- 
mont's Days. (Last Half) — Morln Sisters — "A 
Csse For Sherlock"— Francis Dyer— Carl BobIoI A 
Co. 

ST. JOSEPH. MO. 

Crystal (First Half)— Claudia Coleman— Dun. 
bar'a Singers— Treat's Sesls. (Last Half)— Mon- 
roe Brothers— Lcroy A Harvey— Dickenson A Dea- 
gon — "Luck of a Totem." 

.SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 

Majestlo (Last Half)— Togan A Genera— Voland 
Shoes"— Kicne A Williams— Imperial Jlu Jltsu 
Troupe. 

TOPEKA. KAN. 
Norolty (First Half) — Bollinger A Reynolds — 

■ Jack Polk— McDeavltt, Lacy A Kelly— Eckert A 
Parker— Garden of Aloha. (Last Half) — Adolpho — 
—Millar A Balney— Edwin A Lottie Ford— Cois. 
Wayne A Co. — Lamont's Cowboys. 

TOPEKA, RAH. 
Novelty (First Half) — Wellington A HIU— Sam 
Hood — Hazel Heston. (Last Half) — Claudia 

Coleman — Dunbar's Singers — Treat's Seals. 
WICHITA, KAN. 
Princess (First Hair)— Morln Bisters— "A Case 
for Sherlock" — Francla Dyer— Carl Boslnl A Oo. 
(Last Half)— E. T. Alexander A Co. — Rogers A 
Brockway — Vs. C. Turner A Co. — Moore, O'Brien 
A Cormack. 

WACO, TEX. 
Auditorium (Last Half)— D'Amlco— Wilfred 
Clark A Co.— Foley A O'Nell— Adelaide A Hughes 
—Linton A Lawrence — Lohse A Sterling. 

SAC CIRCUIT 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
Empress— F'alrman A Ferol— Scott A Wilson — 
Hasel Leooa — "Funny Sheet" — Five Musical Mc- 
Larens. (One to nil.) 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Miles— Kathleen Kla Wa Ya— Cecil A Mac- 
Paul A Pauline — Singing Four — Wilbur West A 
Co. — Norrls Baboons. 

DEVIL'S LAKE, H. D. 
Grand (Two Daya)— Six Boyal Huszars— Ray 
Lawrence — The Muroa. 

FARGO, N. D. 
Grand (First Half) — Brooklyn Comedy Four — 
Trolley Car Duo— Margaret Isles A Co.— Friend A 
Downing— Sarah Sadalia. (Last Half)— Eeeler A 
Belmont — Six Boyal Hussars — Ray Lawrence — 
Black A McCone— Link A Robinson. 
JANESVILLE, WIS. 
Apollo (Laat Half) — Howard StlUman— Holland 
A Jeanle— SpraguevA McNeece. (One to OIL) 
XHOXVTXXE, TENN. 
Grand (First Half)— Poor American PatroUars — 
Lillian Pleasants— Ferris Wheel Girls. (Two to 
OIL) (Last Half) — Gerald MnUane. (roar to 

AIL) 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Unions (First Half )— Bassett A Bailey— Los Ks- 
Penotoa A Co.— Keeley A Belmont— Bob A Peggy 
Valentine — Baader la Veil Trio. (Last Half)— 
Van Alstlne Bros.— McGreery A Doyle— "love's 
Lottery" — Sarah Bedalla— Kilkenny Four. 
MASON CUT, LA. 
Cecil (First Half)— Three Regale— Kukenny 
Four— Grace Gibson. (Last Half)— Van Alstlne 
Bros. — Southern A Marks— Morgan A Stewart, 
MARKHALLTOWN, IA. 
Casino (Last Hslf)— Warner A Cole— Three 
Begals— Grace Gibson. (One to fill.) 



SIOUX tSTT. IA. 
Model (First Half )— The Moors— Warner A Cole. 
(One to Oil.) (Last Half)— Kaney, Mason * 
Shaw— Tom Brantfortl — Bob A Beth Stanley. 

8T. CLOUD, MINN. 

Nemo (One Day)— Spragne A McNeece — "Trolley 
Car Duo"— Margaret Isles A Co. — Friend A Down- 
ing— "Offlce Girls." 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Hippodrome (First Half ) — MaDRHeld & Riddle — 

McGreevy & Doyle — "Love's Lottery" — Morgan A 
Stewart — Van Alstlne Bros. (Last Hslf) — Bsssett 
A Bailey— Brooklyn Comedy Four— De Mela— Con- 
ners A Huyck — Baader La Velio Trio. 

W. V. M. A. 

BRANDON, CAN. 
Orphoum (First Half) — Catharine Chalmer A 
Co. (Last Half)— Kittle Flynn— Six Crinoline 
Girls. 

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 

Orphsum (First Half)— Harold Yates— Gorman 
Bros. — "The Tamer" — Oscar Lorraine— --Revoe 
Devogue." (Last Half) — "Junior Follies." 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Academy (First Half) — "Darn. Good & Funny" 
—The Four Klugs. (Tbree to fill.) (Last Hslf) 
— Maryland Four — Oiin Davenport Troupe. (Three 
to fill ) 

Lincoln (First Half) — Robinson A Bomalne — 
Creole Band— Goldlng A Keating— Wllle Hale A 
Bro. (One to 011.) (Last Half) — Boy & Arthur. 
(Four to nil. i 

Amerloan (First Hslf) — "Naughty Princess." 
(Last Half)— Lew A Mo] lie Hunting— "Women" — 
Bob Hall — "The Elopers." (One to All.) 

DECATUR, ILL. 

Empress (First Half)— "Junior Follies." (Last 
Half) — Bimbos — Gorman, Bros. — "The. Tamer" — 
Spencer A Williams — "Bevue Devogue." 
DAVENPORT, IA. 

Columbia (First Half)— Garclnettl Bros.— Bob 
Hell — Gladys Alexander A Co. — Bert A Hor/y 
Gordon — Magaslne Girls. (Last Half) — Embs A 
Alton — Caesar Rlvoll — Bison City Four — Wllle 
Hale A Bro. (One to nil.) 

ST/LOTH, MINN. 

Grand (First Half)— Oallerlnl Sisters— Holmes 
A Wells — Flo Addler & Boys — Msreeno A Delton 
Bros. (Last Half) — Da Rocher A Do Lee — Mon- 
arch Comedy Four — Fred Zobedle A Co. 

EVANSVTLLE, IND. 
New Grand (First Half) — Ovondn Duo — Harry 
Gilbert — "All Wrong" — Lane A Harper — "Ander- 
son's Girl Revue." (Last Half) — Chas. A Anns 
Glocker — Paul Bswens— Six Serenade™ — Jimmy 
Lucas & Co. — "The Lawn Party." 
FT. WILLIAM, CAN. 
Orphoum (Last Half)— Yusney A Arlor— Wright 
A Davis — Harry Sterling — "Check Your Baggage." 
FORT DODGE, IA. 
Pnnceis (First Half)— Argo and Virginia- 
Fremont Benton A 'Co. — Senate Duo — T* Mar Trio. 
(Last Half)— Mile. Paula -Mac and Wynn— Letter 
and Le Roy — Society Circus. 

GREEN BAT, WIS. 
Ornhenm (La«t Hslf) — Hosa Bros. — ltswson A 
Claire — BeU A Fredo— Harris & Nolan. 

INTERNATIONAL FALLS, MINN. 
Grand — Yusney A Arlov — Wright A Davis — 
Harry Sterling — "Check Your Baggage." 
wa-Mnan city, KAN. 
Olobe (First Half)— E. T. Alexander A Co.— 
Hotter* A Brockway — Wm. C. Turner — Moore, 
O'Brien A Cormack — Tbree Falcons. (Last Half) 
—Wellington A Hill— Hazel Weston A Co.— Sam 
Hood. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 
Lyrio (First Hslf)— Monroe Bros.— Bysn and 
Ryan — Allen Beresford and Co. — Jere Sanford — 
American Florence Troupe. 

MADISON, WIS. 
Orpheum (First Hair)— Kartell!— Tllford A Co. 
— Miller Slaters — Diving Nymphs — The Sharrocks. 
(Last Half) — Lew Hoffman — Cross A Doris — Mas- 
ter J. G. Lewis A Co. — Chas. Seamon — Four Kings. 
MILWAUKEE. WIS. 
Palaoe (First Half)— Adroit Bros.— Cbas. Sea- 
mon — Harris A Nolan — Bell A Fredo — Master J. 
Lewis A Oo. — Boas Bros. (Last Half)— Kawana 
Bros.— "What'a the Matter With Ruth ?"— Slatko's 
Bolllckers — Fredy James — Taylor A Brown. 
MOOSE JAW, CAN. 
Allan (First Half)— Victoria Trio— Catherine 
Chalmer A Co.— Kittle Flynn— Six Crinoline Glrla. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

New Grand— Paul Pedrlnl A Monks— Csrl A 1 e 
Clair— Harry La Toy— Six Colonial Belles. 
FT. ARTHUR, CAN. 
Lyceum (First Half)— Yusney A Arlov— Wright 
A Davis — Harry Sterling. 

ROCKFORD, ILL. 
New Palace (First Half)— Ford A Drma— Ka- 
wana Bros. — Hulford A Chain — .Slatko's RoUickers 
— Taylor A Brown. (Last Half)— Adroit Bros.— 
Harry Glrla— Wm. Armstrong & Co. — Cbas. Wil- 
son— Diving Nympbs. 

REGINA, CAN. 

Recina (Last Half)— Jack A Forls— Waak A 

Manning — Burton Hahn A Marts — Howard's Bears. 

ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Metropolitan (First Half) — Teddy and May — 

Hans Hanke — OUvottl, Hoffett A Claire. (Two to 

on.) (Last Half) — Stross A Becker — Coulton and 

Darrow— Tllford and Co. — George Hack— McBse 

and Clegg. 

SASKATOON, CAN. 

Empire (First Half)— Jack A Forls— Waak A 

y, nninj — Burton Hahn & Marts — Howard'a Bears. 
SIOUX CITY. LA. 
Ornhemn (First Half)— C&lts Bros.— Casting 
Campbells — "On the Farm" — "International Girl" 
— Bernevlcl Bros. (Last Hslf)— "Snnnyslde of 
Broadway." 




FIELDS SISTERS 



HASTINGS SHOW HAS XM AS TREE 
Hahtkoiid, Conn., Dec. '2(5. — The mem- 
bers of the Harry Hastings Big Show bad 
a Christmas tree and banquet on Christ- 
ians night on the stage of the Grand Thea- 
tre, this city. All the members of the show 
received presents, and a most enjoyable 
entertainment was furnished by different 
members of the company. Dan Coleman 
was toastmaster. The attaches of the 
Grand Theatre were guests, also Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Hastings, Mrs. I* A. Nelms 
and Mrs. Pbil Peters, and Manager Scul- 
len wears a big smile of happiness, for he 
says, "Best time Santa Chins has given ns 
In Hartford." 



XMAS GIFT FOR MCR. GOLDINC 

St. John, Can., Dec. 20.— A few days 
before Chrutmas. Walter II. GoldincC 
manager of the Imperial Theatre, received 
from his wife a moat delightful Christmas 
present in the form of a baby-girl. While 
this is not Walter's first exiierience as 
walking gentleman, it's his first experience 
with a "leading lady," the others having 
been managers. 



WALL MAY MANAGE LOEW HOUSE 

Hamilton, Canada, Dec. 30. — James 
Wall, manager of the Temple Theatre, is 
being mentioned as manager of the new 
Loew Theatre. 




NEW THEATRE FOR YOUNGSTOWN 

Toungstown, O., Dec. 28.— The Federal 
Holding Co. has leased the Excelsior- Block 
Corner for fifty years and will erect a 
magnificent motion picture theatre to cost 
*l?50.O0O. seating 2,000 people. The ccm- 
rwiay will take possession April 10 next 
ninl expert to open the theatre next Tlinoka- 
civing day. 



R. E. LONG AT CENTURY 

Robert Edgar Long is now assisting 
Nellie Itevell in the publicity department 
at the Century Theatre. 

PI AVC Tabl °ids 

I L/\ I O Alice Hcwlnnd 
—TO Eddy St.. Chicago 

BILLY CARTER 

Writes playlets and everything else — except soncs 
—for vsudevllle. MARLOWE THEATRE. «»d 
and 8'ewart. Ohleam. ■saasmssn* «*i 



AT LIBERTY 

SCENIC ARTIST 

HOt'BI.E GKNBUAI, lirslNK.ss. 
n„, s. R * E> THOMPSON 

" OI " HelUsville. Wis. 



BAILEY SCENIC STUDIOS 

Troy, New York. 

tilth-Grade Scenery of Every Kind for Everr 
Purpos. at Bottom Price* 




W A M X E D 

Tor TEN NIOHTs nt A BARROOM CO. Playing- 
""-aires. People for all parts with specialties. 
Ii.e i dlnu Mary Moron. 17 years old. capable of 
chll.l psrt. I'lsnlst to double part. Total abstain- 
ers inaly considered. Make salary low mid state 
particulars fully. Address Oensral Dalivsry 

lamps, Fla. 

WANTED 

Stock People in all lines. Must do spe- 
cialties. AUDITORIUM PLAYERS 
Salisbury. Mtl. 

MURRAY GRAND PLAYERS 

Want Repertoire People 

in all lines, also good specialty people. 
Low, sure salary. Long season. Ad- 
dress PETER MURRAY, Gen. Dcl'y. 
Providence, R. I. " 



AX LIBERTY t ~" ' 

T. I. F A H L 

Ohsractars and Has visa 

CECIL WOOD CLARENDON 

lagenns 

Address c/o Brunswick Hotel. Decalur, TJJ. 



for Ernie Marks Stock Co., Piano 
Player, must be sight reader. Sober 
and reliable. Also would like to hear 
from people in all lines. Write or wire 
to ERNIE MARKS. Stratford, Ont.. 
Canada. 

AX LIBERTY 

On aronint Co. CIumIii;;. 

r. o.-HARRIS MiLDBtD 

Comedian and Koiit.rette Initeiiiie 

(leu. Bus. Juveniles. 

SIllKle and Double Specialties. Wsnlrid .,. M.HHr 

--Sober— Itellslile. Address P. 0. Hanntn a, w 
Ohio St., Chicago, nis. L 



ZUMARA 

Refined Oriental Dancer 






MADISON'S BUD- 
GET No. 16 



Almost as nee- 
eMOiry to a per- 
former as 
sunshine Is to a plant. Ves, you can succeed 
on the state without all the funny orliclnal 
material contained In MADISON'S Ill'IMiET 
No. 10— BUT NOT NEAll AS WKI.L. <W 
lenU liieluuV Yi original mi lliliilllis. v great 

acts fur 'J males and T for lusle and female: 

a bright Irish act (or 3 people; 10 wonderful 
parodies. 1 crsckerjack minstrel nrst-barts. a 
scri-ainiDK tabloid comedy, besides hundreds of 
new ns» and sldewslk bits. Price ONE 
ui)I.I_lll. Combination price of Iirin;l7l 
Nos. IS and 10 Is II. 50. J AMIS MA DIB OH 
10M THTHP AYEBfUr. aTEW TOSJC. 



TH E NEW YORK CL I P P E R 



January 3, 1917 



1917 HEADLINERS 



Words fcy CHAS. McCARRON and CHAS. S. ALSERTE 



1917 HEADLllfERS 



Music by ALBERT VON TILZER 



DOWN WHERE THE SWJMEE RIVER FLOWS 



•"»cU/itr.q', 



The King of all Southern Songs. Al Jolson's famous hit in "Robinson Crusoe, Jr. 



Words by CHAS. McCARRON and STANLEY MURPHY 



OH HOW SHE COULD 



Mask by ALBERT VON TILZER 



YACKI HACKI WICKI WACK1 WOO 






Hawaiian Song that set the pace, and is still leading them all. 



Mnsicby ALBERT VON TILZER 



Words by ED. P. MORAN and WILL A. HEELEN 

PUT ON YOUR SLIPPERS AND FILL UP YOUR PIPE 

You're Not Going Bye-Bye Tonight 



The funniest song 



Every line a laugh. Plenty of extra 



I Words aad Music by CHAS. McCARRON and CHRIS SMITH 
DOWN IN HONKY TONKY TOWN 



Any act that needs a fast rag song, can't beat this one. Some melody. 



BROADWAY MUSIC CORP., WILL VON TILZER, Pres. 145 W. 45th St., N. Y. C. CHICAGO, '145 N. Clark St. 






A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL FROM 

FRANCES FARR 

THE LITTLE PACEMAKER 

PACEMAKERS COMPANY 



ADELINE FRANCIS 

"THE GRAFONOLA GIRL," Wishes Everybody a Happy New Year 

The only and original Phonograph or Graf onola act of its kind in vaudeville. Fully protected. ' Big success at the Alhambra 
last week. Specially engaged for the "All Women" bill Keith's Portland, Me., Jan. 8th; Lowell, Jan. 15. | 



TOGETHER AGAIN! 

BILLY K. JACK 

HOWARD ™* BOYLE 

"NONSENSICAL NONSENSE" 

Booked Solid, Season 1917 Direction SCHALLMANN BROS. 



SHIP AHOY, BOYS! 



SPILLING THE BEANS 



HAROLD 

LA COSTE 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 



ALICE 

and CLIFTON 

. a. j. HORwrrz 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



THE SURVIVAL OF THE FTTTEST 



"OVER THE HILLS TO VIRGINIA" 

TfaU ii the "Virginia" song- that begin* where all other* leave off. Featured by Marshall Montgomery, Hager 4k Goodwin, Those Five Girls, Du For 
Boys, Dora and Halperin, Jo Allyn and Bobby, Temple Quartette, Quaker City Four, Dixie Harris and All Star Four, Fields, Keana and Walsh, 
Spencer and Williams, Julia Curtis and a host of other big time acts. 

We Also Publish the Big Waltz Sensation: "MISSOURI WALTZ" 

FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER. Inc. 



42 Cohan's Grand Opera Houi 
h CHICAGO, HJL. 



, MARVIN LEE, Mp. Prof. Dent. 



^NOTE: Watch- for announcements of our new songs in preparation 



JEAN ADAIR 



"Maggie— Taylor Waitress" 

Youngsto wn , Ohio, this week 

Direction Lewi* & Gordon 



THE CASTEELS 

A Thriller Supreme AUTO WONDERS OF THE AGE DIRECTION ALF. T. WILTON 

MOST SENSATIONAL AUTOMOBILE ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



SCENIC .ARTIST 



LIBE 

Thoroughly competent, absolutely sober. 

Can play responsible parts 

C. R. MONTGOMERY 

503 Qulncy St. Fairmount, W. VS. 



Bessie Hawthorne 



At 
Liberty 

Characters — Heavies. Best of wardrobe. 
Every requirement. Rep. or Stock. Address 
131 W. Arch St^ Portland, Ind. 



WANTED 

FEATURE VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

Singles and doubles. You must be A-l and 
change for week. No parts to play. State all 
first letter. LAWRENCE TRUMBULL 
PLAYERS. Dolgeville. N. Y., week of Jan. 1; 
Herkimer. N. Y„ Jan. 8. 



LILLIAN 
MORTIMER 

in Vaudeville 



SQUIRREL FOOD 

Aills & Myers 

Those Kilted Klowns 
ASK MOLLIE WILLIAMS 



GOOD LYRIC WRITER 

wishes to meet good composer. Pref- 
erably one in Brooklyn or New York. 
Address "MUSICUS," care of Clipper. 

TIGHTS 

Cotton Tlthta, tot tood quality, 
a pair 90e. Worsted Tlcbti, 
medium weight, % 2 . 00 a pair. 
Worsted Tlchta, heavy weight, 
$2.75 a pair. Imported tUx 
plaited tithts. In brirbt lad tad 
golden Brawn, only $2.50 a 
pair. SOkoUne Tixfcts Id all 
colon. $2.50 s pair. Heavy 75 
per cent. Imported silk Ucbla, 
la bright red only, rectaeed from 
$6.00 to $4.00 a pair. Full 
deere Shirts to matefa tight*, 
same prlee ai Ucbts. ■ Order, 
filled promptly. Clipper Catalog. 
frre on appllratlon. 

BERNARD MANDL 
210-212 W. MAOISM ST. CHICAGO. ILL 




HENRY P. DIXON 

Producer 

BIG REVIEW 

Columbia Theatre Building, New York 



Tenney 



Can you use an act, .ketch, or monologue that will command tbe applause of tbS 
audience, the spproval of the managers, the mat* from the office and the salary 
700 desire. Write, 'phone or call, and let's get acquainted with each other. 
ALLEN SPENCER TEHHZT, Putnam Bids., Bolts til, 11H Broadway, H. T. City. 



DO YOU COMPOSE SONGS OK INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC? 

If so, be sure to have same arranged by an expert; ah artistic arrangement msy mean snecrss. I bare 
done hundreds of big hits. Write or call afternoons, 3-3. EVQEirE FLATZaCANM, SM Wast 47th 
Street, New York. 



At Liberty Account Company Closing 

J. FRANCIS MARLOW 



Juveniles, Heavies, Characters. 
6350 Drexel Ave., 



essential requirements. 

Chicago, HI. 



THEATER WANTED 

For a recognised Stock Co. "near New York." If yoo have the house 1 can deliver tbe goods to gst the 
business. Will rent or sosre. Forty-six wec-Vs In use bnnse. Write, 'phone. • 

J. A. BBOSTOb, 511 Wast Utah St.. New Tors, afomiacalds 1MB. 



MEN WANTED 

for sth U. S. Cavalry Band, Fort Bliss, Texas. 

Clarinets, saxophones and good assistant solo 
cornet. Experienced musicians only. ■ Good 
inducements. Must be between ages of 18 and 
35. Address, WILLIAM S. VANOVEP. Band 
Leader. Sth Cavalry. Fort Bliss, Texas. 

WANTED 

Chorus Girls, Stock Burlesque People 
and 

ORIENTAL DANCERS 
H. S. WALKER 

Star Theatre Jacksonville, Flav 



WANTED AT ONCE 

LEADING LADY 

For three night Repertoire. Young. 

food appearance. Must join or»_ wire, 
end photo. Salary $20. No tickets. 
N. J. BUCKWHEET. 



Two Fh-st-Class Tubs, Two French Horn, one 
first-class Flute and Piccolo Players for In- 
dustrial Band. Permanent position in modern 
factory to the right men. Address THE ROB- 
BINS at MYERS CO, Springfiald, Ohio. 

WANTED 

Woman for Eliza and Ophelia. Woman for 
Topsy. Name lowest salary. Pay own liotcL 
State if you can do specialty or play piano. 
Other useful Tom people write. BERNARD 
McCRAW, CanUteo, N. Y. 



L. WM. PITZER AT LIBERTY 

for burlesque, rep., one piece, or tab. 
Leads, heavies, gen. bus. All essen- 
tials. Produce, direct, script, special- 
ties. Address General Delivery, Balti- 
more, Md. 



Ernie Marks Stock Co. 

Wants Heavy Man 

TaU, good dresser and must be able to de- 
liver the goods. Also Leading or Second Busi- 
ness Woman, must be versatile, possess 
ability and stood wardrobe. Send photos, stat- 
ing age, weight and height. Write or wire; 
Carrol Lynn wire. ERNIE MARKS, Stratford, 
Oat. 



FOR 1917 

get a new act or new All-ia hits for the 
act you are now using from my latest 
Bulletin. Don't lot your act decay for 
want of new i a s swaay material, but brace 
It up from tba greatest vau Seville act 
builder in the world. 

THE NEW No. a 

McN ALLY'S BULLETIN 

PRICE SI.OO 

atcNAIXY'S BULLETIN Bo. 3 contains IT 
SCBEAJOao KOaTOLOOUZS. For Hebrew, 
Irish, Black and White Face. Dutch. 
Tramp. Wop, Female snd Stomp Speech. 

10 OBEAT ACTS TOR TWO MALES. Each 
act an applause winner. 

» B0AHIBO ACTS YOR atAXE AJTS JT- 
aTsT f. Ther'H make good on any bill. 

tt BTTHJE-nsx PARODIES. On ill of 
Broadway's latest Song lilts. 

A COMEDY SKETCH. Entitled "ANXIOUS 
TO OUT niCH." It'a the FUNNIEST 
SKETCH In Vaudeville. 

gcSAUY'B aXBBI afTJfBTRZXS. Con- 
sisting of six corking F1B£T I'AHTS. end- 
Ins with a screaming Finale. "NOT 
QCILTY." 

A TABLOID COMEDY ASS BUKLESttUX, 
entitled "ITS YOUR WIFB"; also hun- 
dreds of Cross-Fire Class and Jokes and 
additional Comedy Surprises. Keraember 
the price of JIcNALJ-Y'R BCUJmN Mo. 
2 Is only OBE DOLLAR per copy, with 
money-back guarantee. 

WM. McNALLT, 81 E. lZSih St. Raw York 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 





CHAPLIN GETS 

OFFER OF 

MILLION 

TRIANGLE AFTER FAMOUS COMIC 



If negotiations now pending are con- 
summated, Charlie Chaplin will be the first 
motion picture star to receive a yearly in- 
come of one million dollars. The comedian 
is working; for the Mutual Film Corporation 
at present, under a contract which is said 
to net him $670,000, annually. This 
agreement expires April 1, 1917. 

Already several picture concerns are in 
the market for Chaplin's services and 
should he elect to leave the Mutual, will 
more than likely accept the proposition 
offered by Chas. O. Baumann, the Tri- 
angle executive, calling; for a weekly 
stipend of $12,000, with an additional per- 
centage guarantee to be paid monthly. 

Tne guarantee will bring Chaplin's 
salary well over the million mark, and 
providing the deal goes through will be 
placed in escrow in one of New York's 
most prominent banking institutions. The 
fact that the European war seems to be 
wearing an end has considerable bearing 
on Chaplin's unprecedented offer, his 
comedies selling on the other side even 
better than in America. 

Chaplin is' the wonder of the theatrical 
age, having risen in three years from a 
salary of seventy-five dollars per week, 
which was the remuneration he received 
for his initial film work with Keystone. 



WANT BETTER INSURANCE RATES 

Ralph A. Kohn, the Famous Players ex- 
ecutive, and J. E. Brouletour, representa- 
tive of the Eastman interests, appeared be- 
fore the Fire Insurance Exchange of New 
Jersey, in Newark, Dec 27, and made an. 
eloquent plea for more liberal insurance 
rates on films in that state. As a result 
of the conference the insurance men agreed 
to meet a committee to be appointed by 
the National Association of the Motion 
Picture Industry and discuss matters 
further. 



SANGER TO BE READY SOON 

Eugene Sanger, who has been telling the 
trade for the past four or five months ex- 
actly what ails the picture business, will 
start producing in his own studio in a 
couple of weeks. The trade is on its tip 
toes to see just in what manner it has been 
wrong. Sanger's productions will be of the 
high brow order, it is understood. 



RALPH DICE WITH COLDWYN 

Ralph Ince has been engaged by Gold- 
Tvyn Pictures, Inc., to direct their forth- 
coming production of "Polly of the 
Circus." Ince is rated as one of the best 
producers in the industry. 



MADGE EVANS WINS CONTEST 
Madge Evans, World Film's infant 
prodigy, won a big newspaper popularity 
contest in the middle West last week. She 
will make her next screen appearance in 
'"The Web of Desire." 



"INTOLERANCE" CLOSES JAN. 6 

"Intolerance," the big Griffith spectacle, 
closes its metropolitan engagement at the 
Liberty, Jan. 6. The picture opened iu 
Pittsburgh and Philadelphia last week and 
is reported to be doing a turnawey busi- 
ness in each city. 



VITAGRAPH DENIES RUMOR 

The Vitagraph Co. sent out a denial that 
u had purchased the Rialto Theatre this 
week: The report gained some credence in 
film circles through the fact of the Rialto 
having contracted for the new Vitagraph 
feature service. 



JUNE ELVIDGE A POETESS 

June Elvidge, the picture actress, has 
taken to writing poetry. . Her initial effort 
will be published shortly and will be en- 
titled "Studio Impressions.'.' Miss. Elvidge 
secured the necessary inspiration while 
appearing recently in World Film produc- 
tions. 



WE TOLD YOU SO 

The final episode of the "Crimson Stain 
Mystery," released this week, discloses the 
identity of the mysterious criminal. He 
happens to be the same person designated 
in the first review of the serial published in 
this paper three months ago. 



ARTHUR JAMES TO PRODUCE 

Arthur James, Metro's publicity man, 
makes his debut as a producer in February. 
The posters of "One of Many," a forth- 
coming Columbia feature, will bear the 
phrase, "Arthur James presents." 



WORLD TITLE CHANGED 
The World feature, formerly known as 
"A Movie Romance," has been changed to 
"A Girl's Folly." Robert Warwick is the 
featured player. 



GORDON'S FIRST FEATURE 

Kitty Gordon's first feature, made under 
World Film auspices, will be called "The 
Haunting Shadow." It will not be re- 
leased until next summer. 



GAIL KANE WITH MUTUAL 

Gail Kane has been engaged by the 
Mutual Film Corporation. She will leave 
for the Mutual's coast studios immediately. 
James Kirkwood will direct Miss Kane. 



"EASY ST." NEXT CHAPLIN 

The next Chaplin has a rather appro- 
priate title. In consideration, possibly, of 
Charlie's avalanche of soft money, made 
during the past two years, his forthcoming 
comedy will be called "Easy Street" It is 
all about tramps. 



DE MULE WONT DIRECT COHAN 

Cecil De Mille, contrary to reports cur- 
rent on the Rialto. will not direct Geo. M. 
Cohan's initial Artcraft picture. Whether 
the announcement that De Mille would di- 
rect Cohan, was made because of De Mille's 
present exalted position in the film busi- 
ness, could not be verified. At any rate, 
Joe Kaufman will be the man to direct the 
Yankee Doodle Boy before the camera un- 
less all signs fail. 



INTERNATIONAL 

AND PATHE 

COMBINE 

HEARST TO CONTINUE PRODUCING 



An important coalition of interests was 
effected Thursday, Dec. 28, when an agree- 
ment was entered into between Pathe Ex- 
change, Inc., and the International Film 
Service, Inc., the latter concern a William 
Randolph Hearst enterprise ; whereby all 
of the serials, features, cartoons and news 
weeklies of the International will here- 
after be distributed through Pathe. 

Edward A. MacManus, general man- 
nger of the International and J. A. Berst, 
vice president of Pathe, arranged the de- 
tails of the combination for their respec- 
tive concerns. According to the present 
plan, the International will continue its 
producing activities independently as hereto . 
fore, as far as amusement films are eon, 
cerned. 

A change will be made, however, in the 
Hearst news reel, the International topical 
and Pathe's Weekly being merged into one. 
This will be called the Hearst-Pathe News. 

A few weeks ago. a rumor had Hearst 
tied up in a combine with Selznick. While 
nothing definite took place, several meet- 
ings were held and plans discussed. From 
present indications it would appear that 
the Hearst-Selznick deal had been per- 
manently declared off. 



FORTHCOMING TRIANGLES 

Bessie Love and William Desmond are 
the stars of the Triangle feature releases 
for Jan. 21. Bessie Love appears in an 
appealing human interest story of life in 
the big city, entitled "Nina, the Flower 
Girl," produced by the Fine Arts Co. ' 
William Desmond has a distinct novelty 
in the Kay Bee mystery play, "The Iced 
Bullet" from the pen of C. Gardner Sulli- 
van and directed by Reginald Barker. 

As "Nina, the Flower Girl," written by 
Mary H. O'Connor and directed by Lloyd 
Ingraham, Bessie Love has a part in which 
she appears to unusual advantage. "The 
Iced Bullet," in which William Desmond is 
starred, is a serio-comic unweaving of a 
unique dramatic fabric, in which an actor's 
ambitions mingle with a murder mystery. 
The play narrates the adventures of one 
T. Chittingham Gall-Worth, a young man 
who describes himself as an "actor-author- 
artist." in the mazes of "movieland." 
Gall-Worth forces his way into the Kay 
Bee studios at Culver City, bent on selling 
"the screen masterpiece of the century," 
and enacting the leading role . thereof. How 
he fares in his strenuous quest for fame 
proves to be both surprising and thrilling 
in the extreme. Desmond's acting is in 
thorough keeping with the lively and 
whimsical character of the play. 



WARWICK'S NEXT VEHICLE 

Robert Warwick's next starring vehicle 
will be the "Court of St Simon." It is an 
E. Phillips Oppenheim magazine story. 
Selznick will release the picture. 



LASKY SIGNS 1LUNGTON 

Margaret Illington is the latest stage star 
to succumb to the lure of the movies. The 
emotional actress signed a contract to 
appear on the screen for Lasky, Dec. 27. 



"FOOLISH VIRGIN" BIG SUCCESS 
"The Foolish Virgin," Clara Kimball 
Young's second picture to be released by 
Lewis J. Selznick Enterprises, has scored 
an instantaneous success in Chicago and 
-New York. The feature is at once an un- 
usually artistic production and a big box 
office winner, combining qualities seldom 
found in latter day photodramas. 



CHRISTMAS IN TRI STUDIOS . 

Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 26. — The holi- 
day season in the Triangle studios had no 
effect other than to increase the energies of 
production. While not busily engaged in 
making "good-bad man" productions for 
the screen, William Hart, however, found 
time to dress a doll and send it off to a 
charity bazaar in Chicago. Lillian Gish, 
Dorothy Gish and Bessie Love, also glad- 
dened the hearts of several little depend- 
ent tots by sending doll replicas of each 
other to the same bazaar. 



MICHELENA BACK TO OPERA 

Beatrix Michelena has resigned from the 
California Motion Picture Co. staff of 
players. Miss Michelena has decided to 
return to the operatic stage. 



HELD CHRISTY UP 

Seven masked men entered the sanctum 
of Christy Cabanne Christmas Eve. and 
held the Metro director at attention to the 
accompaniment of seven revolvers. The re- 
volvers were necessary because the bunch 
wanted, not only to present Cabanne with 
a watch but also insisted on reading some 
poetry written by Fred Stanton. 



THOMSEN'S OWN COMPANY 

Frederic ThomseL. who made some of 
the biggest money makers Vitagraph ever 
released, including E. K. Sothern's "Enemy 
to the King" will launch a producing com- 
pany of his own in the course of the next 
fortnight Thomsen has the backing, it is 
said, of a prominent Texas oil magnate. 

TEMPORARY STAY UP STATE 

Schenectady. N. Y„ Dec 27.— The pic- 
ture houses wereVopen in Schenectady last 
Sunday operating freely without molesta- 
tion. A temporary stay secured from Jus- 
tice Borst, of Amsterdam acted as a legal 
bar to police interference. Nothing can 
now be done by the authorities, in the way 
of enforcing the Sunday closing law of 
New York State, until Jan. 28, when the 
restraining order of Justice Borst is re- 
turnable. ^ '•'.-' 



TAMMANY PROMISES A0> 

Tammany Hall is out with a promise of 
legislative aid in behalf of New York 
movie exhibitors. The powerful political 
organization has instructed Assemblyman 
Kelly to prepare a bill that will be intro- 
duced at the next session of tite Legisla- 
ture, containing special clauses covering 
Sunday film shows. 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 




"THE RISE OF SUSAN" 

Peerless. Five Reels. 
Released Dec. 18 ly World. 
Cast. 

Susan. ..- Clara Kimball Yotng 

Mrs. Joseph Luckett Jenny Dickerson 

Sinclair La Salle Warner Oland 

Ninon Marguerite Bkirwin 

Clavering Cordon Eugene O'Brien 

Story — Modern melodrama. S. E. Tay- 
lor, director. Hal Young, cameraman. 
Story of contemporary life with familiar 
and interesting backgrounds. 
Action— Holding. 
Continuity — Even. , 

Suspense — Well sustained. 
Detail— Right. 
Atmosphere — Convincing. 
Photography — Excellent. 

Remarks. 

"The Rise of Susan" presents Clara 
Kimball Young in a drama which contains 
a well defined story of strong situations, 
rapid action and more than sufficient thrills 
to satisfy the most exacting. Miss Young 
is a youthful, and it goes without saying, 
pretty cloak model who is induced to pose 
as a foreign noble woman by a social clim- 
ber. The deception leads to a long series 
of complex situations terminating in a 
happy ending, which is somewhat marred 
by the sadness of some of the events pre- 
ceding it. In the fore part of the picture 
Miss Young is seen to particular advantage 
as the model, the action permitting the 
wearing of the style of costume she sets off 
to perfection. This is a feature that will 
appeal strongly to the female contingent. 
On the whole an acceptable picture is every 
way. 

Box Office Value. 

Three days. Advertise Clara Kimball 
Young. Suitable for any class of house. 



"THE BATTLE OF LIFE" 

Fox. Fire Reels. 
Released Dec. 11 by Fox. 

Cast 

Mary Roland. Gladys Coburn 

Dave Karns Art A cord 

Jack Ellis. William Sheer 

Tom Roland. .Frank Evans 

O'Leary -. Richard Neill 

Wentworth Alex Shannon 

Story — Melodrama. Strong drama of life 
in the underworld. Written for screen 
by Mary Murillo. James Vincent, direc- 
tor. 

Action — Very interesting. 
Continuity— Even. 
Suspense — Keen. 
Detail — Correct. 
Atmosphere — Realistic. 
Photography — First class. 

Remarks. 

"The Battle of Life" tells an interesting 
tale of the daughter of a professional thief 
who struggles valiantly but is finally over- 
come by the nature of her environment. 
The girl secures employment in a garment 
factory, after her father has been killed 
while attempting to rob the home of a 
wealthy family that has become interested 
in her welfare. Her lover is also a crook 
who tries to go straight. Prevailed upon 
to essay one "last job," he becomes in- 
volved in a quarrel over the spoils with his 
pal. The lover eventually manages to hit 
the narrow trail, the crook partner is ac- 
cidentally shot and a logically developed 
series of events culminate in the desirable 
happy ending. On the whole a very good 
program feature. 

Box Office Valve. 
Two days. Advertise Gladys Coburn. 
This is her debut as a star. She is well 
worthy of the distinction. ■ Smaller and 
middle grade houses. 



"THE STOLEN TRIUMPH" 

Rolfe. Five Reels. 
Released by Metro. 

Cast. . 

Edwin Renald Julius Steger 

Stephen Hunt Barry Burkhardt 

Mrs. Hunt Clara Whipple 

Mrs. Renald. Clara Blandick 

Mrs. Williams 11 arte Reichardt 

Alice Hunt Raye Dean 

Little Alice Helen Badglev 

Edwin Renald, Jr Edward Kenney 

Little Edwin Maury Steuart 

Story — Melodrama. Written for screen 

by Maxwell Karger and Julius Steger. 

David Thompson, director. 
Action — A bit conventional. 
Continuity — Story is coherent. 
Suspense — Not over strong. 
Detail — Accurate. 
Atmosphere— Good. 

Photography— Satisfactory. 
Remarks. 
"The Stolen Triumph" tells a conven- 
tional story of a playwright whose brain- 
child is lifted by n wicked theatrical man- 



"THE ENEMY" 

Vitagraph. Seven Reels. 

Released Dec. 18 by Vitagraph. 

Cast, 

Harrison Stuart. . .". . . . .Charles Kent 

Mrs. Stuart.; Julia Swayne Gordon 

Tavy Stuart:. ,. Peggy Hytana" 

Bitty Lane. .......... J Evart Overton 

Tommy Tinkle .James Morrison 

Geraldine BUly Billings 

Story — Melodrama. Theme treats of the 
evil of drink, a subject that has been 
quite frequently discussed on stage and 
screen. Adaptation of story by George 
Randolph Chester and Lillian Chester. 
Scenario by Garfield Thompson. Paul 
Scardon, director. Robert A. Stuart, 
cameraman. 
Action^ — Draggy. 
Continuity — Coherent. 
Suspense — Not over strong. 
Detail — Will pass. 
Atmosphere— Good. 
Photography— 0. K. 

Remarks. 
Ever since "Ten Nights in a Bar Room" 
became a classic, periodically plays treating 
of the same theme have been produced, with 
more or less of the original's appeal. "The 
Enemy" is no better than the average of 
its countless prototypes, and were it not 
for the fine portrayal of a drunkard by the 
veteran player Chas. Kent, wonld have to 
be entered in the mediocre classe of alco- 
holic moral lessons. The acting of the rest 
of the cast is mechanical and the general 
impression is one of staginess, rather than 
that of reality. On the whole this. will 
pass in the average house. With more than 
half of the country in the "Dry" column, 
"The Enemy" will probably give the ram 
demon something to think about when it is 
shown in the rapidly diminishing bibulous 
states. 

Box Office Value. 
One day. Advertise Chas. Kent and 
mention Peggy Hyland in the billing. 
Smaller bouses. 



ager and on being produced turns out to 
be a big money making ■ success. Play- 
wright loses memory through a series of 
unfortunate circumstances, directly trace- 
able to theft of play and, disappearing, is 
given up for dead. Wicked theatrical man- 
ager feels keen sense of remorse (he cer- 
tainly should), and adopts playwright's 
son. Memory is conveniently restored to 
playwright, through one of those expedients 
scenario writers seem to have standardized, 
son grows to manhood becomes engaged 
to w. t. manager's beautiful daughter, and 
everything is nicely straightened out. 
Box Office Value. 
A fair program feature. Two days. 
Smaller houses. Advertise Steger. 



FILM ASSN. PLANS DINNER 

A dinner and entertainment, under the 
auspices of the General Division of the 
National Association of the Motion Picture 
Industry, is scheduled for Friday. Jan. 26. 
It is to be under the direction of Harry 
Ketchenbach. 



"THE PEOPLE vs. JOHN DOE" 

Universal. Six Reels. 

Released on State Rights Basis. 

Cast. 

John Doe Harry De More 

His wife Evelyn Selbie 

His brother Witti* Marks 

A wealthy farmer. George Berrell 

His sister Maude George 

A detective Charles Mailes 

A prominent lawyer. Robert Smith 

A woman lawyer Leah Baird 

Story — An argument against police third 

degree methods, circumstantial evidence 

and capital punishment. Written and 

directed by Lois Weber. 
Action — Interesting. 
Continuity— Unbroken. 
Suspense — Properly sustained. 
Detail — Good. 
Atmosphere — Right. 
Photography— Especially good. 
Remarks. 

While there is nothing to directly indi- 
cate that the Stielow case prompted the 
writing of the story on which this picture 
is based, the inference in that direction is 
unmistakable. As a matter of fact the film 
carried the title of "The Stielow Case" 
when it was first announced, but for some 
unexplained reason was changed. Possibly 
the New York authorities may have had 
something to do with the matter. As it 
stands, regardless of title, the film is an 
excellent melodrama, capitally produced 
and particularly well acted. The intent of 
the authoress is conveyed in plain terms 
and as an argument for the better treat- 
ment of those so unfortunate as to be ac- 
cused of a crime on circumstantial evi- 
dence fulfills its purpose completely. 

Box Office Value. 

This picture properly exploited should be 
good for a week's run in any of the larger 
cities. 





LL PERMANENT successes in 

motion picture production have been 
founded on the greatness, the vitality 
and power of the plays offered to the public. 
After centuriej, no one has improved upon 
Shakespere's "The play's the thing." 

GOLDWYN PICTURES will link the 

greatest plays with stars of only the first magnitude from 
the ranks of the theatre and the screen. 

THIS ORGANIZATION will rank the 

play, its production, and its star as of first concern. To 
guarantee picture' perfection this company has allied with 
it the playwrights responsible for the greatest box office stage 
Successes Of the present theatrical decade. These authors are : 

IRVIN S. COBB PORTER EMERSON BROWNE 

ROI COOPER MEGRUE MARGARET MAYO 
EDGAR SELWYN AVERY HOPWOOD 

and as many more, soon to be announced. Their plays will 
receive the most elaborate production that can be devised by 
the masters of stage, screen and scenic investiture. 

BEFORE ONE PICTURE is released the 

exhibitors of America will have the opportunity to see not 
less than SIX finished Golduyn Pictures, complete in every 
detail. 

ONE OF THE NOVEL developments in 
this organization will be its reliance upon and confidence 
in the judgments of the nation's exhibitors — instead of treat- 
ing their views with the contempt and disregard that have so 
undermined the solidarity of the picture industry. 




Vanderbilt 11 

SAMUEL GOLDFISH, Pres. 
ARTHUR HOPKINS, Vice-Pres. 



16 E. 42nd St., New York City 

EDGAR SELWYN, Vice-Pres. 
CROSBY GAIGE, Treas. 




! 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 3, 1917 



"MY OFFICIAL WIFE" 

. .Vttftgnpb. Fire Reel*. 
Releated Deo. 11 by Vitagraph. 

Cart. 

Selene Marie. Clara Kimball Young 

Booh* Wetettky.. .... Eerie Willi mm I 

Arthur Lenox ... -.Barry T. Morey 

Bit Wife ..Rote B. Topley 

Marguerite Lenox. Mary Andenon 

BaeUe Welettky Arthur Coiine 

Conttantine Welettky. . .Chariot WeUetley 

Olga, hit wife. Louite Beomdet 

Baron Friedreich L. Roger* Lytton. 

Eugenie. Eutelie Jenten 

Story — Melodrama. Familiar idem of Rus- 
sian intrigue with plotter*, nihilists, 
■ecret police and the nsnsJ accessories. 
Written for screen by Richard Henry 
Savage. James Young, director. Robert 
A. Stoart, cameraman. 

Action — Follows beaten path. 

Continuity — Even. 

Suspense— Manufactured. 

Detail— Good. 

Atmosphere — Very Good. 

Photography — Satisfactory. 

Rsmarks. 

This is a re- issue of a picture that in its 
day created a mild sensation in film land.. 
Naturally since the film was produced the 
directorial art has advanced considerably 
and for this unavoidable reason "My Offi- 
cial Wife" seems a bit "old school" in con- 
st ruction. The presence of ten Vitagraph 
favorites of yesteryear in the cast will help 
its drawing powers to a great extent. At 
least four of the principals have climbed 
to top notch stellar positions in the screen 
world since the picture was originally re- 
leased and the enterprising exhibitor sorely 
baa something to tell bis patrons, with such 
undeniably strong cards as Harry Morey 
Earle Williams, Mary Anderson, and last 
but decidedly not least Clara Kimball 
Young to feature in bis announcements. 

Box Office Vain*. 
This should be good for at least on* day's 
booking. See remarks. 

a SEL ZNICK#P1CT URES 

ffiS©ERl\ 

BRENONS 

Presentation, of- 

NAZMCM 
"mRBRDES 

DyrlisriortCraitf Wentwor 



"THERINKV 

Lone Star. Two Reels. 
Releated Dee. 11 by Mutual. 

Story— Slap stick farce. 
Action — Rapid fire. 

Continuity— Even. 

Suspense— Lots of it. ... . 

Detail— Good for comedy. 
Photography— Good. 

Vemarks. 
Somebody around the Chaplin studio be- 
sides the inimitable Charlie must have seen 
numerous burlesque shows in his time and 
the evidence points to Vincent Bryan whose 
memory for a lot that has been done on 
the stage in the way of good old sure fire 
hokem is apparently in first class working 
order. "The Rink" ia not quite as rough 
as Chaplin's last picture "Behind the 
Screen*," but it's no parlor entertainment 
at that. There is much "action," with 
Charlie always in the midst of the doings 
and the laughs follow each other with be- 
wildering rapidity. Chaplin does some ex- 
cellent tumbling, his falls on the roller 
skates worn through the better part of the 
picture being of a humorous nature that 
completely fulfills the meaning of the oft 
used expression, side-splitting. A chase at 
the finish is one of the best ever put on the 
screen. The vaudeville comedy act that is 
forced to "follow" this two-reeler on a va- 
riety bill will have its own troubles. 
Those wiseacres who go around telling 
every one that the Chaplin vogue is waning 
seem to have another guess coming. 

Box Office Value. 
Looks like a hundred per cent at the 
box office. Any class of house. 



FARNUM IN DICKENS' STORY 

William Farnum began work last week 
on a picturization of Charles Dickens' 
novel, "The Tale of Two Cities," at the 
Fox California studios. He is to portray 
the dual characters of Chan. Darney and 
Sidney Carton. 




DyMarirarvCrai^Wertrvrarlh 
b- A Messade To America 
Of EuropesTracJic Cbnf lic± 

/AOTMERHOOD 

VERSUS . 

war! 





OMNX 

FOOUSHTOOrr 

By Thomas Dixon 

Ailhorof •TMFBIRTHof ANATON- 

A PICTURE FOB EVERY GIRL 

V«rV3 EXPECTS TO MARRY 

AND FOR THE MAN WHO 

IS TO MARRY HER 

L ALBERT 
CAPEIXANI *v 
DIRECTOR StMERAL "A* 

■ ' 86^521- : - ' 2J5*w*8^ 
LEWIS J.SaZNICK 
SOLE DISTRIBUTOR © 



"THE CHALLENGE" v." 

Astra. Five Seels. 

Released Dee. 10 by PatM. 

Cut 

Quarrier. .Claries Gotthold 

Robert Letter.. Montagu Loom 

Alberta Bradley Selene OhadtoUk 

Story — Melodrama.. - Adaptation of stage 
play of same name Scenario by Ber- 
tram Millhauwr. Donald ' M««»fc»ri«t» l di- 
rector. Harry Woods, cameraman. 
Action— Fairly interesting. 
Continuity — Holda together well. 
Detail — Good. • • ■ - 

Atmosphere— Good. 

Photography— O. K. 

Remarks " ." 
"The Challenge" is a story of numerous 
inconsistencies. The idea is conventional 



and the finish being always obvious, there 
is little or no dramatic unspenae. Those 
who like a melodrama with the cut and 
dried love story made palatable by good act- 
ing will find a fair amount of entertain- 
ment incorporated in the five reels. The 
exteriors are worth while and add consider- 
able value to wbat is in tnost respects a 
feature of ordinary program calibre. The 
Cast is small containing but three princi- 
pals. Each is an artist of ability. Mon- 
tagu Love gives a smooth and well bal- 
anced performance, Chas. Gotthold shows 
the advantage of. his ■ long training as an 
actor in the spoken- drama and Helene 
Chadwick, a new face in the film world, 
gives every evidence of becoming a prime 
favorite. 
. . Box Office Value. 

One day.. Smaller houses. Advertise 
with discretion. Feature Chadwick. '. " V 



L 



TRIANGLE 

RELEASES FOR WEEK OF JANUARY !4™ 



Frank Keenan with Margery Wilson 
"The Bride of Hate" 

KAY BEE 

A dutinotive drama of ' the eld South. A myatery 
play with ita'anapeiue predominant to the very end. 
Boldly preeented, powerfully told, original and oon- 
viwda*'. Frank Keenan'a moat ImproaalTe characterisa- 
tion. 




Dorothy Gish 
. "The Little Yank" 

FINE ARTS 

She'e a real lire airl and aha took a thrullnc part 
in the armaria between the Horth and Booth. She 
was a herder Ctrl, ton between loyalty to the 
Union and love for a Southern oftoer, ' It'a the 
different story of the Cirtl war, T'ft'yf and as- 



TRIANGLE .COMEDIES 

TWO 

"Love Under Cover" and 
" The Pipe of Discontent" 

They are clean, daahin*, frothy; 
full of action, plot and hilarity. 

1 VALUABLE ADDITION TO 
THE TBIAJTOI.E PHOORAaL 







WILLIAM A. BRADY 

In association with 

WORLD PICTURES 

PrcMQti 

GAIL KANE and 
CARLYLE BLACKWELL 

In 

"On Dangerous Ground" 

From Burton E. Storvmnn'a tanont nerval, "Little) 

Comrade" 

Directed by ROBERT THORNBY 



January 3, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



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"' vSl^r* A Novelty 

r Hawaiian Song. Great Rag 
Rhythm with wonderful comedy 
punch 

HONOLULU 

AMERICA 

LOVES YOU! 

(We've Got to Hand it to You) 



|p jt francis St 



STAGES B( 



I 



We couldn't stop 

this wonderful Ballad 

from becoming the nation's 

grandest hit if we wanted to. 

I KNOW I GOT 
MORE THAN 
MY SHARE 

(When God Gave Me You) 



By Grant Clarke 
Eddie Cox and 
Jlmmie Monaco 



||HS8a* 



THE 

COUNTRY'S 

BIGGEST NOVELTY 

SONG HIT 



Words and Music By 

Grant Clarke and 
Howard Johnson 



nons 



HITS 



STILL 
THE BIGGEST HIT! 



THERE'S A LITTLE 

BIT OF BAD IN EVERY 
600D LITTLE 6IRL 



IRELAND MUST 

BE HEAVEN FOR 

MY MOTHER GAME 

FROM THERE 



A Sensational Knockout 



By 
GRANT CURKE And 

FRED FISCHER 



Biggest Hit ! Because 
it's the best song in its class 
of the season. 



TREMOKlSg 






By JOE MCCARTHY, HOWARD JOHNSON 
and FRED FISCHER 





~ vSwldh 



ri n\ i*> »» cici in cm m en in w pa 03 fl> ' Y > '" "» '*> P 



I 




£^€ .NEW YORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



m mi m m m »3 nu m m m m m m mi m /in m 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917 



G. Schirmer (Inc.) beg to announce the publication of 



the MIRACLE of LOVE 

A Ballad by Frank McKee -c^FffittJSS-. 




THE MIRACLE OF LOVE 

Words by Mabel McKee 

l 
The days were long and chill and drear, 

No gladness came my heart to cheer. 
About the earth I wandered aimlessly, 
L'ntil you came. 

Then all was changed, the days were bright. 
My skies were clear, my heart was light; 
One glance from your dear eyes, and lo! a 

Paradise 
.My world became. 

2 
Thr sky was overcast and gray, 
A dusky gloom obscured the way. 
My heart was lonely and I seemed 
To live my life (or naught. 
The sun burst forth in golden pride, 
The doors of Heaven opened wide; 
You came into my life, and lo! a miracle 
Your magic wrought. 

Chorus: 
Sunshine for shadows, 
,, Laughter for tears, 
Singing* for sighing. 
Courage for fears. 
Gladness for sadness. 
Gift from above, 
Wonderful m y s tery ! 
The miracle of love! 

Copyright, 1917, G. Schirmer. 




Published in four keys: Ab (C-Db [Eb]) Bb (D-Eb [F]), C(E-F[G]), D(F«-G[A]). 
Complimentary copy with orchestration will be sent to recognized singers 

3 East 43d Street G. SCHIRMER, (INC.) 



New York 




SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

" DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



B. F. KEITH'S PALACE 

Week of January 8th 



Direction STOKER & BIERBAUER 



Doris Wilson Trio 



IN THEIR BRAND NEW COMEDY SKETCH 

"MAKING THEM OVER 



99 



IVIEX WITH HUGE SUCCESS AT THE 
ROYAL THEATRE, NEW YORK 




Copyright, 1917, by tbe Clipper Corporation. 



rounded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 10, 1917 



VOLUME LXrV-No. « 
Price. Tea Ccntt 



REFUSED 90% 

BERNHARDT 

CANCELS 

CALLS LYNCHBURG DATE OFF 



Lynchburg, Va., Jan. 6. — Sarah Bern- 
hardt did not appear here January 3 as it 
-was expected she would, and thereon bangs 
a story. 

According to Manager Hamner, of the 
Academy of Music, William F. Connor, 
Mme. Bernliardt's manager, switched the 
date when he declined to accept Connor's 
proposition of playing the great actress on 
a basis whereby Connor would get ninety 
per cent of the gross receipts. 

Mr. Connor was in the city the last week 
of December negotiating for the trag- 
edienne's appearance at the Academy of 
Music, but he and Hamner could not come 
to terms. 

Mr. Connor said the ninety per cent 
gross receipts was the basis upon which 
Mme. Bernhardt has been playing in other 
cities and when Mr. Hamner offered to take 
the attraction on a guarantee basis, be re- 
fused. Mr, Hamner also made other offers, 
all of which Mr. Connor refused, and as 
Mr. Hamner would not consider the ninety- 
ten proposition, -the Lynchburg date was 
cancelled. 

Mme. Bernhardt played Roanoke Jan- 
uary 3, instead of Lynchburg, then jumping 
to Greensboro, N. C, and continuing her 
Southern tour. 



BROTHER, FAIRBANKS' MANAGER 

Denver, Colo., Jan. 7. — John Fairbanks, 
brother of Douglas Fairbanks, has re- 
signed his position as secretary of the C. S. 
Morey Mercantile Co. of this city and 
formed a partnership with his brother. 
John will go Bast as soon as he can ar- 
range his affairs here and win take entire 
charge of his brother's theatrical interests. 



WALLY McCUTCHEON SAILS 

Wallace McCutcheon sailed for England 
last Saturday for the purpose of joining 
his old regiment, which is now at the 
front. He was given several farewells last 
week by his many friends. 



KEENAN TO APPEAR IN "PAWN" 

Frank Keenan, who recently left the 
services of the Triangle Film Corp., will 
shortly return to tbe legitimate stage. A 
producing company ' is being formed for 
the production of a dramatic offering, en- 
titled, "Tbe Pawn," in which Keenan is 
to portray the leading role. 



"JUSTICE" CLOSING 

John D. Williams will bring the tour of 
"Justice" to a close Saturday night and 
John Barrymore, the star, will fulfill a 
motion picture contract before beginning 
rehearsals in a new play by Edward 
Sheldon. 



ZANFT IN BOSTON 

Sam Kingston and John Zonft are in 
Boston arranging for the premiere of "The 
Daughter of tbe Gods" at the Majestic 
Theatre next Monday. 



JARBOE ISSUES PAPER 

Wahhington, Jan. 8. — Manager Harry 
Jarboe of the Gayety Theatre is Issuing a 
weekly paper, The Gayety Bootter, which 
carries news of local interest to theatre- 
goers. Five thousand copies of this paper 
are distributed weekly. 



LATHAM AND R1GBY ARE ILL 

Fred Q. Latham, general manager of 
tbe Century Theatre, is out of town trying 
to recuperate, and J. C. Rigby, business 
manager of the house was confined to his 
home last week. 



PAVLOWA TO TOUR CUBA 

After leaving the Hippodrome, Jan. 20, 
Anna Pavlowa will take her ballet to 
Cuba, opening March 1 at the Nationale in 
Havana. Her tour will include the prin- 
cipal cities of Cuba and South America. 
October 1 she will sail for England to fill 
an engagement at the Palace Theatre, Lon- 
don, for the season of 1917-18. 



MOUNTFORD BACK IN TOWN 

Harry M. Mountford, International ex- 
ecutive of the White Rats Actors' Union, 
returned to the city from Chicago on Mon- 
day morning. 

When inquiries were made at the club 
house aa to the reason for the return of 
the International executive at this time 
from the "seat of war" in Chicago, it was 
stated that he was here in reference to 
business regarding his "Twentieth Cen- 
tury "strike." When asked as to the defi- 
nition of the "Twentieth Century strike," 
the White Rats' official interrogated failed 
to explain. 



MURIEL HUDSON LEAVES SHOW 

Muriel Hudson left the cast of "Flora 
Bella" Saturday night in Brooklyn and has 
returned to Broadway to begin rehearsals 
in a forthcoming operetta. Hazel Kirke 
assumed Miss Hudson's role. 



LAPHAM, CRITIC, DIES 

S. Gurney Lapham, dramatic critic of 
the Syracuse Herald, and one of the most 
authoritative writers on stage matters in 
America, died at his home in Syracuse last 
Thursday afternoon. 



GRACE LARUE 

DROPS HER 

DIVORCE 

SHE AND CHANDLER RECONCILED 



Mrs. Byron D. Chandler, known to the 
stage as Grace La Rue, baa discontinued 
divorce proceedings against her husband, 
known on Broadway as "the millionaire 
kid." The patching up of this domestio 
quarrel completes another chapter in one 
of Broadway's most famous romances. 

Chandler and Miss La Rue were married 
at Auburndale, Mass., hi 1909, and imme- 
diately went to London where "tbe mil- 
lionaire kid" ran his auto coach to Brigh- 
ton and Windsor in opposition to that of 
Alfred G. Vanderbilt. This, and similar 
exploits, quickly ate up his ready cash, 
and he soon found his funds reduced until 
he appealed to his mother, who gave him 
a regular allowance. It was insufficient, 
however, to support him and his 'wife, so 
Miss La Rue decided to return to the 
stage. 

After appearing in London and Paris, 
both returned to New York, he with many 
automobiles and she with wonderful 
gowns. 

Suddenly, after occupying a suits at 
Rector's for many weeks, they went back 
abroad again where they remaned two 
years, when Miss La Rue agaii; paid New 
York a visit and started divorce proceed- 
inga. 

In July, 1914, Miss La Rue won an ali- 
mony action against Chandler, and the 
court ordered him to pay her $50 a week. 

Efforts this week to ascertain how the 
reconciliation was affected were unavail- 
ing, tbe simple fact that the divorce suit 
was withdrawn being all the news ob- 
tainable. 



SHUBERTS TRY TO SIGN BARNES 

The Shuberta are trying to sign T. Roy 
Barnes for a term of five years. Their pur- 
pose is to star the comedian on a percent- 
age and guaranteed salary basis. 



ROTHAPFEL NOT TO RESIGN 

Despite rumors that he might resign. 
Manager Rothapfel of the Rialto an- 
nounces that be will continue in his pres- 
ent position. 



"MISS SPRINGTIME" AT BOSTON 

Boston, Jan. 8. — The special "Miss 
Springtime" company began its tour at 
the Tremont Theatre here to-night. 



DIVIDEND TO SHOW CREDITORS 

Trenton, N. J., Jan. 8.— A final dividend 
of 10 per cent for creditors in the bank- 
ruptcy case of Buffalo Bill's Wild West 
Show and Pawnee Bill's Far East Show 
has been declared by the trustee, which 
will be paid by Jan. 20. 



EDESON CHANGES PLANS 

Although he bad decided to stop acting 
and devote his time to playwrighting, Rob- 
ert Edeson has changed bis plans and will 
go out again as tbe star of "His Brother's 
Keeper," under the management of Ed- 
ward F. Rush and Lyle D. Andrews, Inc. 
The piece will open in Norfolk shortly. 
Herman Moss will manage tbe show, while 
Robert Kirk will go ahead. 



BRENON SERIOUSLY ILL 

Wilmington, Del., Jan. 8. — Herbert 
Brenon, motion picture director, of late 
associated with the Lewis Selznick enter- 
prises, is seriously ill with typhoid fever in 
a hospital here. 



VAN LOAN HAS DIPHTHERIA 

Herbert H. Van Loan, director of pub- 
licity of the Universal Film Manufacturing 
Co., has been confined to his borne for the 
past ten days with diphtheria. He is well 
on the road to recovery and is expected to 
be up and about within the course of a 
week. 



BURLESQUERS TO QUIT 
Boston, Jan. 8. — Lem Wells, juvenile, 
and Dolly Sothern, soubrette, will leave 
tbe cast of the Broadway Belles, at the 
termination of their engagement in New 
Bedford. Mass., Jan. 20. 



SHEEHAN IN CHICAGO 

W. S. Sbeehan, general manager of the 
Fox Film Corporation, and Annette Keller- 
msnn were guests of honor recently In 
Chicago at a luncheon given by W. H. 
Thompson, Mayor of that city 



PEDDICORD TROUPE ARRESTED 

Cincinnati, Jan. 18. — Four members of 
a theatrical troupe known as the Peddicord 
Frolic Co., were arrested yesterday on a 
warrant sworn out by Frank Brooks, owner 
of tbe Elwood Hotel, for alleged fraud. 



DARCY ON BRONX STAGE 

Les Darcy, the Australian welterweight, 
paid a visit Sunday night to Miner's Bronx 
Theatre, and after the intermission ap- 
peared on tbe stage and made a short ad- 
dress. 



"P ATRIA" FOR KEITH HOUSES 

"I'ntria," tbe motion picture serial, 
will be shown in all the local Keith theatre* 
beginning next Monday. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



I U.,JJ. 



FIELDS CALLED 

GREAT IN NEW 

SERIOUS ROLE 

TRANSFORMATION IS COMPLETE 



NEW THEATRE FOR BROWNSVILLE 

A playhouse is to be erected in the 
Brownsville section of Brooklyn exclusively 
for Jews. The theatre will seat 3,400 and 
at first will be devoted to motion pic- 
ture!. 



Albant, Jan. 6. — Lew Fields, whose 
name has been synonymous with laughter 
and burlesque, abandoned the part of 
Harlequin here last week, when he played 
a serious role in "Bosom Friends," and un- 
derwent a transformation that the critics 
call astounding. 

. Audiences have grown so accustomed to 
laughing at Fields and have linked . his 
name with a slapstick so long that it is no 
easy matter for him to adopt a Warfieldian 
role and evoke tears instead of joy. This, 
however, is what he has succeeded in doing 
with the premier of his new play here, ac- 
cording to the critics. He has demonstrated 
a remarkable histrionic ability that has 
revealed a new Fields, they declare. 

It is difficult for a comedian once estab- 
lished to get the public to take him ser- 
iously, but Fields has, apparently, accom- 
plished what has been considered well' nigh 
impossible, and, according to the comments 
of the local press, has clinched bis claim 
to fame. 

"Those who have read with di-oiay of 
Lew Felds' departure from the musical 
comedy stage,' remarks the Knickerbocker- 
Prett, "will look upon the change to the 
legitimate stage as a decided gain, instead 
of a loss when they catch sight of him in 
'Bosom Friends.' If the change was an 
experiment it ceased to be after the first 
performance. Lew Felds became a full- 
fledged legitimate star." 

The Times-Union says : "Another wreath 
was last night added to the laurels of Lew 
Fields. When the curtain fell on the last 
act Albany theatre-goers realized ' that 
theirs had been the privilege of witnessing 
a rare transformation, the changing of a 
comedian of high magnitude into a char- 
acter actor of no less rank in the theatrical 
firmanent. Mr. Fields gave a finished and 
artistic performance." 

The Albany Argu$ sees a new Fields re- 
vealed. It says: "Many of Mr. Fields' 
ardent well-wishers doubted his ability to 
carry out his ambition to play a serious 
role. The penalty of humor is a deadly one 
and the man who has made you laugh for 
years is always looked to for humor. But 
oat of the Weber and Felds' music ball 
there came the greatest character actor — In 
his particular metier— on the American 
stage today, and, while it would be unfair 
to Mr. Field's budding ambition to say that 
be is as yet another Warfield, there is no 
reason why he should not bid a permanent 
farewell to musical comedy and seek the 
plays that call for simple sentiment salted 
with droll humor. 

"His performance represented an entire 
readjustment of his stage life, manner and 
point of view. To have achieved what he 
has is unusual enough to be impressive, and 
it is a pleasure to welcome Lew Fields and 
his worthy ambition. The play is well 
worth seeing, because it is the scene of the 
birth of a new Lew Fields." 



NIXON TO BUILD IN PHILA. 
Philadelphia, Jan. 8. — Samuel F. 
Nixon will erect a new $1,000,000 theatre 
at the northeast corner of Sixteenth and 
Walnut Streets. The building will replace 
the Forrest Theatre, which is controlled 
by the Nixon-Nirdlinger firm by lease and 
which will be torn down. 



HOPKINS WON'T 

LEASE PUNCH 

ANDJUDY 

WANTS OWN PRODUCTIONS THERE 



MILITARY BAND FOR JOLSON 

The First Field Artillery Band, N. G. 
N. Y., composed of twenty-six pieces, has 
been booked by Abe Feinberg to be an 
added feature with Al. Jolson and "The 
Robinson Crusoe, Jr." show which is ap- 
pearing in Chicago. It will join the troupe 
there next Monday. 



HOLLAND IN TERRE HAUTE 

Tehee Haute, Ind., Jan. 6. — Frank Hol- 
land of The Singing Four, passed the hol- 
idays here. 



COMPLIMENT GERRARD-CLARK 

Boston, Jan. 5. — A big compliment was 
paid Al Gerrard and Sylvia Clark, when A. 
Paul Keith sent to Portland, Me., for them, 
in order that they might appear on a 
specially arranged bill celebrating the 
28th Anniversary of the B. A A Club of 
Boston, of which Mr. Keith is president. 
An act was sent from Boston to take the 
place of Gerrard and Clark while they 
made the trip. 



WAKEFIELD-SLATTERY 
CrNCTWWATX, Jan. 4. — Leon Wakefield 
and Elinor Slattery, both members of the 
"Kentucky Belles" company, were married 
at Noblesville, Ind., Thursday night. 



ELEANOR BLEV1NS TO MARRY 

WiLMiNGTOS, DeL, Jan. 5. — Announce- 
ment has been made of the engagement of 
Eleanor Blevins, motion picture actress, to 
Herbert D. Betts, a wealthy motor car 
dealer. 



TO REVIVE IRISH PLAY 
Plans are being discussed for the for- 
mation of a new producing company by 
George E. Lask and James Madison, for 
the purpose of starring Thomas C. Leary 
and another Irish comedian in an up-to- 
date revival of "Muldoon'a Picnic" 



FRANCES STARR NOT ENGAGED 

Frances Starr denies that she is soon 
to announce her engagement to Ammi 
Wright Lancashire, son of Dr. J. Henry 
Lancashire, 1015 Fifth Avenue, as bad 
been reported. 



ALSOP TO MARRY AGAIN 

Marin Luther Alsop, a theatrical man, 
has obtained a license to wed Hazel L. Rob- 
bins, his executive secretary. This wfll 
make Alsop's third marriage, as he has 
been divorced from two wives, one in San 
Francisco and the other in Chicago. 



Despite the offers of theatrical producers 
to lease the Junch and Judy Theatre, when 
"Treasure Island" ends its season there 
Saturday, Charles Hopkins, manager and 
owner of the theatre, has turned a deaf 
ear to all entreaties in this direction. 

Hopkins has used the-~theatre, which 
seats 299 people, since its erection exclu- 
sively for his own shows. Last season 
"Treasure Island" ran there for twenty-five 
weeks and this season will have been there 
twelve weeks when it closes. The house 
last year showed good returns, but this 
season, it is said, Mr. Hopkins has just 
about broke even. 

When overtures were made to him for 
the lease of the house during his absence 
with "Treasure Island, Hopkins stated he 
wanted only his own productions there, as 
he felt that should a ahow come into the 
house and prove a failure it would detract 
from the theatre's prestige. He said it 
would be much cheaper, therefore, to have 
the house closed during bis absence on tour. 

The "Treasure Island" show will open 
its road season in Brooklyn on Jan. 29, 
and after playing the theatres known as the 
"subway circuit will take the show on the 
road for the rest of the season. His tour 
last season proved to be fairly successful 
from a financial standpoint and Hopkins is 
inclined to believe that his returns win be 
larger this season. 

Tim Murphy, who portrayed the role of 
"Bill Bones," has been displaced by Charles 
McDonald. 

After the conclusion of the road season 
Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins will return to New 
York to put another play into rehearsal, 
-which may have its local premier prior to 
the summer months. 



PORTLAND GETS WIGGINS PLAY 

Pobtlanb, Me., Jan. 10. — The first pre- 
sentation of Kate Douglas Wiggin's drama- 
tization of "Mother Carey's Chickens" will 
he given at the Jefferson Theatre, this 
city, the week of January 29-February 3. 
The play will be given under the personal 
direction of Kate Douglas Wiggin. Fol- 
lowing its engagement here the drama will 
go to Boston. 



MRS. PYNE BETTER 

Hartford, Conn., Jan. 8. — Mrs. Pyne, 
wife of James W. Pyne, publicity agent 
to Parsons' Theatre, who has been ill of 
bronchitis for the past three weeks at the 
Hartford Hospital is now feeling much 
better. 



HURTIG STAFF PLANS BALL 

The second annual entertainment and 
ball of "The Mid-Season Theatrical 
Frolic," which is composed of the house 
staff at Hurtig and Seamon's Theatre, 
will be held at ALaambra Hall, Feb. 21. 
The entertainment will be supplied by 
Managers Harry Bailey and Louis Hurtig, 
of the Alhambra and Hurtig and Seamon's 
theatres, respectively. The oGcers of the 
organization are: Gus Smith, president; 
Herman Lew in, vice-president; Sam Bren- 
ner, treasurer; Frank Anderson, secretary, 
and Sam Lewin, secretaxy-at-arms. 



EDWIN FORREST THEATRE SOLD 

PKOLADEifHiA, Jan. 4. — The Edwin 
Forrest Theatre block at Broad and Wal- 
nut streets, this city, owned by Mrs. An- 
derson, of the Gail Anderson Company, of 
New York, was sold last week to the 
Fidelity Trust Company for $4,300,000. 
The theatre, which occupies a portion of 
the plot, is leased by Nixon & Zimmer- 
man, at a rental of $75,000 a year. The 
probabilities are that a huge office building 
will be erected on the plot. 



STANLEY DREWETT HERE 

Stanley Drewett, formerly connected 
with theatres in this country, but now a 
London, Eng., manager, arrived in New 
York last week for the purpose of secur- 
ing American productions. He says there 
is an inconceivable dearth of plays in Eng- 
land and Continental Europe, owing to 
the war. 



UNVEIL BOOTH STATUE SOON 

After a money raising campaign lasting 
for a decade, the Players Club has raised 
$25,000 for a memorial statue of Edwin 
Booth, which will be placed in Gramercy 
Park, opposite the clubhouse. The statue, 
which represents Mr. Booth as Hamlet, 
will be unveiled on April 23. 



CHARTER TRAIN TO SEE SHOW 

Post Chester, N. 'Y-, Jan. 9. — Alia 
Nazimova's legion of friends in this city, 
where she makes her home, chartered a 
special train to-night to take them to 
Stamford, Conn., for the premiere of her 
new play "'Ception Shoals." The attrac- 
tion opens tomorrow night at the Princess 
Theatre, New York. 



BROOKMAN QUITS THEATRE 

Dave Brookman, who has been one of 
the box office attaches at the Harlem 
Opera House for the last two years, will 
leave his post there Saturday night to 
enter the automobile business. 



BARRIENTOS ANNOUNCES DIVORCE 

lime. Barrientos, the Spanish coloratura 
soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Co., 
announced last week that last June she 
had obtained a divorce, in the Spanish 
courts, from her husband, who is an Eng- 
lishman named Keene and lives in Argen- 
tina, S. A. 



INCREASE MEXICO SHOW TAX 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 6. — It is an- 
nounced here through the Mexican Em- 
bassy that Mexico has established a new 
schedule of taxation on amusements) 
which are as foUow: Five per cent, on 
the receipts of all dramatic, comedy and 
opera companies; 10 per cent, on moving 
pictures; 20 per cent, on horse races and 
cockfights. 



ACTRESS LOSES MOTHER 

Anna Taliaferro AbeU, Edith Taliaferro's 
mother, died last Friday in St. Vincent's 
Hospital and Edith Taliaferro was obliged 
to go on in the leading role of "Captain 
Kidd, Jr.," at the Cohan and Harris The- 
atre. 



FRANCES DEMAREST IH FLORIDA 

Frances Demaxest last week sailed for 
Florida, where she will pass a few weeks, 
after which she win return to New York 
to begin rehearsals in a new musical com- 
edy-, "Lieutenant Gus." 



BEATRICE ALLEN RECOVERING 

Beatrice A1l«n, who underwent a danger- 
ous surgical operation last Friday in the 
Woman's Hospital, has been pronounced 
out of danger and is convalescing at her 
borne. --She will be able to rejoin the cast 
of "The Century Girl" shortly. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



SIX THEATRES 
PLANNED FOR 
BROADWAY * 

TWO NEARING COMPLETION 



The unusually successful start which 
was accorded the season of 1918-17 has 
caused another boom in the building of 
theatres, seven of which are in various 
stages of promotion. 

The latest name to be added to the list 
of theatre builders is that of Selwyn & 
Co., who last week announced their plans 
for a new theatre in Forty-third Street, 
west of Broadway. ' It will have a front- 
age of 100 feet, will seat 1,100 and wfll 
cost about $500,000. 

The No. 1620 Broadway Corporation's 
announcement of plans for a motion pic- 
ture house, to cost a half million dollars, 
assures New York of another "movie" pal- 
ace. This house will be located at Broad- 
way and Forty-ninth Street, with a hun- 
dred feet frontage on the former and run- 
ning through to Seventh Avenue. The 
specifications call for a house with a seat- 
ing capacity of 2,000. 

Henry Miller, who, as an actor and man- 
ager, has endeared himself to the New 
York public, is to have a theatre on Forty- 
third Street, between Broadway and Sixth 
Avenue, which will be called the Henry 
Miller Theatre. 

Edward F. Rush- and Lyle D. Andrews 
are building a theatre on Forty-eighth 
street, next to the Cort Theatre, which U 
to cost $100,000. Work on the construc- 
tion of the building will begin in March. 

The Messrs. Shubert are building two 
theatres on Forty-fifth Street, west of 
Broadway, these houses being nearly com- 
pleted. One of them has been leased to 
Oliver Morosco and will be called the Mo- 
rosco Theatre. The other will be named 
the Theatre Francois and will begin oper- 
-stions as the home of linden L. BonheuVs 
Co., presenting plays in French. 



HYSONS ENGAGED FOR "OH BOY" 

With the engagement of the Hysons, a 
new team of specialty dancers, who have 
not yet appeared in New York, the Com- 
-stock-Elliott Co. has completed the com- 
pany for "Oh, Boy," the musical comedy 
production which will have its local prem- 
iere early in February at the Princess 
'Theatre. 



JIMMIE DUNN'S FATHER DIES 

Jimmie Dunn, of the late team of Flor- 
ence Lorraine and Jimmie Dunn, bad a 
very sorrowful Christmas and New Year's. 
His father received an eighth-inch skull 
-fracture very mysteriously Christmas Day 
and died New Year's Day, never regaining 
consciousness. 



LOTTA CRABTREE ILL 

New Haven, Conn., Jan. 6. — Lotta 
Crabtree, the old rime favorite of the 
American stage, is seriously ill at a hospital 
here. Her illness has been brought on by 
a long series of social engagements. 



PARIS, ILL., WANTS ATTRACTIONS 

Pakib, BX, Jan. 6. — Prank Weaver, 
-manager of ShoafFs Opera House, reports 
mo road attractions obtainable. 



WRITER BANQUETS HORSE 

Hubert D. Walter's horse, "The Duke 
of Fairmont," was honored with its tenth 
annual banquet a few days ago. Walter, 
who is the author of "The Code Book" 
and "The Proving Ground," gives a deli- 
catessen and Beer party yearly in honor of 
his horse, which is attended by the hostlers 
and keepers of the stable. 

The Duke has been in Walter's posses- 
sion for more than twenty years and when 
he was first brought here from the West 
the animal came in a special car with his 
owner. 



KELLERMANN PRIZES AWARDED 

The prizes awarded to the contestants 
who competed in the art contest for the 
best drawing of Annette Kcllcrmann were 
distributed by Miss Kellermann from the 
stage of the Lyric Theatre Monday night, 
during the intermission of the performance 
of "A Daughter of the Gods." The first 
and second prize, which was $150, was 
given to Dorothy Yarian and the third 
prize to William Gropper, who received 
$50. Seven other prizes were also award- 
ed. There were 112 sketchs entered. 



PAYS FOR BERNHARDT STATUE 

Harry Houdini, the handcuff king, has 
finally unravelled the Bernhardt statuette 
mystery by paying the amount of $350 
owed oh the "gift" to the French actress. 
Mme. Bernhardt was presented with the 
statuette December 8 by the "Actors of 
America," but later Gorhsm & Co. pre- 
sented her with a bill for it. The identity 
of the donors remained a mystery, but 
Houdini relieved an embarassing situation 
by paying the amount owed for the gift. 



DORALD1N A BUYS MONTMARTRE 

Clifford C. Fischer has sold his interest 
in the Montmartre restaurant to Doral- 
dina, the dancer, for $35,000. This gives 
the dancer about 35 per cent, of the stock, 
the balance being held by the Shubert in- 
terests, who have ■conducted the place, 
which is above the Winter Garden. In the 
future, the place is to be known as Doral- 
dina's Montmartre and is to be under her 
personal management. 



MAY OPERATE ON SOTHERN 

E. H. Sothern, who was compelled to 
close his Chicago production of "If I Were 
King" owing to illness, has returned to 
New York. His physicians are in constant 
attendance, watching his case closely and 
will come to an early decision whether or 
not a surgical operation will be necessary. 
Mr. Sothem'B wife, Julia Marlowe, is with 
him. 



ACTRESS' TRUNK STOLEN 

Fall Riveb, Mass., Jan. 6. — Leslie 
Shaw, playing at the Bijou Theatre the first 
half of the week, had her trunk stolen from 
an express wagon on Wednesday night as 
she was preparing to leave town. The con- 
tents were valued at two thousand dollars, 
consisting of wardobe and expensive furs. 



SELLERS' BALL 

Springfield, Mass., 
and entertainment of 
Posters and Billers at 
New Year's night was 

Between 3,000 and 
eluding representatives 
the profession playing 



A SUCCESS 

Jan. 10. — The ball 
the Springfield BUI 
the Auditorium on 
a brilliant affair. 
4,000 attended, in- 
of all branches of 
here. 



LAMBS MAKE 

MERRY AT 

GAMBOL 

SHOW GIVEN FOR MEMBERS ONLY 



The members of the Lambs* Club held a 
Yuletide gambol all to themselves Sunday 
night in their clubhouse in West Forty- 
fourth Street. 

William Courtleigh, shepherd, took 
charge of the proceedings. 

Musical and humorous numbers made up 
the program, which began with a Lambs' 
version of Shakespeare's works, written by 
J. Clarence Harvey and acted by Etinge, 
Lonegran, Barlow, Courtleigh, Lewis and 
Cort 

John Charles Thomas made his first ap- 
pearance in Lambland by singing several 
songs. "A Keel Song and Dance," the 
work of John L. Golden and Silvio Hein, 
came next. In the cast were Messrs. 
Eltinge, Taber, Le Guere, Sloan, Kruger, 
Pinto, Hale, Lewis, Courtleigh, Jr., Ilill- 
iard, Gerard, Forde, Kent and Metcalf. 

"The Vindication," by Bertram Mar- 
burgh followed a 15 minutes' intermission 
and then followed many comic songs. 

The headlincr of the evening was a play- 
let entitled "The Call of the Man Child, 
or Miss Eartholdi Off Her Perch." It 
was the work of Clay Meredith Greene 
and James Clarence Harvey. In the cast 
were Messrs. Hopper, Ethier, McGrsne, 
Sainpolis, Beasley, Prouty, Wright, 
Sparks, B rah am, Belcher, Weinburg, Bur- 
ton Holmes, Harvey, Mortimer, Breese 
and Conness. 

A supper followed the entertainment. 



JOHN P. DWIGHT DIES 

Sfkingfield, Mass., Jan. S. — John P. 
Dwight, publisher of the Court 8q. Theatre 
program for the past twenty-three years 
and the local manager of the John McCor- 
mick concerts in this city, died at his home 
December 31, after a long illness. 



HART WITH UNIVERSAL 

William Hart, who has been handling 
special serials for the Vita graph Co., has 
left that concern to become a special rep- 
resentative for the Universal Film Manu- 
facturing Co., at their home offices. 



BROADHURST TO MARRY 

Thomas W. Broadhurst, brother of the 
playwright, and himself a well-known 
manager, last week obtained a license to 
wed Iva Helen Harkinson, an actress. 



LEE WITH "WATCH YOUR STEP" 

Frank J. Lee has left New York for 
Memphis, Tenn., to continue as business 
manager for the special "Watch Your 
Step" company. 



KILGOUR IN YOUNG FILM 
Joseph Kilgour has left the cast of 
"Mile-a-Minute Kendall" to begin a film 
version of "The Easiest Way," with Clara 
Kimball Young. 



ART PLAYERS IN NEW QUARTERS 
The Art Drama Players have taken op 
new quarters in the Fitsgerald Building. 
The organization is now in its third season. 



RIVERSIDE SUIT BEFORE COURT 

Argument was heard last week on the 
appeal from the temporary injunction 
granted by Justice Tompkins to the re- 
quest of Oscar Hammerstein, to restrain 
the operation of the B. F. Keith Riverside 
Theatre. Counsel expressed the opinion 
that a decision on the appeal might be ex- 
pected within thirty days. The question 
of alleged damages is also in abeyance. 
Former Judge McCall stated that the ter- 
ritorial agreements between his clients did 
not include Mr. Hammerstein. 



UNION CHARTER FOR EQUITY ASS'N 
The executive board of the American 
Federation of Labor have promised the of- 
ficials of the Actors' Equity Association 
that a new charter for a labor union for 
actors, embracing the entire acting profes- 
sion, will be granted at the meeting of the 
board to be held this month. 



NEW ORGANIZATION STARTS 

A new semi-professional organization, 
known as the Morningside Players, will 
give as their first production a drama by 
Elmer L. Reizenstein, entitled "The Iron 
Cross." One or two special performances 
of the play will be given next month at 
the Broadway Theatre. 



MRS. STRAUSS LOSES FATHER 
Pbovtdence, R. I.. Jnn. 6. — Mrs. W. H. 
Strauss, known professionally as Bessie 
Mae, and her brother, Daniel S. Babcock, 
mourn the loss of their father, Herman V. 
Babcock, who died January 8 at the 
Providence Surgical Hospital. 



BESSIE PARTRIDGE RECOVERS 

Springfield, Mass., Jan. 6. — Bessie L. 
Partridge, who was recently obliged to can- 
cel a number of vaudeville dates on ac- 
count of ill health, has improved. She 
will shortly leave for Chicago to resume 
her vaudeville tour. 



BAKER WITH DEPT OF MILITIA 

Toronto, Ont., Jan. 5.— Eddie Baker, 
press representative of the Princess before 
the old building was burned down two 
years ago, is now employed in the military 
records office of the Department of Militia 
at Ottawa. 



WIDOW OF ACTOR BEING SOUGHT 

Henry Pope, a fifteen-year-old cabin boy 
arrived last week on the White Star liner 
Lapland in search of his mother, who he 
says is the widow of Victor Niblo, an actor. 



AERIAL PERFORMER ILL 

BOSTON, Jan. 8. — Mr. Zecb, of the aerial 
act of Zech and Zecb, is at a hospital here 
in a very serious condition. 



ALONZO COX TO AUSTRALIA 

Alonzo Cox will sail for Australia Jan. 
11, where he is booked for twenty weeks 
on the variety circuits. 



IVAN CARYLL SAILS 

Ivan Carjll, wife and daughter. Prim- 
rose, sailed for Rotterdam on Jan. 7 on 
the Nieuw Amticriam. 



WELSH'S SHOW TO CLOSE 

Indianafolib, Ind., Jan. 6. — Joe 
Welsh's road show will close here next 
week. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



DIXON PRODUCTION 
AT THE OLYMPIC 

GOES OVER BIG 



At the Olympic. .New York, Henry P. 
Dixon's production by James J. Morton, 
with anything that might be considered 
in the least suggestive eliminated, went 
over to a crowded matinee honse, Monday. 

Harry Hkkey Levan, with the red wig, 
impersonated the naive, bnt wise, Charier 
Chaplin in his usual effective way, and he 
did play the piano in his specialty with 
Claire Devine, who was a convincing prima 
donna in voice and action. 

Altie Mason, the ingenue, and Doby 
Morris, the "nut" soubrette, took an act- 
ive part in the festivities. 

Each member of the company, including 
the electrician, the carpenter, the light 
man and the leader, has an opportunity 
at the opening of the show to introduce 
himself to the audience through a couple 
of bars of song recital. 

Charlie Warren impersonated "Am- 
brose" in noisy fashion, and Florrie 
Brooks as an eccentric, looking for her 
long lost husband, gave the character the 
proper tang. 

Joe Dixon has his favorite character of 
Prof. Cook, who impersonates a lord, for 
which character Charles Saxon is the real 
goods. 

Jack Harter and Joe Raymond double 
on the stage in connection with their me- 
chanical duties, and Frank J. Brady leads 
the Kerngood Association of M. M. P. U. 
members. 

The chorus of pretty girls includes: 
Bobbie Gilmore, Chic May, .Greta Skelly, 
Peggy Martin, Genevieve Dunn, Billy Fox, 
Rose Guild, Myra Furst, Dolly Bertram,. 
Lettie Bolles, Edith West, Evelyn Burn - 
ette, Ella Robinson, Tommy Gilmore, 
Buster Dunn, Francis Subs, Babe West, 
Sarah Kramer, Maude Winters and Muriel 
McBride. 

Miss Devine's numbers were well ren- 
dered, including a new "Egypt" song. In 
The Parcel Post Man" the girls as natty 
letter carriers distributed novel deliveries. 
A bnrlesqne on grand opera by Mr. Levan 
and Miss Brooks made a big hit. The 
Yacki Hula dance was a lively finish. 



LENA DALEY 

Lena Daly, whose photograph appears 
on the front cover of this week's issue of 
Tax New York Clipper, is this season 
playing the leading soubrette role in the 
"French Frolics," one of the big attractions 
of the American burlesque wheel. 






-=:- . 



Baseball 
Four 



Spending their vacation tons m Vaudeville, under the ■ guidance of JO PAIGE SMITH 



GEO. ROBINSON 
GEO. CRABBLE 
HUGH BRADLEY 

JOEGLEASON 



WILLIS WOOD THEATRE BURNS 

Kansas Crrr, Mo., Jan. 8. — The Willis 
Wood Theatre was practically destroyed by 
fire early to-day, with a loss estimated at 
$€0,000. The theatre was to have been 
closed next week and remodelled. It was 
one of the oldest playhouses in the West. 



OLIVE MOORE PLAYS LEAD 

Olive Moore assumed the lead in 
"Daddy Long Legs" at the Montank, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., on New Year's Day, 
owing to the illness of Miss Carson, and 
played it satisfactorily. 



FIELD SUIT NOT SETTLED 

Trehtok, N. J., Jan. 8. — Al G. Field has 
not settled his suit against the Trenton 
Theatre out of court as reported. He says 
the witnesses will be ready when the trial 
will be called. The Al G. Field Co. ap- 
pears here January 12-13. 



SOLAR FINISHES WORLD TOUR 

Willie Solar has returned to New York, 
after having girdled the earth, starting 
three years ago. He is going to quit vaude- 
ville and write a book on his experience 
while on the tour. 



DALY BUYS "THE MASTER'' 

Arnold Daly has purchased "The Mas- 
ter" from the estate of Henry B. Harris. 
The play is to appear soon at the Bandbox 
Theatre under his own management. 



NEW PLAY FOR CASINO 

"You're In Love" will follow Anna Held 
at the Casino, about Feb. L The play is 
now in Boston. 



DELAMATER PLAY OPENS 

Toronto, Ont, Jan. 5. — A. G. Dela- 
mater's first play, since his return to the 
producing field is entitled "Mother Love," 
and was produced at the Grand Opera 
Houst last night. 



TORONTO THEATRE HAS FIRE 

Toronto, Ont7 Jan. 6. — A fire occurred 
last. Saturday when the top gallery of the 
Star Theatre was damaged by flames. The 
fire was discovered, after the matinee, but 
the bouse was in ship-shape order before 
the evening performance. The Star The- 
atre is-' owned by F. W. Stair, and is one 
of two local burlesque theatres. 



MASS FOR JOSEPHINE COHAN 

A memorial mass for Josephine Cohan 
Niblo will be held Friday morning at 9 
o'clock at the Church of the Blessed Sacra- 
ment, Broadway and Seventy-first Street. 



"RIGHT LITTLE GIRL" TO CHICAGO 

Rochester, Jan. 9. — "The Right Little 
Girl" will make its first stop on the way 
to Chicago here Monday for a three days* 
engagement at the Lyceum Theatre. 



NEW THEATRICAL CLOTHIER 

Lou M. Singer has purchased the stock 
of Weaver and Thiell, who conducted the 
"Clothes Shop" at 1604 Broadway, and 
after numerous alterations has reopened 
the establishment as "Singer's Clothes 
Shop." He is making a specialty of cater- 
ing to the theatrical trade. 



STAGE CREW ACTS IN PLAY 

The members of the stage crew of the 
Punch and Judy Theatre played "Treasure 
Island" and among those appearing were 
Charles Auburn, head stage carpenter; 
•Tames Hagan, electrician; Henry Bitter, 
stage carpenter ; John Cronin, head prop- 
erty man ; "Gus" Durkin, electrician, and 
Chauncey W. Keim, the regular stage man- 
ager in charge. 



ACTRESS HAS 2 BOYS ARRESTED 

Mrs. Christopher Pender, a vaudeville 
actress, has caused the arrest of two 
youths, one of whom is charged with in- 
sulting her and cutting her husband's face 
in an altercation. The young men are being 
held in $300 bail. 



O'HARA COMING TO STANDARD 

The Standard Theatre is to have a pre- 
mier week of Jan. 15, '"'hen Fiske 0'Hara 
will make his first appearance in this city 
in "His Heart's Desire," which he has been 
presenting on tour. 



BLIND CHILDREN "SEE" SHOW 

Monday afternoon at the Hippodrome a 
number of sightless children "saw" "The 
Big Show." The party was in charge of 
officials of the Department of Education. 
A social leader provided .the seats. 



E. F. BITNER IN THE WEST 
E. F. Bitner, general manager for Leo 
Feist, left on Wednesday for a short busi- 
nes strip to the West. He will be gone 
about a week. 



STODDARD SUES FILM CO. 

Robert Stoddard has filed papers in a 
suit against the American Film Co. for 
infringement of copyright as a result of 
the recent screen production of "The 
Strength of Donald Mackenzie" by th» 
defendant company. Mr. Stoddard claims 
that the picture is identical with his play 
"The Woodsman," which was produced for 
Tiim by the John Craig Stock Co. in the 
Castle Square Theatre, Boston, during the 
week of Dec. 4, 1911. 



HECKMAN, SHAW AND CAMPBELL 

They Are Featured on the Colonial Bill 

This Week. 



BARKER TO PRODUCE COMEDY 

Granville Barker, the English actor- 
manager, has returned to New York from 
London and will produce for Winthrop 
Ames a comedy which he wrote last year 
from one of Robert Louis Stevenson's 
stories, "The Morris Dance." 



FRANK CANGEY MARRIES 

Frank Cangey, violinist, obtained his 
release from custody last week by the 
Grand Jury after he had married Caroline 

Conti, a non-professional. 



BEZAZIAN WITH VICTOR CO. 

Torcom Bezazian, French baritone, is 
now singing for the Victor Phonograph Co. 
The Victor people, in order to secure his 
services, paid the Columbia Co. $600. 



MRS. HILLIARD GETS $800,000 
Mrs. Robert Hilliard, wife of the Broad- 
way actor, and daughter of James Everard, 
the late brewer, will shortly receive $800,- 
000 from her father's estate. 



ELLIOTT IN ADVANCE OF PLAY 

Louis A. Elliott, last season general 
agent with Seven Cairns Brothers Shows, 
L, in advance of the new'Gaskell and Mac- 
Yitty production of "The End of a Perfect 
Day." 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 





B00KINGAGENTS 

TABOO POOR 

6IRLACTS 

MUST HAVE BETTER OFFERINGS 



The boldness on the part of producers 
of girl acts, in offering tabloids and minia- 
ture musical comedies with inferior mate- 
rial, poor staging and amateurish casts, 
has caused the bookers employed by the 
various circuits to issue an ultimatum in 
regard to the future submission of acts 
of this type for routes. 

In the future all acts will have to have 
performers with considerable ability, com- 
edy of a much superior sort than that at 
present culled from "bits" used in bur* 
lesque shows, principal women with sing- 
ing, voices, and chorus girls with real stage 
experience, instead of amateurs. All in 
all, the producers will have to spend a 
great deal more money in the production 
of their acts in the future than they are 
doing at present. 

The great demand for "girl acts," minia- 
ture musical comedies or tabloid versions, 
has caused a number of booking agents 
and so-called producers to throw together 
a conglomerated lot of comedy, inter- 
preted by a few "amateurish'' comedians, 
assisted by a number of girls ranging 
from six to twelve in number, and call it 
a girl act. To offset the poor material 
tbey furnish the producers use elegant 
scenery, with elaborate electrical effects, 
and offer the acts to the booking offices 
for from $275 to $600 a week. 

Since the demand for girl acts in the 
East began over a year ago more than 
500 acta have been quickly assembled and 
given time. 



TWO NEW ACTS READY 

Roehm & Richards have in preparation 
two new acts that will be launched in 
vaudeville this month. One is entitled 
"Dispossessed," written by Garfield Kil- 
gore, with Florence Tanner and Nancy 
Walker, and the other is "Nutology," by 
John P. Medbnry. 



DAUGHTER FOR MRS. JACKSON 

Gbeekviixe, Fa., Jan. 1. — A daughter 
was born to Mrs. J. E. Jackson, of Jack- 
son and Florence, Saturday. Mother and 
daughter are doing well. 



COLLINS BOOKING NEW ENGLAND 

Boston, Jan. 8. — Stuart Collins, for 
many years connected with the John Quig- 
ley Agency, has gone in with the Lester 
Mayne-Sheedy combination to book a num- 
ber of New England theatres. 



MORTIMER ORPHEUM PRESS MAN 

The successor of Nellie Revell as direc- 
tor of publicity for the Orpheum Circuit is 
G. Horace Mortimer, a New York news- 
paperman, press agent and literateur. 



AUDIENCE HOSTILE TO BENNETT 

Tobohto, Oat., Jan. 6. — Murrey Bennett, 
the monologiat, met with a hostile demon- 
stration at Loew's Yonge Street Theatre 
this week, when he presented his usual Jew 
comedy act. A disturbance in the audience 
was raised because a number of persons 
took exception to his utterances. Manager 
Bernstein received a threatening letter 
next day in which the promise was made 
that an organised attempt would be made 
to break up Bennetf s act unless he was 
withdrawn. Bennett appeared at every 
performance during the week but no farther 
demonstrations were made. 



FRED TALLMAN DIES 
Fred Tallman, an exhibition poolplayer, 
died of pneumonia at the Polyclinic Hos- 
pital last week. He had been touring the 
country in vaudeville. Tallman was a 
member of the White Rats. 



VAUDEVTLUANS MARRY 
Skafobd, Dei, Jan. 6. — Dixon Ames, 
Stuart, of the vaudeville team of Bond and 
Ames, and Anna Willard Morrow, of the 
team of Morrow and Morrow, were mar- 
ried here Dec 29. 



SELDA WANDA IN VAUDE 

Selda Wanda, former partner of George 
Stone, has started a vaudeville engagement 
with "Lover's Lake," in which she ia play- 
ing the female lead. 



MORE ACTS FOR ROYAL 

Starting next week, Keith's Royal 
Theatre will inaugurate a new policy by 
eliminating the Keystone feature from its 
program and running the same number of 
acts as the other Keith houses in the city. 



ROBERTS RETURNS TO VAUDE. 

Hans Roberts is to return to vaudeville 
and will make his reappearance in a dra- 
matic sketch. He left vaudeville two sea- 
sons ago to appear on Broadway in a pro- 
duction. 



HASKELL'S MOTHER DEAD 

The mother of Loney Haskell, the vaude- 
ville comedian died last week in this 
city. Haskell received a message telling 
of his mother's illness while en route from 
Columbus to YoungBtown and arrived at 
his mother's bedside a few minutes before 
she died. 



MLLE. DAZIE SHOWS NEW ACT 

Wilmington, Del., Jan. 8. — Mile. Dazie 
presented her new act, "In the Garden of 
Punchinello,'' last week at the Garrick and 
drew remarkably large houses. 



"FRIENDSHIP" FOR VAUDEVILLE 

"Friendship," a playlet by Eugene Wal- 
ter, is another Friar Frolic skit that if to 
find its way to the vaudeville stage. D. 
Frank Dodge has purchased the producing, 
rights and intends to put it on with a 
good cast. 



ANN WELLMAN FOR VAUDE 

Emily Ann Wellman, who recently 
closed with "Her Market Value" in Chi- 
cago, will make her debut in vaudeville 
next Monday in a sketch by Edward Eis- 
ner, entitled "The Younger Mrs. Stafford." 
In support of Miss Wellman will be seen 
Robert Hyman, Winifred Burke, Stewart 
Robbins and Russell Parker. 



ROYAL HAS WIRELESS 

Ernest Richardson, chief electrician at 
the Royal Theatre, gives orders to Ma 
subordinates by wireless. Richardson Is 
a wireless expert, and the Royal manage- 
ment has allowed him to install a Marconi 
machine in the theatre. He has made an 
extension of it to the stag* and, from there, 
transmits his orders to all parts of the 
house. 



KAHN GETS NEW ACT 

Eddie Kahn has accepted a new not 
sketch written by John P. Meadbory, en- 
titled "The Nutologist." He will soon 
play it in vaudeville under the manage- 
ment of Roehm & Richards. 



KATHERYN DAHL GETS GILLEN 

Charles Gillen, formerly pianist for 
Grace La Rue, is now accompanist for 
Katheryn DahL 



VIVIAN BLACKBURN IN PLAYLET 

Vivian Blackburn will make her debut in 
vaudeville to-morrow at Proctor's Theatre, 
Newark, N. J., in a new playlet by Lewis 
Allen, known as "Peacock Alley." El- 
wood F. Bostwiek and ten others are in 
the cast 



CORR1GAN IN NEW SKETCH 

Emmet Corrigan will make his first ap- 
pearance next Monday in a new sketch by 
Anthony P. Zilles, entitled "Mrs. East- 
man's Brooch." 



TEAM SAILS FOR HAVANA 

"Skeets" Gallagher and Irene Martin 
have sailed for Havana to fill a several 
weeks' engagement there. 



I Patsy's^Patter 



WOODS TO MANAGE NORA BAYES 

A. H. Woods has taken over the man- 
agement of Nora Bayes, and will conduct 
the tour which she is to make at the con- 
clusion of her El tinge Theatre engage- 
ment. 



BROWN FOUR DISBANDS 

The Brown Comedy Four, which has 
been playing U. B. O. bookings, hsa dis- 
banded. 



ARLINE TO QUIT VAUDE. 

Arline Fredericks is going to quit 
vaudeville and return to musical comedy. 



The reign of modern and classical dances 
that have so captivated the public's fancy 
the past two years is passing. High lock- 
ing and other stage dances are now being 
looked upon with renewed interest. Witness) 
the success of the Bell girl in "The Century 
tiirl," Miss Pinkie at the Palace last week, 
the novelty dancing of Kinney & Lusby 
and many others. It will be the survival 
of the fittest hereafter for, now that the 
new dancers with their old dances are la 
the spotlight, they will come in for a lot 
of "serious criticism. A talk with Florria 
Millership, a graduate of the Tiller School 
of Dancing, will convince you how easy it 
is to kick and use one's hands and arms In 
graceful gesticulations at the sama time. 
But, go out and find how few there are 
doing it this season. 



NEW PLAY FOR ROSE TIFFANY 

Rose Tiffany & Co. are rehearsing The 
Mysterious Lady," a vaudeville playlet by 
Arthur Horwits. 



TO PLAY MOSS TOUR 

Gardner's Maniacs sailed last week to 
open on the Moss Tour. 



Officer Vokes is in deep distress over the 
carrying on of Don, his intoxicated canine, 
now scoring heavily with the "Midnight 
Frolic" show. Since Florens Ziegfeld, Jr., 
has given them a full year's contract to 
appear in his productions, Don is insisting 
on a diamond collar and an sorts of frills 
and fancies, heretofore looked upon with 
disdain. Imagine Yoke's surprise the other 
night to find his canine pal eating lobster 
salad with a bevy of Ziegfeld beauties 
around him! Officer Vokes says he has 
credited Don with almost human intelli- 
gence, but he can see plainly, now, that 
success has turned his bead, and he Is fast 
"going to the dogs." 

Irene Franklin, who is, of course, a 
Twelfth Nighter, sang some songs— and 
one of them, by Jack Hazard, is great. 
It's about a debutante looking into the 
eyes of her dear grandma at 2 O. M. and 
wailing "Grandma, dear grandma, come 
home with me now, the clock in the steeple 
struck three." But grandma replying mur- 
murs words* to the effect that the fnn is 
just commencing, that she must have an- 
other one-step, and tells the girl to go 
order a taxi and they will stop at Jack's 
for breakfast. There were too many 
grandmas present to allow the success that 
will ordinarily go with this number. 



W. L. Abingdon, Bijou Fernandas, Bur- 
ton Green, Irene Franklin and a couple of 
others excused themselves from the Percy 
G. Williams "triple event" at Healy's 
Saturday night to run down to the affair 
given by the Twelfth Night Club at the 
Astor Hotel. They stayed long enough to 
say "howdy" to everyone and then went 
back to Healy's for breakfast. 



Cecil Cunningham is jubllaat over the 
prospect of her Orpheum tour, which starts 
the first of February. It Is feared by her 
many friends here that she win make quite 
a stay on the coast, when she returns. 

Daly & Berlew, the whining whirlwind 
wizards of vaudeville, are entertaining the 
guests at the Hotel Martinique, Atlantic 
City, creating quite a sensation and mak- 
ing a lot of friends. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 




PALACE 

The Four Ishikawa Brothers, Japan's 
noted hand equilibrists, could easily be 
billed "Vaudeville's Greatest Hand Equi- 
librists." Their work at this house this 
week was particularly noteworthy for the 
easy manner in which . they accomplished 
their difficult feats of strength and bal- 
ance. Most of it is done on one hand. 

Muriel Window, in that, difficult spot for 
a single, No. 2, strutted on like a little 
peacock and won the heart of everyone. 
She opened with a popular song, the rest 
of her numbers being exclusive. Her 
Birdies' Ball and Gave Man songs are still 
her feature numbers, but a new one. about 
the Town of Toys, went over big. She in- 
terested from the start, and can be con- 
gratulated on her success so early in the 

bill. 

Mme. Doree's Celebrities made the audi- 
ence sit up and take notice, and are re- 
viewed under New Acta. 

Charles (Chic) Sale has a new opening 
for his Rural Sunday School entertain- 
ment. It shows him in the garb of a 
minister, behind a pulpit opening his serv- 
ice, on Sunday morning, giving as a text 
a parody on a real sermon, and reading 
announcements for the coming week. It's 
all in fun, and was thoroughly enjoyed 
by the Palace audience, but it is a ques- 
tion whether it will not be considered 
offensive to churchgoers who are also the- 
atre-goers in other cities. Sale is an art- 
ist and never overdoes any of his well- 
drawn characters. 

Bessie Clayton, in a new' offering of 
dance pantomimes, assisted by Constantine 
Kobeleff and Lester Sheehan, and her 
hand of harmonist entertainers, was 
greeted by the Palace enthusiasts like an 
old friend. Miss Clayton would not be 
overstepping her rightful dues if she used 
the billing, "Queen of the Dance." America 
has never seen anyone who could equal 
her, and Europe has only sent over one 
dancer who could compare with her. 

Claire Rochester, the "Prima Donna Sur- 
prise," opened with a popular song about 
the "Road That Led to Love." A young 
woman in an upper box sang an encore 
verse while Miss Rochester made a change 
to a pink tulle creation which showed off 
her dark beauty to perfection. Her double 
voice surprised all in an operatic selection. 

Another song, about the treasure of a 
perfect love, earned her so much applause 
she had to come out and make a speech, 
in which she told of her flying trip across 
the continent last summer in her car, mak- 
ing the distance in twenty-one days and 
arriving in "Frisco two hours before her 
appearance at a theatre there. 

Louis Mann, in a one-act satire by Clara 
Lipman and Samuel Shipman, entitled 
"Some Warriors," is another new act that 
merits a special review. 

Anna Wheaton, particularly dainty in a 
new white frock, and Harry Carroll, had 
the same spot as last week. They went, if 
anything, better than before, although do- 
ing the same songs, with the addition of 
one about being anxious to get on a train 
for Chicago. 

It seems strange to mention that Chas. 
Ahearn had new scenery. But he did. So 
why not say so. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on page 17) 



RIVERSIDE 

Jack Wilson and his "Co.," in their 
usual next to closing position, are cleaning 
up the comedy honors of the current bill 
at the Riverside. Jack was never in bet- 
ter form than the large audience found him 
Monday evening and had the time of his 
young life kidding the preceding ■ turns. 
Frank Hurst, Wilson's present 
"straight," is a pleasing singer of popular 
numbers and serves as an excellent feeder 
for the blackface comedian's humorous 
sallies. These are more often impromptu 
than routine, and it takes a good man to 
pick np the thread of dialogue. Hurst is 
one of the few who could handle the job. 
Dolores Swarez, while not quite so gingery 
as her numerous predecessors, makes up 
in appearance and class what she lacks in 
vocal accomplishments. 

Willie Weston has several new character 
tongs, which he does in his own inimitable 
style. Weston has a personality that 
reaches right out over the footlights. 

The Seven Bracks are a typical "family" 
of acrobats. The costuming is neat, hot 
smacks a bit too much of the circus. The 
ground tumbling of the "turn is carried 
through with clockwork precision, the 
boys very kindly refraining from nnneces- 
aaiy stalling. Some particularly daring 
"rialey" work stamps the act as one of 
the leaders in its field. 

Roland Travera seems fated to open and 
close shows. He does both acceptably, as 
evidenced by bis performances here and 
at the Orpheum last week. 

Hans Wilson and the McNallya open In 
one- with a discussion relative to a tryout 
in a New York vaudeville house. There is 
a little dialogue, and a suggestion of the 
acrobatics and dancing the male members 
of the trio put over in more generous 
measure when the turn reaches full stage. 
The boys are great as far as acrobatic 
dancing goes, so why try to be actors. 
Hans Wilson, if that is the blonde young 
fellow's name, can twist his ankles in a 
nanner to make Fred Stone sit up and 
take ■ notice. McNally is equally clever 
in his own conception of flip-flop stepping. 
Hunting and Francis entertained with 
their refined comedy and singing skit. 
While they were on, the audience showed 
keen appreciation of everything they did. 
Edna Goodrich and Co. in "The Manne- 
quin" were a laughing success. .The gown 
display went over like wildfire at this 
theatre and France Bendtsen supplied the 
necessary comedy relief, 

Frank Hale and Signe Patterson, with 
the most melodious bunch of musicians 
heard about New York this season, closed 
the first part. The society dancers are 
topnotchers in their class. The Hawaiian 
dances scored even better than the trots. 
As performed by Hale and Peterson the 
Hoola-Hoola looks like a novelty, despite 
the fact that it is being overdone every 
minute of the day hereabouts. 

Mosher, Hayes and Mosher opened. Their 
bicycling; and comedy were enjoyed hy the 
early comers. It is a standard act and 
always sure of going over. 



COLONIAL 

Manager Darling .has used painstaking 
efforts since the season opened to present 
nothing but the best obtainable in the 
vaudeville field, and the crowds that have 
responded is proof that the best always 
pays. 

Frank and Tobie opened with songs, 
dances and several dress creations. Both 
are clever dancers, have plenty of person- 
ality and in this difficult spot took three 
bows. 

Heckman, Shaw and Campbell in "Mo- 
ments Musical," played the piano and 
otherwise made themselves entertaining. 
All three possess fine singing voices, and 
the arrangement of their act is the best 
seen at this house in some time. 

Bert Melrose, with the same tables and 
chairs, bad them "holding on" as usual 
with his funny antics. Bert has added 
several humorous stunts that he closes 
with in one and they make a valuable 
addition to his already clever performance. 

Melville Ellis and Irene Bordoni were 
easily one of the features of the excellent 
program. Ellis has lost none of his clev- 
erness on the piano, .while Miss Bordoni 
can sing English songs as well as French 
ones. A Hawaiian song was one of her 
biggest hits. 

Harry Beresford and company, with his 
successful little playlet; "Twenty Odd 
Years," scored heavily. The sketch is in- 
teresting from start to finish. Isabel 
Mendosa, in a juvenile role, has a bright 
future before her. She is a capable little 
actress and baa an abundance of person- 
ality. 

Moon and Morris, in their remarkable 
dance, "Two In One," opened intermission 
and what these boys don't know about 
dancing isn't worth knowing. They do 
all their dancing in a manner that excels 
anything of its kind on the boards to-day. 
They also do a song that brought them 
good results. 

Wilbur Mack and Nella Walker and 
company, presenting "A Pair of Tickets," 
had no reason to complain of their recep- 
tion. Mack introduced an "apple" song 
for the first time and most likely will re- 
tain it for some time, as it went over big. 
Belle Baker, with an entirely new reper- 
toire of songs, sang in her usual fascinat- 
ing way and captured her audience from 
the start. Miss Baker this time has 
chosen her songs wisely, taking the pick 
from half a dozen of the publishers. Each 
of her songs is rendered as only she can 
Bing them and after her sixth number she 
fairly had to beg off. She scored a tre- 
mendous hit. 

Le Hoen and Dupreece, in a singing nov- 
elty rifle shooting act, held down closing 
position in good shape. They are both 
expert rifle shots and shoot objects from 
almost any position. 

Pathe News pictorial, with views of the 
past week, sent them home in a happy 
mood. 



ORPHEUM 

There is a youthful comedian of acro- 
batic tendencies over at the Orpheum this 
week, who could be developed into a four- 
figured movie cut-up in a couple of 
months, providing the proper director took 
him in hand. J. Gordon Dooley is the 
youngster in- question. He is half of the 
team of Dooley and Dooley, his partner 
being a lively little miss who can sing 
baby songs cutely, make 'em laugh as well 
as the boy, and dance like the proverbial 
sprite. 

Their act is a welcome relief from the 
customary routine offered by mixed song 
and dance turns. 

Better Bros, opened. It is a good acro- 
batic combination with the gymnastics 
far surpassing the comedy attempted. 

The Primrose Four were not in par- 
ticularly good voice Monday afternoon. 
Bob Webb, the heavy-weight tenor, who, 
by the way, did police duty right in the 
town he is playing this week, for twenty 
years or so, received a strong welcome 
from the natives the moment he stepped 
on the rostrum. Webb, although suffering 
from a cold, put over a solo nicely. The 
quartet is at its best in the concerted' 
numbers. A rag song, harmonized ex- 
ceptionally well, sent them off to an ap- 
plause reward, at the finish. 

Jasper, the trained canine, whose hit in 
"Young America" secured the prestige 
necessary to a vaudeville engagement, is 
an intelligent animal. The trainer, -Dixie 
Taylor, handles the animal with every 
show of gentleness and gets results that 
are truly astonishing. 

Houdini improves as the years roll by. 
The needle trick went over just as mysti- 
fyingly as ever, Houdini incidentally liv- 
ing up to his reputation as a quick thinker 
by interpolating several witty remarks 
that immediately put the crowd in good 
humor. 

William Sisto had a difficult spot for a 
talking comedian, opening directly after 
intermission. His Italian political speech 
is full of good laughing points, and he de- 
livered it with . an unction that made it 
genuinely funny. 

Olive Wyndham and company are play- 
ing a Chinese tragedy that is a classic in 
its way. The sketch is very well written 
and possesses the merit of novelty. Miss 
Wyndham is a capable actress. Her per- 
formance of the humble Chinese wife is a 
superior piece of acting. Albert Parry, aa 
the domineering Oriental husband, gives a 
rendition of the role that is peculiarly 
realistic. The third character, played by 
a boy, Fred Goodnow by name, is remark- 
able also for the note of reality it con- 
tains. 

' Gladys Clark and Henry Bergman gave 
their song revue. The late stars of "The 
Trained Nurses" are doing the best act 
they have ever presented. Bergman baa a 
sweet tenor voice with a likable tone qual- 
ity and, what is rather unusual, dances 
quite as well aa be sings. Miss Clark also 
sings and dances artistically. The act is 
well staged and worthy of headline honors 
on any bill. Mr. and Mrs. Rowley DowneB 
will be found under New Acts. 



January 1.0,. 1917, 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




ALHAMBRA 

There was an overcapacity house at this 
theatre Monday night. 

Raymond Wilbert has one of the best 
opening acts on Keith time and the ap- 
plause be received tends to bear this out. 
DeForest & Kearna in "Yon Can't Be- 
lieve Them" presented the neatest kind of 
a man and girl act. Their material is ex- 
ceptionally good and the pair do justice to 
it They deserved a place further along 
on the bill. 

The Van Llcw Trio were very entertain- 
ing. Norma 'Van Liew, who is featured, 
does much to carry the act to success. The 
comedy song is a bit broad to be sung at 
neighborhood houses and rather out of 
place in an act that is otherwise the very 
essence of refinement. 

Lew Pistel and O. H. Gashing will be re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

"Rubeville," closing the first half of the 
■how, carried first honors of the bill. This 
act is all "class" and the audience could 
not seem to get enough of it, 

Nonette followed intermission and mad* 
good as usual. There are times when her 
violin playing has seemed rather careless 
of late and Monday night was one of these 
times. 

Harry Green and Players, in "The 
Cherry Tree," have no difficulty in holding 
down a feature spot and Green makes his 
personality felt from the start. 

"Miln" always goes over big, and the 
audience liberally applauded the tramp's 
versatility. 

Mazie King reviewed under New Acts. 



ROYAL 

Four new acts are on a seven act bill at 
the Royal this week. 

The Australian Creightons, who open the 
■bow, display an unusual amount of "pep" 
with their Indian clubs and present an ex- 
ceptionally good opening act. However, 
they could show beter judgment in their 
manner of dress. They discard their coats 
upon their entrance and work in their 
vests. This tends to give them a careless 
appearance, as though they were practis- 
ing in the bac>< yard. 

Joseph McShane and Arria Hathaway do 
a neat turn in one. McShane would get 
better results if he played more to the 
audience. He does not appear to be try- 
ing to get over, and an audience is always 
quick to resent this attitude. Miss Hath- 
away does a clever Charlie Chaplin take- 
off. Their encore is rather dull and de- 
tracts from the whole act. 

William Rock and Frances White are in 
their second week at the Royal, but are 
"still going strong." Several new numbers 
are introduced into the act. The Swedish 
number, with which they open, is rather 
picturesque and gets over big. Rock sings 
a pessimist song which also scores a hit. 
A moving picture novelty is introduced 
which Rock did in the old days with Maude 
Fulton. It is screamingly funny and 
should be made a permanent part of the 
act. 

This week, instead of showing "how they 
dance in 'Frisco,'' the pair show "how it 
is done in Philadelphia." 

A Triangle feature closed the bill. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

Mabel Burke singing a popular song 
with views of the story shown in motion 
pictures opened the show. 

Keeley Bros, and company, with a bag 
punching exhibition and singing by the 
young woman pleased. 

Winchester and Claire, a man and 
woman, offered a singing novelty with 
capable xlyophone playing. The act opens 
in one, the man appearing behind a news- 
stand. A young woman, who is making 
collections for a fund approaches and a 
bright line of talk takes place between 
them. 

Hazel Muller, a singer with a deep con- 
tralto voice, sang several songs and regis- 
tered a fairly big success. 

"The Cure," one of those comedy drama 
affairs with a story about a jealous wife, 
employing five people, was one of the 
strong features of the bill. There are 
three principal characters, a doctor, tits 
wife, and a woman detective. 

The Three Dolce Sisters, with a new 
lepertoire of popular songs, had an easy 
time of it. The large audience got into 
the spirit of their excellent work and sent 
them over for a big hit. 

Lydia Barry, presenting a new selection 
of songs, with several of her old favorites 
headlined, came very near walking away 
with the show. 

Williard Simms A Co. in that time-worn 
skit, "Flinders' Furnished Flat," supplied 
his usual eighteen minutes of laughter. 

0"Rourke and Kill ion, in a singing sketch 
called "Waiting for the Wagon," seemed 
to please. 

A tab composed of all colored enter- 
tainers called "A Holiday in Dixieland," 
took up some twenty-five minutes with a 
rather tiresome performance. 



NEW ACTS 

Continued on paga 18 



LOUIS MANN & CO. 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — One act satire. 

Time — About ttoenty minute*. 

Setting. — Headquarters on a battlefield. 

This one act satire on the great 
European struggle by Clara Lipman and 
Samuel Sbipman was undoubtedly writ- 
ten for Louis Mann, as the part he 
portrays is well suited to him and he 
gets a few laughs from it. 

The idea of the story is the meeting 
on a battlefield of Richard Strauss, 
Germany's greatest composer, and 
Kdrnond Rostrand, France's greatest 
poet, the spirit of conquest and of 
hatred, being equaled . by the spirit -of 
art. 

Richard Strauss, played by Mr. Mann, 
is valet- and cook to General Von 
Wahnhausen, a war dog, and Kdrnond 
Rostrand, who is -an errand boy in the 
French army, comes into camp with a 
message. The composer and poet ex- 
change confidences and agree they would 
rather write music and poetry than 
fight, and sit down to do it. They are 
surprised by a hard hearted officer, who 
is about to send them out into the 
thick of battle or have them shot as 
traitors, when a superior arrives and, 
recognizing the writers, pays homage to 
their talent, much to the disgust of the 
officer. 

In its present form the act will hardly 
do for vaudeville. 



JEFFERSON 

Florette, a contortionist, opened the bill 
and met with success. Besides doing many 
of the feats usually done by a performer 
in her line, Mile. Florette performed a 
neck dislocation which is remarkable. 

Greenley and Drayton, colored singers 
and dancers, scored heavily with their act, 
their acrobatic dancing being much better 
than the average. 

Philip the Great, a simian, did some 
work on the triple horizontal bars that 
showed almost human intelligence. 

Sam Harris, the comedian, gave his 
singing and talking act and was so well 
liked that he was recalled many times 
and was forced to respond with an encore. 

The singing of Irving and Dode, man 
and woman, brought them appreciation to 
the extent of hearty applause and an 
encore. 

"An Innocent Bystander" proved to be 
a sketch of considerable merit. 

Mahon and Manning, with their singing 
and talking, won the great big hit of the 
bill. They both work from the drummer's 
position in the orchestra, and their act 
is a big "go" from the very start. 

The Metzetti Family of Acrobats, five 
in number, presented their remarkably 
clever act, made np of ont-of-the-ordinary 
stunts and held them in in closing posi- 
tion. 



ROWLEY DOWNES 

Theatre— -Orpheum. 
Style — Dancing. 
Time— Twelve minutes. 
Setting— Fun *top«. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rowley Downes have 
been at the Bossert, a Brooklyn hotel. 
Their appearance at the Orpheum this 
week resulted from the popularity at- 
tained there. 

Their present act seems to. have been 
hurriedly put together for the week's 
engagement and consists of the usual so- 
ciety trots, steps and freak waltzes that 
have come into favor during the past 
couple of years. The dancing averages 
up very well on the whole, and with a 
few theatre engagements .the couple 
should improve greatly. 

The band . carried is only fair, with ■ 
the possible exception of the violinist. . 
It is a debatable point .whether it is : 
exactly good .form to employ a colored, 
d-ummer in a band consisting otherwise 
of white musicians. A good producer 
and a capable vaudeville advisor sjeems 
to be the proper coper for Mr. and. Mrs. 
Downes. , ..... 



MAZ1E KING 



V 

...I. 



•v 



MME. DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Operatic offering. 
Time— About eighteen minutes. 
Setting — Special drops. 

Mme. Doree in this act first steps to 
the footlights and announces it is her 
pleasure to appear before the audience 
as an impresario, presenting the great- 
est group of operatic stars ever appear- 
ing together in vaudeville. She explains 
that her company will give impressions 
of the great operatic artists, Caruso, 
Destinn, Mary Garden and others. Then 
the drop separates and the brilliantly 
costumed group is shown around the 
piano. 

After the opening ensemble number, 
the prayer from "Cavalleria Rusticana," 
Raoul Romito steps out of the group 
and sings the famous Caruso number 
from "Pagliacd" and sings it very well. 
Hazel Sanborn sang "Sempre Libera," 
Tetrazxini's show number, beautifully, 
taking the high E with ease. Grace 
Lyon looking remarkably like Louise 
Homer, sang the lead with Sig. Scala of 
a selection from "Aids." They sang 
"Carry Me Back to Old Virginia" for 
an encore number, and Mme. Doree 
proved she was a singer as well as an 
impresario by singing the solo part very 
sweetly. 

This is by far the beat operatic offering 
that has ever been shown in vaudeville 
by Mme. Doree or anyone else. 



Theatre — Alhamlro. ■ .. 
Style — Toe dancing. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

Mmie King, nminted by Fred Doner, 
gives a very high class dancing act. 

She dances entirely on her toes. 

The first dance, in semi-colonial cos- 
tume, is done by Miss King and Doner. 
While they change, a moving picture of 
Miss King, dancing, is flashed on the 
screen. The pair also dance a charming 
Mandarin conception. Then Doner en- 
tertained with a clever solo dance. Miss 
King later appears as a girl-soldier and 
does a unique military dance, after 
which the pair bring the act to a fast 
close. 

Miss King is a wonderful dancer of 
her kind and Doner proves a thoroughly 
able assistant. 



FISCHER AND McCARTY 

Theatre— lloya I. | 

Style— Soaps. t 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 
Setting— One. 

The members of this team enter in 
their smoking jackets. Fischer loses no 
time in running his fingers over the 
piano keys, while McCarthy starts to 
sing. Their songs include a medley of 
their own compositions, advice on how 
to write a song, a comic ballad, a song 
of which both words and music are 
Fischer's, a Bohemian song and an ap- 
plause-getting stick-to-Wilson song. 

The act will be acceptable on any bill. 
The pair have pleasing voices and use 
them to the best advantage. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 191?. 




"THE LODGER" AT 
MAXINE ELLIOTTS 
DELIGHTFUL COMEDY 



'TBS WKIIV-i fogr act naatlr 
by Horace Annealej Vachell. i ii u n no t- 
ed Monday arealng. January 8, at 
Mills* HUiott'i Theatre. 
CAST. 

Hn. Banting Beat Mercer 

Mr. Bunting Barry Ashlard 

Irene Herding Phjllia Helps 

Tom Bunting Harold Becker 

Ttw Loafer. Usoel Atwin 

Prentlaa rredrrtck- Anuria* 

Inspector Stone Frank Howson 

Pol icemea— Mors aa Ki-U j aad I Gaaa. Pnilnpe 



Coming as s stop gap between "Gam- 
blers All" and Gertrude Kingston's Play- 
ers, and billed but for.a single week, "The 
Lodger," from the Haymarket Theatre, 
London, presented by a cast of English 
players, proved to be a delightful comedy, 
and one which should fill Haxine Elliott's 
Theatre for months to come. 

The play is founded upon the novel of 
Belloc Lownea, and in a clever and humor- 
ous manner deals with the adventures of 
a young nobleman, who, having been de- 
serted by his fiancee on his wedding day, 
determines to lose M— M in London and, 
under an assumed name, takes lodgings 
with a poor couple in Bloomsbnry. 

At the time of his arrival that portion 
of London where he takes lodgings is 
terrified by the crimes of a mysterious 
assassin who prowls about in the night 
atta c ki n g women, and who has been given 
the title of The Avenger." 

The somewhat peculiar actions of the 
young nobleman, especially his habit of 
walking abroad during the night time, 
easily convinces his landlady and her hus- 
band that the mysterious "avenger" and 
their lodger are one and the same. They 
charitably believe him to be insane, and 
their efforts to save him from the police 
and. incidentally, keep him from doing 
harm to another lodger, a charming young 
woman with whom he fall in love and 
eventually marries, furnishes the humor 
of the piece. 

Lionel Atwill, the young nobleman, and 
Phyllis Relph. the poor young lodger, 
were featured in the piece and gave a par- 
ticularly fine performance of the two 
leading roles. Sir. Atwill, especially, was 
excellent. 

The comedy honors of the play, how- 
ever, went to Miss Beryl Mercer, who, as 
the lodging house keeper, suspecting her 
lodger of being the criminal, was loyal to 
the last, gave a performance that was 
really delightful. Harry Asford as Mr. 
Bunting, her husband, was good, and Tom 
Bunting, the son, a detective who was re- 
sponsible for much of the trouble, brought 
a small part into prominence. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAT. 
World—Poor excuse for play. 
Times — Highly amusing. 
Herald — A muting light comedy. 
Sun — Play of tasteless efort. 
American — Surprise of 



"PIERROTS" SUCCESSOR CHOSEN 

"The Morris Dance," by Granville 
Barker, will follow "Pierrot the Prodigal" 
at Winthrop Ames' Little Theatre, when 
that production moves shortly. 



REHEARSE SWAN'S PLAY 

Rehearsals of Mark Swan's new play, 
the initial offering of the Holbrook Blinn- 
James Shesgreen company, are now in 
progress. The cast- of principals include 
George Probert,- Ben Johnson, Forrest Rob- 
inson, Bert LytelL Charles Mackaye, Sid- 
ney Shields, Ruth Benson, AJlie Williams, 
Taylor Graves and Master Reggie Sheffield. 
Hie title of the play has not yet been de- 
cided. The opening date will be Atlantic 
City, Jan. 25. 



REVIVAL OF "MERRY 
WIVES OF WINDSORS 
IS VERY PLEASING 



REVIVAL Or *TH» MERRY WIVES 
OF WINDSOR." — Three act play by 
Wm. Shakespeare. Presented at toe 
Park Theatre, Monday evening, Jan. 8. 
CAB?. 

Sir John Falauff Thomas A. Wlae 

Mlatreaa Ford Constance Collier 

Mistress Pace Isabel Ining 

roso. w. Latwson Butt 

Pace Gordon Bnrby 

Anne Page Vera Poller Hellish 

Mlalnaa Quickly Anriol Lee 

Pentoa Alexander Onslow 

Shallow j. d, Walah 

Slender Barry Hacohnn 

Str Hug* Brans Robert Craig 

Dr. Cains: Marcel Booaaean 

Boat of the Garter Inn Poller Hellish 

Bardolnh. Tracy Barrow 

Pistol Jlcx TfITy 

Nym Robert MaatelL Jr. 

Simple David Lindsay 

BosbV Russell Morrison 

Bobln Lottie Dewey 

Biat Sarraat Alan North 

Second Servant Richard Mattox 



Silvio Hein is responsible for the re- 
vival of "The Merry Wives of Windsor," 
as seen at the Park Theatre Monday night, 
and the capable company of players en- 
gaged for the production assured the 
Shakespearean comedy of a capital perfor- 
mance. 

Thomas A. Wise was again seen as Fals- 
taff and duplicated the success he attained 
in Mr. Hacketf s revival. If this play were 
as commonly produced as it was in the 
days of the elder Hackett, it is more than 
probable that Mr. Wise's performance of 
the fat Knight would go down in theatrical 
history as one of the greatest. As it is, 
with no comparisons to make, it can only 
be said that be gives as near a flawless 
performance as possible. 

Constance Collier and Isabel Irving as 
Mistress Ford and Mistress Page, respec- 
tively, did good work, and Anriol Lee was 
pleasing as Mistress Quickly. The work 
of the other members of the cast showed 
careful rehearsing. 

Aa a production it can be classed with 
the best and speaks well for Manager 
Hein's first attempt as a producer. . 



NEW CENTURY SHOW IN OCTOBER 

The new Century production will be 
ready in October. American star* are 
being engaged and a representative of Dil- 
lingham and Ziegfeld is in Europe seeking 
novelties. 



TO REVIVE "GREAT DIVIDE" 

"The Great Divide" is to be revived 
soon by Henry Miller, and will come to 
New York the moment a metropolitan 
playhouse is available. Mr. Miller will 
appear personally in the play, and the 
role originally acted by Margaret Anglin 
will be entrusted to Kathlene MacdoneU. 



"HER HUSBAND'S WIFE' ' 
IS SEEN AGAIN IN 
BROADWAY THEATRE 



"HER HUSBAND'S .WW*."— A three 
act comedy by A. E. Thomas. rerlTed 
Monday night, January 8, at the 
Lyceum Theatre. 

CAST. 

Nora Norma Mitchell 

Richar d | B al den Eocene O'Brien 

John Belden ..Henry Kotker 

Stuart Randolph W. Qeaham Browne 

Irene Randolph Laura Hope Crews 

Emily Lad** .' Marie Tempest 



"Her Husband's Wife" was first seen in 
this city in 1910, when Klaw & Erlanger 
were the producers. At that time it waa 
not very successful, although the audi- 
ence always seemed to like it. Mr. Miller 
then played the role of John Belden, and 
his faith in the play has caused him to 
revive it at this time. 

"Her Husband's Wife" is written in Mr. 
Thomas' happiest style, and it tells of 
trials which beset Irene Randolph, who 
is a hypochondriac. She is happily mar- 
ried, but fears that she is soon to die 
from some one of her many imaginary 
ills. She thinks not of herself but of the 
future of her husband, whom she dearly 
loves. 

In order to provide for his welfare after 
she has gone, she determines that he shall 
marry her friend, Emily Ladew. But, of 
course, her husband is not to know any- 
thing about the arrangement till she has 
passed away. 

Irene xuakes the proposition to Emily, 
who had a former love affair with Irene's 
brother Richard, whom she still loves. 
Emily is therefore incensed at the pro- 
posal, but agrees to it in order to teach 
Irene a lesson, and with the aid of John 
Belden the lesson proves a good one. 
Irene resents the growing friendship be- 
tween her husband and Emily, and after 
many ludicrous situations the hypochon- 
driac is cured Emily and Richard are re- 
united and the usual happy ending, in 
such cases, results. 

Laura Hope Crews, who played Irene 
Randolph in the original production, is' 
again seen in the role, and it is needless 
to say that her work is excellent. 

Marie Tempest is delightful as Emily. 
She invests the role with her charming 
personality, and her performance is one 
of the best she has given in this city. 

Henry Kolker, who hardly ever plays 
anything poorly, made the character of 
John Belden most pleasing. 

Eugene O'Brien was forceful and manly 
as Richard, and W. Graham Browne did 
capital work aa Stuart Randolph. 



CHOOSE "LOVE MILL." CAST 
The following persons have been chosen 
for "The Love-Mill" cast : Emma Janvier, 
Sophye Barnard, Georgie Lawrence, Yo- 
lande Pressburg, Clarence Harvey, Gus- 
tave von Seyffertix, Gwendolyn Piers, Lyn 
Overman, James Lane and Jack McGowan. 



NAZIMOVA AT PRINCESS 

"Mfle-a-Minute Kendall" win not be 
moved to the Princess Theatre, bnt win be 
taken to Chicago. The next attraction 
there win be Mme. .Nazamova in " 'Oeption 
Shoals," a drama by H. Austin Adams. 



MAUDE CONSIDERS NEW PLAY 

Cyril Mande came to New York last 
week to hear the reading of a play which 
he is considering for production. This 
week he will take his company to Rich- 
mond, Va. 

ARLISS TO APPEAR IN FILM 

George Arlias has signed a contract to 
appear in one five-reel picture in the 
Spring, following the termination of bis 
regular theatrical career. 



MARGARET ANGLIN REHEARSING 

Margaret Anglin has begun rehearsals 
in the new play recently dramatized for 
her use from Gertrude Atherton's novel, 
"The Perch of the DeviL" The play will 
be called "The Lioness." 



W HJTNEY PIECE IN REHEARSAL 

Fred C. Whitney last week placed the 
new Oscar Straus operetta, "Boys Will 
Be Boys," in rehearsal under the direction 
of Fred Bishop. 



"SO. LONG LETTY" CLOSING 
The engagement of "So Long Letty" 
will come to a close at the Shubert The- 
atre Saturday night. 



"TREASURE ISLAND'S" LAST WEEK 

When "Treasure Island" terminates its 
engagement at the Punch A Judy Theatre 
Saturday ni;;ht, it will have completed 307 

performances. 



ARLISS TO REVIVE "DISRAELI" 
George Arliss' plans to revive "Disraeli" 
when he comes to New York next month 
to resume his engagement. The revival 
wUl be made after "The Professor's Love 
Story," in which Mr. Arliss has been ap- 
pearing on tour. 



DICKSON'S NEW PLAY NAMED 

The new play of the South by Harris 
Dickson, which Corey and Riter have se- 
cured for production, has been nmed 
"Down South." Mrs. Fiske selected the 
title. 

"TAILOR-MADE MAN" CAST 

Cohan and Harris have completed the 
cast for "A Tailor-Made Man," which in- 
cludes Bernard A. Reinold, L. E. Conness, 
Barlowe Berland, Bertram Marburg, Flor- 
ence Martin, Grant Mitchell, Mona Minge- 
If-y, Harry Harwood, Lawrence White, 
Hattie Delaro, Lloyd Carpenter, Lotta Lin- 
thicum, Reney Bower, Frank Burbeck, A. 
F. Mayo, Gladys Gilbert, Howard Wall, 
John A. Boone, J. H. Greene and William 
O. Hodge. 

SHUBERTS GET WOODS' PLAY 

The Messrs. Shubert have acquired from 
Frederic and Fannie Halton the producing 
rights to "The Squab Farm." This play 
was presented last summer by A E 
Woods, but after the production Mr. 
Woods decided he did not want the play 
and relinquished his rights. 



BLANCHE BATES ENGAGING CAST 

Players are being engaged by Blanche 
Bates to appear in her support in a new- 
play by Paul Potter. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



ll 




Fotmded taUBbr Frank Quean 

Published by the 

CUPPER CORPORATION 

? r i ind „W;_ 1 v » n fl>">---Pre»ideot and Secretary 

John F EdwmATT. Vice President 

Frederick C Mnllcr Treasurer 

ISM Broadway, New York 
Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN. EDITOR 
Faul C. Sweinbart, Managing; Editor 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 10, 1917 



■^gjiJaF"-* »». at the Po.t Office at 
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THE CUPPER is issued every WEDNESDAY. 
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Stationery Co., 128 Escolra Street, Sydney, 
N. S. W„ Australia. 

Have We Too Many Theatres? 

Within the last fortnight the list of New 
York theatres now building, or in con- 
templation, has been increased by two, 
which brings the number of important 
theatres to be added to New York's present 
supply op to seven. 

Probably at no time in the history of 
the city has snch a number of theatres 
been in concrete construction form, vary- 
ing from the architects' plans to the fin- 
ishing touches. And from present indica- 
tions it is more than likely this number 
will be donbled before the end of the year 
just commenced. At least three prominent 
New York producing managers hold op- 
tions on desirable theatre sites in the For- 
ty-eighth Street district, and the unusually 
large financial returns, which this season 
has shown up to the present time is likely 
to put the theatre-building bee in more 
than one other managerial bonnet and 
cause still further activity among theatre 
architects and contractors. 

This, of course, is the sign of a healthy 
theatrical condition, but once again the 
old cry of too many theatres is heard and 
throws a damper on the enthusiasm which 
the present prosperous season has aroused. 

That New York has at the present time 
quite as many dramatic theatres as its 
play-going public requires is evident from 
the fact that feature films are often the 
attraction at leading local houses. 

When, a few years back, theatre build- 
ing began to make uptown advances, the 
theatres below Thirty-ninth Street were 
seen, one by one to fall by the wayside 
until now the Knickerbocker alone, of the 
dramatic houses, is below that line. And 
it has been a noticeable fact in the last 
decade that the opening of a new uptown 
theatre was soon followed by the disuse 
for dramatic purposes of one of the older 
ones. 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

W. J. G., New York.— 1. "As You Like 
It" was performed at Niblo's Garden Nov. 
29; 1870, and James Mace then acted 
Charles the Wrestler. 2. Edwin Adams 
played Claude Melnotte, in "The Lady of 
Lyons," at the same bouse Saturday after- 
noon, Aug. 12, 1S71, for the annual benefit 
of Jake Zimmerman, the treasurer. 

• • • 

F. K. R., Terre Haute. — Ada Rehan ap- 
peared with Augustin Daly's company in 
"Cyrano de Bergerac," at the Tremont 
Theatre, Boston, week ending Nov. 5, 1898. 
The role of Cyrano was played by Charles 
J. Richman. Many parties produced that 
play in this country. 

• • • 

L. L., Elgin. — The Adelphi Theatre, Chi- 
cago, opened Jan. 11, 1875, replacing the 
old house, which was originally called 
Aiken's Theatre, and which was burned 
Jury 14, 1874. 

• • • 

Old New Yorker. — 1. Banvard's Mu- 
seum was first opened June 17. 1887. 2. 
Booth's Theatre opened Feb. 3, 1869. 3. 
Brooklyn Theatre opened Oct. 2, 1871. 

• • • 

F. H. D., Brooklyn.— Mrs. Seott-Siddons 
made her last appearance on the dramatic 
stage in this city at Wood's Museum, Oct. 
1, 1870. 



SAYS ACT IS COPYRIGHTED 

EnrroR The New York Clipper : 

Dear Sir: While playing the Crosakeys 
-Theatre in Philadelphia last week, Dan 
Ely, who is with the Black and White 
Revue, claimed that we were using the 
"Hallelujah" Trio from his act and asked 
that we be stopped from using the number. 

In reply to this we wish to state that the 
number was originated and used by Mr. 
Oliver, owner of the act, in 1910, with his 
act known then as the American Minstrels 
and was copyrighted by him July 1, 1912 — 
copyright No. 288665, and as such is on 
file in the Library of Congress at Wash- 
ington. 

Now, while our rights are very clear, 
we have no objection to Mr. Ely using the 
number, but do object to his claiming that 
we are using his stuff and we will take 
steps to protect our rights if he does not 
discontinue same. 

Very respectfully, 
En Oltvbs. 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 1, 1917. 



WANTS CURTAINS ON TIME 

Editor The New Yobs Ciippeb: 

Dear sir : I went to a certain Broadway 
show last week which was advertised to 
begin at 8:15. At 8:30 the orchestra be- 
gan to play and about 8:40 the perform- 



!r" — " ■ — — 

|! Correspondents Wanted 

THE CLIPPERJ 
£! Wishes Live, Wide-Awake Representatives 



Everywhere 

NEWSPAPER MEN PREFERRED^ 



jiancnBunnimisiiiiiJiJuiiiiuimmiimninBiti 



ntf»m«iiMwnwn 



Old Tqlee. — Selwyn's Theatre, Boston, 
Mass., opened for the first time Oct 28, 
1867, with "The Fast Family" as the 
offering. 

• • • 

B. F., Buffalo. — Yes, Forbes-Robertson 
came to this country as a member of Henry 
Irving's company. 

• • • 

A. M., Chicago — You can address Mr. 
Andrew Mack, in care of The Friars Club, 
No. 110 West 48th St, New York. 

• • • 

P. F., Boston. — Robson and Crane first 
appeared together Sept 3, 1877, in Chi- 
cago, playing "Forbidden Fruit." 

• • • 

R. A.. Buffalo. — Admiral Dot was born 
March 23, 1858, in San Francisco. 



nnce began. Now, I consider myself a 
reasonable person, but I am human and I 
can see no excuse for advertising to begin 
a performance at one time and starting 
it twenty-five minutes later. 

Of course there were many who did not 
get to the theatre till the curtain went np, 
but I think it is unfair to hold part of an 
audience for twenty-five minutes because 
the rest are late. 

Edward Jaxyieb, 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

James E. Cooper, circus manager, died. 

The American Lithograph Co. was orga- 
nized. 

Adelina Patti arrived in America, 

"The Country Circus" was produced in 
New York. 

L. Fuenkenstein was president of the 
Musical Union. Among the members were 
Victor Herbert, J. M. Lander, Gnstav 
Kerker, Nahan Franko. P. S. Gilmore and 
Leader Cappa. 



THE SERIAL IN VAUDEVILLE 

Editor, The New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir. — A moving picture aerial may 
be interesting enough in its place, but if it 
is not in its place it Immediately becomes 
a bore. The other night I paid my good 
money to see a vaudeville show and the 
intermission was taken up with one of 
these serials. It was the first time I had 
ever seen this particular serial, and I be- 
lieve there were scores of others who had 
not seen it 

I have nothing against the silent drama, 
but when I pay to see a vaudeville show 
I don't think it is fair for the manager to 
make it necessary for me to see the part 
of some disconnected story about the pre- 
vious instalments of which I know abso- 
lutely nothing. Isn't this imposing on good 
natnre? 

Yours sincerely, 

"VAnDEVHXIAH." 



RIALT0 RATTLES 



] 



PERFECTLY PITIFUL 

Proctor's press agent prints: "Pleaaa 
permit Proctor to personally pledge pat- 
manent pleasure to patrons of hla play- 
house. Past performances prove the phe- 
nomenal plurality of popular publio pref- 
erence. Perfection in production will pre- 
dominate all presentations. Proctor will 
persevere in placing premiums on pro- 
grams of pinnacled pre-eminence, proffer 
a profusion of picked playlets and provide 
a paragon panorama of pictures. Please 
permit this parade of pardonable pride, 
which is a petition to your permanent pref- 
erence for his popular pleasure palace." 



WITHIN THE LAW 

Sam P. Genoa, the Shubert representa- 
tive in Chicago, told reporters there chorus 
girls were getting from $25 to $00 a weak 
where they used to get from $18 to $20. 
Evidently this Is the open season on re- 
porters. 

HORRORS OF PEACE. 

Now. that Les Darcy is to enter vaude- 
ville he may learn that there are worse 
things to face than bullets — hotel bills and 
those things at eighty cents a dozen, for 
instance. 



ARE YOU GOOD AT FIGURES? 

If John Drew audiences to see "Major 
Pendennis" on Christmas and Anna Held 
them in at the Casino, what was Margaret 
Anglin for? 



COUNT *EM. 

Eight theatres are in course of construe-' 
lion in New York and that many more si* 
under contemplation. Needless to say each 
will be a model of its kind. 



AH! THAT'S DIFFERENT. 

Helen Freeman couldn't get a license to 
open her toy theatre. But If she had 
wanted to open a cafe, possibly ahe could 
have secured one long ago. 



THE JOYS OF XMAS. 

The ticket speculator fonnd the old «V- 
ing about fooling 'em all the time was aa 
true this year as when, first coined. 



LIEBLER SHOULD KNOW. 

Theodore Liebler's first play will be 
"The Man Who Had Lost." Is It written 
from experience? 



BACK TO THB PRIMITIVE 

The "Masque of Life" has an old-fash- 
ioned hero, for despite the fact that he ll 
s prince, he wears suspenders. 



AN INDOOR WINTER SPORT. 

Buying and selling Madison Square 

Garden. 



ET TU, BRUTE! 

White Bats are suing Green Sheet. 
What color are you playing? 



THIS IS CLASS 1 
A UtUe beer 
A little cheer 
A little tight 
A little fight 
A little drop 
A little cop 
A little Jail 
A little bail. 



12 


THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




January 10, 1917. 


LONDON 


paris WOMEEGM NEW* 


g3 BERLIN 


SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



London, Eng., Dec. 80. 
Little Caprice close* to-night a week*! 
stay at Bradford. 

Lola and May play the Imperial, Can- 
ning Town, next week, 

McAllister and Smith will be at Boston 
for New Tear's week. 

Foreman and Fannin are doing well 
touring the provincial halls. 

La Rascka Duq will play New Year's 
week at the Palace, Plymouth. 

Mignon Elise and Eddy Foy are is tits 
pantomime "Puck and Goose." 

"The Magic Crndfcle" is next week at 
the Hippodrome, Middlesbrough. 

"Troth and Justice** plays at the Hippo- 
drome, Brighton, week of Jan. 8. 

The Dumais had a pleasant Christinas 
week at the Palace, Southampton. 

The lour Clovelly Girls will be at the 
Empire. Holborn, Christmas week. 

Kitchen and Ray closed last night their 
engagement at Marseilles, France. 

Roelgin'a Parrots are at the Empire, 
Clydebank, for New Tear's week. 

Charlie Payne played Christmas week 
at the Queen's, Hollinwood, Lancashire. 

Captain De Tiliiers" Airship will be at 
the Hippodrome. Nottingham, next week. 

The four Delevines were specially en- 
gaged for the pantomime, "Jack and Jin.** 

Bob Anderson and his Polo Pony has 
three more weeks at the Olympia, Liver- 
pool. 

Flora and Alberta will do their "Twists 
and Twirls" next week at the Coliseum, 
Oldham. 

The Two Roses, at the Palace, Dundee, 
this week, will be at the Empire, Roch- 
dale, next week. 

The recent marriage of May Moore Do- 
prex to Bertram C. Grant came as a sur- 
prise to many of the friends of that lady. 

Cliff, the down, who spent Christmas 
week at Elford, is at the Empire, Notting- 
ham, next week and goes to the Hippo- 
drome, Aldershot, for week of Jan. 8. 

.The Royal Hippodrome and King's Hall, 
Dover, having followed oat the Town 
Council's recommendations, a license has 
been granted each house. The Empire has 
not been so fortunate, as the Are curtain, 
recommended by the Council in 1914, has 
not been put in. 



The Melody Makers sailed last week for 
South Africa. 

The Great Raymond makes his reappear- 
ance in London, Jan. 1. 

Many of the local theatres gave extra 
matinees on Boxing Day. 

H. B. Irving will speak at His Maj- 
esty's next Sunday afternoon. 

"The Happy Family," the very first of 
the holiday play novelties, is doing well 
at the Prince of Wales. 

During LQy Brayton'a recent absence 
from the cast of "Cha Chin Chow" her 
place was taken by Muriel Dole. 

Howard Talbot has recovered from his 
recent illness and has resumed the musical 
direction of "High Jinks" at the Adelphi. 

"Young England," presented last Sat- 
urday afternoon at Daly's, includes in the 
cast Harry Dearth, Hayden Coffin, Walter 
Paesmore, Doris Woodall and Clara Bat- 
terworth. 

"Cha Chin Chow" passed its 150th per- 
formance last Wednesday. Business is so 
big that Mr. Asche has added Monday mat- 
inees for the month of January, musing 
four matinees a week. 

By arrangement with Grossmith and 
Lanrillard, Matheson Lang will present 
"Under Cover" at the Strand, Jan. 17. 
Felix Edwards and Miss Jessie Winter 
will play the leading roles. 

Cedle Barclay and Rupert Lister are 
playing the leading roles in "Her Vow," 
which was originally produced last Satur- 
day at the Grand, Doncaster. 

Charles Bosh, formerly manager of the 
Queen's Theatre, Leeds, was engaged by 
Francis Laidler to manage his Theatre 
Royal, in the same city, and began work in 
his new position Dec 22. 

The next production, of the Stage So- 
ciety will be given Jan. 14, when "Augus- 
tus Doing His Best," a one-act play by 
George Bernard Shaw, and "The Golden 
Apple" will be presented. 

The new registration order issued by 
the Secretary of State is of much import 
to performers of all nationalities, Inasmuch 
as all aliens most be registered on or be- 
fore Jan. 6, 1917. The penalty for failure 
to carry out this mandate is a fine of £100 
or imprisonment for six months. 

Dion Boucicault started his twelfth 
season of "Peter Pan" last Saturday after- 
noon at the New Theatre. Unity Moore, 
Holman Clark and George Shelton head 
the cast. There will be daily matinees 
and nightly performances every Thursday 
and Saturday until farther notice. 



Leslie Glenroy is well booked over the 
leading tours. 

"Pimple" Fred Evans is doing well on 
the L. V. T. tour. 



Fred Duprez has rejoined the 
"Mr. Manhattan." 



of 



"The Fatal Wedding" played the County 
Hall, St Albans, Christmas week. 

Having played her special week in "Look 
Who's Here," Hilda Glyder is back in the 
halls. 

Gladys F. Folliott, who has been seri- 
ously ill, is now on the road to complete 
recovery; 

Word has reached here of the engage- 
ment of Sir Herbert Tree's daughter, Iris. 
to Curtis Moffat of New York. 

Helen Pillans, who recently concluded a 
year's engagement with "Pleased to Meet 
Yon," is now playing in the pantomime of 
"Cinderella." 

Sir Herbert Tree has sent $2,000 as 
a Christmas offering, one-half of this sum 
is for the British Red Cross. The balance 
goes in equal parts to the French Red 
Cross and the Actors' Emergency Fond. 

George Parrott, who has for twenty-five 
years been a member of the Alhambra 
Theatre staff, recently celebrated the sec- 
ond anniversary of his marriage to Mar- 
garet Radcliffe. The happy couple re- 
ceived many hearty congratulations. 

"Peg o* My Heart," which the press of 
London designate as "that most obstinate 
success," continues to do phenomenal busi- 
ness at the Globe. "Where the Rainbow 
Ends," also a success at that house, is 
seen only on afternoons. 

For his book for the next Hippodrome 
production, Albert de CoorvQle will col- 
laborate with Georges Arnonld, the well 
known revue writer of Paris, and Wal 
Pink. Rehearsals of the new work will 
begin shortly. 

Albert de Courville has decided to call 
his next production "The Big Show," and 
will stage it on Boxing Day at the Empire, 
Liverpool. The cast includes: George 
French, Poloski Brothers, Jennie Benson, 
Audrey Sutton and Harry Roy. Mr. de 
Courville expects the show to run out the 
season. 

The various entertainments for the ben- 
efit of the war fund, which have been or- 
ganized by Frank Allen, managing director 
of the Moss' Empires, since the outbreak 
of the war at the Moss Theatres through- 
out the country, have realised the sum of 
$191,000. Nearly 3,000 entertainments 
have been given. 



MRS. CAMPBELL IS ANGRY 

London, Eog., Jan. 6. — Mrs. Patrick 
Campbell has rushed into print in defense 
of her mother-in-law, Mrs. William Corn- 
wallis-West, who has been censured by a 
court of inquiry as participant in the army 
scandal. 



SECOND COMPANY FOR CLARKE 

Bombay, India, Jan. 4. — Owing to the 
big success of Harry Corson Clarke's little 
company, Mr. Clarke has decided to pnt 
out another. It is probable that Mm. 
Clarke, Margaret Dale Owen, will head 
the second company. 



GABY, ILL, CANCELS BOOKINGS 

London, Eng., Jan. 4. — Owing to the 
continued illness of Gaby Deslys, she baa 
been forced to cancel bookings on the Moss 
Circuit, which she and Harry Pilcer were 
to fill. She is confined . at her home at 
Kensington Grove with diphtheria. 



GARRICK SHOW FOR NEW YORK 

London, Eng., Jan. 6. — Negotiations are 
about being closed for The Girl From 
Ciros," to be taken to New York. This 
is one of the season's successes here, hav- 
ing run at the Garrick since Sept. 4 with 
three matinees a week besides the night 
performances. 



MAKES HIT IN AUSTRALIA 

Sydney, A us., Jan. 5. — Florence Rock- 
well in less than three months bos estab- 
lished herself as one of the greatest favor- 
ites Australia has had. "Common Clay" 
was her stepping stone, and she will follow 
this with "The House of Glass" and later 
"Cheating Cheaters." 



HARRY LAUDER'S SON KILLED 

London, Eng., Jan. 2. — Word reached 
here to-day that CapL John Lauder, only 
son of Harry Lauder, has been killed at 
the front. He was attached to the Argyll 
end Sutherland Highlanders and had re- 
ceived the military cross for bravery. He 
was twenty-three years of age. 



THEATRES DARK ONCE A WEEK 

j Paris, Fbance, Jan. 5. — By a Govern- 
mental decree all places of amusement in 
France most close one day each week. 
This is in line with the general precau- 
tionary measure taken by the authorities 
to lessen the use of electric lighting, on ac- 
count of the present shortage of coal. 



STANLEY RUSSELL MAY VISIT US 

London, Eng., Jan. 6. — Unless negotia- 
tions now pending fall through., Little 
Stanley Russell, the boy ventriloquist, 
will visit the United States. 



KTNTCHIE KILPATRICK DIES 

Melbourne, Aus., Jan. 5. — Mrs. Kint- 
chie Kilpatrick, wife of Edwin E. Kflpa- 
trick, an American showman in Australia, 
and sister-in-law of Charles G. Kilpatrick, 
the one-legged trick cyclist, died yester- 
day from injuries sustained in an automo- 
bile accident while motoring from Ade- 
laide to Melbourne. Mrs. Kilpatrick was 
an Australian and will be buried in the 
family plot In Melbourne. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




LONG ISLAND TO 

HAVE STOCK 

CIRCUIT 

RUSSELL PARKER MAKING PLANS 



Huntington, L. I., Jan. 6. — A stock 
circuit to include six villages on Long 
Island is being planned by Russell Parker, 
a former employe of the B. F. Keith Cor- 
poration, who announces that only Broad- 
way successes will be played. 

Huntington, Bivernead, Bay Shore, 
Patchogue, Greenport, Port Jefferson and 
Oyster Bay in Nassau County are the 
towns in which he is working. One of 
these will have to be eliminated. All of 
them have suitable auditoriums. 

Mr. Parker's plan is to have a stock 
company play one-night stands at each 
of six towns. . The following week the 
company will again go over the same cir- 
cuit, but with a different vehicle. 

The plan of Mr. Parker has created a 
good deal of interest in theatrical circles, 
as it will be remembered Al Trahern made 
considerable money for many years on a 
circuit of stock theatres on Long Island. 
Mr. Trahern's company played only daring 
the summer months, while Mr. Parker in- 
tends to continue throughout the year. 

In announcing his plans, Mr. Parker 
said : "I expect to interest lodges in the 
various towns in my plan to the extent 
of covering any possible loss. In return, 
they will receive a percentage of the gross 
receipts. The Moose Lodge at Huntington 
has taken both that town and Riverhead. 
My stock company will be in operation all 
year 'round." 



SMITH AND MARSTON IN VAUDE. 

Forrest Smith and Zelda Marston, stock 
comedian and ingenue, are now working in 
vaudeville under the name of Forrest and 
Marston, presenting a comedy skit, written 
by themselves, entitled, "Engaged." 



CHRISTY TO OPEN CO. IN APRIL 

Habtfosd, Conn., Jan. 5. — Hamilton 
Christy is to open a stock company here 
some time in April. 



MUSICAL STOCK IN SEATTLE 

Seattle, Wash., Jan. 5. — Mr. Wilkes 
is running a musical stock company at 
the Orpheum here, presenting Geo. M. 
Cohan attractions, the regular company 
having gone to Vancouver in the mean- 
time. 



MORGAN WALLACE CLOSING 

Sioux Crrr, la., Jan. 6. — Morgan Wal- 
lace will close his stock company at the 
Giand Opera House Jan. 13. 



"OUR CHILDREN" IN STOCK 

"Our Children" has lately been released 
for stock. 



PLUM GETS "THE LURE" 

Hal Plum's stock company has con- 
tracted for "The Lure" for road repertoire 
use. 



MANCHESTER CO. CLOSING 

Manchester, N. H., Jan. 8. — The Wads- 
worth Stock Co., now appearing at the 
Park Theatre, will close Saturday, January 
13, unless Manager Edward Ornstein 
succeeds in renewing the lease which ex- 
pires on that date. The company, includ- 
ing Harry Holllngsworth, Iva Shepard, 
Frances Agnew, Marie Reels, Carroll Ar- 
den, Richard Irving, William Blake, Frank 
DeCamp and Carroll Daly, baa proved pop- 
ular here and all are looking forward to a 
renewal of the lease and continuing their 
engagement 

However, another house is under consid- 
eration and announcements will be made 
shortly. 



LUDLOW CO. IN NEW PLAY 

CovmaTON, Ky., Jan. 6. — "The Auto, 
the Girl and the Question," a new play by 
Jack Emerson, was produced at the Colo- 
nial Theatre by the Wanda Ludlow Play- 
ers Christmas week. 

The cast Included Mr. Emerson and 
Miss Ludlow in the leading roles and 
Taylor Bennett, Walter Harmon, W. How- 
ard Fitx, Alvin Baird, Chaa. Marlowe, Joe 
Peters, John Bnrehl, Ivy Bowman, Perle 
Kincaid and Violet LeClear. 



NEW BRITAIN CO. CLOSES 

New Britain, Conn., Jan. 6. — The 
stock company at the Lyceum Theatre, of 
which Adrian Perian. was manager, closed 
its engagement last Saturday. 



NEW CO. OPENS IN PORTSMOUTH 

Portsmouth, O., Jan. 5. — Kitty Kirke 
opened a stock company here Monday pre- 
senting "The Rosary." 



BABY GIRL TO VERA DENSMORE 

London, Ont., Jan. 4. — Vera Densmore, 
wife of Stanley H. Standon, is the mother 
of a daughter, born Jan. 2. 



PAYTON INHERITS WIFE'S ESTATE 

Corse Payton inherits the bulk of the 
estate of his wife, Etta Reed Payton, 
whose will was filed last week in the Sur- 
rogate's Court. No petition has been filed 
for the probate of the will and no estimate 
is given of the value of the property. 



STOCK PLAYERS CELEBRATE 

Lafayette, Ind., Jan. 5. — Lillian Des 
Monde, leading woman with the Otis Oliver 
Stock Co., and John D. Hammond, juve- 
nile with the company, celebrated their 
first wedding anniversary Dec. 30 and en- 
tertained the company at supper. 



WANT STOCK STARS IN FILMS 

St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 8. — The move- 
ment started by the Seattle Timet to have 
James NeiU and Edythe Chapman star in 
a photoplay is being given encouragement 
here. The two former stock stars are now 
with Laaky, and they have a wide follow- 
ing in St. Paul, where they appeared in 
stock. 



FRANCIS SAYLES' MOTHER DIES 

Buffalo. X. Y., Jan. C. — Mrs. Gilbert 
Sayles. mother of Francis Sayles. died at 
her home here last Saturday. 



STOCK STAR TO 
JAIL FOR NON- 
SUPPORT 



HOWARD SCHOPPE GETS 6 MONTHS 



Although Howard Schoppe, until re- 
cently a member of the Municipal Stock 
Company of Northampton, Mass., sauntered 
into the Domestic Relations Court, New 
York, in fashionably tailored clothes, a 
flower in his buttonhole and swinging a 
cane with his gloved hand, he had to admit 
to Magistrate Cornell his Inability to sap- 
port his wife. 

Mrs. Schoppe testified that her husband 
had not supported her as the court had 
ordered on Aug. 15 last, when Schoppe was 
instructed to pay her $16 a week. Pay- 
ments had lapsed, she said, until Schoppe 
now owed her $117 on account, forcing her 
to again hale him into court. 

Schoppe, so his wife told the court, was 
more or less popular with the college girls 
in Northampton until his wife began send- 
ing him postal cards, every one of which 
conspicuously heralded the fact that he 
was a married man. When this knowledge 
reached his numerous admirers, it is said 
to have caused such a commotion that he 
found it wise to leave the company. 

Schoppe admitted facts to Magistrate 
Cornell that did not help his case to any 
extent. His wife has filed papers for di- 
vorce, while Schoppe was sent to the work- 
bouse, where he will remain for six months 
unless he can furnish a bond to guarantee 
payments in the future. 



ALCAZAR PLAYERS CLOSING 

San Francisco, Jan. 6. — Next week 
will be the last week of the stock company 
at the Alcazar Theatre, Eva Lang and 
John Halliday as the stars appearing in 
"Komance." 

The theatre has been taken over by Sol 
L. Lesser for presentation of his two big 
film spectacles. "War Brides" will open 
Jan. 16 for an indefinite engagement, to be 
followed by "Civilization." Manager 
George Davis promises the resuming of 
the stock career at the house in the spring. 



HIPPODROME PLAYERS TO TOUR 

Fairmont, W. Va., Jan. 8.— This Is the 
last week of the Hippodrome players St 
the Hippodrome Theatre, the lease on the 
house having run out Manager Dave Hell- 
man will take the company on the road 
for a short season, after which the Players 
will return to this city for a run. 



HYMAN FOR NEW PRODUCTION 

Robert Hyman, for the last two years 
leading man with the Princess Stock Co., 
Des Moines, la., has returned to Broad- 
way and declares to have deserted stock 
forever for New York productions. 



HORNE OPENS COMPANY 

Akron, O., Jan. 6. — Col. F. P. Home 
opened his stock company at the Music 
Hall Monday with "The Road to Happi- 



NEW CO. IN GRAND RAPIDS 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Jan. 5.— The 
Chester Bishop Players opened an indefi- 
nite stock engagement at the Columbia 
last Saturday in "When We Were Twenty- 
One." 

The company includes: Chester Bishop, 
Mabelle Aubrey, Trixie Lewis, Helen 
Louise Bryan, Grace Connelly, Stanley 
Price, Jimmy Hughes, Monroe Son, 
Arthur Hughes, Margaret Helmar, Fran- 
cis Le Cour, P. J. Akey and Frank Brink- 
man ; Clyde II. Gardiner, manager, and 
Robert Belle, scenic artist. 



BACK TO PICTURES 

The Broadway Players departed sud- 
denly from the Spooner Theatre, in the 
.Bronx, Saturday, Dec. 30, after one week 
of their new policy of new plays. "The 
Inner Man" waa the last offering. 

The Spooner Theatre, which was to be 
the "House of New Plays," has returned 
to its former policy of Triangle pictures. 



LELAND GETS MISS ARNOLD 

Spokane, Wash., Jan. 4. — Jessie Arnold 
has been engaged by Manager Leland SS 
leading woman for the American Players, 
succeeding Jane Urban. 

An attempt was made to obtain Ethel 
Elder as leading woman, but was unsuc- 
cessful. B. F. Keith, with whom Miss 
Elder is under contract, instituted injunc- 
tion proceedings to prevent Miss Elder 
from coming here, and Miss Arnold, whose 
last engagement was as leading woman at 
the Wigwam Theatre in San Francisco, 
was obtained. 



TABLOID STOCK MEMBERS WED 

San Antonio, Tex., Jan. S. — George H. 
Schumns, professionally known as George 
H. Seymour, and Adcle K. Davis, both 
members of the tabloid musical comedy 
stock company at the Star Theatre, were 
married Des. 38. 



GLADYS EYMAN IN SEATTLE 

Seattle, Wash. Jan. 6.— Gladys Ey- 
man made her debut last week as the new 
prima donna of the Wilkes Players, mak- 
ing her initial appearance in "Forty-five 
Minutes From Broadway." 



FT. WAYNE THEATRE TAKEN OVER 

Ft. Wayne, Ind., Jan. 0. — Mande 
Grafton has taken over the Temple The- 
atre and stock policy will continue. Lead- 
ing people are Jane Aubrey and Frank 
Gallagher. 



BANCE-NEWTON IN 14TH WEEK 

Carroxxton, O., Jan. 6. — The Bancs 
and Newton Company is in Its fourteenth 
week through Ohio. The company Is 
headed East. The roster includes Jack 
Bance, Earle Newton, Billie Miller, Mae 
Beresville, Daisy Stewart, Master Richard 
Miller, Fred Carmel and Madeline Carr. 



HOUSE MGR. TAKES OVER STOCK 

Lancaster, Va., Jan. 6. — C. A. Yerker, 
manager of the Fulton Theatre, has takes 
over the OUy Logsdon Siofk. which baa 
been appearing at the house. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 




OUTDOOR ASS'N 

TO GIRDLE 

EARTH 



WILL ENROLL ALL SHOWMEN 



Definite plana are under way to make 
the Association of Outdoor Snowmen of the 
World a world-wide organization. 

With the appointment of Gerald Kiralfy 
as London representative of the associa- 
tion, the extension of the organization 
has begun and, according to one of the 
heads, will continue until the association 
makes itself felt in every corner of the 
world. 

The support of Le Theatre Journal and 
Slons Etcole Theatre, of Paris, and Der 
Artist, the theatrical paper of Berlin, is 
practically assured, and representatives of 
the association will soon be appointed in 
all of the principal foreign cities. 

Since the association's inception, an or- 
ganized campaign to materially increase 
its membership has been launched. Frank 
P. Spellman, president of the organiza- 
tion, predicts that six weeks will see every 
prominent outdoor showman in the country 
a member of the new organization. 

The officers of the association have lost 
no time in getting to work to further the 
purposes for which the organization was 
formed, according to Spellman. 

"We are, at the present time, appointing 
attorneys in every prominent city in the 
United States," he says, "who are being re- 
tained to protect the interests of the mem- 
bers of our organization. They will be at 
the beck and call of any showman who is 
one of us and finds himself in some unjust 
legal tangle. We are not appointing these 
attorney* for the purpose of getting around 
the law at any time, but solely to protect 
na when we are unjustly dragged into a 
legal mesh — which is a common occurrence 
in the outdoor show world. 

"We are also ready to exert our Influence 
in the various State legislatures to see that 
we get a fairer deal. It is high time that 
the outdoor showmen rebelled against the 
excessive licenses imposed upon them in 
various States and objected to the discrim- 
inating laws passed against them. We are 
going to see that these laws are repealed 
or made more equitable, and the legisla- 
tures of the different States win soon know 
that there is a powerful Association of 
Outdoor Showmen of the World." 

Realizing the need of publicity and an 
extensive press campaign. Albert Kiralfy, 
secretary of the organization, contemplates 
appointing a competent press department 
within the next few days. This depart- 
ment will acquaint all the newspapers and 
magazines of the country with the opera- 
tions of the association and will assist in 
the publicity campaign being waged at pres- 
ent for a larger membership. 

It is claimed that some of the most prom- 
inent theatrical press men of the country 
will be appointed on the committee, and 
that publicity campaign will be waged in- 
cessantly until every big outdoor showman 
of the world is a member of the association. 



NATHAN DAVIS DEAD 

Philadelphia, Jan. 5. — Nathan Davis, a 
veteran circus man, died suddenly in the 
Jefferson Hospital here of an attack of 
heart disease. Be had been with the John 
O'Brien circus as an animal trainer, and 
afterwards was connected with the Cooper 
& Bailey circus and the Adam Fore pa ugh 
show. He accompanied Wm. F. Cody 
(Buffalo Bill) on two of his tours of 
Europe. His last- employment was at the 
Chestnut Street Theatre. 



BARKOOT SHOWS AT FAIR 

Zakford, Fla., Jan. 4. — The Seminole 
County Fair Association was reorganized 
at a recent meeting of local business, and 
it was decided to hold a county fair in 
Sanford week of Jan. 29. The attractions 
will be varied and will include the Bar- 
koot Shows. 



BENSON AND BERGER COMBINE 

James M. Benson and Louis J. Berger 
have formed a partnership for the purpose 
of putting ont a new carnival next season. 
The Benson-Berger Shows will open in 
April in Philadelphia and will play only 
Eastern territory. 



DAVIS IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, Jan. 8. — W. H. Davis, of the 
Johnny J. Jones Shows, is stopping at the 
Saratoga Hotel. He will leave this city 
within a few days. 



H1GGINS TO PUT OUT SHOW 

Pittsburgh, Jan. 6. — Junmie Higgins, 
until recently with Carl Lauther's ten-in- 
one, is putting out a show of his own the 
coming season. . 



BARRY HEADS FAIR ASSOCIATION 

Mobile. Ala., Jan. 6. — W. F. Barry has 
been elected secretary and manager of the 
Gulf Coast Fair Association here. He has 
just come from Jackson, Tenn-, where he 
has been secretary of the West Tennessee 
Agricultural and Mechanical Fair for the 
past ten years. 



MRS. JESSOP DIES 

Conkebsvuxe, Ind., Jan. 6. — Mrs. Caro- 
line Jessop, widely known concessionaire, 
died Dec. 10 after an illness of three 
months. She was the mother of Edward 
Jessop, a well-known showman. 



CIRCUS BAND LEADER DIES 

Muskogee, Okla., Jan. 5. — C. H. Tinney, 
circus band leader for the last twenty 
years, died at a local hospital Dec. 28. 
The body was sent to Memphis, Mo., for 
interment. 



BUFFALO BILL 

SHOWS BEING 

REBUILT 

ENTIRE NEW SHOW FOR 1917 



MECHANIC AND KRAUSE COMBINE 

Sam Mechanic and Simon Krause, for- 
merly of the Krause Greater Shows, are 
organizing a caravan of their own for the 
coming season. W. J. McDonough, pilot 
of the Leon Washburn Mighty Midway 
Shows last season, has been engaged aa 
general agent, 



The Buffalo Bill-101 Ranch Shows are 
busy both in their New York office and in 
their winter quarters in Norfolk, Va., mak- 
ing preparations for the new show which 
win be put out next season. People are 
being signed here daily and many novelties 
are promised. 

Johnny Baker, arenic director of the 
show, and Edward Arlington are planning 
seme unusual things in the line of Wild 
West and military displays. Art Accord 
has been engaged to pnt in a big bull- 
dogging and steer tournament. 

A circus concert will be given at the con- 
clusion of the regular performance in the 
arena. 

Among the circus acts engaged are the 
Slayman Ali Troupe of Arabs, a feature 
with the show last season, and the Berber 
Troupe of Arabs, now in vaudeville. Mme. 
Maranette, with her high-jumping horse, 
St. Patrick, will head the company of 
high-school riders. 

In the show's winter quarters the work 
of rebuilding and refitting the show is mak- 
ing rapid progress. 

C. W. Finney, who has been re-engaged 
as general contracting agent, is already 
out closing lots and billboard contracts. 
Wfllard D. Coxey will again have charge 
of the publicity, and "Roy" Gill remains 
with the big show as treasurer. George V. 
Conners, who is at present on his farm 
near Chillicothe, continues as manager of 
privileges, and George P. Tipton, of Lima, 
Ohio, will again be in charge of the com- 
missary. 



BARNET SHOW ENLARGED 

Satta, S. C, Jan. 6. — The Maryland 
Amnsement Co., in winter quarters here, 
will be enlarged to six cars next season, 
carrying eight paid attractions and a new 
three-abreast, jumping-horse carouseL 
Manager I. J. Barnett announces the 
opening abont March 1. 



SO. FAIR ASS'N TO MEET 

Chattanooga, Tenn., Jan. 8. — The an- 
nual meeting of the Association of South- 
ern Fairs and Expositions will be held at 
the Hotel Patton Jan. 18 and 19, as the 
guests of the Chattanooga District Fair 
Association, Joseph R. Curtis, secretary. 

Officers of the association are as follows: 
George Barnes, Montgomery, Ala., presi- 
dent; Rob Roy, Tennessee State Fair, 
vice-president; Frank D. Fuller, secretary 
Tri -State Fair, second vice-president; A. 
II. George, secretary Mississippi State 
Fair, third vice-president; Sam H. 
Fowlkes, secretary Alabama State Fair, 
secretary -treasurer. 



FERR1ER NOT GUILTY 
Haetvtlle, Mo., Jan. 6. — R. A. (Red) 
Ferrier, manager of the 149 Camp with, 
the H. W. Campbell Shows, who was 
placed in the county jail here on a charge 
of assault with intent to kill, was found 
not guilty and released. 



ELLIS & McLEMORE DISSOLVE 

J. O. Ellis and V. McLemore have dis- 
solved partnership, Mr. Ellis having pur- 
chased Mr. McLemore's interest in the 
McLemore and Ellis Shows and renamed 
the caravan the J. O. Ellis Combined 
Shows. 



SELLS-FLOTO RE-ENGAGED WARNER 

DetTVEb, Jan. 6. — Ed C. Warner has 
been re-engaged as general agent of the 
Sells-Floto Circus. 



KENNEDY SHOWS FOR FAIR 
BsADErrrowrr, Fla., Jan. 6. — The Con 
T. Kennedy Shows have contracted to 
show at the Manatee County Fair, to be 
held here Feb. 13-16. 



BERGER AND BENSON FORM CO. 

Chicago, Jan. 5. — Louis J. Berger, 
formerly general agent of the Dorman t 
Krause Shows, and James M. Benson haw 
joined forces and will take out a new 
fifteen-car carnival next season. 



BEATTY BUYS SHOW FROM CLARK 

St. Paul, Jan. 6. — The Fowler & Clark 
Show, which Barrett & Zimmerson re- 
cently sold to Emmett Clark, has been 
sold to James W. Beatty. 



OHIO FAIR BOYS TO MEET 
Columbus, O., Jan. 8. — A meeting of 
the Ohio Fair Boys will be held Wednes- 
day, when addresses on the various aspects 
of fair conditions will be given. 



WESTERMAN TO HAVE CARNIVAL 

George W. .Westerman is at the head of 
an organization which will launch a new 
carnival next season. Mr. Westerman 
will take personal charge and remain back 
with the show. 



BUFFALO BILL SERIOUSLY ILL 

Denver, Jan. 6. — William F. Cody 
(Buffalo BUI) has been removed to the 
sanitarium at Glenwood Springs. His 
condition is still serious. 



WIFE SUES McCRACKIN 

Samuel McCrackin, circus manager and 
sport promoter, is being sued in the Su- 
preme Court for separation by his wife, 
Katherine. 



LEW GRAHAM AT ANNAPOLIS 

Annatolis, Md., Jan. S. — Lew Graham 
is wintering here. His health is greatly 
improved, and he will have a fine lineup 
for the Ringling Bros. Side Show next 
season. 



WASHBURN SHOWS CLOSE 

Tampa, Fla., Jan. 6. — The Leon Wash- 
burn Shows closed here Monday and have 
gone into winter quarters. 



GAGG IN MILWAUKEE 
Milwaukee, Jan. 4. — Major G. A. 
Gagg, secretary-treasurer of the Hagen- 
bach-Wallace Shows, is spending the holi- 
days here. 



BRADY WITH D. & K. SHOWS 

O. A. Brady has been engaged by Dor- 
man & Krause" to act as general agent. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

38 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



CHI 




FOR ADVERTISING 

Rates, Phone 

RANDOLPH 5423 



CHICAGO THEATRES PLAY TO 

RECOR D-BREAK ING CROWDS 

Unusual Prosperity, Which Started During the Holidays, Is Being 

Enjoyed in Every Line of Amusement; People Clamor 

for Admission "At Any Price" 



Chicago theatres are having the pleasur- 
able experience of prosperity, the like of 
which has never been known before in 
local annals. The present condition began 
Christmas and continued throughout the 
week, and it was expected as a natural 
holiday enthusiasm. But while this may 
have been a stimulus, the progress of the 
New Year finds no diminution in the de- 
jnnd of the public for amusement. 

So great is the popular enthusiasm that 
the raise in prices has had the opposite 
effect of former years, and instead of 
scaring the public, the crowds are clamor- 
ing for admission "at any cost." 

This prosperity is not being felt by any 
one class of theatres in particular, but has 
been distributed among all. Dramatic 
houses are actually cleaning up and man- 
agers have suddenly realized that the Chi- 
cago public has become "show mad." 
Vaudeville theatres are getting their share. 
The Palace and Majestic theatres have 
been sold out continuously for weeks. Even 
loop burlesque houses report unprecedented 
attendance. 

An estimate of the box office returns 



W. V. M. A. ATTACHES ACT 

The W. V. M. A. has filed an attach- 
ment suit against Buster and Bailey, now 
working local houses booked by Pantages. 



ALLARDT BROS. BEING SUED 

Carl Heisen's "Follies De Vogue" re- 
ceived $125 from Allardt Bros., whereas 
they claimed $250, and Leon A. Berezniuk 
has been engaged to sue for the alleged 
balance due. 



THEATRE OWNERS ARE SUED 
Joseph Hopp and Maurice Fleckles, Chi- 
cago proprietors of the Barrison Theatre, 
Waukegan, are joint defendants in a 
unique suit brought by Attorney Berez- 
niak in the interest of Rice, Bell and 
Baldwin, upon a contract signed by Frank 
Q- Doyle. The endeavor is being made to 
establish the point of law as to whether 
an agency can be discharged by theatre 
owners without notice. 



SIMMONS' SALARY ATTACHED 

The Bennett Dramatic Agency has gar- 
nisheed Earl Simmons' salary for commis- 
sions due from the Chicago engagement of 
"The Defective," through Ader & Ader. 



ROSE JOINS OPERA CO. 

Joseph Rose, a tenor of International 
fame, has joined Sheeban's Boston English 
Grand Opera Company here. 



DUBIN AGENCY OPENS OFFICE 

The Sig Dublin Vaudeville Agency has 
opened an office on the second floor of the 
Crilly building. 



of the various dramatic bouses tells the 
tale. 

Last week "Hit-the-Trail Holliday" at 
the Grand played to approximately $12,000 
and New Year's Eve brought in over 
$2,800. "Go To It" at the Chicago closed 
last week with $7,000 for the week to its 
credit. "The Boomerang" at Powers' has 
averaged $15,000 for eight weeks and New 
Year's Eve, with top prices at $5, realized 
$3,000. 

Al Jolson in "Robinson Crusoe, Jr." at 
the Garrick has been averaging over 
$15,000 and last week with New Year's 
Eve at $5 top and other nights at $3 top 
took in about $22,000. "His Bridal Night" 
with the Dolly Sisters, at the Olympic last 
week, realized almost $10,000. "The Fol- 
lies" at the Illinois was estimated to have 
laken in last week about $19,000. "Fair 
and Warmer," in spite of the fact that it 
has been running at the Cort for several 
months, is going above $12,000. Wm. 
Hodge in "Fixing Sister" at the Princess 
last week played to almost $7,000. 

Managers are dizzy computing the mar- 
velous business being done, which it seems 
only a poor attraction is likely to abate. 



"ALL-GIRL REVUE" TO WEST 

Pepple and Greenwald's "All-Girl 
Revue" is finishing the W. V. M. A. tab- 
loid time and will go West on the Acker- 
man and Harris hippodrome time. The 
show for thiR season includes Alice Dudley, 
Louise Elliott, Babe Wilson, Henrietta 
Wheeler, Doyle and Elaine and Adelaide 
Proudlove, with J. D. Proudlove as com- 
pany manager. 



SINGERS AT PRESS CLUB DINNER 

The Chicago Press Dub started the New 
Year with a dinner. Mme. .Phillippe, 
Frances Ingraham (Mrs. Karl MacVitty) 
and James Goddard rendered operatic se- 
lections. 



JOLSON A BUSY MAN 

All the world's records for "endurance" 
performances on the stage, within a given 
time, have just been broken by Al Jolson, 
who is touring in "Robinson Cruesoe, Jr.," 
Saturday, Dec. 30. Mr. Jolson gave three 
performances in Cleveland, at 10 a. m., at 
2 p. m. and at 8 p. m., and at the conclu- 
sion of the performance be left for Chi- 
cago on a special train, where on Sunday 
night, December 31, he gave one perfor- 
mance at S p. m., and another, midnight 
performance. 

New Year's day he gave two more shows, 
in the afternoon and the evening, also a 
regular performance Tuesday night and 
two shows again Wednesday. Thus, within 
a space of fire days, Mr. Jolson and his 
company gave ten performances in two 
cities. 



"PRINTER OF UDELLS" FOR SOUTH 

W. L. Swain will take "The Printer of 
Udells" (royalty edition) South for next 



summer. 



OPERA CO. MAY VISIT NEW YORK 

The Chicago Opera Co. is making plans 
for a shortseason in New York next win- 
ter. ' It is probable that the French opera 
will be prominent on the list produced. 



JAMES AGENCY SUES PEPPLE 

The Marie James Agency has sued T. 
Dwight Pepple for commissions on "Colon- 
ial Minstrel Maids" and "The Song and 
Dance Review." 



EVELYN WATSON JOINS ALLEN 

Evelyn Watson, an ingenue, joined Al- 
len and Howard's vaudeville act at the 
Majestic last week. 



CHANGE BARNES' PLAY TITLE 

Gazzolo, Gatta and Clifford's new play 
by Howard McKent Barnes, which was 
originally called "The Home Without 
Babies," will be known as "The Child Un- 
born" when it opens at the National The- 
atre Jan. 21. The cast will include: 
Gracie Childress (Mrs. Ed W. Rowland, 
Jr.), Nell Davis, Margaret Diblin Pitt. 



BUTTERFIELD IS LIFE MEMBER 

W. S. Butterfield, head of the Michigan 
Vaudeville Circuit and affiliated in the 
management of many vaudeville theatres 
in the Middle West, has been made a life 
member of the Actors' Fund of America. 



CONJURERS HOLD MEETING 

The Chicago Conjurers Club held its 
regular meeting last Thursday at Asso- 
ciation House, North Avenue and Leavitt 
Street. Entertainment was furnished by 
James Thompson with some new magical 
effects. Mr. Taylor with hypnotism and 
Matt Martin with his famous watch man- 
ipulations. The next meeting will be held 
Jan. 18. 



CLAYTON AND LENNIE CANCEL 

Clayton and Lennie, who were in a fire 
at Logansport, Ind., recently, and lost 
everything they had, cancelled their time 
in the mid-West and left Chicago Sunday 
for New York. 



HARRY GORDON'S BROTHER ILL 

Harry Gordon was to have gone out 
ahead of Hamilton Coleman's "When a 
Girl Loves," but upon the eve of his de- 
parture was advised that his only brother 
lay at the point of death at Lawrence, 
Minn., so that he had to give up the place. 



NEW PSYCHIC ACT OPENING SOON 

"Intelligence" is the title of a new act 
with additional billing of "The Psychic- 
Musical Enigma," which will be seen on 
Affiliated time, starting Jan. 28 at Cincin- 
nati, O., and playing the Empress in Chi- 
cago week of Feb. 8. 



Harmony Notes 



The F. J. A. Forster music interests 
were recently changed in such a way that 
greater efficiency has been secured. Fos- 
ter's idea was to divorce ail associated de- 
partments, placing clever departmental 
managers at the head of each. The old 
confusion that resulted from conducting 
publishing and jobbing interests simul- 
taneously has been done away with. Mar- 
vin Lee's control of the professional de- 
partment is now absolute — and everybody 
is talking about the speed with which the 
firm's late numbers hare been popularised. 
"Over the Hills to Virginia" is being sung 
wherever songs are used in Chicago- ^e 
new arrangement enables F. J. A. to go to 
<:ny part of the country where he feels 
Lis personal attention is needed, without 
sacrificing the efficiency of the firm. 

It looks like a Broadway Music Cor- 
poration year, especially at the Western 
end. With Al Jolson and Bert Williams 
introducing "Down Where the Swanee 
River Flows" and "Hicky Woo" in Chi- 
cago, at the same time in big production. 
Irving Bibo is certain that the wonderful 
plugs awarded the catalog leaders will re- 
sult in big sales. 

Believing that "all work and no play 
makes Jack a dull boy," some of the pro- 
fessional managers of firms located in the 
Randolph building find time for occasional 
games of "Rhum." The exact location and 
personnel of these innocent games is not 
given, because Eastern bosses (not to men- 
tion the chief of police) may misinterpret 
the spirit of the quiet games. 

Julius Doane, who has some good ideas 
floating through his brain, despite the fact 
that be is still in his 'teens, is the latest 
to join the ranks of Chicago publishers. He 
is personally popularizing his "Forget-me- 
not-/, ae." 



ONE-NIGHT-STANDS' SETBACK 
Business with the one-night-stands out- 
side of Chicago, so flourishing a few weeks 
ago, has met with a pause. Shows known 
as money makers seem to be losing ground 
rapidly, requiring the re-Investment of 
early season's profits. 



THEATRE WORKSHOP ORGANIZED 

Millbbook, N. Y., Jan. 8. — The Theatre 
Workshop, formed for the purpose of prac- 
tice in play- writing and acting and trials 
of plays, gave its first performance here 
Saturday night at the Bennett School. 



MANAGER ATTEMPTS SUICIDE 

Adolph A. Ackermann, a motion picture 
manager, is in the Knickerbocker Hospital 
in a serious condition, a prisoner charged 
with attempting to commit suicide. 



DATE SET FOR FUND BENEFIT 

The thirty-sixth annual dramatic benefit 
in behalf of the Actors Fund of America 
will take place Friday afternoon, Jan. 26. 
Messrs. Dillingham and Ziegfeld have do- 
nated the use of the Century Theatre for 
the occasion. David Belasco will present 
the second act of "The Girl of the Golden 
West;" Laurette Taylor will appear In a 
novel number and Elsie Ferguson is to 
present W. D. Howell's comedy, "The 
Mousetrap," assisted by a special com- 
pany. Charlotte Greenwood of "Bo Long 
Letty" will present a new comic i 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 





HIGH-CLASS SONGS 

W MUCH FAVOR 



Vawdeville Audiences Enthnte Over 

Numbers of the Better Grade— New 

Ballad* in Demand 

An evidence of the marked change and 
improvement of the musical taste of the 
American people is seen in the enthusias- 
tic welcome accorded songs of the better 
grade in the vaudeville and motion picture 
houses. Ballads of the higher class, which 
up to a short time ago would have bees 
suitable only for concert engagements, are 
now great favorites with vaudeville audi- 
ences, and singers in the two a day houses, 
quick to feel the pulse of their audiences, 
are continually introducing new and mer- 
itorious numbers to meet the requirements 
of the present day vaudeville patrons. 

There is something dependable about 
the better grade song, which makes it a 
far more valuable portion of an act than 
the average popular number, which may 
score a success in one town and be a posi- 
tive failure in another. The popularity 
of good songs is not confined to any { ar- 
ticular locality, for they are aa welcoir - In 
one part of the country as another. 

In this connection the house of G. Schir- 
mer has recently published a new semi- 
high class ballad, which is already at- 
tracting favorable attention among the 
better class of vaudeville singers. It is 
entitled "The Miracle of Love," by Frank 
McKec, and is a particularly well written 
and melodious number. Singable and well 
within the range of the average vocalist, 
it will be a welcome addition to the reper- 
toire of the singer looking for an effective 
solo. 



SILVER WITH MILLS 

F. A. Mills is back in the music publish- 
ing field. He is specializing in high class 
compositions issued with art covers. Max 
Silver, formerly his general manager, is 
once more associated with hint. 



RECORD PRICE FOR OPERA 

At the performance of "Carmen" last 
Friday night at the Metropolitan Opera 
House a record price for seats for a regu- 
lar performance of grand opera was estab- 
lished when some orchestra seats brought 
$30 each and gallery seats sold for $10. 
The house was literally packed and many 
were turned away. Geraldine Farrar and 
Enrico Caruso were the particular mag- 
nets. 



SILBYL CONKLIN TO MARRY 

Silbyl Conklin, contralto at Oovent Gar- 
den, London, and more recently with the 
Interstate Opera Co., Cleveland, has left 
for Japan, where she will be married to 
Lieutenant Kingaley Gordon of the Eng- 
lish Diplomatic Corps. Miss Conklin Is 
the daughter of Judge N. H. Conklin of 
San Diego, Cat 



CARUSO'S SON MUST FIGHT 

Enrico Caruso's eighteen-year-old sen, 
"Fofo," has been called to Join the colors. 
He was studying at Leghorn, preliminary 
to a naval career. His real name la Bo- 
dolfo, after the hero in "Bohtmc." 



"PADDY WHACK" REVIVED 

Chauncey Olcott's admirers are giving 
him the meat enthusiastic welcome every- 
where, consequent on the 'Irish actor- 
singer's resolve to resume the tour of what 
is probably the most successful vehicle yet 
written for him — "The Heart of Paddy 
Whack." In this delightful play Mr. Ol- 
cott is thoroughly at home and his part 
fits him like a glove. Of course, the moat 
enjoyable momenta come when Mr. Olcott 
sings. He is singing all the old favorites, 
chief among them "A Little Bit of 
Heaven," which was specially written for 
Mr. Olcott and first introduced by him in 
"The Heart of Paddy Whack." Two other 
big popular hits sung in this piece are 
"When Irish Byes Are Smiling" and "Who 
Knows?" both of which seem to grow in 
favor with every rendition. Of course, in 
addition to this, it would not be. a Chauncey 
Olcott audience that allowed him to leave 
without singing the old gems, "My Wild 
Irish Rose" and "Mother Machrec" All 
these numbers are published by M. Wit- 
mark & Sons. 



HAWAIIAN SUCCESS 

It is hard to find a new angle from which 
to speak about "My Hawaiian Sunshine," 
the Hawaiian song written by L. Wolfe 
Gilbert and Carey Morgan, and published 
by Jos. W. Stern A Co. When you have 
said that it is a success you have said it 
all. It "registers success" at Its every 
hearing, whether it be from the stage, on 
a phonograph, or a player piano. 



VON TILZER'S NEW BALLAD 

"Love Will Find a Way," a new semi- 
bigh-class ballad, by Harry Yon Tilser 
with words by Walter Van Brunt, is, ac- 
cording to Mr. Von Tilzer, the legitimate 
successor to his well-known "Last Night 
Was the End of the World." The new 
song is being 'featured by many well- 
known singers. 



ANOTHER NOVELTY 

George Whiting, of Whiting and Burt, 
is introducing a new song, which he writes 
Harry Von Tilzer is the success of his 
act. It is a novelty number entitled "I'm 
a Twelve O'clock Fellow In a Nine 
(VClock Town." 



NOW WITH REMICK 
Milton Schwarxwald, for several years 
head of Leo Feist's orchestra department, 
Chicago, is now on the payroll of the J. 
H. Remick Chicago office. 



NEW MINSTREL SONGS 

A P. J. Palmer of the Ah G. Field Min- 
strels recently wrote a new song entitled, 
"Dancing at the Old Plantation," which 
Mr. Eugene DeBell is featuring in the first 
part. The number la backed up by the en- 
tire company and is going over fine. Mr. 
Palmer has two other numbers in the 
show. 



NEW C K. HARRIS SONG 

A new Chaa. K. Harris publication which 
is attracting attention Is "My Little China 
Doll" by Gus Vam, Joe Schenk and Jack 
Yellen. 



STERN BUYS ANOTHER 

Joseph W. Stern and Co- has purchased 
from the T. B. Haviland Co. a new song, 
"Shoot the Rabbit" by Jim Burns and 
Chris Smith, who wrote "Ballin' the Jack." 

"Shoot the Babbit" is expected to exceed 
the record established by "Ballin' the 
Jack," because it is believed to possess a 
greater general appeal than the older song. 



HEM A PRODUCER 

Silvio Heln, who, not so many years 
ago, was a piano player in the professional 
department of Charles K. Harris, is now a 
full-fledged producer of Shakespearian 
plays. His first offering is "The Merry 
Wives of Windsor." 



THANKS THE CLIPPER 

The Detroit City Four, a clever singing 
quartette now appearing with success in 
the West, writes as follows: "We wish 
to thank Tire Cupper for its many valu- 
able music hints. We have 'cleaned up' 
with many of the songs mentioned in its 
columns." 



STILL THEY COME 

Ted Barron has scored another success 
with his new Hawaiian song "On Hono- 
lulu Bay," which has been taken up by the, 
Victor Talking Machine Co. and will be is- 
sued with its February records. This 
establishes it as a worthy successor to his 
other successes, "L-i-b-e-r-t-y" and "Geor- 
gia Moon." Mr. Barron has also written a 
new feature song entitled, "The Girl in the 
Purple Mask," which is to be played and 
sung at every exhibition of the Universal 
Film Co.'s new serial. "The Purple Mask." 



"PINKEY" AT THE PALACE 

"Pinkey" is the name of the act that 
went so well at the Palace but week — an 
act consisting of the wonderful dancing of 
Miss Gladyngs and the clever work of a 
midget who, besides dancing nimbly, pos- 
sesses a really big voice. The latter he 
used to tremendous advantage and the great 
delight of the Palace audiences when he 
sang " Twas Only an Irishman's Dream," 
the novelty number put out by M. Witmark 
& Sons, and one of the best "finds" by this 
house. 

NOVEL TROT TITLES 

Chappell & Co. have selected a novel 
title for one of their new fox trots. It 
is called "Spilling the Beans." Still an- 
other, perhaps a little more appropriate 
than the first, is "Get Off My Foot." 



ODOMS ON LONG TRIP 

Cliff Odoms, traveling representative of 
the Feist house, left on Tuesday for his 
first trip to the coast. He will visit all 
the large towns and cities en route and 
will be gone several months. 



NEW HERBERT PIECE 

Cleveland newspapers were enthusiastic 
over the new Victor Herbert Irish operetta, 
"Hearts of Erin," which was given its first 
presentation on Monday night of last week 
there. The critics were unanimous in 
stating that the famous composer had 
surpassed himself in the writing of beau- 
tiful music. . 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



Leo Flatow, who was known as the 
champion piano pedal breaker of the Bast, 
has settled down in Chicago and burst into 
song. You might be tempted to say "He 
has wrote a song." It has seventeen bars 
in the chorus, and a three-bar break at the 
end. We hate to do it, but it's called 
"Everybody Loves a Jazz Band." It has 
been authentically stated, and not denied, 
that John McCormack will not sing it 



Henry Lewis says it's true about Charlie 
McCarron and his long material, but the 
other part of his act was written by Aaron 
Hoffman. He didn't say a word about 
himself, but as soon as the Anna Held 
show closes, hell go back to vaudeville, 
and be as big a bit as ever. 



Ben Avery has joined the Albert Pianta- 
dosi Music Co. He has been on the out- 
side selling for the Witmarks so long, he 
wants to gather round the stove, and see 
how if s done from the inside now. 



Eggie VanAlstyne in Chicago and Rad- 
ford and Whiting in Detroit turning ont 
big hits for Remick, keep the Eastern boys 
rather upset in their song calculations. 
Beastly, isn't it? 



Horace Wright and his pretty partner 
wife, Reinie .Dietrich, ore shining exam- 
ples of exalted optimists. Christian Sci- 
ence is the other name for it. 



All the makers of piano rolls are print- 
ing the words of the songs on the rolls. 
Next the phonograph records will have the 
words, and — well — figure it out yourself. 



Howard Johnson is the busy little song 
bird in the Feist offices these days. He 
has so many hits he is being solicited by 
Tiffany to open a charge account. 

Newspaper recently said a cabaret 
singer nearly choked to death in a res- 
taurant, but failed to mention whether by 
food or a patron. 



A singer was asked how a certain song 
went with the audience. He replied: 
"Why, they lapped it up like a cat would 
milk." 



Observing thankfully the slow but sure- 
passing of the woeful "wop" song. And 
a few banana salesmen with it. 



Marvin Lee signs "Profmgr." after his 
name now. He profmgr's for The Forster 
Music Co., Chicago. 



Heard of a fellow the ether day who 
was so mean he wouldn't give you the 
correct time. 



Opportunity sold its hammer. It only 
knocked once.*' 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




EIGHTY-FIRST STREET 

(Last Half) 
The bill for the last half at this house 
was of more than usual merit, which is 
saying a lot, considering the high class 
acta which have been given. 

Nelson and Nelson, novelty comedians on 
stilts, offer an opener that is far above 
the average. They kept the house in laugh- 
ter throughout by their funny antics. Both 
are stellar tumblers and even on stilts per- 
form stunts which are often used by others 
without the timber. Although with the 
staff they have it would hardly be neces- 
sary to use a feather to tickle the audi- 
ence, one member of the team does it to 
good effect He blows the feather out of a 
tube and, as it comes down out of the bor- 
der region, he catches it, balanced, on his 
nose. One of the team also discards his 
stilts and, mounted on the other's shoulder, 
drops a long skirt that reaches the floor. 
He then dons a hat and the lower man, 
carrying the other on his shoulder, walks 
about stage. 

William Ebs offers a ventriloquist act 
that audiences, in general, will not fathom. 
A tall man comes out with a suitcase and 
a dummy. He places the dummy on his 
knee, and the latter asks that a twin 
brother in the suitcase be brought out. 
The suitcase is opened and what is appar- 
ently another dummy is placed on the knee 
of the man. The dummy then gets a rou- 
tine of gags out of bis system that threw 
the house into convulsions of laughter. 

While the supposed dummy is singing, 
the man who is holding it drinks a glass 
of wine and smokes a cigarette, seemingly 
a phenomenal bit of business. However, 
the exposure shows the supposed dummy 
to be a little midget, and he is called back 
(or numerous bows and an encore. 

Cna Clayton and Co. have a sketch 
called "Collusion,' which treats of the do- 
mestic trouble of newlyweds. This is a 
high-class turn and would be entertaining 
to any audience. It is very well acted, 
the part played by Herbert L. Griffin btsing 
so artistically done that one almost realizes 
he is looking at a commonplace, every-day 
husband, rather than a mimic one. The 
other parte are also well taken. If there 
is any fault to find with thia sketch it is 
in its length, for at times the action drags 
needlessly. 

Ray Fern and Marion Davis offer a 
clever act, billed as a vaudeville diversity. 
They live up to the billing in every respect. 
Fern is naturally humorous and his part- 
ner is versatile and clever. Their routine 
is excellent. They have side curtains and 
an extra drop, which seem to play no par- 
ticular part in the business. 

Van and Bell, boomerang throwers, in 
the last spot interspersed . a lot of comedy 
into their routine, which is sure-fire. The 
man — the team is composed of a woman 
and a man — keeps a whistle in hia mouth 
which he uses to get laugh after laugh. 
They are exceptionally clever sb boomer- 
ang throwers. 

Lillian Oish in a photoplay, "The House 
Built Upon Sand," held down the Inter- 
mission. It deals with a dreamer and a 
materialist who learn, in the end, to strike 
a happy medium. 



SHOW REVIEWS, Continued 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

Thursday was bargain night at the Har- 
lem Opera House and the management, 
in addition to a big show, gave away al- 
most anything in the line of gifts that 
120th Street merchants would part with, 
in consideration of their names and places 
of business being mentioned when the gift 
was made, as prizes to certain ticket hold- 
ers. . 

There were about thirty of these prizes 
and those not winning one were consoled 
by being admitted free. 

The show opened with the Excelsior 
Models, in reproductions of European 
masterpieces, which was followed by Bon- 
ner and Powers, a novelty singing and 
talking act, who acquitted themselves very 
creditably. 

The next tum was Rosalind Cogblan A 
Co., in a comedy sketch, "She Loves Me, 
She Loves Me Not" 

This act is an exceptionally entertaining 
one, running along at a fast clip to what 
should be the climax, but which develops 
to be the semi-climax, and there loses all 
its speed and effect In the attempt to pnt 
over the climax, the story lags, aa the situ- 
ation created for thia "bit" has been prac- 
tically all gone over prior to the enactment 
of the business done. It therefore would 
be advisable to discard this section of the 
act 

Following this, there was a break in the 
program which greatly retarded the speed 
of the show, through the projection of a 
rather weak comedy picture. 

Then along came Sol Levoy, an illus- 
trated song delineator. It was thought 
that when the house bad been refurnished 
and fixed up that Manager Swift would 
discard all of his old features, including 
Levoy, who has been singing songs in the 
house for the past three years. He has 
practically lost his voice and from the re- 
ception accorded him by the audience it 
could be readily seen that it is not as keen 
for Sol, as it was a year or so ago. 

The second part of the show opened 
with the Saxo Sextette, a novelty turn 
which, through the antics of the comedi- 
enne, earned many a laugh during the 
rendition of the act. 

The Fujiyama Japs, four in number, 
came next on the bill. They introduced 
several mystic stunts, gymnastic endeavors, 
hand writing specialties and the art of 
jiu jitsu. This act is a real novelty and 
if a bit of the "hurrah" business were elim- 
inated would be taken more seriously by 
the audience. 

Hal and Francis presented a quaint 
little sketch, based on the dealings of the 
country girl with the city "wise guy." 
It might be advisable for the young lady 
to curb the second verse of her discord 
song, as it begins to "grate" a bit on one's 
nerves after the rendition of the first 
verse. Also, she might pay a little heed 
toward the perfection of her diction. The 
show closed with Rowley and Tinton, a 
novelty dancing turn, which is reviewed in 
the New Acts Department. 



AUDUBON 

(Last Half.) 

There were too many musical acts on 
this bill. A playlet an acrobatic act or a 
monologue would have improved and added 
color to it 

The show was opened by Seabury and 
Shaw. They are only fair dancers, but 
the marked originality of their ideas makes 
one forget this fault. Their opening is 
very neat. The Spearmint dance won par- 
ticular favor. 

Chabot and Dixon proved popular with 
the audience. Chabot's violin playing 
started the act off in good shape. His ec- 
centric piano playing won applause. But 
Miss Dixon wss disappointing. She has 
no voice, possesses little personality and 
puts little or no "pep" into her work. 

Waters and Moore, in an original skit 
had no trouble in getting over. They do 
their best work near the end of their act 
and, consequently, leave a big impression. 

Lady Suda Noy has a rich and pleasing 
soprano voice which one would not expect 
to find in a Japanese. Nor would one 
expect a Japanese to select the style of 
songs that Lady Suda Noy sings. Her 
nronounciation of English smacks as much 
of Teuton as Japanese. 

The Empire Comedy Four is one of the 
best comedy quartettes in vaudeville and 
should be playing big time. Their voices 
blend well and their comedy is both origi- 
nal and fanny. The funeral dirge of "Chop 
Suey Susie" is a great closer. 

Karl Emmy's dogs do some very clever 
tricks. 



PROCTOR'S 58th STREET 

(Last Half.) 

Everet and White were in the initial 
spot. 

This pair should get some new business 
to open with. The woman has a takeoff 
on Charlie Chaplin that can't be beat and 
she should use this ability more than she 
does. The man states that he will do a 
jump over six chairs which he lines up, 
but only leaps along the side of them. 

Grace and Ernie Forrest were in No. 2 
spot and received well deserved applause. 

Murphy and Klein, a man and a woman, 
need some new gags. Tbe woman pats 
over two songs to good effect. 

Billy Quirk followed. (See New Acts.) 

Victor Morley and Company, eleven men 
and a woman, in a "Regular Army Man," 
have a comedy sketch that is interesting 
throughout The scene is on a border and 
deals with a recruit who wants all the 
army men to wear silk underwear and silk 
hosiery, and who stands at attention as 
if be had the hives. He gets the Captain's 
daughter by "cleaning ' up" on a sergeant. 
The woman's voice in this turn can hardly 
be heard a dozen rows from the stage. 

Miller and Lyles, in blackface, held 
down the next-to-closing satisfactorily. A 
unique twist is given the torn in the box- 
ing business, during whlcb both jig. 

The Three Escardos in a neat acrobatic 
tarn, closed. 



HAMILTON 

(Last Half) 

When it comes to tricks with the lasso, 
gun and whip, Jack Morrissey has no peer 
on the vaudeville stage. His tricks are 
hazardous as well as clever, and Morrissey'* 
assistant is placed in constant danger. Be- 
ing in tbe initial spot did not phase Mor- 
rissey. The act took first honors of the 
bill. 

Sam Harris pleased as a comedian, al- 
though his jokes came over with Noah in 
the Ark and his parodies are but fair. 

Northlane A Ward occupied the third 
spot The girl dresses well and makes a 
very pretty stage picture. The boy la very 
versatile. Their English song is delight- 
fully original and went over big, as did 
also their piano duet 

Tbe Agnes Scott Players scored big with 
their comedy playlet, "You Can't Beat a 
Woman." The Idea of the playlet is 
unique. The playlet is capablly acted. 

Mahon A Manning start oat with a very 
original ides when the "drummer" and the 
actor change places. Their act is clean, 
clever and just long enough. Tbe drummer 
gives a splendid characterisation. 

Grey & Old Rose still get over fairly 
well, despite the fact that they bare been 
doing this same dancing turn for aeraral 
seasons in practically every corner of New 
York. Their act ends with considerable 
"pep," bringing the show to a successful 
close. 



SEVENTH AVENUE 

(Last Half.) 

Joe Dealy and Sister opened the show 
with some very clever dancing numbers, 
their Cakewalk being particularly worthy 
of mention. 

Holmes and Lcvere got over nicely and 
deserved to do so with such original ma- 
terial. At every first performance tbe 
lighting cues for this act seem to go 
wrong, when it is very essentisl to the 
act to have them exactly right. 

Beatrice McKenzie and Company work 
with some exceptionally original idea* 
They keep entirely away from all the 
hackneyed conventions of the vaudeville 
stage, and the audience showed its appreci- 
ation for being allowed to see "something 
different." The end of tbe act went cold, 
because the audience did not realize that 
it was the end. The closing leave* the 
impression that more is coming. 

A waitress loved by an honest, but 
poor plumber, whom she spurns for a dad* 
artist who loves her long-lost sister, is the 
plot of Lottie Williams' playlet. Mia* 
Williams has ability, but wastes it on 
such an offering. Her support is poor, 
none of ite members acting with convic- 
tion. However, many in the audience 
liked the playlet 

The Telegraph Trio were a decided hit. 
but refused to give an encore, despite 
the gratifying applause which rewarded 
their efforts. 

The show was closed by tbe Lots 
Brothers. One of these boys is armies*. 
bnt does more with his toes than most of 
us can who possees ail our limb*. 

"Vera, the Medium," a picture featuring 
Kitty Cordon, followed the vaudeville. 
show. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



ROWLEY & TINTON 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Fourteen minutet. 

Setting — Full stage special draping. 

With the riae of the curtain and the 
appearance of the couple through the 
blade draperies in evening costumes of 
white, one is at a loss to understand the 
nature of this act, especially when the 
couple hang their outer garments on a 
hat rack. One would believe at their en- 
trance that it is a tumbling act of the 
society style. 

However, one is quickly enlightened 
when the couple proceeds to do a soft 
shoe dance. They introduce many novel 
steps in this number that enhance it* 
value to an extent that makes it much 
more attractive than the average da n cing 
turn. 

The man then does a single in the 
style of George Primrose's famous 
dance, interpreting several trick steps 
during the solo. Appearing in a white 
Highland costume, the woman does a 
"Highland" dance, performing much of 
the work on her toes. Her introduction 
to this dance is the singing of a song 

- specially constructed for the number. 

Following Hili, the curtain goes down 
and projected on the picture screen is 
the caption "The Dancing Nightmare." 

The couple are shown in bed in this 
portion of the act, awakening during the 
middle of the" night and, anxious to 

- dance, don their slippers and proceed to 
leave the room. The curtain rises and, 

■ attired in pajamas, the pair goes through 
i a routine of various soft shoe and gro- 
tesque gymnastic dancing stunts to the 
finish of the turn. 

The act is one that will hardly have 
any chance on the two-a-day time, but 
if the finish were changed a bit by put- 
ting "The Dancing Nightmare" at an 
earlier period in the act, it might be 
acceptable for neighborhood theatre 
bills. 



FRANKIE RICE 

Theatre — American. 
Style— /mperwwMrtton. 
Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting— In ttco. 

Frankie Rice opens with a song and 
then, starting with David Warfield, 
runs the gamut of stage celebrities in 
her characterizations. She is a little 
more emotional than Warfield would be 
in the character part of Von Barwig, 
but the portrayal on the whole bore a 
close resemblance to that lovable char- 
acter in "The Music Master." 

She followed with a take-off on Frank 
Tinney and then George Monroe of the 
Winter Garden. Both of these were 
well done. She then discarded an outer 
dress and appeared in the make-up of 
Eddie Foy, changing in sight of the au- 
dience. With her hair rolled up and a 
striped sweater, she went through Foy^s 
antics. 

The characterizations of these celebri- 
ties will appeal to any audience. 
Frankie Rice's facial expressions are 
wonderful and she is able to portray 
both a mood and an emotion. Her rou- 
tine is good, giving her an opportunity 
to make the most out of contrast. On 
the bill at the American she was given 
-number three spot, but easily deserves 
a place in the last half and could hold 
down an early position on the big time. 



NEW ACTsS— Continued 



KINNEY & LUSBY 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 

Style — Dancing act. 

Setting — Special scenery. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

This is a dancing act, which really 
could be styled a pantomime dancing act, 
save for the fact that there is a song at 
the opening. This number should be 
eliminated anyway as it gives the per- 
formers a bad start. 

Opening in one before an unusual look- 
ing curtain as a soldier boy and girl they 
do a sort of wooden soldier dance, danc- 
ing in perfect unison on the order of 
Moon & Morris, and others. The scene 
for the second number is a large window 
and window seat draped in cretonne 
with two large lamps on either side. A 
maid with a large hat box on which she 
dances and an artist meet and do a little 
flirtatious pantomime. 

As a pierrot the boy lights the lamps 
and the girl comes through the window 
doing a dainty toe specialty. The big- 
gest novelty of the act is a number using 
tennis net and rackets, undoubtedly sug- 
gested by Nijinski's pictures in a number 
he did abroad. 

The set is dainty and suggests a doll 
house. The music could be quickened a 
bit, which would help tremendously. The 
act can be made a feature on the big 
time, but needs working out first 



BILLY QUIRK 

Theatre— Proctor's Fifty-eighth Street 

Style— Tatting and Singing. 

Setting — In one. 

Time — Twelve minute*. 

Billy Quirk's initial appearance in 
vaudeville was not a very auspicious 
one, but he will get better as he goes 
along. 

He opens with a song that tells of a 
legitimate actor's experience with the 
silent drama. He then goes off stage 
and, after reappearing, tells some "kid' 
stories and some other gags. Leaving 
the stage still again he comes back to 
sing another song and recite a paraphaae 
on Shakespeare's "Seven Ages." 

Quirk's routine is good as far as it 
goes, but he needs some more jokes. His 
stuff would go better if be would take 
a little more time; neither is it neces- 
sary for him to go off stage more than 
once. His "Seven Ages" poem would 
be more verile if be would keep his 
hands out of his pockets. 

On the whole, Quirk haa a very good 
stage appearance and his voice is strong. 
With the lyrics which he has, the poem, 
and a larger number and variety of gags, 
he will have no trouble in winning 'em 
just like he has done in moving pictures. 



MAUDE HONORS BUND 

Daniel Frohman, president of the Act- 
ors' Fund of America, has received a check 
for $25 from Cyril Maude, requesting that 
it be used to plant a bed of flowers at the 
Actors' Fund Home in memory of Eric 
Blind. , 



DORIS WILSON TRIO 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style— Playlet. 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting— House. 

"Making Them Over" is the name of 
this playlet. 

Doris Wilson takes the part of Cor- 
nelia Hopeful — an exaggerated old maid 
type who thinks that everything nice is 
naughty. Susan Anne Hopeful is an- 
other Cornelia. 

But Isabelle Hopeful, the third sister, 
is out "to get a man." When she ap- 
pears in bridal dress, the other two sis- 
ters finally decide to wake up and each 
decides to steal Isabelle's man, if pos- 
sible. 

In the "wishing arbor" they make 
clever transformations from old maids 
to young brides, and, in a jiffy, the room 
is transformed from a dull old place to 
a cozy, artistic sitting room. 

The act is interspersed with some neat 
dancing on the part of Isabelle, and the 
singing of Cornelia is such as to win 
approval. 

When the man finally arrives, he 
proves to be the colored janitor. Hor- 
rors! Quick curtain! 

The playlet proved interesting through 
its clever transformations and dialogue. 



JAS. MORTON 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Comedy. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting— Pull stage. 

The sudden dissolution of the 
ful partnership of Morton and Moore 
came as a big surprise. 

Moore is to do an act with his sister, 
Florence. Jas. Morton, with only a few 
hours' notice, rushed this act together 
for him and his wife, the attractive little 
woman who worked in the Morton and 
Moore act. 

They open in full stage, palace set, the 
same as the old team. A bit of a song, 
a bit of a dance — some funny falls — and 
Morton soon gets in the good graces of 
the audience. 

Mame Morton makes good as a 
straight for Mr. Morton's funny talk 
and antics, and looks pretty in a most 
attractive wardrobe. 

Considering the newness of the offer- 
ing, great credit should be given them 
both. It will doubtless work out as an 
important comedy act. 



NEW FILM CO. IN SAN ANTONIO 

San Antonio, Tex., Jan. 4.— The Pre- 
mier Film Co. of this city, has been incor- 
porated with T. E. Dillon, P. S. McGeeney 
and E. K. Key as incorporators. The capi- 
tal stock is $6,000. 



McALESTER MANAGER QUITS 

McAlester, Okla., Jan. 6.— A. Bert Bates 
has resigned as manager of the Busby 
and Yale-Majestic Theatres, this city, and 
is succeeded by A. C. King. 



"HELLO, HONOLULU" 

Theatre — Miner's Bronx. 
Style— Girl act. 

lime—Ticenty-siz minutes. 

Setting — Two specials in full stage. 

Six choristers and two men, with a 
story entwined about the "Broken 
Scarab" form the basis of this poorly 
constructed girl act. It is entirely devoid 
of any comedy material or musical 
asset that would make it a drawing 
card in its field. The two scenes, one 
laid at the base of the Pyramids, and 
the other portraying an Hawaiian vil- 
lage, were elaborately constructed and 
with artistic electrical effects, appar- 
ently under the assumption that they 
would carry the act. 

The men, one a juvenile and the other 
a comedian, engaged in dialogue bits 
"culled" from various burlesque shows. 
All of these bits are shop-worn in bur- 
lesque and without any new angle given 
them in the act, fell flat. A bit of busi- 
ness done by the comedian in the 
manipulation of playing cards was novel 
and interesting and proved to be the 
only one of the scenes between the two 
men that received the approbation of 
the audience. 

The act opens with a sweet but weak, 
voiced soprano singing something about 
the desert, which was hardly audible 
beyond the third row. Then the rest 
of the girls come on dressed in Oriental 
costumes. These girls sing a number, 
after which the comediennes make their 
appearance looking for the "Broken 
Scarab." Then follows a succession of 
bits and numbers to the end of the act. 
There is no woman in the act that 
possesses a singing voice, despite the 
fact that almost all of them are called 
upon to lead a number. One of the 
girls does a "Dutch" specialty, singing 
a "Dutch" song and then doing a wooden 
shoe dance. The song might be easily 
eliminated, as the girl's dancing is suf- 
ficient to carry the bit. 

It might be suggested that the girls 

be given a bit of drilling in regard to 

unison in their dancing, as they are en- 

- tirely out of step and line during the 

numbers. 



SINGER MARRIES PUBLISHER 

Eleanor Gator, a singer, last week be- 
came the bride of Eugene V. Brewster, 
motion picture magazine publisher. 



FERGUSON PURCHASES THEATRE 

David Ferguson haa recently purchased 
a new theatre In Hartford, Oonn, which 
he named the Little Playhouse. 



THORNSYKE & BARNES 

Theatre— iliner's Bronx. 

S^yle — Singing and talking. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — Special, in one. 

This act is a decided novelty. 
With the rise of the curtain the in- 
terest of the audience is immediately 
attracted by the dressing of the act, 
which discloses a man attired in the 
dress of a navy officer standing in the 
centre of the stage with a sailor close 
beside him. The officer proceeds to 
make a speech regarding the need of 
men for the navy, at which a man ap- 
pears from the back of the house and 
inquires regarding the advantages of- 
fered by Uncle Sam's naval forces. 

The dialogue between the two is 
clever and witty and the business new 
and novel. Both of the men possess 
good singing voices and the rendition 
of their songs : brought forth sponta- 
uous applause. 

The act is one appropriate for any bill, 
and, if properly bandied will work its 
way np instead of down in the vaudeville 
world. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



QUITS "HAVE A HEART' 

Lenora Novasio has left the "Have A 
Heart" Co., as the character she was to 
have played has heen changed from a sou- 
brette to a prima donna role. 



WM. VAN DORN DEAD 

William L. Van Dorn, 69, a former lec- 
turer and actor, died in Brooklyn De- 
cember 30, just five days after the death 
of his wife. 



THEATRE SAFE BLOWN OPEN 

The safe in the Regent Theatre in Third 
avenue was blown open last week and 
robbers escaped with $400, the receipts 
of the New Tear's performances. The 
watchman was first bound and gagged, but 
managed to call the police. 



TYNAN QUITS 'TENDENNIS" • 
Brandon Tynan has left the cast of 
"Major Fendennis" and will have the lead- 
ing role in the Lieblers' production of 
"The Chute." 



SERVICES HELD FOR ERIC BUND 

Funeral services for Eric Blind, the 
English actor who died in Reading, were 
held last week in St. Michael's Church. 
Many actors were in attendance, includ- 
ing representatives of "Grumpy," with 
which Blind was playing. 



STILLMAN LEAVES BELASCO 

. Henry B. Still man has become associ- 
ated with Ouida Bergere and the Amer- 
ican Play Company. For five years he 
was with David Belasco as play reader 
and stage manager. He has also been 
with Daniel Frobman and Charles Dilling- 
ham. 



LEASE OF CENTURY IS RENEWED 

Dillingham and Ziogfeld have leased the 
Century Theatre for a period of five years 
after the present season. The form of 
entertainment exemplified in "The Cen- 
tury Girl" will be followed in the future. 
An innovation to be made is that of serv- 
ing dinner in the restaurant before the 
evening performance. 



CHILDREN'S PLAYS FOR EASTER 

Alice Minnie Herts, Katharine Lord and 
Jacob Heniger announce that their next 
season of special matinees for children 
will take place about Easter time. 



MeCORMACK BUYS PAINTINGS 
John McCormack, the Irish tenor, has 
added three famous paintings to bis col- 
lection. One is "The Portrait of Rem- 
brandt's Sister," by Rembrandt, which he 
acquired from Henry Bernhardt &■ Son for 
$150,000. 



TALBOTT PLAYING LEAD 

Vancouver, B. C Jan. 4. — Julienne 
Talbott is playing the lead and James A. 
Shadrlck the comedy part with W. B. Sher- 
man's western company of "The Girl He 
Couldn't Buy," playing here this week. 



SIMMONS IN TITLE ROLE 

Danny Simmons is now playing the title 
role in "Bringing Up Father in Polities," 
on the week stands. 



FRITZ ADAMS PLAYING HEAVY 

Febnte. B. C, Jan. 5. — Frit* Adams 
is now playing the heavy with the "Girl 
He Couldn't Buy" Co. 



McBEATH VISITS ST. JOHN 

St. John, Can., Jan. 6. — A. R. Mo 
Heath, now of Montreal, spent the holiday 
season with his family here. Mr. McBeath 
was formerly local manager of the Mutual 
Film Co., later becoming manager of the 
Montreal branch of the same company. He 
is now connected with the Animated Ad- 
vertisers Co. of Montreal. 



STAFF GIVES SIDNEY GIFT 

As a Christmas Day token of their es- 
teem the employees of the Jamaica Thea- 
tre presented Manager Louis Sidney with 
a Masonic charm and a cut glass bowl set. 
John O'Connor, Mr. Sidney's assistant, 
was also the recipient of a punch bowl 
from the staff. 



WILLIAMS SELECTING CAST 

John D. Williams is engaging an all- 
star cast for the play written for him by 
Somerset Maughn. Those already engaged 
are Virginia Hamed, Mrs. James E. 
Ifackett and Henry Dixey. The title of 
the play has not been announced. 



COMPOSER MARRIES 

Henrietta Blancke Belcher, composer of 
many successful instrumental numbers, was 
married on Monday, Dec. 25, to Ralph Men- 
delsohn, of No. 676 Riverside Drive, New 
York City. 



BEBAN'S NEW ITALIAN PIECE 

Eve Unsell has just finished a new Ital- 
ian drama of New York's east side Sicilian 
colony entitled, "The Brother of Beppo," 
for George Beban, who will appear first 
in a screen and later in a dramatic version 
of the piece. 



ALVTENE STUDENTS PERFORM 

The Alviene School Students gave a pub- 
lic performance last week at the Alviene 
Playhouse with "Who's Who," put on in a 
modernized form with musical numbers, as 
a curtain raiser. 



OPERA CO. RE-ORGANIZED 

Cleveland, O.. Jan. 2. — The reorganized 
Hungarian Theatre Company will give its 
premier here January 21, using the operet- 
ta "Denver," as its vehicle. 



HAMMERSTETN ESTATE IN DEBT 

The assets and liabilities of the late Will- 
iam Hammerstein were made public last 
week, showing a deficit of $3,009. The as- 
sets figured np to $4,373 while the debts 
amounted to $7,382. 



COURT DENIES PLEA OF SAYRE 

In the United States Court of this city 
last week Judge Augustus N. Hand dis- 
missed the suit brought by Theodore Burt 
Sayre against Charles Hopkins and others 
to restrain them from interfering with his 
own dramatization of "Treasure Island." 
In addition to having his bill of complaint 
dismissed, Mr. Sayre was imposed with 
the costs. 



GAIXIGAN NOW IN TERRA HAUTE 

Logaxspobt, Ind., Jan. 4. — Edward F. 
Galligan, formerly manager of the Nelson, 
who was recently transferred to the Grand 
at Terre Haute, has moved his family to 
that city, where they will make their fu- 
ture home. Irene Galligan, who was his 
treasurer at the Nelson, will occupy a like 
position at the Grand. 



CHORUS GIRL STILL HEIRESS 

Eleanor H. Davidson, the former show 
girl, and at present playing her first dra- 
matic engagement in "The Little Lady in 
Blue," is still the wife of Louis M. Ream 
and, by the same token, the heiress to 
millions, according to a decision handed 
down last week in the Third Department 
of the Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court. Their decision scored the previous 
annulment of the marriage which, they 
claimed, was "immoral." 



OPERA CO. IS BANKRUPT 

An involuntary petition in bankruptcy 
against the Interstate Opera Company of 
135 Broadway has been filed by a number 
of artists who claim the liabilities are 
$40,000 and $2,000 assets. The company 
has been promoting high-class opera in four 
Middle Western cities. 



"ESTHETIC EVENING" COMING 

Alfred E. Henderson of Aeolian Hall 
will offer a unique performance Sunday 
evening, January 21, at the Princess The- 
atre. He has called it "An Esthetic Eve- 
ning." The program will deal with the 
philosophy of the beautiful and the prin- 
ciples underlying beauty. 



FESTIVAL PROMOTER SUES 
Dubnham, N. C, Jan. 6. — F. E. West- 
brook, promoter of the National Music 
Festival of America, and for some time 
secretary and manager, has filed a suit in 
the Superior Court here for the recovery 
of $30,000. The action is brought against 
G. W. Hinshaw, H. D. Shntt and R. O. 
Alexander who are charged with selling 
the managing company forty acres of land 
for $62,000 when tracts just as desirable 
were offered free. 



BRADY GIVES UP THEATRE 
Wilmington, Del., Jan. 5. — W. A. 
Brady has relinquished his lease of the 
Playhouse Theatre here and hereafter the 
Du Pont interests will conduct the house. 
It Is said the patrons here have not been 
satisfied with the number of high-class 
productions offered the public. 



B. MERRILL TO WRITE LYRICS 

Blanche Merrill has been commissioned 
to write the music and lyrics for "Dance 
and Grow Thin," which diveitisement 
Messrs. Dillingham and Ziegfeld are pre- 
paring for production in Cocoanut Grove. 



DALLY'S SHOWS DOING WELL 

Hutchison, Kas., Jan. 6. — Ted Daily's 
royalty shows are playing to big business 
at the Home Theatre here. Dally is fol- 
lowing np a long list of big city successes 
with "Help Wanted." 



MAUDE ADAMS HONORED 

Maude Adams was the recipient last 
week of a gold-framed set of resolutions 
presented by the Theatrical Protective 
Onion. 

The memorial was presented to her as 
an expression of their appreciation of the 
kindness bestowed by Miss Adams on one 
of their members, Johnny Foster, who was 
Miss Adams' property man and who died 
in New Orleans a few weeks ago. 



SKATERS RENEW CONTRACTS 

Charles Dillingham announced last week 
that he had renewed contracts with the 
skating stars, who have become favorites 
at the Hippodrome. 




Beautiful? 

Yes. Not only beautiful, 
but rich and exquisite 

John McCormack, one 
of the world's greatest 
tenors, must have 
thought a great deal of 
that new song by the 
composer of "A Little 
Love, A Little Kiss"— 

LOVE, 
HERE 
IS MY 
HEART 

and his Victor Record 
No. 64623, of this truly 
wonderful song, is one 
of the most sought-after 
records of the season. 
Proof positive that the 
public as well as artists 
appreciate good songs I 
Artists' copies in all 
keys ready 

LEOFEIST.IncrTrkSrNewYork 

BOSTON CHICAGO 

1*1 Tmumt St. G. O. H. Bid,. 

ST. LOUIS PHILADELPHIA 

7th aad OUv* Su. Braa4 and Cherry Sis. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Paatai** Tbaatr* Btdg. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 




EMPLOYEES IN 

BURLESQUE TO 

ORGANIZE 

HURTIG PLANS MUTUAL ASS'N 



An organization for tbe mutual interest 
and welfare of employees of theatres play- 
ing burlesque attractions is being advo- 
cated by Louis Hortig, manager of Hortig 
and Seamon's Harlem Theatre. 

It is Mr. Hurtis'g intention to bring to- 
gether on an equal footing all employees 
of snch theatres from managers to ushers, 
he believing that the employees of a theatre 
are members of one big family and that It 
is to their interest to have an organization 
through which they can discuss general 
conditions, both for the success of their 
house and individual benefits. 

Hortig purposes to organize the houses 
in Greater New York first. Tbe organiza- 
tion will probably be known aa "The 
Greater New York Burlesque Theatres 
Beneficial and Protective Association." 
He is arranging to send letters to various 
managers of Greater New York and adja- 
cent cities, acquainting them with the pur- 
poses of the organization and asking them 
for their aid and co-operation. 

There la to be a social and beneficial 
side aa well to the organization. Social 
gatherings will be held to which the mem- 
bers of families of the theatre employees 
will be invited, and a sick and death bene- 
fit fund will also be established. The dues 
for the organisation are to be nominal and 
within die reach of all employes. 

Each week a meeting is to be held, at 
which all employes are expected to attend. 
Every two months a general meeting win 
be held, when a general discussion will 
take place regarding the manner of the 
operation of burlesque theatres. At these 
meetings the managers and employes wffl 
narrate the various new innovations that 
have been adopted in their theatres and 
will teU of the way they worked oat. If 
feasible, the other managers wffl be at 
liberty to adopt them. 

Hortig hopes by the first of March to 
have the organization in permanent shape. 



TRAFALGAR BEING TORN DOWN 

The old Trafalgar Hotel on Fourteenth 
Street, New York, is being torn down to 
make room for a new business building. 



COLEMAN ENTERTAINS PRESS 

Habtford, Conn.. Jan. 6. — Dan Cole- 
man, the star of Harry Hastings' big show, 
entertained the Press Club at a banquet 
at the Grand Theatre, Dec 29. During 
the evening vaudevffle and dancing helped 
some of the boys to enjoy themselves. Mr. 
Coleman's entire company attended. 



JEANETTE DUPRE OPENS SHOP 

Jeanette Dupre ha* opened a new ladies' 
wear shop In New York. 



MARK LEA QUITS 

Washington, Jan. 4. — Mark Lea haa 
closed his stock here and is now located at 
Youngstown, O. 



"DAD" FRAZER ENTERTAINS 
Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 6. — The new 
year was fittingly ushered in at Dad's 
Hotel, Philadelphia, when a combined 
birthday party and supper were given by 
Mr. FrazJer to "Broomstick Elliott and 
Joseph Kennedy, both of whom were, guests 
at the house. Among those present were: 
Manse Fifo, tbe Monto Duo, Harry Davis, 
Chief Eagle Teeth, Faro & Sweeney and 
Elliott & Mullen. 



MIDGETS MAKE 

HIT OF EVENING 

AT THE OLYMPIC 



- "At Beauty Rest" is the title of the bur- 
lesque at tbe Olympic, New York, in which 
interesting incidents in an asylum are por- 
trayed. 

Carol Schroeder, the prima donna, 
played the baroness in search of rest, 
which she failed to get. She did, however, 
get plenty of excitement between the 
antics of James J. Lake, as Adam Nutt, 
and Harry Seymour, as Dr. Dopem, who 
used ail their talent to get laughter. 

Freddye Amiott is a clever dancer, es- 
pecially in an acrobatic way, and her 
samples of the Russian' steps were very 
much worth while. 

Sam Mitchell as the energetic program 
boy, sang and danced. Billy Hfll'man 
stood around as the straight, and in the 
characters showed sufficient action. 

Madelene Webb, the hefty ingenue, has 
returned to Pop Lymond's coterie, and 
contributed her share of the good work. 

Miss Schroeder appeared in her specialty 
with one song, and as the parachute girl 
sailed out over the audience winging an- 
other selection. 

Captain Barnett and Son, the midgets, 
made the hit of the evening, doing their 
specialty in evening dress with up-to-date 
talk, and the little fellow was voted a 
doll, "especially when he encored an a 
tango queen for some fancy steps with 
Papa." Later in the evening they returned 
in overalls for the Maggie Dooley Song, 
and the Keely encore, in which they were 
a riot They worked with the chorus for 
a number of returns. 

In the white scene at the finish they also 
appear as a dancing couple for another 
big hand. 

The Exhibition of Modem Dances by 
Schroeder and Lake, dressed In white, was 
well done, especially the burlesque tango. 

The chorus is made up of sprightly and 
pretty girls and each could do her little 
bit, when called upon by Harry Seymour. 
The members are: Laura Burby, Helen 
Smith, Beatrice Marts, Rae Davis, Louise 
Burby, Buddy Tarrington, Welda Nelson, 
Fritxi Randolph, Anna Moore, Goldie 
Moore, Gertrude Gray, Marie WeUer, El- 
sie Ben, Bfflie Shaner, Iva Bennett and 
Goldby. 



BOOKED ON MATRIMONIAL TIME 

Detroit, Mich., Jan. 6. — Ada P. KeUey 
of George Kane's "Ideal Girls" and A. J. 
Kilmer were booked for life on the "mat- 
rimonial time" December 26. Mrs. Kilmer 
is to leave the Kane show and work with 
her husband in "Clown Bobbie and His 
Girl" in vaudeville- 



BURLESQUE HAD 

BIG RETURNS 

NEW YEAR'S 

MANY SHOWS BREAK RECORDS 



Good business this season has not re- 
stricted itself to the legitimate and vaude- 
ville field, for burlesque does not seem 
to have been outdone. 

From all over tbe country, burlesque 
shows are reporting record business and 
following are some of the New Year's Eve 
returns: 

The "U. S. Beauties" at the Gayety, 
Minneapolis, on Sunday and Monday, De- 
cember 31 and January 1, including the 
midnight bow, took in $3,000. 

Fred Irwin's show, on Monday, includ- 
ing the midnight show, realized $1,900 at 
the Orpheum in Paterson, N. J. The' 
Beef Trust at the Casino, Boston, had S. 
R O. to two shows. All the chairs in 
Watson's Banquet Scene and all the chairs 
in the dressing rooms were used. 

Barney Gerard's three shows closed the 
old year by taking the following records in 
one week : "Follies of tbe Day" broke all 
burlesque records in Providence; "Some 
Show" did the same at Hurtig and Sea- 
mon's, while the "Americans" duplicated 
the feat at the Cadillac Detroit 

Tbe Sunday midnight show at Baltimore 
of "The Burlesque Review" drew a record 
crowd. Many patrons in evening dress oc- 
cupied gallery seats and enjoyed the nov- 
elty. The doors opened at 12:01. 

"A New York Girl" broke all records of 
attendance at the Empire Theatre at the 
midnight show, New Year's Eve. 



WATTE TO PRODUCE STOCK TAB. 

Billy E. Waite, the tramp comedian, 
win produce stock tab shows at the King 
Edward Theatre, Montreal, Can., starting 
Jan. 22. The opening week he wffl use 
the first act of his latest musical revue, 
entitled, "Fun and FroUc." 



TYSON LOSES MOTHER 

The mother of Charles Tyson, of Tyson 
and Barbour of the "Mischief Makers" 
company, died Jan. 2. at her home in the 
Bronx. 



SIMONS JOINS THOROUGHBREDS 

Murray J. Simons is playing with T. W. 
Dinkins' "Thoroughbreds." He recently 
returned to this country from Australia. 



BESSIE CARRETTE LEAVES SHOW 

Bessie Carrette closed recently with the 
"FoUiea of Pleasure" and expects to join 
a Broadway attraction. 



AUGUSTA LANG FOR MUS. COM 

Augusta Lang, prima donna of The 
Roseland Girls," has signed a contract 
with the Comet Amusement Co., to be fea- 
tured in a new musical offering which the 
concern wffl produce next season. 



NO WHEEL SHOW AT DALY'S 

The reports that the American Wheel 
Shows would play at Daly's are without 
foundation. General Manager Geo. Peck 
states that no such arrangement has been 
or wffl be made. It has also been rumored 
that the A. B. C. shows would alternate 
between the Olympic and the Union Square, 
bnt the Krauas boys deny any negotiation 
toward such a policy. 



NEW RECRUITS FOR N. O. STOCK 

The Lyric Stock at New Orleans in- 
cludes John J. Black, Mick Markwood, 
May Earle, Edith Graham and Al Warren. 



REPLACES FLORENCE TANNER 

Evelyn Redwood has succeeded Florence 
Tanner as prima donna with Wm. A 

Rocheus Show. 



BANQUET FOR MAE HOLDEN 

A gathering in honor of Mae Holden at 
the Plaza, Brooklyn, following a theatre 
party at the Casino, was held last night. 



DORA BUSH DEAD 

Dora DeVere Bush, wife of Billy Bush, 
leader of the Burlesque Bevue, died at her 
home in Providence, December 28. Mae 
Bush, a daughter, is in motion pictures. 



BURTON JOINS IRWIN 
Joe Burton haa joined Irwin's Big Show. 



Burlesque Notes 



Henry P. Dixon played the straight in 
his Big Review at the Gayety, Baltimore, 
owing to Chas. Saxon's illness and was all 
O. K. until he started to sing. 



Buck Stadtler, wbo was treasurer of the 
Palace, Baltimore, is now the manager, and 
John Satowaky, his assistant is now tbe 
main custodian of the funds. 



Tessie Clark, daughter of P. S. Clark, 
has induced her father to let her work in 
,the chorus of bis A New York Girl Co. 



Lucia Foyat a chorus girl with the New 
York Girl Show, died at the Kings County 
Hospital, Brooklyn, Dec. 31. 



Wm. Y. Jennings has assumed the duties 
of assistant general manager for the 
American Bnrlesque Circuit. 



Richard Dorn haa returned to his former 
post at taking tickets at the main gate of 
the Columbia, New York. 



Dolly Southern baa returned to the cast 
of the Broadway Belles in Brooklyn after 
a week's Alness, 



Billy Bush has accepted die position of 
leader with the Burlesque Review. 



May Sheridan is the new prima donna 
with the Bon Tons. 

Joe Fields is now with "The Record 
Breakers.'*' 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



ACTORS' BAZAAR ON MAY 12 

The bazaar to be given by the Actors' 
i'und of America will open May 12 at the 
( ; rand Central Palace. Efforts axe being 
made by the fund to obtain a $1,000,000 
endowment. The general management 
will be under the direction of Daniel Froh. 
man, the president, and Marc Klaw and 
Charles Burnham. Waldemar De Bille 
will have the executive management of 
the affair. 



MADGE KENNEDY BACK IN CAST 

Madge Kennedy returned to the cast 
of "Fair and Warmer" last week at the 
Bronx Opera House. She was unable to 
find a suitable new play. 



LOVE BACK WITH WORLD 

For a while after the death of Eric 
Blind, Montagu Love played his old role 
of Jarvis in "Grumpy," but last week re- 
turned to resume his work with the World 

Studios. 



STANISLAUS STANCE DEAD 

Stanislaus Stange, composer, died list 
week at his home, 112 Cathedral Parkway. 
He wag born in England and came to 
America in the '80s. His best known con- 
tributions to the stage were "The Jolly 
Musketeers," "Brian Born,'* "Dolly Var- 
den," "When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home," "Pi£E, Paff, Poof" and the adapta- 
tions of "The Chocolate Soldier." He 
was a member of the Friars and Players 
dubs. ______ 

AUGER VISITS ST. JOHN 

St. John, Can., Jan. 5. — E. Auger, of 
the Mutual Film Co., was a recent visitor 
to this city. Mr. Auger, who now makes 
Chicago his headquarters, was formerly a 
resident here, and was the first manager 
of the first film exchange, the Ouimet Ex- 
change, located here. 



MECHANICS' ASSN. GIVES BALL 

Oakland, Cal., Jan. 5. — Tea thousand 
people attended the Theatre Mechanics' 
Association ball last Saturday at the Audi- 
torium. An honorary committee of theatre 
managers of the local houses consisted of 
Geo. Eby, of the Orpheum; Fred Geisn, 
Macdowgh ; Henry Bishop, Bishop's Play- 
house; Will King, Columbia; Robert G. 
Deasy, Pantages: A. Tanatrum, Reliance; 
Lee Price, Broadway, acted as assistant 
floor manager. 



HOPKINS BUYS HOUSE 

Charles Hopkins has purchased a seven- 
story building at 5 East Forty-seventh 
street, which it is probable will be turned 
into a residence. 



JOHN GOLDEN WINS PIANO 

At the Lambs Club during the holidays 
John Golden, one of the owners of "Turn 
to the Right," won a Knabe grand piano 
which was raffled off. Golden took one 
chance which cost him a dollar. 



ORCHESTRA OUT ON STRIKE 

Oklahoma Crt, Okla., Jen. B.— As the 
San Carlo Opera Company was about to 
open with their play "Rigoletto," the or- 
chestra went on strike, and the manage- 
ment was forced to announce the opera 
would be put on without it A pianist and 
organist took the place of the orchestra 
and were applauded. Only four persons 
left the theatre. The musicians claimed 
the bouse was an unfair theatre. 



BUSH BURRICHTER ILL 

Shebidan, Wyo., Jan. 4. — Bush Bur- 
richter, comedian with the Chase Lister 
Company, was stricken with pneumonia 
while here. His mother was seat for and 
he was taken to his home in Dubuque, la., 
where he is convalescing. 



MARJORIE DAVIS IS HOSTESS 

AHDEBSON, Ind., Jan. S. — Mariorie 
Davis of Gaskell and MacVitty's "Bud of 
a Perfect Day" Company was the hostess 
Christmas day at a banquet to the mem- 
bers of the company following the matinee. 



LANSHAW WITH "PERFECT DAY" 

Andebson, Ind., Jan. 0. — G. J. Lanshaw 
and wife are now with Gaskell and Mac- 
Vitty's "End of a Perfect Day" Company, 
a play by Howard McKent Barnes. 



WARDROBE LOST IN FIRE 

Kenosha, Wis., Jan. 7. — Boyle Wool- 
folk's "The Sunnyside of Broadway" was 
in a fire here and the wardrobe was com- 
pletely destroyed, although the scenery was 
saved,, permitting the tabloid to move along 
without losing any time. 



NO PLAY FOR IRISH THEATRE 

The Irish Theatre of America will make 
uo productions this year, according to 
John F. Campbell. Coincident with the 
declaration of peace abroad the company 
will announce its early activities. 



ELKS HOLD MART1NEAU SERVICE 
Aisant, Jan. 5. — The remains of Frank 
W. Martineau, the theatrical man, were 
laid to rest here today. The funeral serv- 
ices were conducted by the Elks. 



TOM MARKS ENTERTAINS 

Stratford, Can., Jan. 4. — The Tom 
Maries Co. celebrated Christmas with a 
tree and a banquet, given by Mr. Marks 
a ter the performance. The tree was 
loaded with everything from diamond rings 
to jumping jacks. Members of the com- 
pany present were: Joe Marks, Chris 
Allen, Bill Phillips, Jim Perin, Donald 
McArthur, Major Caruth, Jock McMillan, 
Jammie Bennet, Florence Wagar, Grace 
Marks, Mabel Caruth, Arlie Marks, Dot 
Phillips and Tom Marks. The company 
is playing to capacity houses. 



MACE BEATS UP MASHER 

Fred Mace, motion picture star, gave 
a masher a good thrashing in the corridors 
of the Hotel Astor last week. Mr. Mace 
declared the masher made some unwelcome 
and insulting remarks to a woman. 



T. _ D. TO OPEN IN STOCKTON 

Stockton, Cal., Jan. 4. — The Turner 
and Bmhnken circuit of moving picture 
houses will soon open their new playhouse 
here, and also contemplate boilding and 
operating, a moving picture theatre la 
Southern California. 



CHAS. NEWTON'S FATHER DIES 

Santa Barbara, Cal., Jan. 6. — Charles 
L. Newton's father, who died recently, was 
buried last month at Rochester, N. T. 

Dad's Theatrical Hotel 

PHILADELPHIA 

FIuhrer&Fluhrer 

**Ahrara wsrHag. tfcaak roar" 



HAZEL FLINT QUITS 

Hazel Flint, in private life, Mrs. Jack 
Squire, left the cast of "Very Good Eddie" 
up in Greenfield Saturday night and has 
returned to New York, where she and her 
husband recently purchased a home. Squire 
will remain with the company, however. 



JULIETTE L1PPE MARRIED 

Juliette Lippe, the actress, and Dr. Gus- 
tily Kolischer of Chicago were married dur- 
ing the holidays at ML Vernon. Miss 
Lippe was seen on Broadway this season 
in "Flora Bella." She will make her home 
in Chicago and will not return to the stage. 



WIFE SUES FILM MAN 
Springfield, Mass., Jan. 6. — Mrs. An- 
nie Goldstein, wife of Nathan E. Goldstein 
of the Goldstein Amusement Co., has 
started action in the Probate Court of 
Hampden County for separate support. 



FRENCH ACTRESS ARRIVES 

Yvonne Eersac has arrived from Paris 
and will make her appearance with Lucien 
Bonbeur's French company at the Garrick 
soon. Much interest is centered in her first 
appearance. 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 



HARRY PATRICIA 

MANDEL and BAKER 

, Straight Prima Donna 

Million Dollar Doll* 

Direction AL SINGER 



MLRRY LEONARD 

Making Cm 1 "" 1 from Hah— w Paopla 

WITH 

BJatch Cooper's Roaalaml Girls 



LYNNE CANTER 

PRIMA DONNA LEADS 

ROSELAND GIRLS 

WD SEASON UNDER MANAGEMENT 
BLUTCH COOPER 



GRACE LEWIS 

Personality Prima Donna 

With BEN KAHN'S 

UNION SQUARE STOCK 



BILLY CARLTON 



German Comedian 

HELLO GIRLS 



JEAN LEONARD 

FEATURED 

With FRED IRWIN'S BIG SHOW 

Soabratta diffarant from the others 

Ra-angagad with Naw Show. 



ALICE LAZAR 

Management 
JACOBS AND JERMON 



MAY HcCORMACK 

With 
BROADWAY B ELLES CO. 



CORTELLI 

Playing Characters 

WITH 

SAM HOWE'S BIG SHOW 




Bigger and Better Than Ever 

JIM BARTON 

ST A R 
20TH CENTURY MAIDS 



DOC DELL 

Eccentric Bat Different 

Signed for 2 More Years vith 

Fred Irwrn's Majeetke 



GEO. P. MURPHY 

With BARNEY GERARD'S 

FOLLIES OF THE DAY 



GEO. LEON 

WITH 

MONTE CARLO GIRLS 
DOING DUTCH AND MAK- 
ING GOOD 



GRACE L ANDERSON 

PRIMA DONNA 
BOWERY BURLESQUERS 

MANAGEMENT HURTIG * SEAMGN 

ItlS-U.IS-U-M 



SQUIRREL FOOD 

Aills & Myers 

Those Kilted Klowne 
ASK MOLLIE WILLIAMS 



HENRY P. DIXON 

Producer 

BIG REVIEW 

Corambla Theatre Boilding. New York 



GENE 



FAY 



Alvarez and Martell 

SCORING WITH 

HARRY HASTINGS BIG SHOW 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



IVAUDEVILLE STARS 



EDWIN ARDEN 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



KATHARINE DANA'S 



UNITED TIME 



FISHER FOLKS' 



MARIE STODDARD 

The "Bud Fisher" of Song 

Direction Max Hayes 



TRULY 



MARTA 



SHATTUCK & GOLDEN 



Direction ARTHUR KLEIN 





I IN/1 

REPRESENTATIVES 




PAUL DURAND 

MCR. & PRODUCER 1005 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



MAX HART 

Room 902 Palaea Theatre Bid*. 



gene HUGHES "US SMITH jo-paige 



VAUDEVILLE MGRS. 



1004 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



3VIAX HAYES 

VAUDEVILLE BROKER 1001-1002 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



PETE MACK 

Palace Theatre Bid*. 



JOHN Ce PEEBLES Hi*b Cla^ C V.ud.rTil]. Act. 

JOHN L. GORMAN, ASSOCIATE Palace Theatre Bid*. 



VAUDEVILLE REPT. 



804 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



MAURICE H. ROSE and CURTIS JACK 

1102 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



STOKER — BIERBAUER 

Palace Theatre Bid*. 



HARRY FITZGERALD 

Room 902 Palace Theatre BoiWtn* 



LEWIS & GORDON PRODUCING CO., Inc. 



AL LEWIS. Genera l 
MAX GORDON. Bookin* 



-PaJnce Theatre 



VAUDEVILLE FEATURE ACTs| 



JAS. 



GRACE AND EDDIE 



CONLIN — PARKS 



'Three Utile Pals" 

Direction THOS. FITZPATRICK 



KELLER 



ANNA 



MACK & EARL 



Direction 
MAX HART 



VODEVfLUNG 



NORMAN MANWAIUN0 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 

U. B. O. — BIG TIME 



VICTOR 



ADELE 



FOSTER & FERGUSON 

BEAU BRUMMEL and the DEBUTANTE 

Direction G. F. BROWN-WM. HENNESSEY 



JACK HAZEL 

DALY & BERJLEW 



Whizzing Whirlwind Wizards 



U. B. O. Time 



Direction, WENONAH M. TENNEY 



EDDIE 



ROSA 



DE NOYER & DANIE 

la' Their Leteet CC nPPnCITIOW ** Writtm by 
Laa*h Pnrraker Uir^JOl 1 IV-lfN Joba P. Medbury 



A Cambtaatiea of Ow 

SPECIAL SCENERY 



ad Liltia* Tune, by Eddie De Noy«- 
Dtrecttao GENE HUGHES ead JO PAIGE SMITH 



FRED 
ANDREWS 

NEW NOVELTY Direction JO PAIGE SMITH 



THE WONDER ACT 



(Greetings) 



SHERLOCK SISTERS 

DIRECTION OF GEO. CHOOSE—UNITED TIME. 



HUSH! BIT OF SCANDAL 

^FOLEY-LETURE'" 



WITH 14 PEOPLE 



ALWAYS A HEADUNER 



KLEIN BROS. 



"NOOTRAL 

P. S— W. Daat 3 tee Saewa. Wa 



99 



JOHN C PEEBLES PRESENTS 

WILLIAM SISXO 

UNITED TIME 



maurice BRIERRE "* KING grace 

Direction ARTHUR. KLEIN 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 




- r i aatbrary at th. 
ba that list, a POSTAL CARD must ba Mat nqaaattog a* to foe-ward row 

ha e lga ea 1 with ytrar full HM aavd tba ill to which tha lattar la to ' 

Uava af buafaaaea fallowed by tba aaadar sbouU ba auntiaaad. 

atJesa tha data <ar atanhbar) af tba CUPPER ta which tba 



lattar. It muat 



at far 



GENTS 



Aduu. a j. 

Hrr-xt, ffc. 
Bnh.ir, C H. 
Baunm, *^"* 
BHllnci, J. X 
Errant, Latter H. 
Broota, Qw. V. 
Km A Blanche 
Brows. Pes (j 
Bettrssd, Frank 
CTanlln. Fled 
CnHlsoo. Webster 
Crane. Gardiner 
Ctiinrhen. Bob 
Cutle, Butt B. 

CallieoU*. Veroon 



Abbott. E<flth 

Beechey, En 
Belaud. Mia H. 
Bacfianan. Maud 
Brehm, Ksthrrn 
Bond, Louis 
Belmont. Anna 
Bryant, Mariner* 

m 

Bennett, Selda 
Charleston. Hut 
CUrtoc. Vn. 

X D. 
Cernrthers, Mabri 



B. 
Clark. BDIle 
De Vole, Dire 

DeiU 

Dafrayne, Frank 
Darioaon. X at. 
DarjatDOB, X W. 
Earene a Barley 
Ernsts, Victor X 
Elwyn. Lome 
Edwards 4k 
Vaoghan 
Erses, Eddie 
Flshman, Lords 
Fletcner, F. 8. 
Fonda. Cbas. 



Dtrrkin, Kathryn 
Bsr'.e, Baby 
Elaine;. Nell 
Eerie, Jnlla 
Earle, Edna 
Edlss. Connie 
Fredlcke. Anna 
Freeman, Grace 
Fuller. Sophie 
Gteasoo. Mrs. A. 

B. 
Gordon.- Grace 
Cllmora, Kittle 
Hills. Anna 



FantTJ, Jkf. 
Frye, Clayton 

CCennon, John L. 

Gj I'l . u . W1U. 

Gffletti. Jan 
Hopper, De Wolf 
HafUt. John B. 
Hobaon, Homer 
Hartley. J. H. 
Bant. Jack 
Haltre, Sam 
Ban. Bdd 
Hlccey, Nell 
Jeaaen. H. C 
Jackson, Barry 
Kennedy. A. 



Lynch, Ed*, 
lewis, H. C. 
Lery. John 
La Bne. Arthur 
Lyla. Cecil W. 
Leahy, Chaa. B. 
Luseif, Geo. W. 
lUckar. Jit. B . 
Winhili, Jfldt 
HaTdpitre- Peter 
MltcivU. Wltl 
Umax, L. R. 
Melfllle, eteta 

Muao, ClUrifT 
NOeTrla, Wtn. 
North. Frank 



Plmffiner, Lincoln 
Payton, Bajmcnd 
Paul. W. 

Frlmnea, Geo. 

H. 
Both. Eddie 
Klalcel. Geo. 
Roy, Walter 8. 
Held. Jack 
Boaelle. Wm. 
Shires, Wm. 
Sagenoa. F. P. 
Shntt, Hnrb 
BjBBk Klka . 
Sarceaatl Geo. 
Standee. Ed. 



Serflle. V. 
Tbotcpax, EL. F. 
Webb. Chaa T. 
Waldron. X U 
Wbltandea, Ed. 
Warren 4 Con- 
nolly 
Wilier, Eddie 

Ward. Eddie. 
VTcntcel, Fred 
White. Geo. W. 
Wffiard, Fred 
E. M. 



LADIES 



Eaelagwrnr, Mr*. 

Hill. Edna 
loots, Mrs. Wn. 

T. 
Kins, Bo>e A. 
RlldAre. Kitb- 

•vrlse 
Undley. Luella 
Levis. Florroce 
LtTCau. Gertrude 
Lohs, aJMH 
Lloyd. Mrs. A. 
Love, Jane 



PLAYERS ENGAGED 



Kitty Gordon by William A. Brady to 
b? the star in at least three motion pictures 
to be produced within six months- 



John H. Goldsnorthy and Lionel Bel- 
more by the Messrs. Shubert for "The Beau- 
tiful Unknown." 



Maude Odell for 
known." 



'The Beautiful {Jo- 



Anne Bradley by Willian Gaxton for 
"Kisses." 



Orme Caldara, Henry Stephenson and 
Cecil Yapp for "Lilac Time." 



Ferdinand Gottschalk by Granville Bar- 
ker for "The Morris Dance." 



Helen Barnes by Robert -Edeson for 
"His Brother's Keeper." 



Mile. Semone for "Dance and Grow 
Thin" at the Cocoannt Grove. 



Saxone Morland for "The Right Little 
Girl." 



Ernest Rowan for Gertrude Kingston's 
company in "The Queen's Enemies." 



Louise Dresser by Henry W. Savage for 
'Have a Heart." 



Marion Davies by E. Ray Comstock for 
"Oh. Boy!" 



Roy Attvell and Lawrence Wheat for 
"You're In Love." 



Madeline Traverse for Mary Pickford's 
company in "Poor Little Rich Girl." 



Margaret Calvert by Smith & Golden for 
second company of "Turn to the Right." 



Dave Ferguson by Marmury, Comstock 
Company for "Very Good, Eddie." 



Orr. Mandle 
Foloff, Eude 
Richardson, Mrs. 

A. E. 
Rickstker, Mrs. 

Fred 
Baron, Mrs. H. 
Rlrers. Rose 
Robeson. Erba 
Rogers, Billy 
Romer, Mae 
Reidy. Irene 
Bobraon. Erba 
Sawyer. La Verne 



Stuart, Ennenle 
Slartns, Marlon 
Serjeant, Birdie 
8tarr, Blanche R. 
Sey-noort, Na- 
talie 
Tra»?rs. Belle 
Tnrscolt, Mrs. 

Dodc 
Walker. Nellie 
Wood. Nellie D. 
Wilson. Mrs. 
Wilson. Ulllan 



Loftln. Dixie 
Lucifer. Mrs. L. 
Murray. Miss M. 
McAdaffl, Wini- 
fred 
Matthews. Lottie 
Murphy, Marie 
Melntyre, Aleyn 
Mullally, Ore 
Morley, Loretu 
Morrill. Hilda 
Norland. Jeaoette 
Sale. Bcmlce 
Norman. Maa 

THEATRE DAMAGED IN FIRE 

Iocansport, Ind.. Jan. 5. — Fire origi- 
nating in the Angle Hotel, which adjoins 
the rear of the Colonial Theatre, spread 
to the stage and completely destroyed the 
scenery loft, the stage, scenery and all 
equipment. Manager Harlow Byerly's 
office, two pianos, the drummers' traps and 
an extensive musical library were also con- 
sumed by the flames. The asbestos curtain 
protected the auditorium of the theatre 
and it was not greatly damaged. Manager 
Byerly at once secured the use of the 
Broadway Theatre, and while the firemen 
were still fighting the flames of the Colo- 
nial he opened for the first evening per- 
formance. 

WARRENS TO TAKE REST 

Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. 8. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Perce Warren, who closed the season 
with Ed C. Nutt's Comedy Players 
(Northern), are here after visiting with 
Mrs. C. E. Rettig, Shreveport, La., and 
W. F. Dransfield and Emma Warren, 
Clay City, III. They will spend the winter 
in this city. 

LEAGUE POSTPONES MATINEE 

The special matinee performance of 
scenes from famous American dramas an- 
nounced for this week under the auspices 
of the Drama League have been postponed 
because of the inability of Arthur Hop- 
kins to obtain a theatre with adequate 
accommodation for the large amount of 
scenery necessary. A final date will be an- 
nounced as soon as a theatre has been ac- 
quired. 

Central Fibre Wardrobe 

$30.00 

FfHlbtlK 

average $50.00 

wardribt aid 

mum 

CBTntAL TRUHK 
FACTOIT 

SIMONS at CO. 

701) ARCH St. 

PHTLA. 




HIP. BALLET CLASS TO CONTINUE 

The retirement of Anna Pavlowa from 
the Hippodrome program Jan. 20, when 
her twenty weeks' contract expires, will 
not affect the plans of the Hippodrome 
Free Ballet Class, which Pavlowa baa 
been conducting. These classes will be 
continued and made a permanent feature. 



TOY'S COMPANY CELEBRATES 

• Marietta, 0., Jan. 7. — Ben Toy's 
Musical Comedy Co. passed their fifth 
Christmas here, where they had their usual 
big-lime Christmas evening. Many beau- 
tiful and costly presents were exchanged. 
Manager Toy gave each member of the 
company a gold piece in addition to his 
salary. On Christmas day the annual din- 
ner was held at the Wakefield Hotel covers 
being laid for the fourteen members of 
the company. Roster of the company : 
Mr. and Mrs. Benj. Toy; Grace Farnum, 
prima donna ; Flynn and Stanley, novelty 
dancers; Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Jaquins 
(•oldie Mantel], Eva Scbmoed, Gertrude 
Pest, Lillian Bedford, Moret Bodine, Wil- 
bur Braun and Irving Gold. The company 
lias not lost a day's work since the opening 
of the season, and has been more than 
making good, having many return dates 
ahead of them already booked. 



MINNIE PALMER ACTING AGAIN 

Jersey City, N. J., Jan. 6. — Minnie 
Palmer, at one time one of the our most 
popular comediennes, appeared at the Ma- 
jestic Theatre as Mrs. Mutt in "Mutt and 
Jeff." John R. Rogers, Miss Palmer's 
former manager and former husband, sat 
in the front row and applauded vigorously. 



REYNOLDS HAS NEW JOB 

William B. Reynolds, who has been as- 
sociated as press representative with Corey 
and Riter, is to join the staff of John D. 
Williams. Reynolds has for a number of 
years been a member of Cbarles Frohman's 
staff. 



PIPE ORGAN FOR NEW AVON 

Decatur, 111., Jan. 8. — The New Avon 
Theatre has installed a pipe organ. 



DEATHS 



CHARLES A. POUCHOT, a theatrical 
manager, died at his home In this city last 
week. Mr. Pouchot booked many American 
acts on foreign vaudeville circuits and 
brought European acta to this country. Ho 
was formerly associated with the Mat-Ion- 
elllt Agency. 



GEORGE MORTON, 68 years old, died 
last week at the Actors' Fund Home on 
Staten Island. He was one of the last sur- 
viving members of the famous Booth & 
Barrett Company. He Is survived by his 
wife, Ada Morton, who was also well 
known on the stage twenty-five years ago. 
Mr. Morten has been associated with such 
stars as Adelaide N'eilson. Sir Charles 
Wyndham and Joseph Jefferson. His last 
engagement was with Dustm Farnum in 

"The Vlrsrlnlan," In 1908. Almost imme- 
diately thereafter he went to the home on 
Staten Island, for which he had always 
been an ardent worker. 



GEORGE WOLFF CHRISTY, who. dur- 
ing his early life, was connected with the 
late Tony Pastor. Billy Emerson. Dan 
Rice, and others, died Dec 3 at Beauvolr. 
Miss., aged seventy-nine years. He was 
also a clown with the late John Lolo on 
the Adam Forepaugh shows a score or 
more years ago. 



JOE HERZOG, one of the leading contra 
'.enors In minstrelsy and vaudeville, died 
recently In a St. Louts hospital, at the 
age of thirty-four years. 



ERIC BLIND, who portrayed the role of 
Mr. Jarvls In "Grumpy" with Cyril Maude, 
died Dec. SI at the Reading: Hospital. Read- 
ing, Pa., from pneumonia. 



GAIETY BtM^S 

^■•TaVaaaVJ * » Wed. * oat at «.«t 

■WQtCHELL SMITH and JOHN I~ OOLSXB 



T i es ea t tba 



TURN TO THE RIGHT 

By Maasre. BUnltb sad Haaaara. 



V/Vr*%. M. ou^, .am. pw ixaataa at— 

UPSTAIRS .DOWN 

BY ruEDEHlC A FANNY HATT0N 



COHAN & HARRIS S~~ 

Phoaa Bryant S344 

srraa. «.to. Mats. Wed. * Sat. !.». 

OOHAB ft HanMtTr! praaaat 

CAPTAIN KIDD, JR. 

A rmreleal adrantsra by Blda Joaaaoa T< 



wart aid e« 



REPUBLIC 

Brea. 8.20. Hats. Wad. A Bat. IJo. 

iitote Honmii s aa n a l a 

GOOD GRACIOUS ANN ABELLE 



A New Play by Clara Kcaacaar. 



b. r. rxmrs 

PALACE 

Broadwaj A tilt. St. 

Mat. Dally at X P. M. 

38. 60 and 75c. 

Ivarr Blgbt 

ss-so-Ts-tt-n.se 



LOUIS XAHM. BZB8XK 
OLATT0K, "OHIO" 
SALE, Anna Wbeatoa A 
Harry Carroll. Claire 
Rochester, Meae. Dane's 
Celebrities, Ciaa. Absara 
Troupe. Tata's Motoring. 
Isblkawa Bretaert, Falao* 

News Pictorial. 



nri *crA *ost «4tb M. Bras. IM 

DLL/UtU Mats. Tbara. * bat. at S.S8 

David BBLASOO i nn ate 

FRANCES STARR 

In a refreshingly new comedy 

"LITTLE LADY IN BLUE" 



KNICKERBOCKER ERfHAT 



Klaw A Crli 



Erlaaser 

DAVID BZZABOO pTaseatl 

DAVID WARFIELD 

la Us wwM-noawaed «»••"■•._ 
THE MUSIC MASTER 
Beats 4 weeks ahead, 

eltinci ™^K*.d?^.. , ^" tM • 

a. H. WOODS praaaatt 

CHEATING CHEATERS 

B y MAX MA»C1H. 

HIPPODROME 

HiNiflHINT CHaHLBS DIIXlMOHAlf 
Nlgbt* at S.1S-. Mat. errary day. S.U. 
••THE BUS SHOW" 

STAGED BTB.IL BDBHBTDB 

With tka lDcc.mper.bJ- PAVLOW A 

wsrer io» i mammoth i 100 NOVsTURaa 

BAXurr I MlrlBTBBIA I 1000 PBOrL* 

Wea-leVe atpeat show at lowest peseaa. 

HUDSON evvun zr- tu - 

KLAW A wwT.awnwn ua e a eat 

ELSIE FERGUSON 

SlIIKLbl Ml «a 

By HDXBZXT rOOTBEJt. 

GEO. rVf . TSZATBX B'WAT • «BI 

cohan's "• ^aiyr 

II-AW * gBLANOBB 



RUTH CHATTERT0N 

aad Company, lorlodloc Bmee MrBar. to 

"COME OUT OF THE KITCHEN" 



EWkM nine B'wriy. 40 St. Errs. R.». 
iVl rlKCl Mate. Wed. A Sat. 2.SO. 

MAUDE a f kiss 

ADAMS CINDERELLA 

J. M. BARRIE'S GREATEST TRIUMPH. 

COLUMBIA THEATRE 

0WAY. tTtb STBEXT. N. Y. 

Billy Watson's Big Show 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 



Route* Mint Roach ThU Office Not Later 

Than Saturday 

Adams, Maude (Cbas. Frohman, Inc., mars.) 
-Empire, New York, tadef. 

Arthur, Jalia — Criterion, New York, 'T*dyf, 
"Alone at Last" ' — Majestic, Brooklyn, 8-13 ; 

Springfield. Mass.. 17-18. 
'•Anna and the Girl" — Indianapolis, 11-18. 
Bernhardt, Sarah — Charleston, 8. CL 18. 
"Big Show, The" (Cbas. B. DUtagham, 

mgr.) — Hip.. New York, lndef. 
"Ben Hur" — Manhattan o. H., New York, 8- 

18 ; Hartford, Conn., 16-20. 
"Boomerang, The" (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

Powers', Chicago, lndef. 
"Broadwny After Dark" (National Prod- Co., 
Inc., mgrs.) — Clearfield, Va, 10; Da Bole, 
11; Barneskoro, 12: Johnstown, 18-15; 
Lewlstown, 16; Snnbury, 17; Milton, 18; 
BloomsbarK. 19 : Plttston. 20. 
"Belle of Are. A" (C M. Maxwell, mgr.)— 
Cairo, W. Va.. 10 ; West Union, 11 ; Penna- 
boro. 13: Oakland, Md, 13; Frostburg, 
13 ; Myersdale, Va., 16 ; Smlthon, 17 ; Con- 
nellsvllle. 18 ; Unlontown, 19 ; Latrobe, 20. 
Collier, Wm. (H. H. Frazee, mgr.)— Long- 
acre, New York, lndef. 
Clarke. Harry Corson and Margaret Dale 

Owen — Calcutta, India, lndef. 
Clifford, Billy "Single"— Jackson, Miss., 11; 
Flattlesbuix. 12 : McComb. 13 : Baton 
Rouge, La.. 14 : Plaquemlme. IB ; Napoleon- 
vllle. 16 : Honma, 17 : Morgan City, 18 ; 
Franklin, 19; New Iberia, 20. 
"Cheating Cheaters*' (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 

Eltlnge. New York, lndef. 
"Come Out of the Kitchen" (Klaw A Er- 
langer A Henry Miller, mgrs.) — Cohan's, 
New York, lndef. 
"Century Girl, The" — Century, New York 

lndef. 
"Capt. Ktdd. Jr." (Cohan A Harris, mgrs.) — 

Cohan A Harris, New York, lndef. 
"Cohan Revue 1916" (Cohan A Harris, 

mgrs.) — Forrest, Phlla., 8-20. 
Dunn. Emma (Lee Kneel, mgr.) — Thirty- 
ninth Street New York, lndef. 
Ditrlchsteln. Leo (Cohan A Harris, mgrs.) — 

Garrick. Phlla.. 8, lndef. 
"Daddy Long Lees" — Toronto, Can., 15-20. 
"Don't TeU My Wife" (Miles Berry, mgr.) — 
Palisade. Neb.. 10 : Wauneta. 11 : Impe- 
rial. 12-18: Cambridge, 15-16. 
"Don't Tell My Wife," Eastern Co. (Tbos. 
Alton, msrr.l — Sycamore. O.. 12: Plymouth, 
13 ; Wellington. 15 : Lodl, 16 : Orrvllle, 17 ; 
Mlllershurg. 18 : Coshocton, 19 : Dresdon. 
20. 
Eltlnge, Julian — Montauk. Bklyn.. 15-20. 
"Everyweman" (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — 
Denver. 7-13 ; Victor, 14 : Colorado Springs. 
15: Pueblo. 17; Canon City. 18: Rock 
Ford. 19: La Junta, 20. 
"Experience" (Elliott Comstoek A Gest. 

nigra. > — San Francisco. 8-13. 
"Experience." Elliott, Comstoek & Gest, 

mgrs.) — Belasco. Washington, 15-20. 
"End of a Perfect Day" (Gaskell A Mac- 
Vltty. Inc.. mgrs.)— Elgin, 111.. 11-13: 
Kenosha, Wis., 14. 
Faversham. Wm. — Booth, New York, lndef. 
Fenmson. Elsie — Hudson. New York, lndef. 
Flske Mrs. (Corley A Rlter. Inc., mgrs.) — 

Broad. Phlla., lndef. 
"Fslr nnd Warmer" (Selwyn A Co.. mgrs.) — 

Cort Chicago, lndef. 
"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn A Co., mgrs.) — 
National. Washington, 8-13: Academy. 
Baltimore. 15-20. 
"Flame. The" (Richard Walton TuUy. mgr.) 

— Ford's. Baltimore. 8-13. 
"Freckles," Western Co. (Broadway Amuse. 
Co.. mgrs.) — Holbraok. Colo- 10: Hol- 
dredge. 13 : Franklin, 13 ; Superior, 16 ; 
Belleville, Kan.. 17 : Topeka, 19-20. 
"Freckles." Eastern Co. (Broadway Amuse- 
Co.. mgrs.) — West Grove. Pa., 10: Bed 
Uon. 11 : Waynesboro, 12 ; Front Royal. 
Vs.. IS: Berryvllle. 15: Hagerstown. Md.. 
18: Cumberland. 17: Keyser. W. Va, 18: 
Piedmr.nt. 19. 
George. Grace — Plymouth, Boston, lndef. 
Graham. Oscar (Oscar Graham, mgr.) — 
Runce. Tex.. 10: Alice. 11-12: Bishop. IS: 
Mc Allen. 15: Mission. 16: San Benito, 17: 
KIngsvIlle. 18: Port Savaca, 19: Goliad, 
20. 
"Good Gracious Annabelle (Arthur Hopkins. 

mgr.l — Repabllc, New York, lndef. 
"Gambler's Al!" (Percy Burton, mgr.) — 

Miixlne Elliott New York, lndef. 
Held. Anna — Casino. New York, lndef. 
Holmes, Taylor — Hartford. Conn.. 10; Spring- 
field. Mass, 12-13. 
Halo*. Mitsl (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — 

Colonial. Boston, 8-20. 
Hodge. Wm. — Princess, Chicago, lndef. 
"Her Soldier Boy" (The Sbnberts, mgrs.) — 

Astor. New York, lndef. 
"His Bridal Night," with Dolly Sisters (A. 
H. Woods, mgr.) — Olympic. Chicago, lndef. 
"Himse of Glass, The." with Mary Ryan 

(Cohan A Harris, mgrs.). 
"Her Hatband's Wife" (Henry Miller, mgr.) 

— "Lvcenm. New York. 8. lndef. 

"In Old Kentucky" (Rowland. Clifford. Gatta. 

Inc.. mgrs.)— Kankakee. HI™ 11: Terre 

Haute. Ind.. 12 : TSvansvllIe. 13-14 : Owena- 

boro. Kv_ 15: Henderson. 16: Paducah. 17. 

"Ikev and Abev (Geo. H. Bubo, mer.) — Nor- 

wav. Is.. 10: Tipton. 11: Stanwood. 12: 

Olin. 13 : Keystone. 14 : Traer. 15 : Dows. 

10: Eaele Grove. 17: Jewell. 19: Hampton. 

in : Waterloo. 20. 

"Justice" (John D. Williams, mgr.) — Albany, 

N. Y_ 13: Newark. N. J.. 15-20. 
"Just a Woman" — Indianapolis. 8-13. 
"Kstlnka" (Arthur Hammerstetn. mgr.) — 

Memphis. Tenn, 18-21. 
"little Peeev O'Moore." Easton Co. (Na- 
tinral Prod. Co, Ine- mcrs.i — Twin Falls. 
Idaho. 10: Buhl. 11: Preston. 12: Downey. 
IS: Loc*n. Utah. 15: Smlthfleld. 18: Rich- 
mond. 17: Salt Lake City. 1S-20. 





"Little Cafe, The" (Philip H. Nlven. mgr.) — 
Salisbury, N. C 10 : Greensboro, 11 ; Dor- 
bam, 12; Petersburg, Va., 13; Newport 
News, 15; Norfolk, 16-17; Richmond, 18; 
Charlottesville, 19; Staunton. 20. 

"Love o' Mike" (Elisabeth Marbury, mgr.) — 
Alvln, Pittsburgh, 8-18; Shubert, New 
York, 15, Indet _ . 

Mantell. Bobcrt — Belasco, Washington, 8-13. 

"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 
mgr.) — Playhouse. New York, lndef. 

"Miss Springtime" (Klaw A Erlanger, mgrs.) 
— New Amsterdam. New York, lndef. 

"Merry Wives of Windsor" (Bylvio Heln, 
mgr.) — Park, New York, lndef. 

"Montana" (Bankson A Morris, mgrs.) — 
Portalea, N. Mer, 10; Bo swell, 11; Ar- 
teala. 12; Carlsbad, 18. 

"Million Dollar Doll/ 5 Easton Co. (Harvey 
D. Orr. mgr.) — Winchester. Va, 10; Hag- 
erstown, Md., 11 ; Cumberland. 12-13 ; Key- 
ser, W. Va.. 16: Parsons, 16; Elkina, 17: 
Oakland. Md-. 18: Fairmoimt, W. Va„ 19; 
Unlontown, Pa., 20. 

"Mother Love (A. G. Delamater, mgr.) — 
Kingston, Can.. 10; BrockvUIe, 11; Ot- 
tawa, 12-18; Montreal. 15-20. 

O'Hara, Flake — Montana, Bklyn. 8-13. 

"Oh 1 Oh 1 Delphlne !" — Springfield. Mass., 19- 
20. _ 

"Other Man's Wife." Eastern Co. (Victor E. 

Lambert, mgr.) — Seneca Falls, N. Y, 10; 
Geneva, 11 ; Palmyra, IS ; Watertown, 18 ; 
Rome. 15; Amsterdam, 16; Schenectady, 
16: Mechanlcsville, 18; Glen Falls, 19; 
Rutland, Vt, 20. ^ 

"Pierrot the Prodigal" (Wlnthrop Ames and 
Walter Knight mgrs.) — Little. New York, 
tadef. _ .- 

"Pair of Queens" — Altoona, Pa, 13. 

"Potash A Perlmutter in 8oclety" (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — Nixon, Pittsburgh, 8-18. 

Starr, Frances (David Belasco, mgr.) — Bt- 
lasco, New York, lndef. 

Stahl, Rose (Cbas. Frohman, Inc, mgr.) — 
Augusta. Gl, 10 : Atlanta, 11-13 : Bir- 
mingham, Ala.. 15; Montgomery, 16; Mo- 
bile, 17: Meridian, Miss., 18; Vlcksburg, 
19: Natchez, 20. _ _ . 

Sanderson-Bryan-Cawthorn — Grand. Cincin- 
nati, 8-13 ; Nixon. Pittsburgh. 15-20. 

Sotbern — E. H. — Blackstone, Chicago, lndef. 

Skinner, Otis (Cbas. Frohman, Inc., mgrs.) — 
Springfield. Mass.. 10 ; New Haven, Conn., 
11: Hartford. 12-13: Albany. N. Y, 15; 
Schenectady, 16 ; Syracuse, 17-18 ; Roches- 
ter. 19-20. 

"So Long Letty" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 
Shubert. New York, 8-18 : Albany. 18-20. 

"Snow of Wonders, The" (The Shuberts, 
mgrs.) — Winter Garden. New York, lndef. 

"Seven Chances" — Shubert, Bklyn.. 8-13. 

"Sonny South" (J. C. Rockwell, mgr.) — 
Edgerton, Wis.. 10 : Stoughton. 11 : Elk- 
horn, 12 ; Brodhead. 13 ; Bhullsburg, 15 ; 
PtattevlUe, 17; Lancaster, 18; Darlington, 
19, Lodi. 20. 

"Step Lively" — Mt- Carmel. Pa.. 10: Lans- 
ford, 11 : Shenandoah, 12 : Honesdale, 13. 

Tavlor. Laurette (Klaw A Erlanger A Geo. 
C. Tyler, mgrs.) — Globe. New York, lndef. 
The 13th Chair" — Forty-eighth Street New 
York, lndef. 

"Turn to the Right" (Smith A Golden, mgrs.) 
— Gaiety, New York, lndef. 

"Treasnre Island" (Cbas. Hopkins, mgr.) — 
Punch A Judy. New York. 8-13. 

"This Is the Life" (Independent Amuge Co., 
mgrs.) — Lead. S. Dak.. 10 : Rapid City. 11 : 
Edgemont 12 : Crawford, Neb., 13 ; Al- 
liance. 15: 8ldney. 16. 

"Twin Beds" (A. S. Stern A Co.. mgrs.) — 
San Francisco. 7-13. 

"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 
— Cort. New York, lndef. 
"TJncbastened Woman, The" (Oliver Mor- 
osco, mgr.) — Wilbur. Boston. lndef. 

"Very Good Eddie" (Marbury. Comstoek Co, 
rajrrs.) — Adelphl. Phlla., lndef. 

Washington So.. Players — Comedy, New York, 
lndef. 

Warfteld. David (David Belasco. mgr.) — 
Knickerbocker, New York, lndef. 

Wilson. AL H. (Sidney R. Ellis, mgr.) — 
Johnstown. Pa.. 10 : Tarenrnm. 11 : Frank- 
lin. 12: Oil City. 13: Salamanca, N. Y, 
18: Olean, 19: Elmlra, 20. 

"Watch Your Step" (Chaa B. Dillingham, 
mgr.) — Memphis. Tenn.. 12-13. 

"When Dreams Come True" (Courts A Ten- 
nis, mgrs.) — Emporium, Pa.. 10; St 
Mary's. 11 : Ridgeway. 12 : Warren. Pa., 
13: Kane. 16: Johnsburg. 16: Dn Bols, 
17; Punxsatawnev. 18: Clearfield. 19. 

"Yellow Jacket The" — Harris. New York, ln- 
def. 

"Ztecfeld's Follies" — Illinois, Chicago, lndef. 

International Circuit 

"Broadway After Dark" — Bronx, New York. 

8-13 
"Brinsring Up Father" — Kansas City. Mo, 

7-18 : Bovd's. Omaha, Neb, 14-20. 
"Brlnsnog Up Father" — Castle Sq~ Boston, 

8-13. 
"Come Back to Erin" — Lexington, New 

York, 8-13. 
"Daughter of Mother Machree" — American, 

8t Louis. 8-13. _ 

Ellnore. Kate — Poll's, Washington, 8-la. 
"For the Man She Loved" — Pittsburgh. 8-18. 
"Girl Without a Chance" — Worcester. Mass. 

8-13 
-Gus Hill's Follies" — Detroit R-13. 
"Hour of Temptation" — Memphis, Tenn.. 8- 

13; New Orleans, La., 15-20. 
"Jerry" — Jersey City. N. J, 8-13. 
^Little Girl God Forgot" — Toledo. O., 7-18: 

Detroit Mich.. 14-20. 
"Mutt ft Jeff's Wedding" — Paterson, N. J, 

R-13 
"Mutt" A Jeff's Wedding" — Nashville, Tenn.. 

8-13. 



"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" — 
Gotham, Bklyn., 8-13. 

"My Mother's Rosary" — Grand O. H., 
Bklyn., 8-13. 

"Old Homestead, The" — Walnnt, Phlla, 8-18. 

"Pedro, the Italian" — Orphenm, Phlla,, 8-18. 

"Pretty Baby" — New Orleans, 8-13. 

Thurston — Birmingham, Ala, 8-13; Rich- 
mond. Va, 15-20. 

"That Other Woman" — National, Chicago, 
8-13. 

Welch, Joe — Indianapolis, 8-13. 

"Which One Shall 1 Marry" — Walnnt, Phlla., 
15-20. 

STOCK AND REPERTOIRE ROUTES 

Permanent and Travelm* 

Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass., lndef. 
Alcazar Players — San Francisco, 8-18 ; sea- 
son closes. 

American Players — Spokane, Wash., Index. 

Academy Players— Halifax. N. 8, Can, ln- 
def. 

Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass, lndef. 

AU Star Stock — New Bedford, Mass, lndef. 

An cell Stock (Joe Angell. mgr.) — Park, 
Pittsburgh, lndef. 

Angell Stock No. 2 (Ike Jntras, mgr.) — 
8harp8burg, Pa„ lndef. 

Angell's Comedians (Blllle O. Angell. mgr.) — 

Guerdon. -Ark., 8-13. 
Austin. Mildred, Stock — Bir m i ng ha m . Ala, 

lndef. . . . 

Balnbrldge Players — Minneapolis,, lndef. 
Burbank Players — Los Angeles, lndef. 
Broadway Players — -Portsmouth, O, lndef. 
Bayley, J. Wiflard, Players— Belolt, Wis, In- 

Blve, Browne, Bep. Co. (Jack Moore, mgr.) — 
Newark, O., lndef. _ _ ,_. 

Bishop, Chester, Players — Grand Rapids. 
Mich, lndef. _ ^ . ._ 

Coburn-Pearson Players — St Cloud. Minn., 
lndef. 

Denham Stock — Denver, lndef. 

Dubinsky Stock (Ed. Dnbinsky, mgr.) — St 
Joseph, Mo, lndef. _ _. 

Dally. Ted, Stock — Hutchinson, Kan., lndef. 

Demlng, Lawrence, Theatre Co. — 8herldan, 
Wyo, indet _ . . . 

Elsmere Stock — Elsmere, Bronx, lndef . 

Eckhardt. OUver. Players — Begins, Sask.. 
Can, iodef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell, Mass., lndef. 

Empire Players — Salem, Mass, lndef. 

Empire Players (C A. Mcnghe, mgr.) — 
Pittsburgh. Pa, lndef. . 

Fifth Ave. Stock (Jacques E. Horn, mgr.) — 
Fifth Ave, Bklyn, lndef. _ 

Fleming, Alice, Stock — Portland, Ore., lndef. 

Gordlnler Bros. Stock— Ft Dodge, la, indet. 

Gibney, Marlon, Stock — Oak Park, HI, lndef. 

Hyperion Players — New Haven, Conn, lndef. 

Hathaway Players — Brockton, Mass, lndef. 

Hippodrome Players (Dave Hellman, mgr.) — 
Falnnoont, W. Va, 8-13. 

Harper Players, No. 2 Co. (Robert J. Sher- 
man, mgr.) — Ft Huron, Mich, lndef. 

Home, CoL F. V, Stock — Akron. O, lndef. 

HUIman Ideal Stock (Harry Sohns, mgr.)— 
Axtell, Kan, 11-13 ; Centralla, 15-17 : 
Frankford, 18-20. __. i. . 

Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, ln- 

Kelth's Hudson Theatre Stock — Union HBl, 
N. J, lndef. --. - ... 

Kelly Bros. Stock — Lansing, Mich, lndef. 

Knickerbocker Stock (Geo. Barbler, mgr.) — 
Knickerbocker. PhUa., lndef. 

Klrke. Kitty. 8tock — Portsmouth, O, Jndef. 

Lawrence. Del, Stock— San Franclaco. lndef. 

Ludlow, Wanda, Playera — Covington, Ky, ln- 
def. 

Lyric Theatre, Bto<* — ^Pttoenlj. Arix, lndef. 

Lbgsdon. Oily. Stock— Lancaster. Pa, todef. 

Lonergan Players (E. V. Phelan, mgr.)— 
Lynn. Mass, lndef. 

Lewis A OUver Stock (Jack Lewis, mgr.) — 
Kankakee, 111, lndef 

Morosco Stock— Los Angeles, lndef. 

Mozart Players (Jay Packard, mgr.) — Elmlra, 

National Musical Stock (C. B. Hagedorn. 

mgr.)— Detroit. Mich, tadef. „,__^ 

National Stock (F. B. Cole, mgr.)— Minne- 

Ne^U^PUyers— Jefferson City. Mo, lndef. 
Northampton Players — Northampton, Mass, 

Orphenm Players— Reading, **-*■**£.„.-. 

Oliver, Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace. 
mgr.) — Lafayette. Ind.. lndef. 

Overholser Stock— Okla City, Okla., tadef. 

Princess Stock— Sioux City, la, lndef. 

Park Opera Co.— Park, St. Louis, lndef. 

Plavers Stock — Players, St Louis, lndef. 

Park. Edna, Btoek— Tampa, Fla, lndef. 

Poll Stock — Scranton. Pa, lndef. 

Spooner. Cecil. Stock — Lawrence, Mass, ln- 
def 

Shubert Stock— Milwaukee, lndef. 

Shubert Stock— St Paul, lndef. 

Somerville Theatre Players — Somervllle, 

St^CUlr. Winifred. Stock (Earl 81pe. ragt.) 

— Paterson. N. J, lndef. _ ,^ ., _ 

Shnbert A Williams 8tock — Waltham, Mass, 

Temple' Stock— St Wayne, Ind, lndef. 
Turner-Hammond Players (Jim Hammond. 

mgr.) — New London, Conn, lndef. 
Van Dyke A Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.)— 

Tulsa. Okla, lndef. ... 

Wilkes Players— Seattle. Wash, lndef. 
Wilkes Players — 8alt Lake City. Utah, lndef. 
Wallace. Chester. Players — Butler, Pa, lndef. 
Wallace, Morgan, Players — Sioux City, la, 

S-13 
Wilcox" Stock— Mt Vernon, N. Y, indet 
Wlllls-Wood 8tock — Kansas CItv. Mo, lndef. 
Wsdsworth 8tock — Manchester, N. H, 8-13. 
Williams. Ed, Stock — Omaha. Neb, lndef. 



Williams. Ed, Stack— Elkhart Ind, indet 
Wight Bros, Theatre Co. (Hllllard Wight 
mgr.) — Decatur. Neb, 8-18: Pender. 16-20. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

Deloy's Dainty Do dines (Eddie Deloy, mgr.). 

Enterprise Stock (Norsand Hilyard, mgr.) — 

Enterprise Btock, No. 2 Co. (Norman Hil- 
yard, mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. 

Hyatt A Le Nore Miniature M. C. Co. (L. H. 
Hyatt, mgr.) — London, Can, lndef. 

Hall, Billy, M. C Co. — Lowell, Mass, 1-6. 

Kligare'a Comedians — Cincinnati, O, tadef. 

Lord A Vernon M. C Co. — Clarksburg, W. 
Va, indet _ 

Maxwell A Shaw Tab. (Bob Shaw, mgr.) — 
Chester, Pa, 8-13. _ 

March's M. C. Co. — Lebanon, Pa, 7-18 : 
Dover, N. J„ 15-20. 

Rellly's, Fox, Globe Trotters — Bluefleld, W. 
Va, 8-13. . ^^ 

Snb-Marlne Girls (Merserean Bros, mgrs.) — 
Amarillo, Tex, 8-18. 

Shaffer's, AL, Boys and Girls — Nassau, Ba- 
hama Islands, 8-18. 

Stewart, Walter J, Stock (Stewart A Good- 
win, mgrs.) — Chicago, indet 

Boladar, Chaa, A Brtokley Girls— Hopewell. 
Va, 8-18; Lynchburg, 15-20. 

Tabarin Girls (Da've Newman, mgr.). 

Topsey Turvey GlrU (KeUy A Artyn, mgrs.) 
—Oil City, Pa, 13 ; Warren, 16 : Kane, 
16 ; Johnsonbnrg, 17 ; St Marys, 18 ; Em- 
porium, 19 ; Henova. 20. 

Walker Musical A Lady Minstrels— Klnston, 
15-17; Goldsboro, 1820; Wilmington N. C, 
8-13 

Zarrow's American Girl — AsheviUe, N. C 
8-13 

Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Fuquay. 
mgr.) — Newport News, Va, 8-13. 

Zarrow's Variety Review (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 
—Clarksburg, W Va., 8-13. ■ _ , 

Zarrow's Passing Revue (Wm. Hill, mgr.) — 
Pittsburgh, 8-13. 

BURLESQUE 

Colombia, Wheel 
Al Reeves' Bta Beauty Show — Columbia, Chi- 
cago, 8-13 ; Gaiety, Detroit, 15-20. 
Behman Show — Star A Garter, Chicago, 8-13 ; 

Berchel. Des Moines, Iowa, 15-17. ' 

Ben Welch's — Corinthian, Rochester. N. Y, 

8-13: Bastable, Syracuse, 15-17; Lemberg, 

Utlca, 18-20. , ._ „ . 

Bon Tons — Lemberg, Utlca, 11-13 ; Gaiety. 

Montreal. Can, 15-20. 
Bostonlans — Casino, Brooklyn, 8-13; Empire, 

Newark. N. J, 15-20. ___„. 

Bowery Burlesque™ — Palace, Baltimore, 8-13; 

Gaiety, Washington, D. C, 15-20. • 
Burlesque Review — Gaiety. Waahlnetou, D. C, 

8-13; Gaiety, Pittsburg, Pa, 15-20. 
Follies of the Day — Grand, Hartford, Ct, 

8-13: Jacques, Waterbury, Ct, 15-20. 
Globe Trotters — Berchel. Des Moines. Iowa. 

7-9: Gaiety. Omaha. Neb, 15-20. 
Golden Crooka^ — Empire, Albany. N. Y, 8-13: 

Casino, Boston. lo-20. 



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afafl OrAsra FlOsd Sams Day 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



H astings Show — Cohen's, Pongbkee pale, 11-18 ; 

HurtU & Seamoa's. New York. 1W0. 
"Hello, New York"— Gaiety, kansaa CUT, 

8-18 ; Gaiety, St. Loois, 16-20. 
Hip- HId- Hooray Girls— Empire, Newark, N. J., 

8-13; Casino. Philadelphia, 1S-20. 
Howe's Kissing Girls — Colonial. Providence, 

K. L, 8-18 : Gaiety, Boston, 15-20. 
Irwin's Bl« Show— Empire. Boboken, N. J, 

8-13; People's, Philadelphia, 16-20. 
Uberty Girls — Gaiety, Boston, 8-18; Colum- 
bia, New York, 15-20. 
Maids of America — Empire, Toledo. 0_ 8-13 : 

Lyric, Dayton, 0„ 15-20. 
Majesties — Orpbeam, Paterson, N. J_ 8-18 ; 

Empire, Hoboken, N. J., 15-20. 
Marlon's Big Show — Empire, Brooklyn. 8-13 : 

Park, Bridgeport, 18-20. 
Merry Rounders — Olympic, Cincinnati, 8-18 ; 

Columbia. Chicago, 15-20. 
Midnight Maidens— Gaiety, Detroit, 8-13; 

Gaiety, Toronto, Can., 15-20. 
Million Dollar Dolls — Gaiety, Toronto. Ont„ 

8-18; Gaiety. Buffalo. N. Y.. 16-20. 
MoUy Williams' Show — Bronx, New York, 

8-13; Orpheum, Paterson, 15-20. 
New York Girls — Casino, Philadelphia, 8-13 ; 

Miner's Bronx, New York, 16-20. 
"Posa Puss" — Gaiety, Buffalo, N. Y., 8-13; 

Corinthian, Rochester, N. Y„ 15-20. 
Rae Doll in Bagland — Lyric, Dayton, O., 

8-18; Olympic, Cincinnati, 15-20/ 
Roseland Girls — Jacques, Waterbnry, Conn., 

8-18 ; Cohen's, Newbnrg. N. Y., 15-17 ; 

Cohen's, Poughkeepsle. 18-20. 
Rose Sydell London Belles — Gaiety, Mon- 
treal, Can., 8-13; Empire, Albany, N. Y., 

Sldmau's Show — Gaiety. St Louis, Mo.. 

8-18 ; 8tar and Garter, Chicago, 16-20. 
Sightseers — Gaiety. Omaha, Nebr., 8-13 ; open. 

13-20: Gaiety, Kansas City, 22-27. ^^ 

Some Show — Park, Bridgeport, Ct~ 11-18: 

Colonial, Providence, B, I., 16-20. 
Spiegel's Revue — Star. Cleveland, O..- 8-13: 

Empire, Toledo, O., 15-20. 
Sporting Widows — Peoples. Philadelphia, 

8-13; Palace. Baltimore, 15-20. 
Star and Garter — Casino. Boston, 8-18 : 

Grand, Hartford, Cfc, 15-20. 
Step Lively Girts — H. 4 S., New York. 8-13 ; 

Empire, Brooklyn, 15-20. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Open, 8-13; Gal,- 

ety, Kansas City. 15-20. 
Watson's Beef Trust — Columbia, New York, 

8-13: Casino, Brooklvn, 16-20. 
Watgon-Wrothe— Gaiety, Pittsburgh. 8-13 ; 

Star. Cleveland, O., 15-20. 

American Circuit 

Americans — Englewood. Chicago, Jan. 8-13:- 

Gaiety, Milwaukee, 15-20. 
Auto Girls — MaJeBtlc. Scranton, Pa.. 8-18: 

Gaiety. Brooklyn, 15-20. 

Beauty. Youth and Folly — Wllkesbarre. 10-13 : 

South Bethlehem, 15: Easton, 16; Trenton, 

N. J.. 18-20. 
Bl«r Review of 1917 — Olympic, New York, 

8-13: Majestic, Scranton. Pa., 15-20. 
Broadway Belles — Howard. Boston, 8-13 : 

New Bedford, Mass., 15-17; Worcester. 

18-20. 
Charming Widows — Academy. Jersey City, 

8-13; Trocadero, Philadelphia, 15-20. 
Cherry Blossoms — Gaiety. Baltimore, 8-13 ; 

Gaiety. Philadelphia. 15-20. 
Darlings of Paris — Century. Kansas City, 

8-13: Standard, St. Louis, Mo.. 15-20. 
Follies of Pleasure — Layoff, 11-13; Star, 

Brooklyn, N. Y.. 15-20. 
French Frolics — Holyoke, Mass., 8-10 : Spring- 
field, 11-13 : Howard, Boston, 15-20. 
Frolics of 1916 — Standard. St. Louis. Mo., 

8-13 : Englewood. Chicago. 15-20. 
Ginger Girls — Empire, Cleveland, O., 8-18: 

Erie. Pa.. 15-16; Ashtabula, O., 17; Park, 

Youngstown, O.. 18-20. 
Girls from Jovland — Open, 8-13 ; Englewood. 

Chicago. 15-20. 
Girls from the Follies — Gaiety, Minneapolis. 
8-13; Star, St. Paul, Minn., 15-20. 



Grown Dp Babies — Gaiety, Chicago, 8-13; 

Majestic, Indianapolis, 15-20. 
Hello GUU — Gaiety. Philadelphia. 8-13; 

Olympic New York, 15-20. 
Hello Paris— Lyceum, Columbus. O., 8-13; 

Newark, «., 15: Zanesvllle, 16; Canton, 

17 ; Akron, 18-20. 
High Life Girls — Trocadero. Philadelphia, 

8-13; ML Carmel. Pa., 15; Shenandoah, 

16; Wllkesbarre. 18-20. 
Lady Buccaneers — Akron, 11-13 ; Empire, 

Cleveland. O., 8-18. 
Lid Lifters — Terre Haute, Ind., 8-10; Gaiety, 

Chicago, 15-20. 
Military Maids— Buckingham. Louisville, 8-18 ; 

Lyceum, Columbus. O., 15-20. 
Mischief Makers— Hudson, 8chenectady. N. 

v., 10-13; Blnghamtoo. N. Y.. 15-16: 

Oneida. 17; International, Niagara Falls, 

18-20. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Worcester. 11-18 : Am- 
sterdam, N. Y., 16-16; Hudson, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y„ 17-20. 
Pace Makers — Gaiety, Brooklyn, N. Y., 8-13; 

Academy. Jersey City. N. J., 15-20. 
rarislan Flirts — Perm Circuit. 8-13: Gaiety. 

Baltimore, 16-20. 
Pat White Show — Majestic, Indianapolis, 

8-18 ; Buckingham. Louisville, Ky.. 15-20. 
Record Breakers — Savoy, Hamilton, Can., 

8-13: Cadillac, Detroit 15-20. 
September Morning Glories— Gaiety, Mil- 
waukee, 8-13; Gaiety, Minneapolis. 15-20. 
Social Follies — Star, Toronto. Out, 8-13 ; 

Savoy, Hamilton, Can., 15-20. 
Tango Queens — Cadillac, Detroit, 8-13 ; open, 

15-20; Englewood, Chicago, 15-20. 
Tempters — Open, 8-13 ; Century, Kansas 

City, 15-20. 

Thoroughbreds — Inter National. Niagara Falls. 

11-13 : Star. Toronto. Ont. 15-20. 
Tourists — Park, Youngstown, O., 11-18; Penn 

Circuit 15-20. 
V. S. Beauties — Star, St Paul, Minn.. 8-18; 

open. 16-20; Century, Kansas City. 22-27. 

Penn Circuit 

Opera House, Newcastle, Pa., Monday. 
Cambria, Johnstown, Tuesday. 
Mlshler, Altoona, Wednesday. 
Orpbeam, Harrleburg, Thursday. 
Orpheum, York, Friday. 
Academy. Reading, Baturday. 



152 Theatrical Lawyer 

EDWARD J. ADER 

10 So. La Salle St. Chicago 

Practice in State and U. S. Courts 



PARKER'S 
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LOEW REPRESENTATIVES 



FRANK BOHM, Inc. 



Lou Edleman, Gen. MgT. 



New York City 



MARK LEVY 

Vaoderaie Manager S02 Putnam BUg. 



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26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 



BBML1M BEmSMMMMT 




BY DR. MAX THOREK 



Surgcon-in-Chief American Hospital; Consulting Surgeon Cook 
County Hoapital; Consulting Surgeon Sheridan Park Hoapital, 
Chicago; Surgeon White Rata and Actors Fund,' etc, etc 

Tha.. artklas are written exctesivelr far the NEW YORK CUPPER. 
QosstioDa sej ulnlns te health. iHseeta, hygiene, seU-praaarvatisB, pre* 
— M— ' el ■ba p se s aawt —liars ef general l a t a ra at te health win be 
uuwmd fa> thia calama. ADDRESS ALL INQUIRIES TO THE NEW 
YORK CLIPPER HEALTH DEPARTMENT, ISM Breedway. N«» York 
City. Wan apace wiU sot fiult ar tha subject la net •ultakla far an 
epaa answer, la ttara will be east te tha applicant perenaalry. Dr. Thank 
•bould not ba espe 
individual diseases. 



applicant p ai auually. 
te diagnose or prescribe In these eolun ia a for 



"MOVIES "—A FAQOR IN SURGERY 



Medical and surgical science is progress- 
ing by leaps and bounds. The impossible 
of yesterday is possible today. Some of 
the achievements in the healing art. are 
truly miraculous. Every craft and art has 
added its mite to the completion of present- 
day diagnostic and therapeutic methods. 
And now, to cap the climax, the "movies" 
promise to be one of the strongest assets 
in medical education and dissemination of 
knowledge that is of vital value to the dis- 
ciples of Aesculapius. 

Ernst A. Dench, author of a well-known 
treatise on the moving picture, writes 
thusly in the November issue of "The 
Nurse (Jamestown, N. X.). 

"The College of Physicians and Surgeons 
intends using motion pictures as part of its 
course of instruction. At a demonstration 
held in New York City last March, five 
phases of surgical operating were dealt 
with in a five-reel picture. The chief sub- 
jects, the removal of a goitre and the re- 
moval of stones from the bladder, were 
handled by Dr. Eugene Pool of New York 
Hospital, and Dr. Charlea Peck of Roose- 
velt Hospital, both of whom lectured upon 
the operations. The films were shown to 
an audience of two hundred in the tower 
lecture hall, in which a fire-proof booth 
was installed to accommodate the operator. 

"How are surgical films produced? In 
the early part of 1012, Biegmund Lnbin, 
president of the well-known film company 
bearing his name, invented a machine 
which combined the motion picture with 
the X-Ray. This machine enables the di- 
gestive organs of man to be filmed. 

"Dr. Neff, of the PhUadelphia Hospital 
is quoted as saying in a newspaper inter- 
view : 'I do not allow any doctor to go out 
to the hospital and take patients away to 
be photographed. But such physicians as 
are attached to the staff are permitted to 
do so, if the patient does not object. If 
the patient objects, that ends it. But I 
have heard of no objections being raised, 
and the patients become interested and en- 
joy the experience. It is a change for 
them.' 

"Mr. Lubin has been good to us. Our 
motion pictures of microbes in milk were 
made at his establishment, and he placed 
all the resources at onr command. A 
Frenchman actually succeeded in film ing 
the digestive organs of a trout. The fish 
was put on a- restricted diet which included 
flour, sugar, peptone, snbnitrate of bismuth 
and water. For filming purposes he used 
• table with a glass pool at each end in 
order to provide the necessary water to 
keep the trout alive. There was not an 
inch of extra space in which the trout could 
more and the top of the envelope was cov- 
ered with a piece of paraffin paper. This 
tutx; was placed in a receptacle under the 
table, the camera being focused on the 
glass and operated by an electric motor. 
The trout was compelled to fast for two 
days in this cramped position, the constant 
flow of fresh water keeping it alive. This 
is known as the Carvello system. A spe- 
cial sized film, the depth of which is two 
and three-fifth inches is used and usually 
two thousand exposures a second are made 
instead of the usual sixteen. A motor con- 
trols the X-Ray camera, and this motor 
can be run at whatever speed suits the sub- 



ject To cover an operation occupying days, 
the operator simply switches the clutch at 
the right gear, the result being that ex- 
posures are made at intervals. Some time 
ago a German surgeon invented a machine 
called the bioroentgenograph, which demon- 
strated some interesting facts concerning 
the stomach. In the film taken, the whole 
stomach was revealed at work; when the 
animal subjects were excited or angered, 
the stomach movements stopped. The gen- 
eral course followed is to supply the patient 
with some digestible food, a regular meal 
in fact, mixed with bismuth, or barium to 
make it opaque to the Roentgen-rays, which 
are behind the patient. The camera, how- 
ever, is in front, where it 'registers' the. 
movements of the stomach, at the rate of 
twelve exposures every twenty seconds, on 
negative stock larger than the standard 
size. The negative copies printed from the 
negative are on the regular film stock. . . . 

"Microclnematography makes it possible 
to descend the surgical ladder. One film I 
saw not so long ago showed blood-corpuscles 
as large as dinner plates. These were at 
war with dozens of large microbes which 
hit back at each other. . . . 

"The lens of the motion-picture camera 
is focused through a microscope which 
magnifies objects from 2,000 to 76,000,000 
times. The French companies who make 
a specialty of the work have fully equipped 
laboratories in which trained scientists pre- 
pare subjects for the film. Their work 
necessitates plenty of research, while much 
patience is involved in taking the films 
themselves. The most exasperating thing 
about germs and microbes is that they, per- 
sist in moving about In groups and have no 
respect for the limited area covered by the 
camera lens. The photographer, to avoid 
this, generally contrives to have them ap- 
pear against a black background. The 
light at the sides is of 2,000 candle-power 
and this is just sufficient strength for pho- 
tographic purposes. To make it stronger 
would kill all of the objects. 

"In 1012, Dr. T. H. Weisenburg, pro- 
fessor of Clinical Neurology at the Medico- 
Chirurgical College of Philadelphia, pre- 
sented at the Academy of Medicine, five 
reels of films dealing with nervous and 
mental diseases. The leading picture in- 
troduced twenty-six patients for the pur- 
pose of demonstrating dimentia precox, 
which waa followed by cases of manio-de- 
pressive insanity, chronic mania-, paranoiac 
states, paresis and melancholia. Dr. 
Weisenburg*s method is to mark the bodies 
of nervous patients with colored chalk or 
charcoal and then film them in their char- 
acteristic poses. ... In this connec- 
tion ultradnematography is invaluable. 
Dr. Gustabe Monod who has before now 
delivered lectures in the United States, 
took pictures of athletic movements by this 
method at the rate of one-hundreth of a 
second. But when seen on the screen, the 
speed was only sixteen pictures a second, 
which slowed down the action consider- 
ably. . . ." 

In the near future refinements in cine- 
matographic technique will be of inestim- 
able value to students and practitioners of 
medicine and surgery alike. American 
genius will materially aid in the accomp- 
lishment of that end. 



NECK BLEMISHES AND LIVER 
DISTURBANCE. 

MRS. M. McG., New York, writes: 
Dear Doctor: I. am a member of the 
profession and am a constant reader of 
The New York Clipper. Several doctors 
have told me that my liver ia inactive and 
that my blood is in very bad condition. On 
my neck there are several 'protruding wart- 
like projections. I am told they are due 
to the liver condition. I have tried many 
things for the liver and blood, without the 
slightest beneficial results. I weigh about 
140' lbs. Any suggestions you will give 
me will be appreciated. 

REPLY. 
In the first place the brown spots usu- 
ally spoken of as "liver-spots" have abso- 
lutely nothing to do with disturbances of 
liver-function. "Inactive liver" and "bad 
blood" are two terms which mean nothing. 
There are a great variety of diseases of the 
liver and there are just as many disorders 
of the blood. You must first establish a 
diagnosis and find out what really is the 
trouble. Is the blood-condition a simple- 
anemia or something of greater importance? 
Is the liver-disturbance a functional affair 
or some organic condition ? Until you have 
these matters definitely established — and 
that can only be- done by a painstaking 
physical and chemical examination — you 
cannot expect to receive intelligent treat- 
ment for the trouble whatever it may be. 
As it is, you are kept in the dork. Don't 
do it. Find out what is what. 



CATARRH IN HEAD. 
8. D. B., Pittsburgh, writes: 

Dear Doctor : I am an interested reader 
of your page in the Clipfeb and would ap- 
preciate any advice you can give me. I 
have been troubled with head-catarrh for 
two years. It is just lately that I have 
choking spells every morning after break- 
fust. Occasionally I vomit during these 
spells. Is that caused by catarrah? Is 
there anything that will relieve it? Many 
thanks for an early reply. 

REPLY. 
The mistakes many people make ia to 
ask for prescriptions for "catarrah of the 
head" — so called. These catarrhal condi- 
tions are usually due to inflammatory con- 
ditions in the nose, throat or the accessory 
sinuses of the skull, of which there are 
many. Supposing now. that one of these 
sinuses is inflamed? It stands to reason 
that using any medicine on general prin- 
ciples for "cold" will not touch the spot. 
If, on the other hand, diseases of the tur- 
binate bodies in the nose, etc., are causing 
the trouble, these will have to be eliminated 
before the catarrh would be cured. Vomit- 
ing Is often due to dripping of mucus from 
the back-portion of the nose into the throat 
— post-nasal catarrh so-called. Have your 
nose, throat and mouth examined by a com- 
petent nose and throat specialist and as- 
certain what perpetuates the trouble. You 
will get relief by eliminating the exciting 
factor. 



ELECTRICITY AND ANEMIA. 

ANAEMIC. Neto York, N. Y., writes: 
Dear Doctor: I am anemic and while 
I am in the city I am taking electric treat- 
ments for anemia. While I am traveling 
this is not practical. I would therefore 
like to know what I may do to improve 
that condition by means of proper diet ex- 
ercise, medicines, etc. Your advice will be 
anxiously looked for and heeded. 

REPLY. 

I cannot see how electricity can improve 
anemia. At least it is not a recognized 
method of treatment. Fresh air, outdoor 
exercise, walks, etc.. coupled with a proper 
' diet are the essentials constituting the 
proper treatment of anemin. The cause for 
the blood-deterioration must be carefully 
inquired into, and of course eliminated. 
Follow this diet list: Yon may take 
broths of all kinds; all fresh fish and raw 
oysters : meats — chopped or scraped, not 
well done : in fact all sorts of meats, the 



red ones preferred; eggs; all sorts of fari- 
naceous foods and vegetables; desserts. 
Yon must avoid: Hashes, stews, cooked 
oysters, clams, pork, veal, turkey, salt meats 
—except ham and bacon ; cabbage, cucum- 
bers, turnips, carrots, squash, spices, 
pickles, vinegar, pies, pastries, bananas, 
pineapples.. As to medicines, the best I 
know of is a five-grain Blaud's pill, freshly 
prepared, three times daily after meals. 
Ask the druggist to add a small quantity 
cf cascara to each pill to counteract its 
somewhat constipating effects. 



PIMPLES— ACNE. 
CONSTANT READER, N. Y., writes: 
Dear Doctor : I am a young woman and 
ever since. I can remember I have had 
pimples on my face. I drink plenty of 
water and eat plenty of raw and cooked 
fruit I was told that impure blood is re- 
sponsible for the condition of my complex- 
ion. Is that so? My mother tells me that 
the time will come when the pimples will 
disappear by themselves. Would you ad- 
vise me to take some blood-tonic? Will 
look for an answer in the Clipper. 

REPLY. 
Your mother's philosophy is more valid 
than the "Impure blood" logic. No, indeed ; 
yon have no impure blood. Anemia will 
sometimes cause pimples but what you say 
makes me think that is not the case with 
you. Keep your bowels active ; do not take 
any patent stuff; live on a vegetable diet 
and use sulphur soap instead of castile. If 
the former irritates the skin somewhat use 
it only occasionally. Have your physician 
give you some acne- vaccine injections into 
the arm, that is if the condition is marked. 
If only slight follow your mother's advice. 



FATTY TUMOR. 

MRB. P. It. T„ Cincinnati, O., writes: 
Dear Doctor: My husband and I are 
'both In the theatrical profession and I have 
decided to consult yon in regard to a lump 
which has developed gradually during the 
last three years, between my shoulder 
blades. It is not painful and outside of 
being there -it causes me no inconvenience. 
I visited a cousin of mine who is a physi- 
cian and be diagnosed the lump as a fatty 
tumor. He called it a lipoma. I would 
greatly appreciate a few words in The 
New' York Cupper, about this formation. 
Is it dangerous? What is best to do for 
it? If decided to have it removed, how long 
will it keep me from work? Many thanks 
for an early reply. 

REPLY. 
Lipoma, or fatty tumor, as it is termed, 
is a benign form of growth and is quite 
common. Do not worry about it As a 
rule it is not dangerous. It is, of course, 
beat to have it removed. Its removal is, 
in experienced hands, a very simple mat- 
ter. It can be done local anesthesia (with- 
out putting you to sleep). A few days Is 
all that is usually required to effect a cure. 



SEX-EDUCATION. 
INQUIRER, Bt. Paul, Minn., writes: 
Dear Sir: Do you believe sex-education 
is beneficial to the human race? 
REPLY. 
Without becoming a crank on the sub- 
ject I should say yes. 



FISSURE OF ANUS. 
MRS. C. S. S., Boston, Matt., writes: 
Dear Doctor Thorek: I am an actress 
and was compelled to give up my route be- 
cause of a fissure of the lower bowel that 
renders me miserable. It has bothered me 
now for over a year. Local treatments 
were given me by at least four doctors, 
with only temporary relief. Otherwise I 
am in excellent health. Can you suggest 
something to help me. I am afraid of the 
knife. I shall be forever grateful. 
REPLY. 
If yon will submit to take gas for a few 
minutes and place yourself in the bands of 
a competent susgeon, you need not enter- 
tain any fears. The pains you are suffer- 
ing are excruciating I know. Yon will per- 
ceive no pain whatever. 



January 10, 1917. THE NEW YORK CLIPPER & 



Thanks, Boys, Thanks! 

IT happened at the Friars Club. They were seated at a table drinking — ice-cream sodas — and munching Nabisco 
Crackers. 
"Oh, yes," said Number 1 , "Feist is all right for ballads." 
"It's a fact," said Number 2, "You've got to admit that Feist is strong on ballads. Everybody in the profession 
says that But they, can't produce novelty songs." 

"Yes, yes," chimed in the third. "They haven't the writers to do it They can write ballads, but nothing else." 
"Oh, I don't know," said the fourth, "They have had some novelties. Take 'MOTHER.' That certainly was a nov- 
elty song. 'THAT'S HOW I NEED YOU' also was a novelty. It created a new-»tyle song." 
"Yes," chirped Number 1, "but they were all ballads, weren't they?" 

"Here comes Phil Kornheiser, Feist's professional manager," said Number 2. "Let's 'kid* him about it" 
So they did. Kidded him good and plenty. And Phi) got peeved, and excitedly asked: 

"How about 'RIP VAN WINKLE.' 'ABA DABA.' 'DANGEROUS GIRL,' 'HONEY MAN.' and what's the 
matter with "LITTLE BIT OF BADT 

"Wise-Guy," Number 1 yawned, and said: 
"Why talk about 'has beens'?" 

Thereupon Phil grabbed his hat and rushed over to die Sanctum-Sanctorum of the Boss, and said: 
"We've got to have novelty songs I" 

To which promptly came the. response: "Aye, aye, me lad, go to it! But why this sudden desire for novelty songs?" 
Phi! told the story of the four "experts" at die Club, and the Chief replied: 

"Go get thy scribes 1 Order them to come before me, that I may have a chat with them. Have diem here at high-noon 
tomorrow." 

Phil left, the office, confident that there was to be something doing. For he saw a merry twinkle in the Chief's eye. 
Next, day, the scribes came at the appointed time. • The doors were locked and bolted; the heavy curtains drawn dose. 

For they, were in secret conclave. 

****** 

"Yes, yes, but you failed to finish the story." 

The conclusion of the story is that we are grateful to die four performers who tipped us off that what the profession wanted 
most was novelty songs, and who gave us die inspiration to create novelty songs for the artist That's why we are able to hand 
the profession the greatest array of novelty songs ever produced at any one time by any one firm in America. Look diem over, 
and see for yourself whether the discussion at the conclave was productive or not 

HERE THEY ARE: 

"There's a Little Bit of Bad in Every Good Little CirU" by Grant Clarke and Fred Fischer. Was it a hit? (Answer 
by the profession) : "Surest thing you know!" "Honolulu, America Loves You," by Grant Clarke, Eddie Cox and Jimmie 
Monaco. An absolute novelty! Unlike anything ever written. "Since Sarah Saw Theda Bara," by Alex Gerber and Harry 
Jentes. A Yiddisher character song. One that compels performers to admit that we are turning out novelty songs that help 
to make the acts "hit the high spots"! Here's another — a 22-karat pippin: "What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at 
Me For, If They Don't Mean What They Say?" by Joe McCarthy, Howard Johnson and Jimmie Monaco, and "There's a 
Little Bit of Monkey Left in You and Me," by Grant Clarke and Jimmie Monaco, both introduced by Henry Lewis in Anna 
Held's New York Casino success, "Follow Me." 

And now comes the novelty song which press and public have proclaimed a vertitable knock-out: "Its Not Your Na- 
tionality, It's Simply You," by Howard Johnson and Joe McCarthy. And then for good measure, so that you can have a 
choice, if the other fellow on the bill sings any of these ahead of you, we present still another novelty success entitled "Keep 
Your Eye on the Girlie You Love," by Howard Johnson, Alex Gerber and Ira Schuster. Even in the ballad line we have 
novelty hits, such as "There's a Garden in Old Italy," by Joe McCarthy and Jack Glogau. And added to these heavy suc- 
cesses we have the two greatest ballad hits in the world: "Ireland Must Be Heaven, For My Mother Came from There," by 
Joe McCarthy, Howard Johnson and Fred Fischer, and "/ Know I Got More Than My Share," by Grant Clarke and 
.Howard Johnson. 

Doesn't this indicate that we have the greatest staff of writers of any publishing house in America, if not the world? 
Doesn't this prove our ability to give the performer, or artist, what they want — when they want it? 
That's why you hear more FEIST songs sung in the United States of America than any other. In a word — we have 
kept our promise and lived up to our slogan: 

"YOU CAN'T GO WRONG WITH A FEIST SONG!"— LEO FEIST. INC.— YOU KNOW WHERE. 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



U. B. O. CIRCUIT 

SEW YOBX CITT. 
Palaoe— Moor* * Moore— Millie Weston— Wright 

* Dietrich — Marine Brother* ft Bobby, imr to 
AIL) 

Colonial — Joe Towle — Beat* Plorfgny — lis. c. 
Morton ft Co.— "Girlies' Gambol"— "Girl with 1000 
■Tea" — Brennan * PoweiL 

Royal — Venlta Pltahugb — Blanche Sloane — Hood 
ft Morris — Kirk ft Page — Cecil Cunningham. 

aaBPeeTgsIa— Chick Sale — Clark ft Bergman— H. 4 
E. Puck — 1-eo Been. 

Alhamhra — Belter Bros. — Primrose Foar — B. ft 
B. Bomple— Hale ft Patterson— Bert Melrose— B. 

* G. Doolej— Dorkin'e Girls— Seren Bracks — Win. 
ft M. Cutty. 

BROOKLYN. - • 

Bnehwiak — Jasper — Maale Kins' ft Co. — MeShane 
ft Hathaway— MUo— Valerie Bergere Co.— Edwin 
George — Wheaton ft Carroll. 

Orpheum — Mildred* Macomber — "What Happened 
to Both?" — Nonette — Dunedln Duo — Inglla ft Rcad- 
lnc — Cbaa. Olcott — DeForest ft Keams — Fay Tem- 
ple ton. 

ATLASTA, OA. 

Porsy-th — Foot Entertainers — Weiss Tronpe — 
Dsrld S* pint el n— Nat C. Goodwin— Selma B rests 
—Wilfred Clark ft Co.— Skipper, Kennedy « 
Beeves. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Eaith's— Bob Albright— Frank ft Toot— Ellis ft 
Bordonl — Bonlta .ft Hears — Eddie Cut ft Co. — 
•Garden of Snrprlaes" — ' 'Creation"— Boudlnl Bros. 
— "BoheTffle." 

BIRMINGHAM, ST.a 

Lrrio (First Half)— Frank Cromlt— Page, Heck 

ft Mack. (Last Half)— Weston * Claire Oscar 

Lorraine— Valentine ft BeH. 

R0TTALO, S. Y. 

Shea's — Ben Dealer ft Co. — Althoff Slaters 

Tom Edwards ft Co.— "Five of Clubs"— Harry 
Green ft CowWiD. Ward ft Olrls— Sam ft Kittle 
Xnr/ton. 

_ BALTXX03E, KD. 

Maryland— Marlon Weeks— Dealer ft Rugel— 
Clifford Walter— Three Bosslres — Regal A Bender 
— Adelaide ft Hughes. 

CLEVELAND. OHIO. 
•.T^'tT 8 ** ■■» BeH-Julian Base— Kelly ft 
Galrlu— Three Alex— Era Taugnay — Dugsn ft Bar- 



lonmevz 




F&f N&sst W&®lk 



era cars An, ohio. 

Keith's— Al Herman— Werner Amorls Tronpe 

Jean Adair ft Co.-Kfrby ft Rome— Three Jahns— 
Eddle For ft Co. 

CHATTANOOGA, TESB. 

Keith's (First Half)— Four PaJdrons— Conroy ft 

O'DonneU— Carlisle ft BomaT. (Last Half)— Venlta 

Coold— Parish ft Pent— Bernie ft Baker. 
C HARL OTTE, X. a 

Piedmont (First Half) — Frank Mullane Poor 

Entertainers. (Last Half) — Fem ft Davis— The 



C0LTJX81TB. OHIO. 
Keith's— J. C. Nugent ft Co. — -The Stampede" 
— SylTester ft Vance— Welch's Minstrels— Drer ft 
Fay— "The Headllners"— Soretty ft Antoinette. 
CTTABT.K8TON, 8. O. 
aca d e my (First Half)— Kltner. Taylor ft McKay 
— Three Bobs — Boser's Comedy Dora. (Last Half) 
—Ward ft Van. 

DAYTON, OHIO. 
Keith's — "Prosperity" — Frank LeDent — Adantaa 
Tronpe— Lewis. Belmont ft Lewis— Msyhew ft Taj- 
lor — The Sharrocka. 

DETROIT, MICH.. 
Temple — Musical Johnsons— Moore ft Haager— 
Elan Byan ft Co. — Four Holkrways — Van ft Bell — 
SearplooT ft Vavara. 

rsrs. fa. 

Colonial— Hnll A Dtrrkln— Bolcer Bros. — Dainty 
Marie — Great Howard. 

GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 

Empreea — la Argentina — Loner HaekeQ — Evs 

Taylor ft Co. — Gerard ft Clark— Burt Johnson ft 
Co. — "New Prodncer." 

HAMILTON, CAS. 
Temple — Moran ft Welser — Follea D' Am our — Mrs. 
Gene Hughes ft Co.— Berrick ft Hart— Edna Mun- 

s«r. 

Indianapolis, tsd. 

Grand— Bensee ft Balrd— Gordon ft Blca— Edwin 
Arden A Co. — Hnssey ft Worsler — Daisy Jean — 
Alaaka Trio— Cole. BnaaelJ ft Davis. 
JACKBOKTTT.T.y, FLA. 

Keith's (First Half)— Cecil Weston ft Co.— 
Chang- Wa Four. (Last HaU)— XTette— Ed. Mor- 
too — "Joy Bldera." 

LOUISVILLE, KT. 

Keith's— Barley ft Barley— Cspt. Anson ft Doc- 
tor — Cbaa. Z» Fletcher — Foot Hoabmnda — Swor ft 

Avery— Coaa. E. Evans ft Co. 

XONTRXAL, CAS. 
Orpheum — Claude Gtlllnxwster — Dunbar's Darkles 
— Howard ft Clark — Donovan ft Lee. 
NORFOLK, VA. 
Academy — Jim MeWUUama — Qaach Sisters — A. ft 
G. Terry— Wro. Ebbs— Kanasawa Jape. (Last 
Half)— Herbert Germain Trio— Ethel McDcnough. 
SASHVLLLE, TESTS. 



(First Half)— Weaton ft Claire— Oscar 
Lorraine — Valentine ft Bell. (Last Half)— Frank 
Ctomlt— Page. Hack ft Mack. 

PROVIDENCE, B. L 
Keith's— 8telndel Bros. — Marx Bros. — Julius Tsn- 
nen— Pistel ft Cuahtng— Muriel Window. 
PITTSBURGH, PA 
Saris— Bath St, Denis — Edna Aug — Weber ft 
Wehl— Anatrallao Crelghtona— Black ft White. 

PBXLADELPHIA, PA 
Kaith'a— Axthnr Sullivan— loe Carson ft Co- 
nnoting * irancls— -Sports in the Alps"— Belle 

Baker— Montgomery ft Perry — OllTe Wyndham ft 

Co.— Jan. J. Morton— Miller ft Mack. 
BOCBZSTES, B*. T. 
Temple — Geo. M- Boaener— Brlce ft King— Three 
Hlekry Bros. — Eras Antonio Trio— Johnson ft 
Harty — Kerr ft Berko — Palfrey. Hall ft Brown — 
Porter J. White ft Co. 



ROANOKE, VA. 
Roanoke (First Half) — Fern & Davis— The Ber- 
rens. (Last Half) — Frank Moliaoe — Four Enter. 
talners— Lewis ft White. 

BICHKOHS, VA. 
Lyrio — Herbert Germain Trio— Ethel McSon- 
ough. (Last Hslf)— Jim McWiniams— Gaach Sis- 
ters — A, ft C. Terry — Wm. Ebbs — Kanasawa Japs. 
8AVAWAH, OA. 
SaTannah (First Half)— Trette— Ed. Morton— 
"Joy Bldera." (Last Half)— Cecil Weston ft Co. — 
Chang Wa Fonr. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith's — Nan Halperin — Louis Hardt — J. ft B. 
klorgen — Hash Herbert ft Co. — Knapp ft Cornelia 
— Geo. Damerell ft Co. — IfizmOuaa'i Dogs. 
TORONTO, OAK. 
Bhaa'a— Lockett ft WaldroD — CartmeB ft Harris 
— Alf Loyal — Dorothy Granrme — Atoo Foot — De- 
Biere. 

WAEHISG10S, X>. 0. 
Keith's — Harris ft Hanion — Kerr & Weston — 
Clark ft Hamilton— McCarthy ft Faye — Nina 
Payne ft Co. — "California Boya" — Wm. Caxtoo ft 
. Co. — Blossom Seeley ft Co. 

TOUaTGSTOWS, OHIO. 
Keith's— Lorenberg Sisters— Lew Holts — Aleian- 
dtr Bros. — "Boys of 19ir' — Bob Dalley ft Co. — 
Smith ft Austin— J. ft M. Herri na 

ORPHEUM CaRCUTT 

CHICAGO, TT.T-. 
Majestic — Emma Cams ft Co. — White ft Cst- 
anagh — Kalmar ft Brown — Bradna ft Derrick — Mc- 
Donald A Holland — Willard — Hlrsenel Hendler — 
Four Beadlnxn. 

Palace — "Honor Thy Children" — Allen ft How- 
ard — Marshall Montgomery — Haydn & Haydn — Ap- 
dale's An! ma la — Maleta Boneoni — The Brlghtona. 
CALSABT, OAK. 
Orpheant — Haruko Onuld — Ames ft Wlnthrop — 
Miss Leltae! — Beatrice Herford — Morton ft Moore 
— Frances Nordstrom ft Co. 

SESVHB, COLO. 
Orpheum— "Dancing Girl or Delhi" — Bernard ft 
Harrington — Kenny ft Honis — "Fire Belgium 
Girls" — Nen O-Connell— Mm. Doria— McKay ft 

Ardise. 

DTTLTrTH. sVK 
Orpheum — Dorothy Jardon — Maria Lo— Webb ft 
Bums — Flanagan ft Edsrards — Oorbett. Sheppard ft 
DoDoran — Tempest ft Sunshine. 

DEB MOSSES, IA. 
Orphoom — "The Bride Shop" — Everest's Mon- 
keys—John Gelcer — Whiting ft Burt — Cycling 
Brunettes— Raymond ft Carerley — "'Tate'a Fish- 
ing." 

XAHSAB CTTT, XO. 
Orpheum — "Forest Fire" — Clown Seal — Mr. ft 
Mrs. George Wilde — Bert Leslie ft Co. — Biggs ft 
Byan — Josie Heather ft Co. — Bert Fltaglbbon. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Orpheum — Mason ft Keeler Co. — Eddie Leonard 
ft Co. — Finke'a Mnles — Mabel Russell ft Co. — Bens 
Parker— Anna Chandler— BankoS ft Girlie Ballet 
— Mario ft Duffy. 

LINCOLN, NUB. 
Orpheant — Bert Levy — Lonls London — Marie 

Fltsclbboo — Mullen & Coogan — Silver ft DnTal — 

Stone ft Ksllst— Sarah Padden ft Co. 

UTTTSXAPOUB. MTKN. 
Orphemn — Laura Nelson Hall A Co. — Morton ft 
Glass— Cantwell ft Walker— Misses Campbell— 
Calts Bros.— Musical Geralds— Scotch Lads A Las- 
sies. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Orphoom — Mil?. Dasle ft Co. — Allan THnehart ft 
Co. — Orth ft Dooley — Britt Wood — Arco Bros. — 
Hooper ft Masonry. 

sts'si ti n m_ TENN. 
Orpheum — Hermlne Shone ft Co. — "Garden of 
Aloha"— Walter Brower— Oliver ft Olp— Callrte Co- 
nant — Beeman ft Anderson. 

DEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Orphams — Els ft French — Chas. Grapewln ft Co. 
Kramer ft Kent — Britt Wood — Ftorenae Don — Fria- 
c oe L nnette Sisters. 

OMAHA, HEB. 
Orphaom — Sophie Tucker ft Co. — Chic Sale — Alice 
Lyndon Doll ft Co. — Williams ft Wolfus — frank 
Carmen — The Hyphen— Craig Campbell. 
OAKLAND, n». 
Orpsaam — Age of Reason— Mayo ft Tally— Ro- 
nalr. Ward ft Farron — Stan Stanley Trio — Al 
Shayne — Flying Henrys — Muriel Worth ft Co. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 
Orpheani — Orville Harrold — Wining ft Jordan — 
Valleclfs Leopards — ImboS, Conn ft Coreene — 
Martin ft Fabrlnl — Creasy ft Dayne. 
ST. LOUIS, XO. 
Orpheum — Evans, Bnrrowea ' Fontaine — Ward 
Bros. — Seren Honey Boys — Daffy ft Lorense — Ly- 
dell ft Higglns — Kltaro Troupe — Nederreld's 
Baboons. 

BAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 
Orpaaaa — Phyllis NeUaon Terry — Donohae ft 
Stewart — Burdella Patterson — "Miniature Berne" 
— Milt Collins— John ft Winnie Henning— Morris 
ft Campbell — Clayton, White ft Co. 

SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON ASS FBXSBO. 
Orphsnm— Lottie Homer—The Volunteers— Mr. 
A Mrs. Haunt* Barry — Irwin ft Henry — Parkes ft 
Conway — Nellie Nichols— Ollle Young ft ApriL 
ST. P ATTL , MISS. 
OrphsBm— Lew Dockatader— Harry ft Anna Sey- 
mour— Pst Barrett— Geo, Kelly ft Co. — Frank WO- 
bbo — Ottratt!, Sfelfet ft Cratir — H«l>»n * Fnller. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orpheum — Pllcer A Douglas — Trovato — Odlva — 
Adair A Adelphl— Mrrl A Dclmar— Inef Macanley 
ft Co.— Alleen Stanley. 

SALT LAKE CTTT, UTAH. 
Orphonm— Rae Samuels — Maryland Singers — M. 

Lightner ft Alexander — "Lots ft Lots of tt"- 
"Gsotier'e Toy Shop" — Saroy ft Brennar — Six 
Water Lillles. 

VASCOTJVEB, OAK. 

Orpheum — Geo. Nash ft Co. — Mme. Chilaon Ohr- 
man — Harry L. Mason — Foster, Ball A Co. — How- 
ard's Ponlt-s — MHaresj — Farber Girls. 
WINNIPEG, CAS. 

Orpheum — Morgan Dancers — Maurice Buxkh&rt — 
Benny A Woods— Byan ft Lee — Hubert Dyer ft Co. 
— Zeda ft Hoot — Henry Keane ft Co. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

SEW YORK CTTT. 

A m e rican (First Half)— P. George— Joseph's 
Tronpe — Trindel A Esther — Hal Crane ft Co. — 
Keed ft Wood — Agnes Scott Players — Hanley, Lam 
ft Smith. (Last Half)— Jane ft Irene Melbs— 
Leonard ft Louie — Percy Pollock ft Co. — Alice Cole 
—Helen Page ft Co. — Al Bryant ft Co. 

Boulev/ard (First Hslr) — Stetson ft Huner— Hen- 
drix ft Padula— Harry First ft Co.— Mand Mulled 
Jerome ft Canon. (Last Half)— Brandt ft Aubrey 
— Hattt Coleman — "Mimic World." 

TinoMn Square (First Hslf) — Leonard ft Lonls — 
Ethel Costello — Jessie Haywood ft Co. — Chappelle 
A Vldocq— Madge Norton Trio. (Last Half) — 
John ft Pearl Begay — Hendrtx A Padula — Trindel 
A Eethter — Dorothy -Burton ft Co. — Loo- Anger — 
The C iuumen a. 

Avium B (First Half)— Prank ft Bessie Win- 
nluger — Tom Linton ft Glrto — L. Wolfe Gilbert — 
KltrUng's Animals, (Last Half) — Barke ft Burke 
— Hesdls A Miller— Maistro. 

areolar Square (First Half)— Alice Cole— WW- 
lams ft Segal — Leila Shaw ft Co. — Will A Marie 
Rogers — Bnch Bros. (Laat Half) — Carhray Bros. 
—Gray ft Wheeler— Frankle Bice— Monti Opera 
Co. — roster ft Lorettc — Wells Oxford Fire, 

Delanosy Street (First Half) — Reno — June ft 
Irene Milton — Annie Kent — Helen Page ft Co. — 
Chase ft LaTour— Al Bryant ft Co. (Laat Half) — 
Morris A Miller — Hoyt's Minstrels. 

National (First Half)— Brandt ft Aubrey— 
Harry Coleman — "Mimic World." (Last Half) — 
Cornelia A Adele — Vlrclnia Ogden — O'Brien ft 
Buckley — Clark ft McCulloagb — Jerome A Carson. 

Orphemn (First Half )— Carhray Broa.— Morris 
A Miller — Wilkena A WHkens — Dorothy Burton A 
Co.— Clark A McCnIlooxn — Boeder's Tronpe. (Laat 
Half)— Beed ft Wright Girls — Cook ft Stevens — 
Mabel Harper — Hal Crane ft Co. 

■areata Arenae (Pint Half) — Three Nome Sis- 
ters— Harris A Lyman — Plske A Fallon — Hoyt's 
Minstrels— The CromweDs. (Lest Half) — Van Dell 
Sisters — Chase A LaTour — Storm ft Marsden — Hoey 
ft Lee — "Boeder's Invention." 

BROOKLYN, S. T. 

Bijou (First Half) — Cooper ft Hartman — "The 
Harmless Bog" — Morstl Opera Co. — Hoey ft Lee — 
Wells Oxford Fire. (Last Hslf)— Three Norrle 
Sisters — Madge Norton Trio — Harrla ft Lyman — 
Adrian — 'The Criminal" — Will ft Marie Bogere- 

SeXalb (First Hslf) — John ft Pearl Begay — 
E. J. Moore — O'Brien & Buckley — Percy Pollock 
ft Co. — Frankle Rice. (Last Hslf) — Flske ft Fal- 
lon — Williams ft Segal — "The Harmless Bug" — 
Msnd Muller. 

Warwick (First Half) — Robinson McKlnnlsb. 
(Lest Half) — Frank A Bessie Winninger — Kln- 
tlng'S Selm.le 

Fnlton (First Half) — Cornelia A Adele — Seymonr 
A Seymour — Farrell ft Farrell — Florence Bayfield 
— Al Golem Troupe. (Laat Half)— P. George — 
Belle A Mayo— Leila Shaw A Co.— Wllkens A WH- 
kens — Buch Bros. 

ATLANTA , GA. 
G. O. H. — Antonis — Green A Parker — Wilmer 
Waltera ft Co. — Henry Frye — "Cadets de Gaa- 
coyne." 

BALTIXOHE, XD. 
Hippodrome^ — Ben ft Haxel Mann — Little Lord 
Robert— Mlnetta Don — "Frolicking Glrla"— Eddie 
Borden ft Co. — Breen Family. 



BOBTOS, 

Orphans (First Half) — White. Mnllaly ft White 
— Armstrong ft Ford — "PaxU Shop" — Nerlus ft 
Gordon — "Holland Romance"— Laurie Ordway— 
Kunlra Tronpe. (Last Half) — Hess ft Hyde — 
Saona ft Co .— Ferguson ft Sunderland — "Salvation 
Sue" — Bell Boy Trio — Mannls 

Bt. Jamea (First Half)— Bice A Francis- 
Maurice Samoela ft Co. — Ksthryne MUey— Berboor 
Troupe. (Last Hslf) — Mae Marlon — Gray ft Ki an- 
ker — "3ust for Instance" — Gould A Lewis — Archer 
ft BeUord. 

si". RIVER, MASS. 

Bijou (First Half) — Macola — Ferguson A Sunder- 
land — "Salvation Sue" — BeH Boy Trio — Heas ft 
Hyde. (Last Half)— White, Mollaly ft White — 
Nerins ft Gordon — "Holland Romance" — Laurie 
Ordway — Kuniva Troupe. 

HOBOSEB, S. J. 
Lyric (First Half)— "The Criminal." (Last 
Half) — George W. Moore — Walton ft Delberg — 
MoratJ Opera Co. 

XEWABK, X. 7. 
Majestic (First Half) — Gliding O -Means— Beed 
ft Wright Glrla— Norwood ft HaU — Storm ft Mars- 
den— Mabel Harper. (Laat Half) — Cooper A Hart- 
man — Beno — Reed A Wood — Harry Ford ft Co. — 
Chappelle ft VIdocQ— Gray ft Graham. 

XEW BOCHELLE, X. T. 
Loerw'a (First Half)— HB1 ft Dale— BeTse ft 
Mayo— Ethel Mae HaU ft Co. (Laat Half)— Annie 
Sent — Jessie HayvroM ft Co. 



PROVIDENCE, B. I. 
lusty (First Half)— Mae Marvin — Or*) 1 ft 
Klnnker — "Just for Instance" — Gould ft Lewis — 
Archer ft BelfordL (Last Half)— "Paria Shop"— 
Rice ft Francis — Maurice Samuels ft Co. — Katbryn 
MUey — BerDour Troupe. - 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
Plasm (First Half)— J. MarteUe— Hour ft Boggs 
— Great Saona ft Co. — Oncomings A Harris — So- 
rority Glrla. (Last Half)— George Randall ft Co. 
— Bice A Frances. 

TORONTO, OAS. . . 

Yonge Street; — Dancing Mars — Corcoran ft Mack 
— Tyler ft St. Clair — C. A M. Cleveland — Mam: 
Leonl A Co. — Tom Kelly — Welch. Mealy A Mont 



pou circuit .-•;""■ 

BBISCSEPOBT. conn. 

Poll (First Hslf)— Raymond WUbert— Smith 4 
Farmer — "Lore in Suburbs" — Gene Green A Go. — 
"What's the Ideal" (Last Half)— Sheet ft Eldred 
—"To Save One Girl" — Dunbar A Taran — Clark's 
Royal Hawallana. 

Elan, (First Half)— Two Totos — Greenley A 
Drsyton— "Fascinating Flirts." (Last Half)— De 
Berg. Sisters — Helen ft Bice — Arthur Lavine ft Co. 

HARTFORD, CO HTT. 

Palaoe (First Half)— Burnett ft Scott— "To Save 
One Girl"— Kerslak'a Pnga. (Laat Half)— Chuck 
Haas — Baseball Four — Smith A Farmer — J. K. Em- 
mett ft Co.— Berlin Sisters— Kerslak'a Pigs. 

Poll (First Half) — Qninn A Lee— Billy Sogers— 
Fred J. Ardatn ft Co. (Last Half)— Gertrti.ie 
Barnes — John A Mae Burke — "What's the Idea?" 
SEW HAVEN, CONS. 

Poli (First Half)— Helen ft Bice— Milton A Pe 
Long Sisters — Dunbar ft Turner. (Last Half) — 
Raymond WUbert — Greenley ft Drayton — "Love io 
Suburbs" — Gene Green ft Co. 

Bijoo (First Half)— Sheets ft Blared— Val ft 
Ernie Stanton — Clark's Royal Hawallana. (Ls-t 
Half) — Billy Rogers — Pringree, Wallace ft Co.— 
Jenka * Allen— Two Totos. 

. 8PBINOPIBLS. MASS. 

Palaoe (First Half) — Chuck Haas— Berlin Sisters 
—Baseball Fonr — J. BV Emmett ft Co. — Van Ber- 
gen A Gosler. (Last Half) — The Friesches— Msn- 
nlng A Moore — TJIUsn Kingsbury A CO. — Val &. 
Ernie Stanton — "Faahion Show." 
BCBAXTOS, PA 

Poll (First Half) — Queenle Donedln — Morris & 
Miller — Musical Misses— Flonie MUIershlrj — Elenor.;- 
ft Carlton— "Minstrel Berne." (Last Half) — 
Johnny Ringer A Dancing Dolls — Thornton ft 
Thornton — Adelaide Boothber — Bar ft Arthur — "In 
the Trenches." 

WATEBBTTBY, CONN. 

Poli (First Hslf) — The Friesches — Manning A 

Moore — Pringree WaRace ft Co Jenka 4 Allen — 

"Fashion Show." (Last Hslf) — BIche ft Clegg— 
Milton A De Long Sisters — Melody Poor. 
WXLKXS-BABRE, PA. 

Poli (First Hslf) — Johnny Singer A Dancing 
Dons — Thornton A Thornton — Adelaide Boothber — 
"In the Trenches." (Last Half)— Queenle Dune- 
dln— Morris A Miller— Musical Misses— Elenore ft 
Carlton — "Minstrel Berne," 

WOBCESTEB, MASS. 
Poli (First -Half) — Gertrude Ba rnes Mi lan 
Kingsbury A Co. — John A Mae Burke. (Laat Half) 
— Quinn A Lee — Van Bergen A Gosler — Fred J. 
Ardath ft Co. 

Plaxa, (First Half)— BIche ft Clegg— Norton & 
A y r ea Melody Four— Arthur Levine ft Co. (Laat 
Half) — Two Blasett A Scott— "Five Fasclnatine 
Flirts." 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 

CALOAET, CAS. 
Faataare* — Berlo Diving Girls — Mack A Volmar — 
Mystic Bird — Dix ft Dixie — Grace Edmonds- 
Frank Fogarty. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Paatages — Horliek Dancers — Howard ft Fields ft 
Co. — Santnccl — Freer, Dagett A Freer — Sebepp'e 
Circus. 

EDMONTON, CAS. 
Pantaxea — "Motor Msdness" — Daisy Jerome — 
"The JnngUman" — Amoros ft Molvay — Morton. 
Bros. — Harry Rose. 

GBEAT PALLS, MONT. 
Fantasies (Jan. 15-18)— Bell Claire Bros.— Eliza- 
beth Cutty — "Telephone Tangle" — Nan Grey— 
Australian Woodchoppem— Bobble ft Nelson. 

XASSAS CTTT. XO. 
Empress— Sherman. Van ft Hymen — Valentine 
Vox — Clifford ft Mack — Three Mori Broa. — "Not 
Sundae." 

LOS ANGELES, OAT. . 
Pa ata ges "London Bell Blngera" — "Bettln; 
Bettys"— Olive Briscoe— Sigbee's Dogs— Smith £ 
Kaufman. 

MTSNEAP0LI3, XTSS. 
Pantagss Cedora— Bernardi— Friend ft Downing 
— Bawls ft Von ar—ifm.!* — Geo. ft Mae Lafevre — 
Oakland Sisters. 



■Billy 



BTJPEBJ0R, WIS. 
Paatages — Patrlcola — Tabor A G: 
Swede Hall ft Co. — Saawya. 

OGDEN, TJTAH. 
Pan tagea— O'Neal ft Walmsley ft Girts— Valerie 
Slaters— Adonis ft Dog— Pierera Sextette— BarrT 
Hlnea — Dale Farnsworth Trio. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 
Pantaxea'— Hardeen — Joe Whitehead — Osaki Japs 
—Wood. Melville ft Phillips— John T. Doyle ft Co. 
— Howard ft Boss. 

" PORTLAND, ORE. 
Pan taxes'— Wlnatoo's Seals ft Nymphs— Lasca Is 
Sextette— Sterling ft Marguerite— Joe Boherts — 
Lemalre ft Dawson. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



BIS DIEGO, CAX. 

Pajrtag**'— atr. lrjQulslUte— Three Heltons— 
Rocker ft Wlnnlfred — Borse A. Broderlck — Senator 
Slnrphy. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

Fmtl(il' — BtiliU ft Co. — Isetta — G llro j, 

"rlss-nes ft Montgomery — Weber ft EUIott. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 
Pantaa-e*' — Great Icon ft Co. — KInkald Kilties — 
Ecthoff ft Gordon — Trerltt'a Canine* — Margaret 
ford— Jooes ft Johnson. 

BAH FBAMCTSCO. CAX. 
Fantaces'— "All Aboard" — Mosa ft Frje — Oly tu- 
ple Desvall & Co. — NoTel Bros. — Nancy Fair. 



Paatagea' — "Mr. Chaser" — Anthony ft Mack- 
Bob FlUsltnmona ft Son — Wins ft Ah Boy — Sol ft 
Leslie Bun — Anthony ft Mack. 

TACOKA, WASH. 
Faatacas' — ■■Courtroom Girls" — Pour Cook Sla- 
ters — Daniel* ft Conrad— Four Portia Sisters — Ouls- 
botnl ft BTeen. 

VASCOTJVXH, out. 

Paataa-as' — "Bed Heads" — Herbert 4 Dennis— 
Verna M er c er e a n ft Co. — Jubilee Four — Raymond. 

VICTORIA, OAV. 

Pastas**' — Qraber'a Awimaia — Gaston Palmer — 
Raj ft Efenma Dealt — Wilson Bros. — Metropolitan 
Five. 

WIBH1PK 0, CAST. 

Pantages' — Reynolds ft Donegal) — Mickey Feal- 
I»y— LangTloca — Klein Broa. — ttahoney ft Auburn — 
Elisabeth Otto. 

U . B. O. CIRCUIT 

DAJ1VILLE, IHk . 

Pslaoo (First Hair)— "Junior Follies." (Last 
Hall)— Jed ft Mollle Dooley— Lew ft Motile Hont- 
Jdje — Bawaon ft Claire — Dlero — "Anderson's Girl 
Bene." 

FORT WAYXE, INS. 

Pslaoo (First Half)— Jed ft Ethel Dooley— 
Dlero— "Suffragette Berne." (Lest Half) — Coa*. 
ft Anna Gloeker — Chas. ft Madeline Dunbar — Kate 
Watson — Herman Lieb ft Co. — Jimmy Loess ft Co. 
— "Paradise In Hooolola. 

rtTDIASAPOUB, m>. 

Lyrio— Lnplta Ferea— Godfrey ft Henderson — 
Frank Stafford ft Co. — Kane ft Herman — Burton's 
Hawaiian*, 

MTJSKXGON, MICH. 

Begest (Flrat Half )— Lillian Sieger— Earl ft Ed- 
wards — Herman Lieb ft Co. — Victoria Four — Darto 
Q Blmlto. (Last Half)— Levine ft Inman— Fiddler 
ft Sbelton— "On the Veranda" — Ralph Connors — 
Bobble Gordose. 

BUTTERF1ELD CIRCUIT 

AHB ARBOR, MICH. 

Majeatlo (First Half) — Scamp ft Scamp— John 
P. Beed — Frre Lyceum Girls— bonne- ft Albert— 
"Winter Garden Berne." (Lest Half)— "Six Lit- 
tie Wire*." 

BATTLE CBKTTK, MICH. 

Bijou (First Halt) — Scamp ft Scamp — John P. 
Reed — FlTe Lyceum Girls — Gonne ft Albert — "Win- 
ter Garden Berne.** (Last Half) — Pennalne — 
Browning ft Dean — Harry Holman ft Co. — C. 
Francis Beianer— "The Gown Shop." 
bat crrr, mjch. 

Bfjeo (First Half) — Pennalne— Browning ft 
Dean — Harry Holman ft Co.— C. Francis Ee'scer — 
"The Gown Shop." 

FUST, MICH. 
Majestic (First Half)— Mystic Hansen Trio—' 
Green, McBenry ft Dean — Hal Stephens ft Co. — 
Hope Vernon — "Gus Edwards' School Days." (Last 

Half)— Four Rose* — O'Neal ft Qallngher — The 
O'Learys — Frances Kennedy — "Irish American 
Girls." 

KALAMAZOO. MICH. 

atajestie (First Half)— "The Blow-Out." (Lest 
Half) — The Ferraroe — Lorraine ft Baffle — 'fine 
Family" — Geo. Morton — Eight White Hussars. 
LAHSDJG, MICH. 

Bijou (First Half) — The Ferraro* — Lorraine ft 
Eagle — -The Family" — Geo. Morton— Eight White 
Hussars. (Last Half)— •The Blow-Out." 

BAOrN AW, MICH. 
Strand (First Half)— Foot Rose* O'Neal ft 
Gallagher — The O'Learys — France* Kennedy — 
"Irian American Girls." (Last Half)— Mystic 
Hansen Trio — Green. McHenry ft Dean — Hal Ste- 
phens ft Co.— Hope Vernon — "Gn» Edwards' School 
Days." 

INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 

AUHTIal, TEX. 

Majeetio (First Half)— Togan ft GeneTs— Voland 
Gamble— 8. Miller Kent ft Co.— Brlerre ft King- 

Tango Shoes"— Keen* ft Winisms— Imperial Jla 
JItea Troupe. 

DAT.T.AR, TEX. 

Sisters— 



MaJesUa— Chip 
Echardt ft Parka 



ft Marble — Morln 
—Frank Hartley. 
FT. WOBTH, TEX. 
Byea (First Half)— Bollinger ft Beynolds— 
Echardt ft Parker — Jack Polk— "Garden of Aloha" 
—Joe Brennafi — Frank Hartley. (Last Half) — 
Adolpho— Miller ft Balney — Charles Wayne ft Co. 
— '•Lament's Western Days"— Edwin ft Lottie 
Ford. 

Majeetio (Last Half) — Togan ft Genera — Voland 
Gamble — S. MtUer Kent ft Co. — Brlerre ft King- 
Tango Shoes"— Keene ft Williams— Imperial Jin 

Jltsn. 

GALVESTOH, TFT 

G. 0. H. (First Half)— O'DonrieU ft Blair— 
Jaats ft West— "Petticoats" — Chief CaopoUeu — 
Frederick V. Bowers— Beacon ft Mayne — Sylrla 
Loyal ft Co. 



HODSTOH, TEX. 
Majeatio — The Faynes— Josephine DstIs — Harry 
Glrsrd ft Co. — Lew Madden ft Co. — Raymond. 
Bond ft Co.— Comfort ft King — Leo Zarren Troupe. 

JOPLTN, MO. 
■ Etootrle (First Half)— Cook ft Bothert— Malser- 
off Troupe. (Last Half)— Barber ft Jackson — 
Caesar RItoII. 

LITTLE BOCK. ARK. 
Majestic (First Half)— D'Amlco— Foley ft O'N'ell 
— Chan. Fleuman ft Co. — Linton ft Lawrence — 
Lobse ft Sterling— Bits Mario Band. (Last Half) 
— Bollinger ft Reynolds — Karl Kerry — "Leap Year 
Girls" — Two Keras — White's Circus. 

MUSKOGEE, OBXA. 
Broadway (Flrat Half)— Adolpho— sillier ft 
Balney — Edwin ft Lottie Ford — Charles Wayne ft 
Co. — "Lamont's Western Days." (Last Half) — 
"A Case for Sherlock" — Francis Dyer — Carl Roslni 
ft Co. 

OKLAHOMA crrr. okxa. 
Lyric (First Half)— B. T. Alexander ft Co.— 
Rogers ft Brockway — Wm. C. Turner ft Co. — 
Moore, O'Brien ft Car mack — Three Falcone. (Last 
Half) — The Norrells — Bemary ft Seartli — "Cran- 
berries"— DeWItt Bursa ft Torrence — AI aid 
Fannie Stedman. « - 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 

•Heetrle (First Half)— Layer ft Palmer— "Merrj 
Married Men." (Last Half)— Ryan ft Ryan— 
Malseroff Troupe. 

ST, JOSEPH, ao. 

Crystal (First Half) — HertJe Bees o n Klaas ft 
Walman— Helen Bereeford ft Co. — Clayton ft Len. 
nle— The Seeback*. (Last Half )— Cook ft Bothert 
— Edna Dreon — BernlTlcI Broa. — Frank Bueh — "Tun 
on the Farm" — Murphy ft Delmar — luas Troupe. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX, 
atajestio (Last Half) — O'DonneU ft Blair— Jsnls 
ft West — "Petticoats" — Chief Caapollcan— Fred- 
erick V. Bower* — Scheon ft Mayne— SylTla Loyal 
ft Co. 

TOPEKA. KAN. 

HoTatty (First Half)— Monroe Bros. — Grace He- 
Cormlck — Leroy ft Harrey — Dickenson ft Deagon — 
"Luck of a Totem." (Last Half) — Bertie Beeaon 
— KIsas ft Walman — Helen Bereaford — Clayton ft 
Lennle. 

TULSA, OKLA. 

Empress (First Half) — "A Case for Sherlock*' — 
Francis Dyer— Carl Roslni ft Co. (Last Hslf) — 

B. T. Alexander ft Co. — Sogers ft Brockway — Wm. 

C. Turner ft Co.— Moore, O'Brien ft Cormsck— 
Three Falcons. 

WICHITA, KAN. 

Princess (First Half)— Sam Hood— Basel Hea- 
ton — Wen Norworth ft Moore — Chin Chin. (Last 
Half) — Boo* ft Ashton— Dunbar's Salon Blngl 
Claudia Coleman — Treat's Seals. 



WACO, 

Auditorium (Last Half) — Togan ft Genera — 
Voland Gamble— S. Miller Kent ft Co. — Brlerre ft 
King — '"Tango Shoes" — Keene ft Williams — Im- 
perial JIu Jltau. 

S. & C. CIRCUIT 

ABEBDEES, 8, D. 
Bijou (Two Day*)— Black ft McCone— Holland 
ft Jeanle — McGreery ft Doyle. 

cnrcTNX&Ti, OHIO. 
Empress — "Femall Clerka" — Gerald MuUane — 
Howard ft Graf — Lillian Pleasants — Kerry ft Mc- 
Gee— Ferris Wheel Girls. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Mnos— Scott ft Wilson— FItb Musical MacLarena 
— Haxel Leona — Society Fire — Pearl Bras, ft 
Bums. (One to fin.) 

DEVIL'S LAKE, N. S. 
Grand (Two Days)— Trolley Car Duo— Bob & 
Beth Stanley. (One to flu.) 

FARGO. N. B. 

Grand (First Half) — The Mures — "Love's Lot- 
tery"— Baasett ft Bailey— Bob ft Beth Stanley- 
Three Harmony Kings. (Last Half)— Holland ft 
Jeanle — Kaoey. Mason ft Scholle — Conner* ft 
Hack — Alfredo ft Pssquale. (One to fill.) 

JANXSVTT.TT., WIS. 

Apollo (Last Half)— The Backos— Michael En- 
melt — Los Espanosos ft Co.— Dyso ft Bann — "A 
Night In the Park." _ L 

KNOXVXLLE, TEW. 

Grand (First Half) — Marsh ft Lawrence — Stan- 
ley ft FarreU. (Three to AIL) (Last Half) — 
Harry Brooks ft Co. — Kilties Band. (Three to 
fllL) 

MINNEAPOLIS, MTNS. 

Tfaiqao (First Half) — Kaoey. Mason ft Scholle — 
Brooklyn Comedy Four — Conner* ft Hnyck — Tom 
Brentford. (One to fill.) (Last Half)— The Mnroa 
— Black ft McCone — Three Harmony Kings — 
Dancing a la Carte. (One to nil.) 

masoh crrr, ia. 

CecU (First Half) — Drawee, Hamho ft Frisco — 
Mansfield ft Blddle. (One to fill.) (Last Half) — 
Bob ft Beth Stanley— Warner ft Cole. (One to 
OIL) 

aUBSHAIXTOWV, IA. 

Casino (Last Hslf) — Kathleen Kla Wa Ta — 
Morgan ft Stewart— Van Alstlne Bros. (One to 
811) 



Orient (Last Hslf )— Prlekett ft Lester— Mans- 
field ft Blddle — Mimic Foor. 



8T. CLOtTD, 
Homo (One Day) — "Lore's Lottery" — Baasett ft 
Bailey— Reader La Velle Trie. (Tare to ML) 
ST. patxl. Mm. 
Hippodrome (first Half)— Alfredo ft Pasquale— 
Anna Bra Fay — Kilkenny Four — Sarah SedaUa. 
(One to nil.) (Last Half) — Drawee. Hambo ft 
Frisco— Tom Brentford — Anna Bra Fay— Tudor 
Cameron ft Co. (One to fin.) 



Ob account dosing of "Shepherd of the HUla" Co. 



DONNA WILBUR 



LAIRENCE FOSTER 



Hgt. 5 (t. llii in. Age 26. 
Leads or Heavies. 



Hgt. S ft. 6 in. Age 22. 
Leading or Second Bus. 

Want Reliable Stock, Rep. or One Piece. 
Jan. 12 — Ottawa, 111.; 13-14 — Kankakee, 111. Then Bradley Hotel, Rush and 
Grand Avenue*, Chicago, HI. 



Wanted for Orpheum Stock Co., Jacksonville, Ha. 

One bill a week. Good 1 Tr-^-'-g Juvenile Man; light comedian; character man; director; second 
woman; character woman; ingenue. State age. height, it single. Rehearsals start Jan. 16, 
open 21. Don't write— wire lull particulars, night or day letter. State salary. VERNOR 

WALLACE, Orpheum Theatre, Jacksonville, Fla. 



WANTED — Location for Tabloid Musical Stock 

After January 21. Ten people, ladies and gentlemen. Girls all lead numbers. Three specialty 
teams. Elaborate wardrobe. Closing fourteen weeks' engagement; ask Manager Murray here. 
Bent, guarantee or salary. JACK LORD, Lord aad Vernon Musical Comedy Co.. Clarks- 
burg, W. Va. 



WANTED 



For AL. G. FIELD GREATER MINSTRELS, Song and Dane* 
Man to double alto in band. Experienced Chora* Singer to 
double alto in band. Address AI. G. Field, as per Route. 



EUROPEAN WAR 



LECTURE 
ON 

with finest and most wonderful sensational pictures ever taken. Reading or lecture giving 
new facts and stories from the trenches. An investment of $200 puts you tn the high est class 
where you can clean up $25 to $75 an evening as we do. Address PEERLESS PICTURE CO., 
Set S. Division Ave, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



UP-TO-DATE SCENIC STUDIO 

WITH INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR MOTION PICTURE FACILITIES IN 
THE THEATRICAL DISTRICT OF GREATER NEW YORK 

Address L. M. TURNER, Care Clipper 



Performers Dealers 

You nead and want Am*rric*'» Forrmcut Ballad 

"Forget-Me-Not Rose" 

JULIUS DOANE, Music Pub., 1244 N. Claremont Ave., Chicago 



Cornell-Ppicc Players 

A TOtlQg man for juveniles, and some leads. Matt be experienced, reliable, of food appearance. 
and possess good wardrobe. One with singing voice preferred. State all particulars first letter. 
CORNELL * PRICE. Address Week Jan. Sth, Mosvneigihals, Pa.; Week Jan. 15th, V sender* rift. Pa. 

Anthony Blair 

FIFTH AVENUE STOCK 
Happy New Year! Exctue Me— we overslept 

— WANTED — 



Toons;, good-looking leading man; young heavy man: character man of large 
build; people in all lines — for permanent stock. Two bills a week; two matinees. 
Long engagement for right people. Send photos and state all in first if you 
want a reply. Address W. HEDGE HOLMES. Lyceum Theatre. Pittsburgh. Pa. 



We Invite ill Su(il| Members ol the Iheilncil f::'-:v.::- Is EtlfU'lc'.'ig A^ortrr.enl c 

GREAT NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG NUMBERS 



: • .,% KN1CKERBOCKKR HARMON YSTUDIOS 



Tenney 



can yoa nse an act, aketeh. or moBolosroe that will eommsnd fne apples** of ta* 
audience, tfce approval of the manager*, the rente from tbe office, and the salary 
jot desire. Write, 'phone or call, and let's get acquainted with each other. 
axu-3 «mcn Tt»m. rwtaani Blir.. ggiU eta. 1«W BreaawaT, a*. T. Oltr. 



ARTaSTS' REPRESENTATIVE A PRODUCER 



Paltce TVeatr* Halt; . 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



BILLY WATSON- IN 
"BEEF TRUST' IS 
AT THE COLUMBIA 

Billy Watson, in presenting bis "Beef 
Trust" this week at the Columbia, New 
York, has brought twenty healthy speci- 
mens of chorus girls, and they fairly filled 
the roomy stage. 

The three productions with which Wat- 
son has been identified of late years have 
been combined into one entertainment, 
showing the alley, with its fun and bat- 
tles; the christening, with its entertain- 
ment and speeches, and the "Choice of the 
Model," with Philip as one of the judges. 

New scenery has been provided, and the 
alley has some class. The banquet scene 
on the roof garden is pretty, and the 
models are arranged before rich black 
hangings to set off the expanse of limbs. 

Billy Watson has bis usual line of com- 
edy interspersed with the impromtu mate- 
rial which he so aptly invents. 

Frank Bambard is retained for his real- 
istic impersonation of Grogan, the Dutch- 
man's friend and rival for supremacy in 
alley politics. 

Jean Leighton entertained well with her 
piano playing and singing at the christen- 
ing; her "Home Town" song also getting 
several encores. Margie Newell as Kittie 
la the same irrepressible youngster, with 
song and dance trimmings. 

Julius Jacobs, as the Patch "cop," was 
a suitable foil for Grogan and Krouse- 
meyer. 

B01» MeGarry, Billy Bowers and O. W. 
Braddoek filled in on the bits. 

Eleanor Revere, who was- the- winning 
model, was kept busy throughout the 
show. 

The chorus presented Lulu Stanley, 
Lulu Leslie, Lillian Smith, Kitty Dayton, 
Loretta Qaxton, Dolly Gordon, Carrye 
Bernard, Grace Sachs, Billy Barry, Lily 
Eealy, Harriett Murray, Rhea Hill, Mamie 
Howe, Mabelle Reid, May Wagner, Flor- 
ence Cooke, Edith Ager, and Hazel 
Langley. 

"The Firemen's Parade and Tableau" 
was put over nicely. Margie Newell led 
the "Buttonhole Makers' Ball" number 
for several encores- 
Billy MeGarry and Eleanor Revere pre- 
sented a lively specialty, during which Mr. 
MeGarry showed clever footwork in a clog 
dance. 




ALBOLENE 



"Stmrm of thm mtagm 

hawmadmittfierat*" 

"I am using Albolene every day and 

find it surpassing. Ic cuts the paint 

nicely and does not irritate the skin. " 

STELLA MAVHEW. 

Alhnlans a potap m t and a coaei rah** 
a fit the makx- op box: tl» in h and t lb 
oki*. It mar be had of most drttgsisa and 
Smm in mifcmn. Stmplt few. oq request, 

McKESSON * ROBRINS 



NWYeaat 



•1 FsJtooStrewt 




PROFESSIONAL COPIES AND ORCHESTRATIONS IN ALL KEYS 



sai francisco CHICAGO M. Witmark & Sons Philadelphia boston 

FANTAOES BUG. SCHTLLES BLDG ■■ ■ « rf . .. ..... H KM CHESTHTJT ST. 811 TKZKOXT ST 

AL BROWNE. Mgr. TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. U Ei2m 2 S " itS Stt ' ED- EOWARDS, Hfr. JACK LAHEY. Mfr. 




TJasJ far SO yean hy Stan of tb> f m fes um . Sad 
for tm EXOBA omnia. CBABLCS MBTQ. 
[Sat. 186S] 1-3 K. 13th SL. New Talk 



"Four Years in Europe 

With Buffalo Bill" 

(Complete Account of CoL Cody's Tour) 
ONE DOLLAR A COPY 
VAN FLEET, 47 W. 28th St., New York 

TaciTopj, N. J, Jan. 4. — As a means of 
enlivening the mental facilities of the pris- 
oners at the New Jersey State Prison mo- 
tion pictures are to be introduced. 



WANTED IMMEDIATELY 

Man. who plays mouth organ and banjo, and can double on dancing- or yodling, 
for vaudeville headliner. Call, write or wire. H. WATSON, Room 711, 
1482 Broadway, N. Y. 



WANTED 

Good Stock and Musical Comedy Com- 
panies for Summer Parks. Address 

J. A. TAGGART 

Greonlleld. Vf« 



WASTED — MlQ wbo has bad experience assist- 
ing protean act; prerloos experleoce essential. 
State lowest terms. Answer E. «-"»»«, c /o Now 

York Clipper. 



•JOIN ON WIRE 

Leading, H=ivy and Character Man. Must be 
tall and able to deliver the goods. NO BOOZE. 
Good treatment and money sore. Make salary 
in keeping- with the times. Specialties pre- 
ferred. Address 

MANAGER STOCK CO^idney. Ohio. 

WASTED TO BUT — Second hand drawing room 
set. 5 folding flats, each Oat most hare door open- 
ing 15 ft. high, not less 30 ft. width; rock bottom 
price with crates. Answer J. Fletcher, e/o Clipper. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



JEAN ADAIR 



"Maggie— Taylor Waitress" 

Laying Off This Week 



Direction Lewis Ac Gordo 



THE CAST EELS 

A Thriller Supreme AUTO WONDERS OF THE AGE DIRECTION ALF. T. WILTON 

MOST SENSATIONAL AUTOMOBILE ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 




If Yon Have Read About 

$15 °° Clothes fig BB "* 

Come and f~*\ 

I Look Over Our (14^) 
Styles First \LS 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

SINGER'S CLOTHES SHOP 

Cor. 49th St., 1604 B' way, One Flight Dp 

BILLY CARTER 

Writes playlets and ererytbtDg else — except soots 
—for Taoderllle. HASXOWE THEATRE. Std 

and Stewart Chicago. 



Big rime Acts 



PAEOD1K3, etc Catalog 
for stamp.' . EticlasiTe 
work done. I Vu na for 

•tamp, Interriewa arranged for by tatter onlj. 

MABT THATES, SIM Broad St, WmjHmm *• *• 

WAIMXJED— 

CIXVER TRAINED DOG.- Give description 
and price. Address MARK, 117 West Mtn St., 
New York. ~^^ 

AT LIBERTY 

Characters— Reliable, Experienced. VICTOR DE 
LACEY. 3 Parish Place, Worcester, Mass. TeL 
Csdar SM. 



w 



VAUDEVILLE 
CIRCUIT 

S08 DELAWARE BLDG., CHICAGO 



Wanted^ 

Soubrette 

That can change for week; double acts; one 
with medicine show experience preferred; also 
good sketch team. Send photo. MURDOCK 
BROS. BIG MEDICINE SHOW, 
N. H. 



AT LIBERTY 

Ingenue Lead 

Young, appearance, wardrobe, abil- 
ity. Address "M. R." c/o N. Y. 
Clipper. 



AT LIBERTY 



Ingenues and Juveniles, height S ft. 4J4 in.; 
weight 110 lbs. Wardrobe, ability, appearance. 
Prefer repertoire, or one piece. Address Z4I 
North I7th St_ Philadelphia, Pa. 



Large List of Q| BlfC 

Mew Profes- S~M fl ¥ e9 
sional and ™ eB«waw 

Amateur Plays, Vaudeville Sketch- 
es, Stage Monologues, tjew Min- 
strel Material. Jokes, Hand-Books 
Folk Dances, Musical 
Entertainments. 




P.ecitaticna. Dialogues, Speakers, 

. k Wigs. BeambyGreaie Paints and 
Other Make-up Goods. CATALOGUE FREE. 



Tableaux, Drills, Wigs. Be 



T. S. QEN1SON * CO., DEFT. 17. CHICAGO 



SLAYVf AN ALI 

.: Producer of 

ORIENTAL NOVELTIES 



MADISON'S BUD- 

af % l?1* V* I *C Aa lMDe that 

of this famous encyclopedia of gilt-edge com-' 
edy material. MADISON'S BUDGET No. 16 
coats %\ and contains 12 original monologue*, 
8 great acta for two males and 7 for male 
and female, a bright Irish act for three 
people, 20 Bare-are parodies, 4 professional 
minstrel first-parts, a screaming tabloid 
comedy, entitled "Hare Mercy, Judge"; also 
hundreds of nifty gaga and fanny sidewalk 
bits. Remember the price la ONE DOLLAR; 
or for $1.00 I will send BUDGET Nos. 15 
and 16. JAKES MADISON, 1052 Third. Ave- 
nue. Hew York. 



LOCATION WANTED FOR Al STOCK CO. 

Tabs or Full productions, anywhere. WM. J. NELSON, Jan. 11-12-13, Deposit, 
N. Y.; Candor, N. Y. ( following; week. 



WANTED— 

STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 

Good House, Good Business, Capacity Ma. Two Bills per week. Three mats. Factor; town 
of 30,000. Good town for Permanent Stock. First class Stock and Repertoire Cos. write. 
J. C. CARNETTE. Crystal Theatre, Anderson, Ind. 



WANTED— 
For the Walter Davis Stock Company 

Youny, good looking juvenile man (or strong line of parts; must do specialties. General 
business man with specialties. Long engagement, sure salary, first-class time. Write or 
wire ADAM W. FRIEND, Mgr., care Orpheum Theatre, Steelton, Pa., week of January 8th; 
Opera House, Caatesville, Pa., week January 15th. 



SONGWRITERS 



a car ootrsit: amfe. ST AST SIGHT. Sand rm nea^ , 



■ Ait-g-lT-T-: 



SENT FP 



I Bn^Mm- sgaj ll gssl jjsnsss s - 

KNICKERBOCKER STUDIOS,!*? Gaiety Theatre Boilriiag, N. T. Gty 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

a. pau. Ksnu. iwaat *. r. aucs. vk-Pr-s. a g— . m«t. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 

Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



RUTH 



BARNEY 



NOBLE 8 NORTON 

A BREEZE FROM MUSICAL COMEDY 

Direction IRVING COOPER 



Joe Lane *»* Pearl Harper 



"The Manicure and the Man 



*> 



£*f.oW MONEY 




WANTED QUICK 

Inienue to Play some Soubrettes, with good 
specialties, man for leads and heavies. Other 
useful people with specialties, write. J. 1— 
TEMPEST, Union City, Pa.; week of 15, Cony, 
Pa. 

WANTED QUICK 

For Edna Clymer Stock Co., Character and Gen- 
eral Business Man with specialties. Moat harr 
good wardrobe, A-l agent. Other asefol repertoire 
people with specialties write. Name lowe-tt *alarr. 
Btste all first letter, enclosing photos and pro- 
grams. Mast Join oa wire. Address CRAB. fl. 

HJXBEHT, 1111 Wallace St., Philadelphia, p.. 



PEACE 

la nse d ec. In Europe,— Funny Comaify to 

wanted In vaudeville. You can't make 
peace for Europe, but you can maka your 
audience laugh by using- the up-to-data 
comedy material from 

THE NEW No. a 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN 

price ei.oo 

JseHAIXT'B BUIXETTH Ho. t contains IT 
MMUBM XOBOLOOUES. For Hebrew. 
Irish. Black snd White Face. Dutch, 
Tramp. Wop, Female and Stomp Speech. 

10 GREAT ACTS JOE TWO KALES. Baca 

act an applsose winner. 
8 ROARIXG ACTS FOE K1LZ AMT> lTC- 

afaT.F Ttej'U make good on any bill. 
23 BURE-PTHE PARODIES. On all of 

Broadway's latest Song Hits. 
A COMEDY SKETCH. Entitled "ANXIOUS 

to obt rich." it's u» funniest 

SKETCH In VaodcTlHe. 

Mdfaixrs mthii t HJ J T 8 T R ELS. Con- 
sisting of six corking FIRST PARTS, end- 
inc with a screaming Finale. "NOT 
OCJLTY." 

A TABLOID COKEDT AND BtrBUESOTTE. 
enUtled "IT'S YOUR WIFE"; also hun- 
dreds of Cross-Fire Gags and Jokes and 
additional Comedy Surprises. Remember 
the price of McNau.y'r bulletin No. 
2 Is only OKE DOLLAR per copy, with 
money-back guarantee. 

WM. KcNaUY, 81 E. 12Sth St. New York 



WIGS, TOUPEES, GREASE, 
PAINT, ETC 

S'ml (or Price List 
G. SHINDHELM, It* West aath St, N. Y. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 





PROPOSED TAX 

MENACE TO 

INDUSTRY 

N. Y. FILM MEN TO FIGHT SCHEME 

With the avowed intention of increasing 
the annual revenues of the State of New 
York to the extent of $2,000,000, Senator 
Elon K. Brown Has introduced a resolution 
in the Legislature that proposes to inves- 
tigate the motion picture industry, for the 
purpose of determining how the 'film busi- 
ness may best yield the foregoing amount 
by way of taxation. 

A committee of three has been appointed 
consisting of the following State Senators : . 
John Knight of Wyoming county, James 
W. Yelverton of Schenectady and James 
J. Walker of New York City. They will 
work conjunctively with a committee of 
Gve Assemblymen in an effort to find out 
the most efficacious method of applying the 
proposed impost, providing that both 
branches of the Legislature pass favor- 
ably on the resolution. A compromise 
2*ay be effected should the resolution be 
adopted this week, whereby an agreement 
may be reached regarding Sunday picture 
shows throughout the State. 

The National Association of the Motion 
Picture Industry is already on the job with 
a well defined plan to combat this latest 
attempt to mulct the film folk. The asso- 
ciation will immediately start a campaign 
using similar propaganda to that employed 
to such good purpose in defeating the re- 
cently squelched Christman-Wheeler bill. 

It will be pointeo out among other 
things by representatives of the N. A. of 
the M. P. I. that several legislators active 
in promulgating the Christman-Wheeler 
measure, were returned unceremoniously to 
private life by their constituencies at the 
past election. An appeal for public support 
in opposition to a State tax on the film bus- 
iness will also be made via the picture the- 
atres; slides, literature and lecturers being 
utilised as in the previous fight. 

The Brown resolution briefly summed 
up, practically proposes to charge the pic- 
tare men §2,000,000 for the simple privi- 
lege of transacting ■ a legitimate business. 
While not verified, it* is understood, the 
liquor and saloon interests of the State 
are backing the film tax scheme with all 
of the powerful resources at their command, 
it being a well known fact that the movies 
have made deep inroads into the hitherto 
large profits- of New York's thirst empo- 
riums during the past three or four years. 



ELDREDGE QUITS PICTURES 

Charlie Eldredge , who has played a 
range of characters, embracing everything 
from a newsboy to a millionaire in the 
past eight years, vrilr leave the screen to 
its own resources in a week or so. The 
veteran film actor will next try his hand 
in the exhibiting end, having accepted the 
job of assis tin g M. W. McGee in the man- 
agement of the Majetic Theatre, Detroit, 
where he expects to soon become an exhibi 
tion expert. 



BY WAY OF CONTRAST 

The life of the average film star contains 
something new every moment of the day. 
For illustration, last week at the Triangle 
coast studios, Constance Talmadge played 
a scene in a feature, necessitating a per- 
sonal encounter with timber wolves. On 
the other hand, Lillian Gish in "The House 
Built Upon Sand" during the action slept 
in a $20,000 bed. Both played their parts 
willingly. 



MAE MARSH IS DIFFERENT 

Mae Marsh has peculiar claims to dis- 
tinction as a film star not only for what 
the possesses in the way of talent, acting 
ability and personality, but by reason of 
what she does not only in the line of man- 
nerisms, affectations, fails, etc. The Gold- 
wyn star, according to reliable information, 
does not own a Roman- bath, a country 
villa, racing car, a desire to utilize the 
American flag for self advertisement nor 
an inclination to collect antiques. 



BARRYMORE SELZNICK STAR 

John Barrymore has been engaged as 
the star of the next Herbert Brenon pro- 
duction, "The Lone Wolf." Work on the 
forthcoming feature will start next week. 
Barrymore, who left the Bcreen over a 
year ago to return to the stage in Gals- 
worthy's "Justice," will play a role in 
'The Lone Wolf" that is more or less of 
a radical departure from the type of light 
comedy parts he was formerly identified 
with during his previous sojourn in pic- 
turcland. 



ADLER'S NEW JOB 

Bert Adler, formerly connected with the 
film enterprises of Herbert Blache in an 
executive capacity, has been appointed 
metropolitan manager of the Educational 
Films Corporation of America. 



SLADD1N RETURNS FROM TOUR 

Spencer Sladdin is back in New York 
after a four weeks' trip, which took him 
as far as the coast, in the interests of 
"The Crimson Stain Mystery. According 
to the Consolidated Film Corporation's 
publicity department his venture into the 
hinterland was frought with conspicuous 



"THE WHIP'S" BIG SCENE 

The big scene of "The Whip," in which 
u complete train of railroad coaches is 
smashed to smithereens, was photographed 
at Greenwood, Del., last week. The cost 
of the realism achieved in the scene in 
question will put a terrific dent in $25,-. 
OCO. The Paragon Co. is making the screen 
version. 



WORLD STUDIOS BUSY 

No less than five feature productions 
are in active preparation in the World 
Film Corporation's Fort Lee studios. 
Kitty Gordon is busily engaged in "Haunt- 
ing Shadows" tinder the direction of E. 
Chautarde. Ethel Clayton will star 
shortly in The House Cat," Alice Brady 
In "Motherhood," Carlyle Blackwell in 
'Who Is Sylvia" and Gail Kane in "Her 
Higher Destiny," all five reelers. 



FINE ARRAY OF 

STARS FOR 

GOLDWYN 

NEW CO. COMING FACTOR IN FIELD 



FROU FROU CHANGED 

Instead of releasing the film adaptation 
of Frou Frou under its original title, the 
World Film Corporation has decided to 
call the picture "A Hungry Heart." It 
will be ready for the market Feb. 5. 



One of the really interesting' announce- 
ments of the new year in picture circles is 
the engagement of Maxine Elliott by Gold- 
wyn Pictures Corporation. Now that she 
has decided to take the plunge. Miss El- 
liott is delighted over her forthcoming en- 
try into the hitherto untried field o.f the 
cinema. 

As the many persons who have seen her 
can testify since her return from Europe 
last week, Maxine Elliott is still the rad- 
iant beauty whose personality made In- 
numerable stage plays successful during the 
long periods she occupied a commanding 
figure in American theatricals. 

Work of the most strenuous kind at the 
relief hospitals along the Yser Canal has 
agreed with Miss Elliott apparently. In 
order to make an immediate screen appear- 
ance for her new managers she is taking a 
several months' furlough from the war re- 
lief work that has occupied all of her time - 
during the past two years. The vehicle that 
will introduce Miss Elliott to the picture 
fans of America has been selected. Its 
title will be announced shortly. 

Another important Goldwyn capture in 
the stellar line is Jane Cowl, known to 
millions aa the heroine of "Within the 
Law." Immediately following the run of 
her present stage engagement in "Lilac 
Time" Miss Cowl will begin work in a 
picture production for the Goldwyn Cor- 
poration. Two of America's greatest 
dramatists are already busily engaged in 
writing a like number of photodramas, each 
being constructed with a full knowledge 
of the type of play Miss Cowl's admittedly 
well developed talents are bet suited to. 
Every season hereafter Miss Cowl will be 
seen in at least two Goldwyn film produc- 
tions. 

With its wonderful staff of playwrights 
and with the additional advantage of high- * 
class executives such as Samuel Goldfish, 
Arthur Hopkins and v Edgar Selwyn the 
Goldwyn Corporation is assuredly well 
fitted to make things hum once they get 
started in the busy whirl of filmdom. 

The first release will have Mae Marsh, 
one of the biggest drawing cards presently 
playing before the camera. This picture, 
which promises to set a new mark in screen 
production, will be ready for market within 
the month. 

The concern has now under contract 
Ralph Ince, the noted director whose train- 
ing and advice practically put Anita Stew-, 
art in the enviable stellar position she holds 
today. 

Mae Marsh. Maxine Elliott and Jane 
Cowl. There is a trio worthy of any ex- 
hibitor's consideration. 



BUYS NOTED WRITERS' SCRIPTS 
The Universal Film Manufacturing Co., 
through the Authors' Associated Agency, 
has purchased more than 800 scripts of 
noted writers. 



MUTUAL HAS EDNA GOODRICH 

The Mutual has engaged Edna Goodrich 
to appear in four features. She will leave 
for the coast as soon as her present vaude- 
ville tour is completed. 



MORE MOViE MILLIONS 
The Famous Players — Lasky Corpora- 
tion has increased its capitalization from 
$12,600,000 to $20,000,000. Win. H. Eng- 
lish, vice-president of the Empire Trust 
Co. of New York, was added to the direc- 
torate at the annual meeting of the con- 
cern's stockholders held last week. 



COHAN'S LEADING WOMAN 

Marguerite Snow will play opposite, in 
George M. Cohan in Artcraft'B screen ver- 
sion of "Broadway Jones," now in course 
of filming in Florida. 



MEYER WITH SUPERPICTURES 

Phil Meyer, until recently manager of 
the New York exchange of B. S. Moss, 
has joined the selling forces of Superpic- 
tures. 



FIRST UNDER COMEDY 

"Max Cornea Across" is the title of the 
first Max Under comedy to be released by 
Essanay. Motion . picture men are rather 
curious regarding how the American public 
will take Under, whose films have not been 
shown on this side of the water for many 
years. In Europe they think he is funnier 
that Chaplin. We shall see. 



WM. NIGH WITH FOX 

Wm. Nigh, ex-Metro director, whose un- 
derworld pictures made a lot of money for 
that concern, has been signed by William 
Fox. 



BRONX EXHIBITORS ELECTION 
The Cinema Club of the Bronx held its 
annual election of officers last week. John 
J. Wittman was unanimously re-elected 
president; Nathan Vinegrad, vice-presi- 
dent; Sam Sucbman, treasurer, and Henry 
Cole, secretary. 



ORPHANS SEE SNOW WHITE 

Through the courtesy of the Paramount 
Pictures Corporation, three thousand 
orphans of Minneapolis were given an in- 
vitation performance of "Snow White" 
Christmas Day. Similar performances were 
given in other cities. 



MAUDE FEALY WITH LASKY 

Maude Fealy, the popular dramatic 
actress, has signed to appear in two fea- 
tures for the Lasky Co. She' leaves for the 
coast this week. 



ESTERBROOK DIRECTING 

Howard Esterbrook, who has confined 
his screen activities to acting exclusively 
heretofore, has joined the Morosco forces 
and will -direct himself and other stars in 
forthcoming productions. 



January 10, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



"BLACK ORCHIDS" 

Bluebird. Five Heels. 
Released Jan. 1 by Bluebird. 

Cast. 

Marie de Severac Cleo Madison 

Ensile de Severac Richard La Reno 

George Renoir — ... ... . .Francis McDonald 

Zoraida Oleo itaditon 

Marquis de Chantal.. . .Wcdgewood Nowell 
Sebastian de Maupin — Howard Orampton 
Ivan de Maupin Francis McDonald 

Story — Melodrama. French locale. Story 
suggestive of the type of gruesome tales 
written by Edgar Allen Poe. Directed 
by Rex Ingraham. 

Action — Absorbingly interesting. 

Continuity — Not a break. 

Suspense — Correct. 

Detail — Correct. 

Atmosphere — Great. 

Photography— Good. 

Re m ar k s. 

"Black Orchids" is an exceptionally good 
picture. Hereafter when the respective 
merits of the ten greatest feature directors 
are being discussed Rex Ingraham, prac- 
tically a new comer in the field, will have 
to be considered seriously. Ingraham dis- 
plays a peculiar cleverness in suggesting 
the biearre, without at any time making 
the story offensive in the slightest degree. 
The cast has been chosen with an eye to 
fitness, each player involved in depicting 
the action evidencing a keen knowledge of 
what was required. The film may not 
particularly please all classes of picture 
patrons, nevertheless it should appeal to a 
sufficient number to warrant financial suc- 
cess. Cleo Madison does about the best 
work of her long picture career. Others 
who score artistically are Francis Mc- 
Donald, Wedgewood Nowell, Howard 
Orampton and Richard La Reno. 
Box Office Value. 

Larger cities three days.- Smaller towns 
one day. Advertise the character of thr 
story. 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"WHOM THE GODS 
DESTROY" 

Vitagraph. Five Reels. 
Released Dec. 23 by Vitagraph. 

Cast. 

Mary O'Neil .Alice Joyce 

Leslie St. George Leigh. . .Harry T. Morey 

Bir Denis Esmond Marc MaoDermott 

O'Neil. Logan Paul 

Father McCarthy Charles Kent 

King of England Thomas R. Mills 

Lady Esmond Mary Maurice 

Carl. .Mr. Biegel 

Story — Melodrama. Irish locale. Treats 
of recent Irish rebellion. Good human 
interest story. Written for screen by 
J. Stuart Blackton and Cyrus Town- 
send Brady. Directed by J. Stuart 
Blackton and Win. P. S. Earle. 

Action— Moves swiftly. 

Su spense — Strong. 

Continuity — Even. 

Detail — Good. 

Atmosphere — Realistic. 

Photography — Satisfactory. 
Remarks. 

This is a well made feature. The acting 
is of the best and nothing has been over- 
looked in the matter of staging. The story 
will appeal more to those of the American 
population whose sympathies in the con- 
flict now being waged in Europe are in- 
clined toward the Allies. There is quite 
a bit of romantic Interest surrounding the 
Irish hero, but while not in any way un- 
neutral the film seems designed to help 
create pro-British sentiment. Harry 
Morey is excellent as an English army 
officer. His repression in the heavier 
dramatic scenes is indeed highly commend- 
able. Marc MncDennott in the role of an 
Irish patriot plays with a dash and lively 
spirit quite in keeping with the character. 
Alice Joyce makes the heroine convincing- 
ly human throughout the entire picture. 
On the whole a production that should 
rause considerable talk. 

Box Office Value. 

Two days. Advertise the character of 
the story. Feature. Morey, MacDennott 
and Joyce. 



"OLIVER TWIST" 

Lasky. .Five Reels. 

Released Dec. 20 by Paramount, 

Cast. 

Oliver Twist M arte DofO 

Bill Bikes Hobart Bosworth 

Fagin. .. 'Fully Marshall 

The Artful Dodger Raymond Hatton 

Mr. lirr.icnlow James Neill 

Nancy .Elsie Jane Wilson 

Mr. Bumble Harry Rattenbury 

Monk* Carl Btockdale 

Story — Adaptation of Chas. Dickens' novel 
of the same name'. Scenario by James 
Young. Directed by James Young. 

Action — Holding. 

Continuity — Well maintained. 

Suspense — Keen. 

Detail — Accurate. 

Atmosphere — Great. 

Photography — Impressionistic. 

Remarks. 
This version of the celebrated literary 
classic is a wonderful piece of filming. The 
production maintains a high standard of 
artistry throughout its entire length. The 
director has caught the exact spirit and 
atmosphere of the Dickens story and the 
players carry out the idea admirably. 
Oliver Twist, as portrayed by Marie Doro, 
becomes a living character, who seems to 
have stepped ont of the pages of the book. 
The "Fagin" of Tully Marshall will un- 
doubtedly add to that artist's already well 
established reputation as a character actor. 
Hobart Bos worth gives a forceful rendition 
Of the reprehensible "Bill Sikes" and Elsie 
Jane Wilson is likewise happily cast as 
"Nancy." Raymond Hatton plays the 
"Artful Dodger" according to the best 
traditions of the role. 

Box Office Value. 
In the better houses this should play a 
full week. Advertise Marie Doro. 



"THE HEIRESS AT COFFEE 
DAN'S" 

Fine Arts. Five Reels. 

Released Deo. 27 by Triangle. 

Cast 

Waffles Bessie Love 

Carl Miller Frank Bennett 

Shorty Olson Max Davidson 

Clare Johnstone I/ucille Younge 

Bert Gallagher Alfred Paget 

Story— Comedy drama. Written for 
screen by Bernard McConville. Directed 
by Edward Dillon. 

Action — Very entertaining. 

Continuity — Even. 

Suspense— Well sustained. 

Detail — Very good. 

Atmosphere — Excellent. 

Photography— Good camera effects. 

Remarks. 

Bessie Love is the bright particular star 
of this entertaining film story. The clever 
little actress displays a wonderful knowl- 
edge of characterization in depicting the 
role of a waitress in a rough and ready 
quick lunch bcanery. The fact that she is 
scarcely past the pinafore age makes her 
performance all the more remarkable. 
Numerous incidents of every day life have 
been incorporated in the scenario by the 
author and the plot is rich in human in- 
terest values. The picture has been ade- 
quately mounted and the cast is thoroughly 
competent On the whole a decidedly good 
feature. 

- Box Office Value. 

Three days. Advertise Bessie Lore. She 
has a large following among the fans. 



"THE PRICE OF SILENCE" 

Bluebird. Fire Keels. 

Released Deo. 11 by Bluebird. 

Cast 

Helen Urmy Dorothy Phillips 

A line Vola Smith 

Oliver Urmy Front Whitton 

Edmund Stafford Lon Cheney 

Jenny Cuppa Evelyn Belbia 

Billy Cuppt Jay Belasoo 

Ralph Kelton Jaek Mulhall 

Landlord Eddie Brown 

Story— Modern problem play. Very melo- 
dramatic and not always convincing. A 
movie feature of the old school. Writ- 
ten for screen by W. Carey Wonderly. 
Scenario by Ida May Park. Directed by 
Joseph De Grasse. 

Action — Overdrawn theatricalism. 

Continuity— O. K. 

Suspense — Manufactured. 

Detail — Satisfactory. 

Atmosphere — Fair. 

Photography— Good. 

Remarks. 

This is a very ordinary movie melo- 
drama. All of our old friends in the way 
of broad coincidences, conventional situa- 
tions and other attributes of single-reel 
program stuff are easily recognizable. The 
acting is passable, judged by elementary 
standards. The seta are satisfactory, pho- 
tography much better than the story de- 
serves and the fact that the more sensa- 
tional characteristics of the piece are kept 
well within bounds a creditable point in 
favor of the director. The borrowed Blue- 
bird slogan, "the play's the thing," is not 
proved very satisfactorily in this .picture. 
Several exterior scenes are worthy of spe- 
cial mention. 

Box Office Value. 

One day. Smaller houses should make 
money with this. Advertise the title. If 
any player is to be exploited Dorothy Bhll- 
lips is the most logical choice. 



LAEMMLE DENIES AGAIN 

Carl Laemmle has again denied that he 
will leave the Universal and start a rival 
concern. One of the trade papers published 
a report last week which brought forth the 
second denial on the part of Mr. Laemmle. 



"MIXED BLOOD" 

Red Feather. Fire Reels. 

Released Dec. 23 by Universal. 

Cast 

Nita Valyes Claire McDowell 

Carlos George Beranger 

Big Jim .Roy Stewart 

Joe Nagle Wilbur Higby 

Lottie Nagle Jessie Arnold 

"Blootch" White Harry Archer 

Mrs. Valye* Mrs. Emmons 

Story — Melodrama. Lots of romance and 
adventure. Action takes place along 
the Mexican border. Written for screen 
by Willard Mack. Directed by Chas. 
Swickard. 

Action — Fast and furious. 
Continuity — Well told story. 
Suspense — Strong. 
Detail— Right. 
Atmosphere — Very realistic. 
Photography — Standard. 

Remarks. 

This is a good, old-fashioned movie 
thriller, suggestive in many ways of some 
of the better grade Kay-Bee westerns. The 
story is a bit passe, but then the old stuff 
very often goes the best, at least when it is 
handled properly. In this instance the 
story owes a great deal to the capable man- 
ner in which Chas. Swickard has visualized 
the high lights of the action. There Isn't 
a dull moment in the entire five reels and 
an die aces who are strong for lively melo- 
drama will keenly enjoy following the 
lurid adventures of the photoplay's pic- 
turesque frontier characters. Good feature 
for the smaller houses. 

Box Office Value. 

One day. Advertise Claire McDowell. 
The border thing should pull where It 
hasn't been overdone. 



"SNOW WHITE" 

Famous Players. Six Reels. 

Released by Paramount. 

Cast. 

Snow White Marguerite Clark 

Prince Florimond Creighton Hale 

Queen Brangomar... Dorothy G. Cvmming 

Berthold (huntsman) Lionel Braham 

Witch Hex Alice H'ajsoum 

Story— Fairy tale. Adaptation of Grimm's 

immortal fantasy. Directed by J. Searle 

Dawley. 
Action. — Very entertaining. 
Continuity— Story coherently told. 
Suspense — None. 
Detail— Excellent. 
Atmosphere— Perfect. 
Photography — Very artistic 

Remarks. 

While this is a feature particularly suit- 
able for children, still there is much that 
will interest and entertain an adult audi- 
ence. There is a subtle charm in the ac- 
tion, and Director Dawley must be cred- 
ited with having turned out a visualization 
of the pretty little fairy story which has 
long been a literary classic, that will pass 
muster before the most captious of critics. 
Marguerite Clark is Snow White. She 
gives a performance that may easily be 
termed faultless. In the matter of seta 
and exterior locations "Snow White" is 
worthy of the highest commendation. The 
cast is up to the mark. As a whole a 
notable production. 

Box Office Value. 
This picture played all of last week at 
the Strand, New York. Crowded houses 
at every performance testified to its draw- 
ing powers. Should attract new patrons 
to the picture theatres throughout the 
country. 

"VANITY" 

Popular Players. Five Reels. 

Released Jan. 1 by Metro. 

Cast. 

Phyllis Lord Emmy Wehlen 

James Burke Tom O'Keefe 

Robert Armstrong Edward Martindetl 

Dick Armstrong Paul Gordon 

Torn Mason J. W. Hartman 

Bessie Allen. Esther Evans 

Story — Melodrama. Conventional tale of 

love, murder, mystery and intrigue. 

Jack O'Brien, director. 
Action — Interesting. 
Continuity — Even. 
Suspense — Keen at times. 
Detail — Satisfactory. 
Atmosphere — Will do. 
Photography — First class. 

Remarks. 

As a conveniently built starring vehicle 
for Emmy Wehlen, this feature fulfills Its 
purpose quite satisfactorily. A model in 
a dress making establishment becomes in- 
volved in a plot to fasten a murder on a 
man, with whom she subsequently falls in 
love. A scheming police chief, who runs a 
gambling hou«e as a side line to his official 
activities, secures the model'; aid through 
the means of a frame-up. In the end the 
girl fools the detective however by "get- 
ting something on him." The hero Is 
exonerated and everything is lovely. Miss 
Wehlen gives a characteristically good 
performance as the model, incidentally 
wearing some very nifty costumes. Paul 
Gordon is an excellent type as the hero 
and Tom O'Keefe displays a genuine his- 
trionic ability as the bullying police of- 
ficial. An entertaining feature. 
Box Office Value. 

Two days. Fair advertising. Suitable 
for middle grade and smaller houses. 

THREE SELZNICK'S READY 

The Selznick Enterprises will release no 
less than three big productions during the 
month of January. They are "Panthea" 
with Norma Talmadge, "The Argyle Case" 
with Robert Warwick and the "Eternal 
Sin" with Forence Reed. Each of these 
features has been produced on an elaborate 
scale and their success as box office attrac- 
tions seems assured. 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 10, 1917. 



"A WOMAN ALONE" 

Brady-World. Five fisela. 
Relented Jon. 1 by World. 

Cast 

Nellie- Watdron Alice Brady 

Ton Blaine Edward T. Longford 

Rujus Waldran Edward it. Kimball 

Bamontha Justine Cutting 

Stephen Carter. Jr. Arthur Ashley 

Stephen Carter, 8r. ... .J. Clarence Harcey 
Michael Flynn Walter D. Greene 

Story — Modern problem play. Written 
for screen by Willard Mack. Directed 
by Harry Davenport. 

Action — Entertaining. 

Continuity — Clearly told story. 

Suspense— Holding. 

Detail — Satisfactory. 

Atmosphere— Good. 

Photography — Standard. 

Remarks. 
Willard Mack has furnished the director 
with a rather conventional scenario. The 
story while lacking in novelty, however, is 
very entertaining and the distinctive man- 
ner in which the feature has been staged 
makes up for any deficiencies in plot values. 
Alice Brady is seen to advantage aa a 
woman who essays a mild flirtation with 
subsequent disastrous results. Miss Brady 
makes a part that is somewhat artificial, 
exceedingly convincing. The supporting 
cast is adequate in every way. On the 
whole a feature that should meet with good 
box office returns. 

Box Office Value. 

Suitable for any class of bouse. Willard 

Mack's play writing reputation should be 

of considerable value in exploiting this 

film. Advertise Alice Brady. Two days. 

"THE TRAVELING SALES- 
MAN" 

Famous Players. Five Reels. 
Released by Paramount. 

Cast. 

Bob Blake. Frank Mclntyre 

Beth Elliott Dorit Kenyan 

Franklin Royee. Harry Northrnp 

Sirs. Babbitt. Julia Stuart 

Martin Drury Ruueil Batntt 

Julius Barry Blakemoro 

Watt*. James O'Neill, Jr. 

Story — Comedy drama. Adaptation of 
stage play of same name by James 
Forbes. Joseph Kaufman, director. 
Action — Very entertaining. 
Continuity — Even. 
Suspense— Sufficiently holding. 
Detail— Good. 
Atmosphere — Very good. 
Photography— Excellent. 

Remarks. 

The Traveling Salesman" was a mat 
success aa a stage piece. In screen form 
it should please the average audience, al- 
though it may never attain the popularity 
enjoyed as an oral entertainment. The 
absence of the dialogue, which made the 
spoken version an exceptional comedy of 
American life, manners, morals and cue- 
toms, is of course rather conspicuous. 
Sub-titles composed of phrases taken 
from the original play, help considerably, 
but somehow or other the general effect 
is a bit flat. Frank Mclntyre, m«Hng his 
picture debut in this, does excellently in 
nis unfamiliar environment and should be 
so elect in a short time might become a 
screen favorite, provided his ambitions 
lie in that direction. Good cast. On the 
whole this is a satisfactory program fea- 
ture. 

Box Office Value. 

Three days. Play up to title and fea- 
ture Mclntyre strongly in the billing. 
"The Traveling Salesman" should go best 
in larger houses. 

VAN DER VEER GOING TO S. A. 

Willard Van der Veer leaves to-day for 
Venezuela to take motion pictures for 
the educational department of the Gau- 
mont Film Co. He will stop off on his 
return to the United States to take scenes 
in the West Indies and other tropical sec- 
tions which, be expects, will be of unusual 
interest and of considerable value. 



TRIANGLE TRADE NOTES 

Los Angeles, Cab, Jan. 8. — The big, 
electrically lighted, enclosed studio at the 
Triangle-Fine Arts plant in Los Angeles is 
rapidly nearing completion. It is expected 
that it will be finished about the middle of 
January. When completed the enclosed 
studio will cover a floor space 60x120 feet. 
Other improvements include a new scene 
dock, covering 60x140 feet, a large paint 
shop and another open air stage covering a 
space 70x200 feet, all of which have been 
completed. 



George Stone, the six-yetr-old star of 
the Triangle-Fine Arts studio, is confined 
to his bed with a severe attack of grippe. 
His illness Is the result of a cold water 
soaking he received recently while working 
with Wilfred Lucas in the picturization of 
"Jim Bludso." 



Enid Bennett, the new Triangle-Kay Bee 
star, completed her second starring vehicle 
today and left for San Francisco, where she 
will meet her sister, arriving from Aus- 
tralia, and then leave for New York. Miss 
Bennett will return to the studio in Culver 
City during the early part of January, 
1917. 



The unusual combination of a mother 
and daughter playing together is seen in 
the new Triangle-Fine Arts picture, "The 
Girl of the Timberclaims." Constance Tal- 
madge's mother enacts a prominent part in 
the drama, which is her daughter's first 
starring vehicle. 



BUTTERFIELD IN TOWN 
W. S. Butterfield, the Michigan theatre 
magnate, is a New York visitor this week. 
He will look over several big features with 
an idea of playing them over his big circuit 
of vaudeville and picture bouses. 



WAR ON SUGGESTIVE TITLES 

The New York license bureau is said to 
be watching certain manufacturers whose 
productions are, as a rule, more innocuous 
than harmful, but often give the public the 
wrong impression through the use of sug- 
gestive titles. The moment these producers 
make a false move it is reported the bureau 
will move more swiftly than it has hitherto, 
because of the activities of the city's 
numerous reform organizations. 



COMING 

MACK SENNETT- 
KEYSTONE COMEDIES 

BETTER THAN EVER 



We wish to state 
that as heretofore, 
Mack Sennett-Key- 
stone Comedies may 
be had only through 
Triangle Exchanges 



KESSEL & BAUMANN 

Releatod only by 

TRIANGLE 

DISTRIBUTING CORPORATION 



PHILA. PAPER PANS GRIFFITH 
D. W. Griffith and the North American, 
the Philadelphia news paper, are currently 
engaged in an acrimonious war of words 
over certain unpleasant notices accorded 
"Intolerance," the big Griffith spectacle 
which opened in the slumberous burg a 
couple of weeks ago. The newspaper took 
exceptions, it seems, to the awful panning 
"Intolerance" bands out to the reform ele- 
ment. 



DWAN FINE ARTS MGR. 

It is reported in New York film circles 
that Allan Dwan is shortly to be appointed 
to the post of general manager of the Fine 
Arts, Los Angeles studios, succeeding to 
the place formerly held by David -W. Grif- 
fith, who made the world-famous "Birth 
of A Nation." 



COLONIAL STUDIO BURNS 

The old Colonial Motion Picture Cor- 
poration's studios, at 226 West 35th Street, 
New York, were destroyed by a fire 
Wednesday, January 3, which caused dam- 
ages to property and costumes said to ap- 
proximate $200,000. The studios have been 
rented for the past year by the Columbia 
Pictures Corporation, a Metro constituent. 
Petrova and two other actresses had a 
narrow escape from being caught in ■ the 
burning film plant. 



GRAHAM TO LEAVE MUTUAL 

J. H. Graham will leave the Mutual 
Film Corporation in the course of the next 
week or so. His next connection in the 
picture field will most likely be with the 
Famous Players-Lasky-Paramount com- 
bination. 



MASTABAUM HAS MONTANA FILMS 

The.Mastbanm interests, of Philadelphia 
have taken over the state right holdings of 
the Montana Film Corporation, including 
the Pennsylvania territory held by the 
latter firm on "Civilization." 




SELZNICK^PICTUHES® 

Harry Ropf ****' 

P resent s . . 

ROBERT 

MRWK 

m. 

(ty Arrangement nth Klaw tndErUnger) 

"THE 
ARGYLL CAST 

By Harvey IWU ins Harriet 

Ford and William J.Burns^ 



tt- 



JosephUSchenck 

Presents 

NORMA 

THMDGE 

PANtim" 

By ncwikrariHofre 

THESrOKtfOFA 

LOVE THAT WAS 

t&KEATER THAN 

jg LIFE OR DEATH 

53 ts» 

?5 DiBecren BY 

_ 1EWIS J.SELZNICK 
&? SOLE DISTRIBUTOR 



A CTREOT DETECTTVE - 

siorv wrm a big 

LOVE. INTEREST 
DIRECTED SY 

RMPHWME 





WILLIAM A. BRADY 

In association with 

WORLD PICTURES 

Presents 

ETHEL CLAYTON 



<• 



99 



The Bondage of Fear 

Cast including RocUiffe Fellowes, Arthur Ashley and 
John Bowers. 

Directed by TRAVERS VALE ' 



January 10, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 




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Ohio. 

MUSICAL Gl ssSlSl 
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N Y 

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VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
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I 



Vaudeville again contributes to Broadway 

a worthy prospect for stardom 

in musical comedy, — 

HENRY LEWIS 

Featured in Anna Held's New York Casino success, "Follow Me". 
Scoring tremendously with two new unusual novelty song hits: 

I "WHAT 00 YOU WANT TO MAKE THOSE EYES 
AT ME FOR, WHEN THEY DON'T MEAN 

WHAT THEY SAY" 






5 



By HOWARD JOHNSON, JOE McCARTHY and JIMMIE MONACO; 

AIM D 



"THERE'S JUST A LITTLE BIT Of MONKEY 
STILL LOT IN YOU AND ME" 

By GRANT CLARKE and JIMMIE MONACO 



As you no doubt anticipated, both these wonderful songs are published by 



BOSTON 
181 Tremont St. 

PHILADELPHIA 
Broad and Cherry St. 



LEO FEIST, me. 

135 W. 44th St., NEW YORK 
CHICAGO. GRAND OPERA HOUSE BUILDING 



ST. LOUIS 

7th and Olive St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Pantages Theatre Bldg. 



• ^^j.jj^jfcj J j l LJ..^juu. J j^, . jiitt-m. t.-.i iamiiiiii;ii:-Mj|.Mi. m. r, :;i; iii.iiirui mi ;,unni«ai,l i:;iii|.|iiili!/iirinM»ffll«^^ 



fc 






'\ 



1 



^n-i^rfwniHj^^ 



A 




iZm NEW YORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 

in in in mi mm in m in in m in mi hi m nn ws 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 




HIT 

CELEBRATION 



To the 
Profession: 



Hits for Everybody — the comedian, the comedienne, the ballad singer, 
the coon shouter, double acts, tabloids, in fact, every style of singing 
act is well provided for in this remarkable collection of novelty songs. 
It gives us great pleasure to be able to cater to your needs so thor- 
oughly at the beginning of the new year. 



DOWN WHERE THE SWANEE RIVER FLOWS 
PUT ON YOUR SLIPPERS AND FILL UP YOUR PIPE 

(You're Not Going Bye-Bye Tonight) 

EVE WASN'T MODEST TILL SHE ATE THAT APPLE 

(We'll Have to Pass the Apples Again) 



THE HONOLULU HICKI BOOLA BOO 



TO ANY GIRL 



ITS THE IRISH IN YOUR EYE 

(You've Cot Me Going With Your Irish Ways) 



Oh, How She Could 

YACKI HACKI WICKI WACKI WOO 



DOWN IN HONKY TONKY TOWN 



The ICini; of all-Souther. 
Songs. At -Jojson's Fa- 
mous hit in ''Robinson 
Crusoe, Jr." f L'^,1 

Words by].. 

CHAS. McCARRON and 

CHAS. S. ALBtkTt 

Music by! .'■ 

ALBERT VQN f r l>ZER 



funniest *b'nfj in 
r». . Every line & 



Words by . 

ED. P; MORAN and 

WILL A. HEELEN 

Music by 

ALBERT VON TILZER 



Watch them flock in for 
this one T n e biggest 

riot in years. 

Words by 
CHAS. McCARRON 

Music by 
ALBERT VON TILZER 

I ■_■ 



ne by [the boys 

'•Oh. How 

She Could YackS Hack.'." 

A clean-up for any act. 

Words h|y 

LEW BROWN ..,..) 

CHAS. McCARRON 

Music by 

ALBERT VON TILZER 



The greatest novelty 
march song in years. 
Not even excepting "My 
Little Girl," by the same 
writer. 

Words by LEW BROWN 
Music by | 
ALBERT VON T1UER 



Don't overlook this great 
novelty Irish song. ' Pure, 



lines, wonderful melody, 
and it's different. 
Words by WILL DILLON 

Music by 
^ALBERT VON TILZER 



The Great H 

: that set- the pace, 
and is still leading them 
all. 

Words by 

CHAS. McCARRON and 

STANLEY MURPHY 

Music by 

ALBERT VON TILZER 



rag song, cant.l 

one. Some melody! 
Words and .Music by 

CHAS. McCARRON a- 
CHR1S SMITH 



BROADWAY MUSIC CORP., WILL VON TILZER, Pres. 145 W. 45th St., N. Y. C. CHICAGO, 145 N. Clark St. 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1BSJ 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 17, 1917 



VOLUME LXrV-No. SO 
Price Ten Cent* 



LAMBS CLUB 

MEMBERS 

REVOLT 

PLAYERS JOIN M OVEMENT 

There is a revolution on within the 
Lambs and Players Clubs and what 
promises to be the most exclusive and 
conservative theatrical club on Broadway 
is now. in the process of organization. 
Its birth is the culmination of dissatis- 
faction on the part of many of the most 
prominent members of the two clubs. 

The idea of such a club has been secret- 
ly discussed off and on for almost ten 
years, according to one of the main- 
springs of the present movement, but has 
always been balked at and put off on ac- 
count of the delicate nature of the pro- 
ject and the want of a leader fearless 
enough to undertake the initiative and 
cast a defl at the older organizations. 
However, things have now come to a 
point, it is said, where matiy of the mem- 
bers of the two clubs are willing to bring 
the matter to a head and have banded to- 
gether to put it solidly on its feet. 

The dissatisfaction toward the older 
organizations has arisen from several 
causes, it is said. One of them is that 
the older clubs have lost much of their 
theatrical distinctiveness, so that it ia 
now possible for a man in any walk of 
life to become a member. The theatrical' 
members are said to resent the presence 
of bankers, lawyers and merchants with- 
in the club walla and feel' that this has 
tended to thwart the objects for which 
the clubs were originally organized. 

Then, too, the cluba have also been 
materially increasing their memberships, 
with the result that many young mem- 
bers have been taken in, who, while en- 
titled to membership, are of. a different 
school than the older actor, and the lat- 
ter has resented the intrusion of this 
younger order. 

For some time the revolution within the 
confines of the two clubs has been assum- 
ing greater and greater proportions until 
a definite campaign was recently deter- 
mined upon for the formation of the new 
organization which will hold its first 
meeting within the next few weeks. 

It will limit its membership to 100 
members who will be recruited from the 
two older organizations. To qualify for 
membership, one must have had at least 
twenty-one years of close association with 
the stage. 

The club will begin humbly, occupying 
(.Continued on page 6.) ■ - 



BELASCO TAKES MACK PLAY 

Willard Mack, the actor-playwright, has 
written a four-act play entitled, "Alias 
Cancelled," for David Belasco which will 
have its premier at the Belasco Theatre, 
Washington, D. C, February 5. Mack has 
signed a three-year contract with Mr. 
Belasco and will himself portray the prin- 
cipal role in the new play. The support- 
ing members of the cast are, Marjorie 
Moreland, Arthur Dondrau, Gns. Wein- 
berg, Kd win Mordaunt, J. Wilson, Camille 
Grume, Anna Mack Berlin, Catherine 
Moleneaux, Tammany Young, George 
Clarke, John Jevne and Ned Mack. 



GROVE OPENS TOMORROW 

Cocoanut Grove, established atop of the 
Century Theatre by Charles Dillingham 
and Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., will be opened 
tomorrow night immediately following the 
performance of "The Century Girl" down- 
stairs. "Dance and Grow Thin" will be 
the theatrical feature which will be given 
on the dance floor in the centre of the 
enclosure. 



"THE BRAT" TO BE RECAST 

Oliver Morosco is recasting "The Brat," 
the Maude Fulton play in which she had 
the leading part, and is rushing rehearsals 
so that it can be ready for a New York 
opening some time in February. He has 
an option on several theatres, on a rental 
basis for the play. 



"LILAC TIME" HAS PREMIER 
Morribtowtt, N. J., Jan. 13.— "Lilac 
Time," Jane Cowl's new starring vehicle, 
had its premier here tonight. A number 
of New York theatre managers and cri- 
tics accompanied Edgar and Archie Selvyn 
and Arolph Klauber to witness the per- 
formance. 



SOTHERN GIVES UP HOUSE 

E. H. Sothern last week sub-leased his 
house on West Fifty-third Street. Ac- 
cording to his physician this does not in- 
dicate that Mr. Sothern intends leaving 
the city, but that the Sotherns would 
hereafter live in hotels. 



N. Y. PLAYERS WED IN PARIS 

News comes from Paris announcing the 
marriage there of George Kingston, for- 
merly of the Ward and Vokes company, 
and Henrietta Newman, formerly of the 
"Prince of Pilsen" cast. 



MISS MATTHISON HAS NEW PLAY 
. Edith Wynne Matthison will be seen ' 
this season in a modern comedy by her 
husband, Charles Rann Kennedy, entitled 
"Rib of Man." 



ACTOR GETS 

AWARRANT 

FORMACK 

TROUBLE OVER SKETCH 



As a result of the alleged sale of the 
script for a vaudeville sketch, by his 
former business partner, Charles Bach- 
man, in 1015, Willsrd Mack, the actor- 
playwright, came very near being arrested 
last Thursday when John C. Bennett, a 
Thespian, obtained a civil order of arrest 
for the playwright in addition to suing 
him for $10,000. It was only by the 
"kicking in" of $650, in settlement of the 
claim that the playwright avoided a trip 
in the company of Deputy Sheriff Conlin. 

In his complaint, filed in the Nassau 
County Court, Bennett alleged Bachman 
had sold to him a sketch purported to 
have been written by Mack for $862.50. He 
alleged that this same sketch had also been 
sold to one Fred Gray, a vaudeville per- 
former, who is using the material at pres- 
ent. 

Mack was on his way to the office of 
David Belasco, in the Belasco Theatre, 
when confronted by Deputy Sheriff Conlin, 
Attorney George Levy and Bennett, Con- 
lin Informed him he had a civil order of 
arrest and that he would have to accom- 
pany him to Lndlow Street Jail, until ar- 
rangements could be made for a bond. 
Mack suggested they go into the Belasco 
offices and after talking the matter over 
in the presence of Mr. Belasco, Mack gave 
Bennett $650 in settlement of his claim, 
after which the suit and order of arrest 
were withdrawn. 

According to Attorney Levy. Mack was 
a victim of circumstances. He stated that 
the author, prior to going to California in 
1015, had given Bachman the right to dis- 
pose of any of his vaudeville material upon 
a 10 per cent commission basis, and that, 
while Mack was away, he had disposed 
of several of Mack's sketches, of which this 
was one, without making any report to the 
author of bis transactions. He declared 
that as soon as he explained to Mr. Mack 
the actions of bis agent, the latter, con- 
vinced that he was responsible for Bach- 
man's actions, made restitution to Bennett 
for the money obtained from bun. 



MILLER QUITS FOX CO. 

Cbas. A. Miller, who has had charge of 
booking the road shows of "A Daughter of 
the Gods," resigned his position last week 
on account of illness. 'Bam Kingston has 
been -put tn charge of this department. - 



SHUBERTS SIGN DORALDINA 
Doraldina has accepted a contract with 
the Shuberts and will appear at an early 
date in a Broadway musical production. 
The contract provides that she shall do a 
feature dance and shall not be required 
to be on the stage more than fifteen min- 
utes. She will only appear while the 
show is on Broadway, and the engage- 
ment will in no way interfere with her 
dancing at the Montmarte. 



HOWARD'S MINSTRELS CLOSE 

Gene Howard's "Merry Maid" minstrels 
just closed with a successful season 
through New England. The company car- 
ries 15 people, mostly girls. The soubrette 
was Ethel CashUle, and the end men Eddie 
Ward and Gene Howard. 



HARRIS TO BE GUEST 

Sam H. Harris will be the guest of 
honor at a dinner given by the Green 
Room Club on February 4. Irvin Cobb 
will be master of ceremonies and a special 
feature will be a new skit written by Tom 
Barry. 



BEATRICE ALLEN RESUMES 

Beatrice ("Bitlie") Allen, dancer in "The 
Century Girl," who underwent an opera- 
tion at the Woman's Hospital recently, 
has returned to her part in the musical 
show at the Century Theatre. 



GREER MANAGING "EDDIE" 

Brady Greer baa been appointed busi- 
ness manager of the original "Very Good 
Eddie" company. For several years he was 
treasurer of Hammerstela's Victoria 
Theatre. 



JACKSON TO STAY AT HIP 

Joe Jackson's contract with the Hippo- 
drome has been extended for a further 
period. It originally called for. the 
period as did Pavlowa's. 



ARNOLD DALY RECOVERING 

Arnold Daly, who was operated on at 
the Roosevelt Hospital last week, was re- 
ported to be well on the road to recov- 
ery at that institution yesterday. 



FRIARS TO GIVE BEEFSTEAK 

.The Friars will give a beefsteak dinner 
the night of Jan. 31, at the Monastery. 
The entertainment will include vaudeville 
and special features. 



MINER GOES TO CALIFORNIA 
H. Clay Miner, manager of the Henry 
C: Miner Estate, left for southern Cali- 
fornia last week on basinem connected' 
with the moving picture industry. ■'•■ ■ ' 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



SELWYN STATES 

SAVAGE PLAY 

INFRINGES 



MAY START LEGAL ACTION 



With the presentation of "Have a Heart," 
a musical comedy offered by Henry W. 
Savage, at the Liberty Theatre last week, 
Edgar Selwyn charged the story was 
similar to a comedy entitled "Nearly Mar- 
ried," which he wrote several years ago, 
that was produced by Cohan & Harris in 
1914, at the Gaiety Theatre. Upon wit- 
nessing the performance at the Liberty, 
Selwyn immediately got into touch with his 
attorneys and told them to take legal steps 
to prevent the farther presentation of 
"Have a Heart," with the material inter- 
polated in it which he claims is similar 
to that of "Nearly Married." 

It appears that prior to the presentation 
of "Have a Heart" at the Liberty, reports 
were current in the theatrical district that 
the stories of both plays bore a marked 
similarity, and after the first perform- 
ance the comparison of the relative ma- 
terial of the two plays was the sole 
subject of conversation among the first- 
nighters. Several of the reviewers of the 
daily papers also called attention to this 
fact in their criticisms of the play. 

Mr. Selwyn was greatly Incensed over 
the alleged use of this material by the 
anthor, Ony Bolton, aa he claims that prior 
to the New York showing he had notified 
Bolton of the similarity of the stories of 
the two ehowa and that the latter had 
promised to eliminate any material that 
might be objected to by Selwyn. Thin 
Mr. Sewlyn state* was not done. 

He declared that several months ago he 
had an idea of converting "Nearly Mar- 
ried" into a musical show and sent for 
Jerome Kern to supply him with the 
musical version. After explaining the story 
of the play to Kern the latter informed 
Selwyn that he bad already supplied the 
musical version of the play to Bolton, stat- 
ing that it was the story of "Have a 
Heart." 

The anthor then took the matter up with 
John W. Rnmaey, the playbroker, who 
represented both Bolton and himself. After 
a few days, Rumsey told Selwyn that he 
had conferred with Bolton, and that the 
similarities wonld be eliminated from the 
play. It was also agreed, it is said, that 
Bolton was to submit his new version to 
Selwyn for his approval prior to in- 
corporating it in the piece. 

Mr. Selwyn sent his attorney to Atlantic 
City to witness a performance of the show 
prior to the presentation in New York. 
Tue attorney, who was familiar with the 
Selwyn show, reported that the stories were 
still alike. Selwyn conferred with Rumsey 
again, and the latter assured him that 
Bolton wonld eliminate the material ob- 
jected to by him prior to the New York 
opening. And when this was not done, 
Selwyn, after witnessing the opening per- 
formance, declared to both Bolton and Mr. 
Savage that he would seek legal redress. 

Ernst ft Cane, who represent Mr. Selwyn, 
stated yesterday that they had no definite 
legal coarse In mind but that they expected 
to take ac*'on in behalf of their client 
shortly. 



BURLESQUE FOR GRAND STREET 

Edwin A. Relkin and Ben Levine have 
signed a contract with Jack Rovenger, 
manager of the Grand Street Theatre, 
Grand and Christie Streets, to use that 
house as a burlesque theatre for ten 
weeks, commencing Monday, April 30. The 
seating capacity of the house is 2,000. 
This is the first time that burlesque will 
be operated in such a large theatre below 
Fourteenth Street since H. C. Miner gave 
up his franchise. The bill will be changed 
weekly as will also the book, scenery, cos- 
tumes and principals. 



NOTED ACTRESS 

MAY LOSE 

HOME 

ASKS HENRY FORD FOR AID 



MISS HAMMERSTEIN TO STAR 

Elaine Hammerstein, who is now of the 
B. S. Moss screen forces, is about to be 
starred in a feature film entitled "One 
Hour," which is designated as a sequel to 
"Three Weeks" and "One Day," both Moss 
screen productions. This will be the first 
of eight special features Mr. Moss will pro- 
duce during the year. 



MADELINE HOWARD ARRIVES 

Madeline Howard, an English actress, 
arrived in New York last Sunday on the 
American liner New York. Miss Howard 
is going to Colorado Springs for a rest, 
after which she intends returning to New 
York to appear in a Broadway produc- 
tion. 



BOSTON LIKES BRIGHOUSE PLAY 
Boston, Jan. 13.— At the Copley Thea- 
tre the production of "The Odd Man Out," 
by Harold Brighouse, has been well re- 
ceived this -week. This was the first 
American production of the play. 



CRACK SAFES DURING BLIZZARD 

Uniontown, Pa., Jan. 14. — During the 
blizzard which raged here last night the 
safes of two local theatres were blown 
open and robbed of $1,500. 



BRUNER WITH GENERAL FILM 

Frank Bruner, formerly of the business 
staff of Selwyn ft Co., has been engaged 
by the General Film Co. as press repre- 
sentative. 



SWEATNAM FOR DICKSON PLAY 

Messrs. Corey and Riter have signed 
Willis P. Sweatnam for the principal com- 
edy role in Harry Dickson's comedy, "A 
Nigger in the Woodpile." 









sys££? 







ROY BUTLER MARRIED 

Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 11. — Roy Butler of 
New York and Alice Gertrude Rickey of 
Boston were married here recently. They 
are both with the "When Dreams Come 
True" company, Butler playing the prin- 
cipal juvenile lead and Mrs. Butler doing 
the feature dance of the show. Butler is 
a former Atlantan. 



If Supreme Court. Justice Cohaian grants 
an application now pending before him, 
Amelia Bingham will have to vacate her 
home at 103 Riverside Drive, New York, 
long one of the landmarks of the Drive. 
The petitioners for the application are 
Thomas M. McKee and William H. Schu- 
bert who are foreclosing a $25,000 mort- 
gage against the property. 

Mrs. Bingham has refused either to 
leave the house or to pay rent, according 
to Henry Keale, who was appointed re- 
ceiver of rents for the premises pending 
further proceedings. The defendant main- 
tains that she retains an equity in the 
house and that she will not leave unless 
forcibly ejected. 

"The place has a sentimental hold upon 
me," confided Mrs. Bingham to a Cufpeb 
reporter, "and it would take a lot to 
make me leave it. The house represents 
years of happiness, and all these valuable 
bric-a-bracs, paintings and statues that 
you see were collected by my husband and 
me in the happy hours that we spent 
traveling together. I will not give them 
up; they mean so much to me." 

Bingham, who will be remembered as 
one of the active members of the Ford 
Peace Party, died while on the peace mis- 
sion. 

"Ab my husband was such an ardent 
supporter of Mr. Ford," Mrs. Bingham de- 
clared, "when I found myself in my pres- 
ent plight, I wired asking him to take 
a mortgage on some of my land, so that 
I could raise sufficient money to save my 
home. But for some reason or other, Mr. 
Ford never answered my telegram." 

During Bingham's lifetime he made 
some heavy investments in Wall Street. 
With the outbreak of the war, he was 
caught in the panic which followed. Mrs. 
Bingham, to cover her husband, mortgaged 
her Riverside home to McKee ft Schubert, 
to whom her husband owed many thou- 
sands of dollars. Her failure to pay the 
mortgage is the cause of the present eject- 
ment proceedings. 

The house in which Mrs. Bingham lives 
is one of the most unique on the Drive. 
It is a five-story dwelling of a simple 
front, but is ornamented with statuary 
embellishments on the balconies over the 
entrance doors. There are five statutes, 
three being over the main entrance. The 
interior of the house is alive with oil 
paintings, more statues and valuable 
foreign collections of all descriptions. It 
resembles an art museum more than a 
residence. 



NELLIE MALUN ENTERTAINS 

Nellie Mallin, of "Her Soldier Boy" Co., 
entertained several members of the com- 
pany at her home last Sunday night with 
a house warming. Dorothy Flamm, Flor- 
ence Vincent, Jane Gray, Guy Mixon, Moe 
Rosenthal, Wm. Landry, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Allen were among the guests. 



CORBETFS HOUSE ROBBED 

BAYBIDE, L. I., Jan. 15. — It has just been 
discovered that the home of James J. Cor- 
bett on Bayside Boulevard, this place, has 
been stripped of all the valuable relics 
collected by Mr. Corbett during his days 
in the fistic arena. Just when the rob- 
bery occurred is not definitely known. 



STAGE AT HIPPODROME CHANGED 

In order to make room for Annette Kel- 
lermann'a appearance in an aquatic spec- 
tacle at the Hippodrome beginning Jan. 
22, it was necessary to construct a third 
floor on the stage to accommodate the 
aquatic production. 



GOODWIN HEADS FILM COMPANY 

' Milwaukee, Wis., Jan. 14. — The Nat 
Goodwin Film Co., with Nat Goodwin as 
president, has been incorporated here with 
a capital stock of $500,000. The incorpora- 
tors are Levi Pollard, Henry E. Winkler, 
and Frank Saxe. 



"PIERROT" IN LAST FORTNIGHT 

"Pierrot the Prodigal" is in its last fort- 
night at the little Theatre. The house 
will be closed until Feb. 13, when Gran- 
ville Barker's new comedy, "The Morris 
Dance," will be produced. 



PRODUCERS TO MAKE COSTUMES 

Chas. Dillingham and Florenz Ziegfeld 
are establishing their own costume factory 
and have obtained the entire ninth floor of 
the century Theatre Building for the pur- 
pose. 



WOULD BAR BOYS FROM SHOWS 

Tebbe Haute, Ind., Jan. 13. — A protest 
has been made by the Women's Federated 
Clubs of this city against alleged attend- 
ance of young boys at burlesque shows. 



Breaking 



HOUDINI 
Through The New York Clipper 



GEORGE GATTS HERE 

George Gatts, of Gazzolo, Gatts & Clif- 
ford, is in New York and has engaged the 
cast for "The Katsenjammer Kids," which 
will receive its first production in Chicago 
Feb. L The Washer Brothers, late of 
"Mutt ft Jeff," will play the leads, sup- 
ported by Alice Gilmore, Betty Powers, 
Nick Basil and others. Gatts will also en- 
gage a cast for "The Unborn Child" before 
his return to Chicago. 



LAST 3 KELLERMANN WEEKS 

"A Daughter of the Gods" is in its last 
three weeks at the Lyric Theatre, after 
which it will be followed by "The Honor 
System," another Fox picture. 



MOCSARY MOVES OFFICE 

Edwin Mocsary, treasurer of the Rialto, 
has had his office moved down from the 
third floor of the theatre to the second. 



WEBSTER QUITS BELOIT HOUSE 

BELOTT, Wis., Jan.. 13. — C. I*. Matison 
has succeeded' Al Webster as manager of 
the Majestic. 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



PLAN $7,000,000 

THEATRE FOR 

NEWJTORK 

STRUCTURE TO SEAT 38,000 



If the plans of Albert E. Kiralfy, long 
known as a builder of spectacles, mate- 
rialize. New York will shortly have the 
largest amphitheatre in the world, cap- 
able of accommodating 38,000 persons 
within its walls. The cost of the struc- 
ture will exceed $7,000,000, according to 
present estimates. 

The tremendous scale of the under- 
taking was revealed last week by Kiralfy, 
who is a member of a family made 
famous for their presentations of dra- 
matic spectacles and expositions, both here 
and abroad. Mr. Kiralfy stated the com- 
pany he represented had just acquired an 
entire city block in the theatrical district. 
The exact site and many of the details 
he refused to disclose. 

The building is to be between Forty- 
second and Fifty-fifth streets and be- 
tween Fifth and Seventh avenues, "five 
minutes' walk from Longacre Square," 
according to the promoter. The financial 
end of the project is largely in the hands 
of British capitalists, according to Mr. 
Kiralfy. However, in the exploitation of 
the idea, he is being assisted by his 
brother, Charles I. Kiralfy, and father, 
Tmre Kiralfy. 

The unique enterprise ia planned to 
have many surprising features. Its im- 
mense amphitheatre is to consist of two 
complete auditoriums, each one of which 
will seat 10,000 people. In this way two 
conventions of the largest size can be held 
in the building at the same time, and four 
in one day. 

In case more than 10,000 spectators arc 
to be accommodated at any gathering, it 
will be possible to roll the two audi- 
toriums into one. There will be separate 
stages and equipments for each audi- 
torium, but they will be so arranged they 
can be joined into one arena at short 
notice. 

Another innovation will be for clearing 
the theatre of every seat in order to hold 
automobile or other shows — for example, 
where the flat floor space is desired. The 
seating tiers will be in fourteen sections. 
Each section will be on rollers. At the 
end of a convention, if the floor is to be 
cleared, the sections are rolled, one after 
' another, into an immense elevator, and 
dropped to the basement, where there is 
room for storage. 

Beside the amphitheatre, there will be 
a restaurant, to hold 5,000 diners, and a 
roof garden. The rest of the building will 
be taken up by offices and stores. 

First steps to erect the gigantic struc- 
ture! will be taken in the Spring, when 
ground will be broken. It is intended to 
have the building ready by October, 1018. 
Circuses, exhibits, expositions, ba- 
zaars, horse shows — the things which 
have made vanishing Madison Square 
Garden famous — all will find room here 
when that historic structure goes. 



WM. REDMOND DEAD 

William Redmond, the tenor, died on 
Wednesday of last week following an 
operation for appendicitis. 

Mr. Redmond, whose real name was 
Frank Nugent, bad been prominent in the- 
atrical and music publishing circles for 
nearly twenty years and was at various 
times a member of prominent theatrical 
companies, but recently was connected 
with several of the large music publishing 
houses. 

At the time of his death, he was a mem- 
ber of the professional staff of M. Witmark 
& Sons. He was a fine pianist and 
possessed a tenor voice of exceptional 
range and quality. He was likewise one 
of the best ballad singers in the country. 
First attracting attention when a member 
of the Primrose & Dockstader minstrels, 
be was for several seasons, one of the 
strong features with that company. Modest 
and unassuming, his personality was a 
particularly fine, one and his friends in the 
theatrical and musical world were num- 
bered by the hundreds. He leaves a wife 
and three children. 



CHAS. FR0HMAN 

CO. TO MAKE 

FILMS 

STARS UNDER CONTRACT 



TO PRODUCE AT GARRICK 

It is reported that within a short time 
the Garrick Theatre will become a regular 
producing house, several plays being on 
hand which are deemed worthy of pro- 
duction. 

"NOTO" ATTACHMENT STANDS 
The author of "Noto," Mary Lee Wert- 
heimcr, made application last week before 
Judge Cohalan asking that the attachment 
against her for $16,000, secured by George 
Blumenthal, be vacated. The application 
was denied. 

COHAN WONT GIVE REVUE 

George Cohan has finally decided not to 
present a revue this season. The reason 
given is that he will be entirely engaged 
in motion picture work during the coming 
Spring. 

MAY PRODUCE "CAPTIVES" 

It is reported that Edith Ellis plans to 
organize her own company to produce 
"Captives," a play which she wrote. Pro- 
ducers have considered it, but seem afraid 
that it will offend the Catholic Church. 



"GREAT UNKNOWN" OPENS JAN. 29 

New Haven, Conn., Jan. 16.— This city 
has been chosen as the place for the pre- 
miere of the Messrs. Shuberts Strauss 
operetta, "The Great Unknown." January 
29 is the date set. 



NEW PLAY BY CARPENTER 

"The Way Home" is the title of a new 
play just completed by Edwin Childa Car- 
penter. 




HAS NEW BURLESQUE SHOW 

F. L. Ferguson is arranging to put out 
a burlesque aggregation on the one night 
stands through Pennsylvania, Ohio and 
New York. The title of the show is "The 
20th Century Maids." The principals are 
William Jennings, Cora Roberts and Ed- 
die Semon. Twenty-four chorus girls will 
be carried. The show will open Feb. 12 
in Shamokin. 



After many offers and hundreds of con- 
sultations, the Charles Frohman Company 
has at last consented to enter the moving 
picture field, according to an announcement 
just issued from their offices. 

Alf Hayman, representing the Charles 
Frohman Company's interests, and John 
R. Freulcr, president of the Mutual Film 
Corporation, have entered into a contract 
and active operations are to begin im- 
mediately. A $2,500,000 corporation has 
been formed to be officially designated as 
"The Empire All-Star Corporation," with 
the explanatory sub-title, "Presenting 
Charles Frohman's Successes in Motion 
Pictures." The capital stock of the con- 
cern is entirely paid up and no stock 
will be offered for sale to the public. The 
principal office of the new corporation will 
be in New York City, with branches in 
Chicago and London. 

The bureau for the selection of plays 
and scenarios of the new corporation will 
be under the direction of Augustus 
Thomas, dean of American dramatists, and 
the art director for the Charles Frohman 
Company. Mr. Thomas is an authority 
on lighting effects and the New York studio 
of the corporation is now being constructed 
and fitted with many new and novel ap- 
pliances for the production of such effects 
plsnned by him. 

Studios, built after the same modal, will 
also be maintained in Chicago and in 
Southern California. Directors have been 
selected from the bcBt available in this 
country and in Europe. The pictures pro- 
duced will be distributed exclusively by the 
Mutual Film Corporation, the concern that 
now has the placing of all the Charlie 
Chaplin comedies. 

A number of the stars who have ap- 
peared under Charles Frohman's manage- 
ment, both in this country and in England, 
have already been placed under special 
picture contracts and will appear in the 
roles which they originated and with which 
their names are Identified. Other members 
of the original casts of the playB will be 
engaged, wherever it is possible, to enact 
again the parts they created. 

It is the intention of the new corpora- 
tion to give to the name of Charles Froh- 
man the same high value in the motion 
picture field that it has possessed so long 
in the legitimate theatre. 

Work on the first picture to be produced 
by the new corporation will begin in New 
York about February 1. 



WHITE IN ACTORS' HOME 

Chas. E. White, who, for a great many 
years has been a manager of burlesque the- 
atres and Bhows. entered the Actors' Home 
yesterday. White was manager of the 
Garden Theatre in Buffalo for a number 
of years, and for the past seven years has 
been employed by Gus. Hill His last posi- 
tion was as business manager of "The Mid- 
night Maidens," for Hill, early this season. 



BELASCO HAS NEW ONES 

David Belasco has a Japanese play for 
production, starring Leonora Ulrica, to be 
ready in March, and another, "The Love 
Thought" to follow in April. 



AMATEUR NIGHTS FOR BRONX 
At the Bronx Theatre Manager W. T. 
Keogh has installed amateur nights on 
Tuesdays, In conjunction with the Inter- 
national Shows. 



TYLER TO STAR FLORENCE NASH 

That Florence Nash will star under the 
direction of George C. Tyler was decided 
last week when the manuscript of a new 
play was delivered to Mr. Tyler after it 
had proved acceptable to Miss Nash. 



"TREASURE ISLAND" EXTENDED 

Charles Hopkins has extended the en- 
gagement of "Treasure Island" for two 
more weeks. Beginning Monday there was 
a reduced rate for the first four evenings 
of the week. 



WILL QUIT "HAVE A HEART" 

Louise Dresser is not to romain in the 
cast of "Have a Heart" very long, because 
of an existing contract with the Orpheum 
Circuit, which calls for her appearance in 
Kansas City on January 22, with a full 
tour of the circuit to follow. 



"BLUE PARADISE" FILLS GAP 

Kansas Crrr, Mo., Jan. 14. — "The Blue 
Paradise" has cancelled its engagement in 
Decatur, II., and other nearby cities to fill 
open dates here on account of the illness 
of E. H. Sothern. 



HOUDINI 
Breaking Through The New York Clipper 



K. A. E. ORDER NEW PLAY 

Retinoid Wolf is to write the book snd 
lyrics, and Louis A. Hlrsche tie music 
for a new three-act musical comedy to be 
produced this Spring by Klaw and Er- 
langer. The title is "The Rainbow Girl." 
The scenery will be designed by Joseph 
Urban and the sketches for the costumes 
are already in the hands of V. Richard 
Anderson, of Schneider and Anderson. 
Julian Mitchell will drill the chorus and 
Herbert Gresbain win direct the dialogue. 
The play calls for a large cast and elabo- 
rate staging. It will be placed in rehearsal 
shortly. 



"THE LODGER" AT BANDBOX 

"The Lodger" has been transferred from 
the Maxine Elliott Theatre to the Band- 
box. 



SW ANN'S PLAY NAMED "IP» 
Mark Swan's latest play is named "If." 
It is now being produced by the Blinn- 
Shesgreen Corporation. 



UTICA LUCES LAMBERT PLAY 

Utxca, N. Y., Jan. 10.— "The Other 
Man's Wife" which was presented at the 
Colonial here was well liked. The play is 
In three acts and was written by Victor E. 
Lambert 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



CECIL CUNNINGHAM 

Cecil Cunningham, whose picture ap- 
pears on the front cover of this week's 
issue of The New York Cufrb, upset 
several vaudeville records this season by 
breaking at once into the headline class. 

All Miss Cunningham's songB are com- 
edy numbers, which are her exclusive 
property, written by Jean Havez, who 
happen* to be her husband. The num- 
bers, however, were written before their 
marriage, and Miss Cunningham in speak- 
ing of it said: "I made such a big hit 
with Mr. Havex'a songs that I realized his 
importance in my career and so clinched 
matters at the altar. Don't imagine that I 
kidnapped him," she continued, "I was a 
lady, and waited for him to ask me." 



VAN LOAN GOING ABROAD 

Herbert H. Van Loan, director of public- 
ity for the Universal, accompanied by 
Mrs. Tan Loan and their child, will sail 
for London on the American line 8JS. 
New York, Saturday. Van Loan win go 
abroad to take charge of the publicity 
for the concern at all of its Continental 
offices. He is to make a spectacular cam- 
paign for the serial pictures that the con* 
earn is making, also for the various spe- 
cial releases, such as "20,000 Leagues Under 
the Sea," and other big productions of its 
type. His headquarters will be at both 
the Paris and London offices. He expects 
to stay on the other side for a year. 



ACTRESS SEEKS DIVORCE 

Charging- that her hnsband. Captain 
Selwyn Joyce, has another wife, Mrs. 
Eiielle Thebaiid Joyce, an actress, is seek- 
ing an absolute divorce. When the case 
was brought before Justice Giegericb, of 
New York, Dorothy Scofield, a former 
member of a troupe that Captain Joyce 
once managed, told the court that ahe was 
also the wife of the defendant, and that 
she did not discover that Joyce had an- 
other wife until after a quarrel. 



GRACE WASHBURN MARRIED 

Grace Washburn, a screen star, and 
George A. Cassaaus, a son of the Mexican 
Ambassador to this country during the 
Diss regime, were recently married. 
Cassasns la well known along Broadway 
and ia said to have a very large income. 
Miss Washburn waa a member of the 
"Ziegfeld Follies" for a number of years 
prior to entering screen work. 



BANDITS ROB FILM THEATRE 

St. Lotto, Jan. 13. — The proprietor of 
the Webster Theatre waa held up here 
vrhile 200 persons were seated in the audi- 
ence. The manager, David Graham, waa 
counting the receipts when two men 
walked np to the box office window and 
demanded the cash. As they were escap- 
ing, he opened fire and a revolver duel 
followed. Graham told the police he be- 
lieved he had shot one of the men. The 
robbers obtained $200. 



"LIFTS" GEO. COHAN'S COAT 
George M. Cohan's overcoat was stolen 
from his automobile last week, where he 
had left it while be went into his office. A 
man, passing, noticed the coat and climbed 
into the machine after it as if be were the 
owner, but a couple of chauffeurs saw his 
actions and called a policeman. 



EVELYN NESBIT OX 
Mrs. Jack Clifford, professionally known 
aa Evelyn Nesbit, and former wife of 
Harry Thaw, was ill last week as the re- 
sult of an operation performed upon her 
nose. She has been suffering with an ob- 
struction of her nose since her return to 
the city from the Adirondacks several 
months ago. 



WENTWORTH LOSES BOAT 

Eddie Wentworth, stage carpenter at 
the Forty-fourth Street Theatre, had ar- 
ranged a fishing party for Sunday, and 
Saturday night stocked his boat with the 
necessary accessories of fishing parties and 
tied the craft up for the night. A heavy 
windstorm tore the boat away and it has 
not yet been found. The boat alone is 
worth $700. 



C. A. WILLIAMS DEAD 
Abhevtixe, N. C, Jan. 12. — C. A. 
Williams, an actor who came to Asheville 
with Rose Stahl and the company which 
presented "Our Mrs. McChesney," last 
Tuesday night, died yesterday morning at 
the Mission Hospital from uremia. Mr. 
Williams was too ill, when he reached this 
city, to play his role in the comedy and 
waa taken to the hospital under the care 
of a physician and his condition grew 
steadily worse. The deceased is survived 
by two sisters and a brother, all .of whom 
live in Chicago, whence the remains will 
be shipped for interment. 



CAMPBELL EFFECTS SOLD 

The entire house furnishings of the late 
Robert C. Campbell, one of the biggest 
theatrical bill posters in the country, are 
being sold at auction by Benjamin S. 
Wise in the residence, 20 West Eighty- 
second Street, this city. The sale, which 
began yesterday and is expected to end 
today, is made to close the estate. 



DOMAN WORKING IN PARIS 

Word has been received by H. IT. Van 
Loan of the Universal publicity depart- 
ment from Robert Doman, bis former as- 
sociate, that the latter has given up the 
idea" of being a war correspondent and 
that at present he is employed as a typist 
in one of the munition plant offices in 
Paris. 



BEN JACKSON IN BOSTON 

F. E. Crossman is acting as manager of 
"A Daughter of the Gods," at the Lyric 
during the absence of Manager Ben. Jack- 
son, who has gone to Boston, where he 
is in charge of the Fox interests at the 
Majestic Theatre. 



COCHRANE GOES TO ENGLAND 

Thos. W. Cochrane, who has been the 
special representative of the Universal 
Film Manufacturing Co., in the Orient for 
the past three years, sailed on the 
American Liner St. Paul for England last 
Saturday. 



CHILDREN SEE "MERRY WIVES'* 

The stage children of the Professional 
Children's School were the guests of Isabel 
Irving at Monday night's performance of 
"The Merry Wives ef Windsor." 




ACTOR HELD FOR LARCENY 

Hassan MnssaHi, an actor, is being held 
for the theft of two diamond rings from 
Mrs. Charlotte Crosby, 477 Central Park 
West. It is alleged that they were taken 
from Mrs. Crosby's dresser and returned 
to her by Mussalli, after she accused him. 



GRACE DE VERE MARRIED 

Boss Kevsey New, a Chicago publisher, 
and Grace de Vers, a member of the Chas. 
EL Taylor Company, were married Jan. 7 
at "The Little Church Around the Corner." 
Tile romance had the beginning in an In- 
troduction at the Press Club of Chicago. . 
Mr. and Mrs. New will reside at the 
Rockyfall Apartments, IMS W. 111th 
street, New York, before taking up their 
permanent residence in Chicago. 



BECOMES ILL AT PALACE 

Richard Jones, twenty-two years old, of 
Wilkes-Bsrre, Pa., was suddenly taken 
ill while attending a performance at the 
Palace Theatre Sunday afternoon and waa 
removed to the Polyclinic Hospital. His 
ailment was acute gastritis. 



NOLAN HAS 2 NEW PLAYS 

Maharot Cttt, Pa., Jan. 13. — J. Jerome 
Nolan has just finished writing two new 
plays: a white slave play, "The Fallen 
Angel," and a farce comedy, "When 
Shakespeare Came to Town." 



OPERA DANCER LOSES NECKLACE 

Rosina Galli, first dancer of the Metro- 
politan ballet, was robbed of a valuable 
pearl necklace after the opera last Thurs- 
day night on her way to her apartment in 
the Hotel Adlon. 



HARP MADE LIEUTENANT 

Word reaches this country from "Some- 
where in France" that Norman Harp, an 
English actor well known in this country, 
has been promoted to a lieutenancy of 
artillery. 



CLUBS HONOR LD4DSEY 

William Lindsey, author of "Seremon- 
da," has been elected president of the Bos- 
ton Drama League and vice-president of 
the Authors' Society. 



HELENE VEOLA IN "THE FLAME" 

I'kovtdf.rck, R. I., Jan. 15. — Richard 
Walton Tully has engaged Helene Yeola, 
Mrs. P. Byron Russell, to play the Ameri- 
can consul's wife in "The Flame." 



CARUSO TO MAKE TOUR 

Enrico Caruso Is to make an extended 
concert tour throughout the United States 
under the management of the Metropolitan 
Musical Bureau at the close of his en- 
gagement here. His programs will consist 
of widely known operatic arias and Sicil- 
ian and Italian songs. 



BARRYMORE PICTURE AT RIALTO 

Ethel Barrymore is being seen this week 
in "The White Raven" at the Rialto and 
is just as charming on the screen aa ahe 
is on the spoken stage. 



CHANGE "DOWN SOUTH" TITLE 

The title for "Down South," Harris 
Dickson's new play, has been changed to 
"A Nigger in the Woodpile." 



HOUDINI 

Breaking Through The New York CKpper 



LEAVES "BUNKER BEAN" 
Florence Shirley is to retire from the cast 
of "Bunker Bean," now on tour, and play- 
ing in Brooklyn this week. 



CENTURY GETS MILDRED FISHER 

Mildred Fisher has been added to "The 
Century Girl" cast. She was the model 
for Paul Manship's prize winning "Statue 
of Salome" and has appeared in panto- 
mime snd given violin recitals. 



BURLOCK BACK FROM ENGLAND 

William Burlock arrived in New York 
City laat week from England, where he 
has been In charge of three "Birth of a 
Nation" organizations. In London he 
superintended its engagement at Drnry 
Lane. 



ELITE, BURLINGTON, REOPENS 

Bdbunqton, la., Jan. 15. — The Elite 
Theatre, which has been dark for over 
eight months, will be opened soon by the 
new owner, Julius Siegel, who lately • ac- 
quired the property. 



THEATRE CHANGES POLICY 
Little Rock, Ark., Jan. 12.— The 
Palace Theatre has changed its policy from 
straight picture program, adding a dra- 
matic tab. company. The Russell Show 
opened. 



PHHJPP BACK IN PLAY 

Adolf Philipp made his reappearance in 
"Sadie from Riverside Drive" at the York- 
vine Theatre last week, after a short ill- 
ness. 



EMMA JANVIER LEAVES CAST 

Emma Janvier left the cast of "The 
Love Mill" last week. 



LAMBS' MEMBERS REVOLT 

(Continued from page 8.) 
but two or three rooms at first. Here, it 
la planned to have the members congre- 
gate and enjoy each others' company un- 
interrupted by younger members and lay 
friends. 

A committee is now busy seeking suit- 
able quarters for the club. It is their 
desire to secure clubrooms on one of the 
side streets in the West Forties, perfer- 
ably near the Iambs. 

While it is possible that many of these 
members will still retain their member- 
ship in the Lambs and the Players, their 
interest and energy will be centered in 
the new undertaking, it is believed, and 
will have a serious effect upon the older 
organizations. 

Charles A. Stevenson is said to be one 
of the leaders of the new movement. His 
association with the new club is particu- 
larly Impressive in view of the fact that 
he is one of the original Lambs. 

Others who are said to be active "revo- 
lutionists" are Harry Harwood, William 
H. Crane and Louis Massen. 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PLAN TO OPEN 

N.V.A. CLUB 

SATURDAY 

ALTERATIONS ARE BEING RUSHED 



If alterations which are being ruahed 
are completed in time, the clnbrooms of 
the new National Vaudeville Artists, oc- 
cupying the entire third floor of the build 
ing at the southwest corner of Broadway 
and Forty-eighth street, will be opened to 
tile members and their friends Saturday 
evening. Elaborate furnishings have been 
secured for the olubrooms. Then will be 
a ladies' reception room, library, amoUng 
and billiard room and a restaurant on the 
floor. 

The occasion on Saturday, if things are 
in readiness, will be in the nature of a 
housewarming and entirely informal. In- 
vitations will be sent to all of the mem- 
bers and the various representative vaude- 
ville managers and agents to attend the 
affair. A buffet lunch will be served and 
a vaudeville entertainment given. 

The dob has a membership of over 1,000 
persons and applications at an average of 
twenty -five a day are being received by 
Secretary Henry Chesterfield. He States 
that daring the talk of the White Bat 
strike, applications for membership were 
received at an average of fifty a day. 

The officers of this organization declare 
the interest shown indicates a desire on 
the part of the performer to meet the man- 
ager on a friendly basis. 



NEW ACTS FOR ORPHEUM 

A number of acts that have been popular 
on the Keith Circuit during the current 
season have obtained routes on the Or- 
phenm Circuit and will open at different 
points during the present month. Bert 
Leslie ft Co., in "Hogan in Mexico," opened 
in Kansas City Monday. Natalie Alt 
starts her engagement at Des Moines next 
Monday, as do Ne who ft* and Phelps at Kan- 
sas City. Claude Gillingwater & Co., in 
"The Frame Up," will open the same day 
at Doluth, and Louise Dresner is sched- 
uled to open at Kansas City Jan. 28. 



EMMA FRANCIS MARRIED 

Emma Francis and her dancing partner, 
Harold Kennedy, who are on the Orpheum 
Circuit, have been married. Miss Francis 
haa been before the public since she was 
a child. 



BROOKS REHEARSING "OLIVES" 

Marty Brooks is rehearsing his new act, 
"Olives,*' which opens at an early data. 
Cliff Dickson and Frank St Clair head the 
cast and are assisted by seven girls. 



WILLS TO PAY ALIMONY 
According to papers now on file in 
the Supreme Court, Nat M. Wills, the 
comedian, intends to pay $2,200 in back 
alimony to Mrs. Helolse Wills. In the 
future he promises to pay her $125 a week 
as regularly as he receives bis pay check 
at the Hippodrome. Mrs. Wills recently 
tied np Wills' salary by an injunction. 



JAS. DUKELAN HONORED 

Jas. W. Dnkelan (Slim Jim), of Bolfe 
& Maddock's "Bubeville," was given a 
dinner last week, having passed bis 
seventy-fourth birthday. Mr. Dukelan is 
one of the oldest living members of the 
theatrical profession.- He had been on the 
stage fifty-five years. 



NEW SKETCH FOR MME. BESSON 

Frances Nordstrom has written a new 
sketch for Mme. Season, who was seen in 
Orpheum vaudeville in "It Doesn't Hap- 
pen." The new sketch is entitled "After- 
wards" and deals with the children left 
orphans because of the war. 



MAHONEY IN THE CATSKILLS 

Billy Mahoney, of Brady and Mahoney, 
who recently suffered a nervous break- 
down, is in the Catakilla recuperating and 
expects to be at work within a month. 
The team has had its Western bookings 
set back. 



NEW SKETCH ON MOSS TIME 

Martin Build, Phil Singer and Eliza- 
beth Jaffe are presenting a new sketch 
on the Moss circuit entitled, "My Busi- 
ness Manager." The sketch was written 
by Guild. 



ALICE TUCKER MARRIED 

Alice Tucker, one of the members of 
RJta Mario's orchestra, now playing in 
Orpheum vaudeville, and Aaron "Jennings, 
a Pittsburgh man, were married recently. 



JANE OAKER FOR VAUDEVILLE 

At the close of this season Jane Oaker 
will appear in vaudeville in a dramatic 
sketch written for her by Julian Eltinge. 




HAINES SKETCH FOR PANTAGES pSwS SSfsSg&g; KSrJ 5KS M 
Robert T. Haines has booked his sketch, 
"The Man in the Dark," over the Pantages 

Circuit and opens Feb. 15 under his direc- HOUDIN1 

CiOn. Brwdring Through The New York Clipp-r 



NEW TEAM IS FORMED 

Ida Brooks Hunt, former star of "The 
Chocolate Soldier," and Catherine Hayes, 
late of Hayes and Johnson, have formed a 
partnership for vaudeville and will be seen 
in the near future in a new operetta en- 
titled, "Orange Blossoms," by Angle 
Breakspear and Mabel Norton. They will 
carry a special set and a company of five. 



LULU GLASER FOR VAUDE. 

Lulu Olaser, musical comedy star, will 
shortly be seen in the U. B. O. Theatres 
in a new one-act farce with music, entitled 
"Margary," by Raymond Peck, with lyrics 
by Louis Weslyn and music by Muriel Pol- 
lack. She will be supported by Tom 
Richards and a company of four. Alf T. 
Wilton will direct her tour. 



LEVITTS ACT ON SUN TIME 

Joe Levitt's "Mirth and Melody Girls" 
have obtained a rout* on the Gus Sun 
Circuit They opened at the Olympic 
Theatre, Buffalo. The act Is a miniature 
musical comedy carrying nine people. 



CARR DIVORCE SUIT DROPPED 

A settlement oat of court has led to a 
discontinuance of action for separation 
started in New York by Mary Garr against 
her husband, Alexander Catr, of vaude- 
ville and legitimate fame. 



MdNTYRE BACK IN SHOW 

James Mclntyre, of Mclntyre ft Heath, 
returned Monday to "The Show of. Won- 
ders" at the Winter Garden, after an ab- 
sence caused by bronchitis. 



NEW THEATRE FOR CHARLESTOWN 

GHABLEBTOwir, 8. 0., Jan. IS.— The 
Pastime Amusement Co. is building a new 
picture bouse on King Street, which will 
seat about nine hundred. 



FREDDIE JAMES BOOKED 
Mark Levy has obtained a route of 18 
weeks for Freddie James, the Juggler, over 
the Pantages Circuit. Ha will open at 
Milwaukee, March 1L 



BRAY HERE FOR VISIT 

Charles E. Bray, who has been hi New 
Orleans superintending the construction of 
the new Orpheum Theatre, is hers on a 
visit. 



BUTTERFIELD IN N. Y. 

W. & Butterfleld, of Battle Creak, Mich, 
is in New York securing new acta for his 
vaudeville circuit of theatres. 



NEW GIRL ACT FOR BROWNE 

Both well Browne, the female impersona- 
tor, is soon to be featured in a girl act, 
which is now being organized. 



WATERS TO CO ABROAD 

Tom Waters sails for England this week 
and will open in vaudeville shortly ill Lon- 
don. 



Patsy's Patter) 



The laughs and applause given the Louis 
Mann act at the Palace last week grew in 
volume at each performance, On Satur- 
day afternoon not a line of the clever 
satire was missed by the "live" audience. 
The laugh that registered the highest waa 
when the Duke Von Stolzen aaked Rost- 
and if there was anything he could do for 
him, and Rostand responded, "Oh yes, you 
can do me a great favor. Wont you 
please let the French army walk into 
Berlin." 

Leslie Palmer, as the Duke, had the big 
speech, in which he told of Germany's real 
greatness. But Mr. Maan dispensed the 
laughs and logic throughout the act that 
set the value and quality of the offering. 

Stagedom will welcome back to the fold 
next week Sally Cohen, of the well known 
partnership of Rice A Cohen. Miss Cohen 
haa been in retirement for nearly two 
years, much to the regret of her many 
friends and admirers of her splendid abil- 
ity. Eddie Garvie will support her in a 
comedy sldt entitled "Mary ft Joan." 

Geo. Felix, personally known and known 
to me to be the husband of Lydia Barry, 
haa a surprise for vaudeville. He is to 
appear in a one-man comedy pantomime 
which promises to be a big laughing nov- 
elty. His opening date la a dark secret, 
but he will be seen in town shortly. . 

Mary Forrest holds the unique position 
of stage manager with the Edna Goodrich 
act, besides playing the head saleswoman. 
Miss Forrest, besides being a T. M. A, is 
an artist and writer and chuck full of am- 
bitious ideas that are sure to bear im- 
portant fruit in the future. 

Edgar Allen Wolff and Anatol Friedland 
are collaborating on a one-act musical com- 
edy for Louis Simon. It will be a pre- 
tentious affair of the type and class of 
"The Persian Garden," Mr. Simon's former 
offering. 

Tommy Gray haa written a new act for 
Bud and Nellie Heim. 



Ask Masie King to tell yon about bar 
Jap house boy when sha was on the 
Coast. 



NEW SKETCH FOR WAR — II 

PoBTxaifD, Me, Jan. 14.— "The Mystery 
of the Rases," a musical comedy sketch, 
by Will a Maefarlane and Fred H. Mar- 
tins, will be presented next month under 
the auspices of the Bristol Imperial Ooua- 
cdl for the benefit of the wounded soldiers. 



LUBIN TAKES VACATION 

Jake Lnbin, assistant general booker 
of the Loew Circuit, left Monday for a 
two weeks' vacation at Atlantic City. 
Jos Scbenck will again take orsr the 
books, assisted by his brother Mas. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 




PALACE THEATRE 

There was a capacity house before the 
curtain went up for the first act at this 
house Monday afternoon and there was 
speculation as to who drew all the people, 
the Russian Ballet stars, the vaudeville 
■tars or the serial picture star, Mrs. Ver- 
non Castle. 

Maxine Brothers and Bobby started 
things off fine. The work of the boys is 
always good, and Bobby shows a sense 
of comedy that is surprising in a canine. 
Horace Wright, through a misprint, 
billed as "Horace White," and Rena Diet- 
rich, in front of their beautiful Hawaiian 
art drop, proved their rights to their bill- 
ing of "somewhat different singers.*' It 
was a shame to have to sacrifice them so 
early on the bill. Miss Dietrich's sing- 
ing of a mammy's lullaby, accompanying 
herself on the piano is a particular gem, 
as sung by her. These artists are always 
a delight to both the ear and eye. 

Willie Weston entertained with comedy 
numbers but occasionally verged on the 
suggestive, which is all wrong for a 
comedian of his calibre. He has a seri- 
ous poem about America being "Mine and 
Thine" that goes well. 

Ho Brooks, in his newest comedy 
dramalet "Dollars and Sense" closed inter- 
mission. He can be congratulated on see- 
ing the eternal triangle at a different 
angle. His offering is reviewed under 
"new acts." 

Theodore Kosloff, premier danseur, 
supported by Vlasta Maslova and other 
capable dancers, are also reviewed else- 
where. 

Violet Dale opened very promisingly 
with a breezy number and gave impres- 
sions of Anna Held and May Vokes which 
went very well. Then a long drawn im- 
pression of Bernhardt, reciting (in French) 
something about the theatre and the 
battlefield, with special scenery showing a 
dying soldier, threatened to spoil every- 
body's good time. A study of Nazimova 
in "War Brides" also depressed. 

Miss Dale has a way of smiling, after 
she announces her impressions, which 
seems to say "Yes, Vm going to do that 
for you. Isn't it nice of meT" 

Smiles and confidence mean much in an 
act of this sort, but a better selection of 
subjects would mean more. 

Florence Moore and Brother Frank 
Moore stepped into what might ordinarily 
have been a bad spot, but the audience 
wanted comedy and were ready to laugh 
if given half an opportunity. They liked 
Brother Frank's opening number, his style 
and his manner, and when Florence came 
on they knew they were going to have a 
good time. They did not try to restrain 
themselves. 

The first episode of the serial "Patria," 
with Mrs. Vernon Castle, ran untU 5:45. 
While there was nothing very sensational 
in this episode, save the narrow escape 
of an auto rushing across the tracks be- 
fore a fast express (seen many times by 
all) it held the promise of future thrills. 

The first installment shows that the plot 
is to be built around Japanese and Mexican 
«piea living in the United States. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued cm page 17) 



RIVERSIDE 

Chic Sale, on very late, made the cus- 
tomary riotous Kt he has been making 
regularly all season in metropolitan 
vaudeville houses. 

Harry and Eva Puck have a production. 
The scenery is of the impressionistic sort 
that made Urban's creations a success on 
Broadway. The mechanical effect of the 
auto and train, while a bit reminiscent of 
a Winter Garden show of several seasons 
ago, is efficiently worked and adds a 
tonch of novelty to one of the niftiest 
singing acts in vaudeville. 

The idea of a love story in song has 
been excellently carried out by Edgar 
Allan Woolf. The music by Harry Puck 
is tuneful and full of melody of the kind 
that pleases the masses. Harry sings de- 
lightfully, and his sister is cute and 
pretty. It is a great combination. The 
turn should not have many lay-off weeks 
with this act. 

Bondini Brothers play accordeons skill- 
fully. Popular and operatic selections are 
all the same to the Boudinis. The rag 
stuff is cleverly arranged, and the crowd 
warmed up to it immediately. Herbert's 
Leaping DogB were programed for the 
opening spot. Those who were in found 
the act highly enjoyable. The animals 
are well trained and go through their 
routine with little urging. 

Bessie Clayton and her two artistic as- 
sistants, both masters of their respective 
styles of dancing, present a terpsicborean 
novelty that is worthy of headline honors 
in any company. Lester Sheehan made a 
personal hit. He is exceedingly graceful. 
Oonstantine Kobeleff, a Russian dancer 
whose experience with * the best ballet 
troupes of the old world has given his 
work a finish almost impossible of attain- 
ment on this Bide of the ocean, was also 
accorded plenty of recognition by the 
audience. 

The band of the Clayton act is a world 
beater. 

Gladys Clark and Henry Bergman in a 
song cycle demonstrated their entertain- 
ing powers to the entire satisfaction of 
the Riverside first nighters. Bergman 
sings easily and avoids annoying manner- 
isms. Miss Clark has a sweet voice also, 
which she uses with proper discretion. 
Bergman is a capital comedian 'and might 
interpolate a little more comedy in the 
act. 

Alexander Can and Company, in a 
sketch offering entitled "An April Show- 
er," closed the first part. Mr. Carr up- 
held his reputation as an artistic deline- 
ator of real life characters. The company 
is adequate, and the sketch played con- 
vincingly throughout. 

Leo Beers and his pianologne specialty 
walked off with one of the big hits of the 
evening. Mr. Beers is a clean cut and 
versatile entertainer. 

"Patria," the movie serial featuring 
Mrs. Vernon Castle, closed and held them 
in to the last foot of film. 



COLONIAL 

The flash at the Colonial this week is 
"The Girlies' Gambol." 

With the crowd coming in late, Cath- 
erine Powell found it hard going with her 
dancing, in the opening spot The novelty 
of having her dressing room on the stage 
helps the act greatly. 

Martin Brennan and Ethel Powell fol- 
lowed. (New ads.) 

Joe TowJe rolled down go many bows 
he got tired coming back. 

Xvette followed intermission, an ex- 
ceedingly difficult spot for her, as she 
opens with a song. 

Leona La Mar, the girl with the thous- 
and eyes, pleased greatly as she unraveled 
the trials and tribulations of the love-lorn. 
The manner in which she divulges the sub- 
jective thoughts of persons in the audience 
is almost uncanny, as well as revealing, 
although blindfolded, the nature of any 
objects shown to her partner, who works 
off-stage. 

Aveling and Lloyd could mope out into 
the road and make the members of a 
stalled funeral procession laugh. They 
walk on stage like a couple of "regular" 
southern fellows going down to an alley 
to shoot craps — Aveling even needed a 
shave. 

The first episode of "Patr'a" was given 
and held the audience. Some big thrills 
are promised. 



ALHAMBRA 

Retter Brothers started the show off 
Monday evening promptly at 8 o'clock 
and, despite the fact that most of the 
audience was being seated during their 
act, scored big in the initial spot. 

The Durkin Girls have a snappy act, 
and the one who does most of the sing- 
ing is particularly full of ginger. They 
made the most of an early spot. 

Bert Melrose did his original Melrose 
fall and never did so to a more appre- 
ciative house. 

Maryon Vadie and Ota Gygi receive 
their review under New Acta. 

Rae Dooley and J. Gordon Dooley 
earned a storm of applause with their 
offering, every bit of business in their 
act being the personification of speed. 

Hale & Paterson also seemed to please 
the Harlemites immensely. Perhaps it 
was the pair, as much as their versatile 
sextette, that drew the wonderful ovation 
tendered them at the close of their act. 

Following intermission came the Seven 
Bracks, the third acrobatic act on the 
bin. 

William Sisto pleased with His First 
Speech, but became a trifle tiresome with 
his harmonica business. 

Bessie & Harriet Remple presented a 
New Act, reviewed accordingly. 

The Primrose Four close the vaudeville 
show. They are not a closing act and 
progress slowly in the last spot. 



ORPHEUM 

The Dunedin Duo opened and received 
a royal welcome from the usual Monday 
afternoon regulars. 

"What Happened to Ruth" is a novelty 
in the line of comedy sketches. The chap 
in the upper box kept the house in an 
uproar with his witty interruptions. 

As a satire on the hero and shero type 
of drama. George M. Roseau's little skit 
seems to Ell a long felt want. 

The Three Avolos have a showy look- 
ing set of instruments. Their concerted 
numbers landed them safely in the hit 
column. 

Nonette snng several songs and played 
the violin delightfully. She was in excellent 
voice Monday and scored equally well with 
her vocal solos and violin selections. The 
Hawaiian imitation sounded curiously like 
the real thing. 

Patsie DeForest and Allen Keams are a 
classy young couple. They have the right 
Idea of light entertainment. Blanche Mer- 
rill wrote- the material and it is np to 
the minute in everyres peer. 

Fay Templeton was one of the big hits 
of the bin. 

Chaa. Olcott scored a laughing success 
in his original piano specialty, and "The 
Night Boat" kept the audience in the best 
of spirits with its clever lines and situa- 
tions. Mildren Macomber ft Co. closed 
and registered a solid hit. It is a beauti- 
fully staged dancing act and deserves to 
be a sensational success. 



ROYAL 

If Blanche Sloan has a middle name, it 
is "Daintiness." She opens the show at the 
Royal this week, performing a series of 
aerial feats which, in themselves, are not 
so daring but are carried over big by Miss 
Sloan's exceptional grace and personal 
charm. 

Jack Ryan & Arthur Franklin followed. 
(See new acta.) 

Moon & Morris, presenting "two in one" 
dances, held down the third spot. They 
go through their routine like clock-work. 
The originality of their dances is bound to 
please and they have no trouble in getting 
over. 

"Those two southern gentlemen," Avel- 
ing A Lloyd, saunter on without any make- 
up, talk and act natural for a few minutes, 
and then saunter off again while the house 
shows its appreciation with ringing 
applause. Stealing their "stuff," they are 
a pair of A. Gs. What* s an A G.T Why, 
an applause-getter! 

Emmett Corrigan's playlet came next. 
(See new acts.) 

Following intermission came James C 
Morton & Co. Although Morton has 
raised foolishness to the nth power in 
this offering, he registers a decided hit 
which, after all, is the proof of the 
pudding. 

Cedl Cunningham made a gratifying bit 
with her husband's songs. Her curtain 
speech won approval. It might, however, 
be replaced by another song number of the 
same quality as her other ones, to advan- 
tage, for her songs are splendid. 

La Sylph is reviewed under New Acts. 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




AMERICAN ROOF 

ChaB. Pottsdam bad an exceptionally 
well blended and balanced bill for the 
first half that delighted the audience on 
Monday night. The show opened with 
P. George, "The Musical Chef," who 
evolved the unique idea of disguising his 
musical instruments as kitchen utensils. 

Gordon Brothers and Golden have a 
rather commonplace singing and dancing 
specialty. 

The Josephos Troupe, which was a fea- 
ture of the Bingling Circus last season, 
presented a' novel comedy human juggling 
act. 

GrindeU and Esther, in an eccentric 
singing, talking and dancing offering, fol- 
lowed. 

Hal Crane and Company, in his dra- 
matic sketch, "The Lash," closed the first 
half. The act is of a melodramatic tinge 
with a very weak plot, though well acted. 

Beulah Pearl, a clever singing come- 
dienne with songs and chatter, received a 
big reception at the end of her turn. 
Camille Personi and Company offered a 
nonsensical Japanese operetta, Butterfly 
Love. A great deal of new comedy has 
been added to the act since last seen 
by the reviewer, which helps to add to 
the merit of the offering. William and 
Mary Sogers came next and were fol- 
lowed by the Cam, a novelty juggling 
act, which closed the show. The elec- 
trical display end of the act might be 
curbed a bit. It is a novelty, but a bit 
prolonged. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

Every seat was filled and a number of 
standees were in evidence when the first 
show of the week began last Monday after- 
noon. 

The Three Arleys, two men and a 
woman, began the bill with their equilib- 
ristic and head balancing act and their 
work brought them abundant applause. 
They are clever performers and the perch 
balancing work of the smaller man and the 
woman calls for high praise. 

Hager and Goodwin, singer and pianist, 
■cored heavily with some of their own 
compositions. 

Toby Claude and company in "I* Petite 
Bevuette," were well liked. Miss Claude's 
introduction of songs, she rendered in 
several musical comedies and revues, with 
appropriate costumes for each, were well 
liked. She had good support from Wm. 
Smythe, and a man and young woman 
whose names were not given. 

Jack Inglis and Mary Beading, with 
their "stage hands" assistants, talked and 
sang themselves into the favor usually 
accorded them. 

Mario and Trevette, man and woman, in 
a single act, scored a success. 

Harry Tate's "Motoring" in sixth place 
on the bill was the same old laugh-getter 
it has always been. 

Harry Carroll, singing his own songs, 
was so well liked that the audience de- 
manded an encore. 

HirscbofTs Troupe of Gypsies closed the 
bill and held them to the last. This is an 
unusual act. 



JEFFERSON 

Faust and Faust in a comedy musical 
offering met with only fair response. Their 
fooling took up too much of the act. 

Lyrics, a singing comedienne, was at 
her best in an Irish number. She did not 
have much of a voice but her personality 
carried her through. 

"Jinny," with Lillian Mortimer, a 
Southern playlet, was a very draggy 
affair. The plot bordered on melodrama, 
especially in the free-for-all fight between 
the two women, which got a good laugh. 

Ed. and Jack Smith sang and danced 
their way into immediate favor. As soft 
shoe dancers, they exhibited skUl which 
one would have to go a long way to equal. 
The applause wMch they received was 
certainly well merited, and they were 
called upon for an encore. 

The Georgia Comedy Four, a blackface 
singing and comedy team, were entertain- 
ing. They worked quickly and the audi- 
ence evidently liked their style, for they 
applauded until long after the next act was 
announced. 

Great Lamberti gave impersonations of 
noted musicians, but could not command 
the attention of the audience. His imper- 
sonation of Hollman, the 'cellist, was the 
only offering which was above fair. 

Waite and See sprung ail the tried and 
true jokes, but it was left to the woman 
who appears as a suffragette with a votes 
for women banner, to gain any applause. 

The Five Belmonts presented an artistic 
as well aa skillful novelty offering in clos- 
ing position. 



NEW ACTS 

Continued on page 18 



CITY 

Adrian, in blackface, presented a comedy 
singing and talking act in which a great 
deal of Henry Lewis* old material is used. 
But the singing of one of his assistants 
got a very big hand. 

Wastika and Understudy proved to be 
trained seals. The act was liked. 

Chappelle and Tribble, a black and tan 
team, opened with a patriotic song. Their 
songs and patter were only fair. 

Homer Lind and Company presented a 
sketch which served to introduce violin 
playing by the girl and singing by Mr. 
Lind. 

Mile. Bianca and company were a little 
above the spectators at this house, for 
their terpsichorean offering was not 
appreciated as it should hare been. 

Hanley, Sum and Smith were a passably 
pleasing trio, whose singing ability will 
have to improve before they leave the 
small time. 

Julia Nash and company in a dramatic 
sketch entitled "Liz" was the only bright 
spot on the bill, which, on the whole, was 
not a very entertaining one. 

Keno, Melrose and Eeyes offered their 
acrobatic novelty and gained the plaudits 
of the audience. 



FLORENCE & FRANK 
MOORE 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Singing and talking. 
Time — Thirty-five minutes. 
Setting — Drawing room. 

Florence Moore, well known in pro- 
ductions and for her work in vaude- 
ville with Billy Montgomery, enter- 
tained and pleased a large audience in 
a comedy talking and singing act with 
her brother, Frank, formerly of Mor- 
ton & Moore. 

Mr. Stillwell at the piano, accom- 
panied Mr. Moore in an opening number 
that just suited Mir^ giving hint an op- 
portunity to do hia neat cane manipula- 
tions, and a little soft shoe dancing. 

Miss Moore opens with a number 
about being a long way from Tipperary 
and constantly admonishes the pianist 
and orchestra leader to play it a little 
higher. She soon gets the audience 
laughing at her efforts to reach a high 
note and the act is set. 

A Hawaiian number sung by Mr. 
Moore gives his sister another oppor- 
tunity for comedy in the way of a 
green grass Hawaiian skirt that won't 
stay fixed. 

More comedy on a bench with brother 
Frank kept the friendly audience in 
good humor. 

Florence Moore has undoubtedly come 
back to vaudeville with the personality 
and talent that marked her work here- 
tofore and looks exceedingly well. 
Brother Frank works weU with her. 
The act, of course, is too long, but will 
easily work down to twenty or twenty- 
five minutes, at most. 



THEODORE KOSLOFF & CO. 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Russian dancers. 

Time — Twenty-five mimiin. 

Setting — Special, icith orchestra on stage. 

Theodore Kosloff cannot be offended 
at a comparison with NljinaU from the 
American viewpoint, at least. He is 
not as graceful, but he is more manly. 
A splendid artist, particularly in this 
style of ballet work, he is well sup- 
ported. 

Vlasta Maslova, an artist, also from 
the Imperial Russian Ballet, dances 
with him in two beautiful numbers 
Ecstasia d'Amour, an exquisite number- 
and Adagio Romantique. 

Too much praise cannot be given the 
work of Vera Fredova, who has no spe- 
cial billing, but dances as few Russian 
dancers have, on the Palace stage at 
any rate. Her opening number, Spring, 
is a poem of grace. Dance Bohemiense 
is pretty, and the Dance Russe Pay* 
sanne, which she does with Senia Ru- 
safoff, is artistic and quaint. 

Natasha Rombova does the Pizzicato, 
made familiar to Palace audiences by 
Piatov. 

The dances are well arranged and ran 
beautifully smooth for a Monday per 
formance. 



VAUDEVILLE FOR ARCADE 

Jacksokvuxe, Fla., Jan. 15. — The Ar- 
cade Theatre, heretofore devoted to moving 
pictures, has been renovated and has insti- 
tuted Keith vaudeville. The stage is now 
one of the best in the South. 



WILL AND MARY ROGERS 

Theatre — American Roof. 
Style — Comedy skit. 
Setting— /n one. 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 

The skit rendered by this clever, 
versatile and entertaining couple is en- 
titled, "It Didn't Take the First Time," 
and was written by Felix Adler. The 
material is rather commonplace. Still 
it was assembled for laughing purposes 
and accomplished this object. 

The story u about a man and his 
wife, who, after having been divorced 
for several years, meet on the street and 
recall old reminiscences. A recitation, 
with a human touch delivered by both 
the man and woman, seemed to be to the 
liking of the audience. 

The story then revolves around the 
fact that the man baa neglected his 
wife for his "club," but when he an- 
nounces to her that he is no longer 
a member of it, she consents to be re- 
united to him in marriage. 

The sketch is bright and snappy and 
if a few of the "gaga" which seem to 
have a doable meaning were eliminated, 
would be a most acceptable turn. 



EMMETT CORRIGAN & CO. 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style— Playlet. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting — House. 

This is a particularly well acted play- 
let, entitled "Mrs. Eastman's Brooch." 

John is a ticket-of-Ieave man, although 
bis wife is not aware of the fact that he 
is on parole. At Mrs. Eastman's house 
party, the hostess's brooch has been 
stolen. A quick search has availed 
naught aud the guests are asked to stay 
for the night until a more complete 
search is made. Mary, John's wife, baa 
retired, but, owing to the excitement 
cannot sleep. Her husband guesses her 
symptoms and accuses her of stealing 
the brooch. 

She confesses just as there is a knock 
at the door and the chief of police enters 
to search the bouse. As he goes to 
search the wife, he Is intercepted by 
John, who wrests his pistol away and 
recognizes in him an old crony. It comes 
out that be is not the chief of police at 
all. John makes him take the diamonds 
and go. 

He then turns to his wife and asks be" 
how ahe came to commit the theft 8hi- 
tells her story, explaining that it was 
the temptation of a moment, which he 
states is but the commencement of a 
career of crime, unless checked. 

Just then a shot rings out. John's old 
crony has been caught with the goods 
and killed. John says. That is the way 
it always ends." 

The playlet is far above the average. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 




"LOVE O* MIKE" AT 
THESHUBERTIS 

MILDLY AMU SIN G 



"LOVB O' HIKB."— A comedy, with 
music, la a protoroe mud two acta. 
Bask by Thomas B jdu ay. lyrics by 
Hutj B. Smith ud Baste by Jerome 
Km. ' Presented Monday evening, 
January 15, at the Shubert Theatre. 

SIR. 

Betty, a maid ...Katharine Besets 

aba. Allison Marvin, the brntuss 

au'jod MeBala 
Blf Jackson, tin ba tier, a morla* picture 
"faa" Qeone Baaaall 

TifOCKT HMH«at<»»«i»»W«M • eLs90Qs> MaW BBB 

MoUy Holly Helatyra 

Vivian ..viitan Wt»n 

...*•• .....LuelU Gear 

....Helen Clarke 

Peggy Wood 

Bruce Grant Alan Mwarda 

Jack Taoaaa.. Baaaaa Baldwin 

Lieutenant Stafford, Klldare's secretary. 

Pftiiiii sssnssai 
Captain Lord Michael KIMare. 

Lawrence Orossmlth 

Alonso Bird..... CUftoo Webb 

Phil Mania Qoantin Tod 

Tad Wataon Jack Bohn 

aba. O'Boarke Aaale Lydiate 

Kra. Scbmalts Ulllan Devere 

Hilda Hilda Peatlsnd 

Gloria, a daacer Oloria Goodwin 



GARDEN TO OPEN AGAIN 

Beginning January IS the East-West 
Flayers are to give a series of week-end 
performances at the Garden Theatre. The 
plays to be produced are "The Stranger," 
"Paul and Virginia," "The Awakening of 
Narradin" and "Night." 



NAZIMOVA OPENS HER 
SEASON AT PRINCESS 
WITH UNUSUAL PLAY 



"HAVE A HEART" 

MUSICAL TREAT 

AT THE LIBERTY 



There is bat a alight plot, to the light 
and mildly amusing story of "Love O" 
Mike" which came to the Shubert Thea- 
tre on Monday night, bat Elizabeth Mar- 
bury and Lee Shubert have selected such 
a clever company to portray the parts of 
Thomas Sydney's book, and Jerome Kern 
baa furnished such a melodious score that 
the piece was well received. 

Six charming girls are spending the 
week end at the home of Mrs. Marvin, in 
BronxviHe, there are also present seven 
young men, one of them Capt. Lord 
Michael KUdare, and the admiration 
which ail the young ladies have for him 
and their manner of showing it arouses 
the jealousy of the other gentlemen. 
Lord Michael, who rather enjoys the hero 
wprahip of the ladies, at the suggestion 
of the butler poses as the daring rescuer 
of a woman and her two children from 
a biasing building, bat in the midst of 
his i honors is exposed by the real hero 
who happens to be one of the young men 
of the bouse party, and whose fiancee 
has continually urged him to do some- 
thing heroic. 

The butler, also, is not above claiming 
distinction, poses as a farmer pugilist, and 
at the time of the story's beginning had 
become such a devotee of the motion 
pictures that all his actions savored of 
the 51ms. 

The roles of the six young girls, played 
by Leone Morgan, Molly Mclntyre, 
Vivian WesselL LueUav Gear, Helen Clarke 
and Peggy Wood were made most enjoy - 
able, while Lawrence Qrossmith, aa Lord 
Michael, gave bis usual clever and finished 
performance. 

George Haseell, the butler, was amus- 
ing and the balance of the cast was ade- 
quate. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAT. 
World— Sure to pleat the eye. 
Times— Mildly amusing but tuneful 
Herald— Polite, prettg. una pleating. 

. Sua— Rather conoeutloual. . • 

, Tribune — S*oa» of charm. 
American— Sprightly force of youth and 



"HAVE A HBAET" — A mimical com- 
edy la two acts. Book and lyrics by 
Gay Bolton and P. G. Wodehonse. 
Moafc by Jerome Kern. Presented 
Thursday evening, January 11. at the 
Liberty Theatre. 

CAST. 

Henry Billy B. Tan 

Ted Sheldon Drnald Macdonald 

Llnte O'Brien Msrjorie Gateson 

Detective Baker Eueene Keith 

Rutherford Scboonmaker. . . .Thurston Ball 

Captain Charles Owen Boy Gordon 

Peary Scboonmaker Eileen Tan Biene 

Mrs. Pyne. ..•••«•••.... Flavla Arcsro 

Matthew Pyne James Bradbury 

Dolly Brabason Louise Dresser 

Ynssnf. .Joseph del Poanta 

Maltre d'Hotel Eugene Bevere 

Georgia Peggy ream 



With a book of genuine humor, lyrics 
which fairly bubble with wit, and a 
musical setting which easily surpasses 
anything which Jerome Kern has previous- 
ly written, "Have A Heart," Henry W. 
Savage's first musical production of the 
season came to the Liberty Theatre on 
Thursday night and immediately enrolled 
itself among the successes of the season. 

Book and lyrics of the piece are by 
Guy Bolton and F. 6. Wodehouse, who 
collaborated with Mr. Kern in "Very 
Good Eddie," and deal with the marital 
troubles of the young Schoonmakers, who 
at the beginning of the play are living 
apart, and the wife is considering a di- 
vorce. An adventurous woman has caused 
the separation, but the young couple, who 
accidentally meet in the lingerie depart- 
ment of the husband's big shop, are soon 
reconciled and determine to rectify their 
mistake as soon as possible. 

They do this by stealthily . going to the 
seaside hotel in which they spent their 
honeymoon and under assumed names 
determine to forget their differences and 
be genuinely happy again. Of course, 
friends and relatives unexpectedly appear, 
as well as the woman who caused their 
troubles and many complications arise, 
aH of which are happily straightened out, 
the adventuress landing her cheerful aid. 

In the company are Thurston Hall and 
Eileen Van Biene, the disagreeing pair; 
Louise Dresser, who eaused the trouble; 
Donald Mscdonald and Marjorie Gateson, 
Flavia Arcaro, James Bradbury, Joseph 
del Puente and Billy Van, who as the 
elevator boy in the big department store, 
furnished the major portion of the com- 
edy. Mr. Van, familiar to vaudeville 
audiences, is new to Broadway musical 
eomedy, and hie fun was irresistible. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAT. 

Tribune— Mooes snappily. 

Herald — Goet at high speed. 
. Sun— Complete tuceau. 

Times — Bright-ani tunefuL 
. World— BrioM, clean, musical . 

sjneriean— Overflow* in mutic. . , 



•••a 

play 

Wedl 

PtJdc 

Maode. 


iPTION 8BJOAL8."— A three act 
by H. Austin Adams, produced 
lesday evening, January 10. at the 
eaa Theatre. 

CAST. 








..Mitchell Lewis 








.Mme. NsximoTS 













WISE HAS NEW COMEDY 

Tom A. Wise, now playing Falstaff in 
"The Merry Wives of Windsor," will fol- 
low that play with an American corned;, 
based upon the life of the late P. T. Bar 
num. B. Iden Payne will stage the play 
for John D. Williams. 



Mme. Nazimova began last Wednesday 
her promised season in a repertoire at the 
Princess Theatre giving as her initial of- 
fering '"Ception Shoals," an unusual play 
in this age of unconventional stage works. 

The play is based upon the sex inno- 
cence of Eve Coffin, who supposes herself 
to be the daughter of Job Coffin, the 
keeper of 'Ception Shoals Lighthouse, off 
the coast of Southern California. 

The first act shows Philip Blake's 
Motor Yacht "The Driftwood," fast on 
'Ception Shoals. He is anxious to get 
away because he has as a passenger a young 
woman, known as Maude, who is about to 
become a mother. Eve from the lighthouse, 
fees the yacht's lights and swims to the 
eboals, surprising Blake by appearing in a 
one piece bathing suit. 

Eve tells Blake she has come to him to 
learn what a woman is and what a man is. 
She says she has never spoken to a living 
soul except her father and has never even 
seen another woman. She tells him she was 
born years before, in the lighthouse 
and that now the desire to live and to 
know the world has overwhelmed her and 
she has broken the ironbound rules of her 
father and come for knowledge. 

Blake takes her on board the "Driftwood" 
and she is present at the birth of Maude's 
child. Maude and her babe are taken to the 
lighthouse, despite Job's objections. 

When the party sails away Blake 
promises to return for Eve. When he does 
return Job tells him Eve is dead and Blake 
departs. Eve, broken hearted and over- 
whelmed in her desire to become a mother, 
commits suicide in the sea. 

While the play is one of the really big 
plays of the season it is marred by a rather 
draggy second act and by the entrance of 
Smoot in Act 3. The logical ending seems 
to be the meeting of Eve and Blake on his 
return. 

The role of Eve differs from any in which 
we have seen Nazimova and in its portrayal 
we get a sidelight of a hidden talent we 
did not know this great actress possessed. 
This was her childlike simplicity in the first 
act Her work throughout was brilliant. 

Mitchell Lewis gave a forceful characteri- 
sation of Smoot and Henry Harmon made 
Job a trne-to-life grouchy, canting hypo- 
crite. — 

Charles Bryant did fairly well in the 
difficult role of Blake and Edith Speare 
gave a colorless performance. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 
Herald — One of the big plage of the gear. 
Tribune — Nazimova often a glittering 
•tar. 

Wo rid — Exct Rent acting by Nazimova, 
Times) — Interesting performance. , . 
Awwrrtfait — Nazimova 1 s work . brilliant. 



"IN FOR THE NIGHT' 
PROVES TO BE ONLY 

MILDLY AMUSING 



"IN POB THE NIGHT* - — A three-act 
farce by James SaTery, produced 
Thursday evening. January 11. at the 
Pulton Theatre. 

CAST. 

Willi Joseph Herbert 

Mrs. O'Dowd Mane Haynes 

Timothy Crawford Herbert Yost 

Orlando Boffins Gerald Griffin 

Sylvia Curtis Lay Cabin 

Stephen Hamilton Edwin forsberg 

Mrs. Gordea-Blrkborough Ethel Martin 

Lord Montague Bannerdale Percy Ames 

Pansy Mountjoy Irene Oshler 

Frank Barley Curtis Oooksey 

Barbara Hamilton Eileen Wilson 

Col. Nathaniel Curtis Charles Mason 



"In for the Night," which is Mr. 8a- 
very*s first play for the general public, his 
other efforts having been for production by 
the Hasty Pudding; Club, of Boston, is 
presented by the Empire Producing Corp. 
If the author had done his work as -well as 
the producing company there might have 
been a different tale to telL Bnt he didn't. 

"In for the Night" lacks originality, but 
this might readily be overlooked if it were 
written with an eye to its construction. 
There is abundant material, with numer- 
ous bright' lines, and the author's theme 
is good in spite of its tacking newness. Bnt 
it is the crude way in which it is handled 
that makes the farce unfunny. 

The story revolves aronnd two eloping 
couples who are endeavoring to elude the 
would-be brides' respective fathers. They 
all stop at an inn and before they can get 
away to be married the tigers of the me- 
nagerie of Boiling's Circus escape and hold 
the inmates of the inn prisoners. When 
all the guests have congregated it is seen 
that there are present, besides the elopers, 
the two fathers, an Hinglis*, lord who ex- 
pected to be the husband of one of the 
would-be brides and a chorus girl who con- 
sidered herself engaged to one of the 
grooms-to-be. 

After a general mixup, the sky clears. 

Percy Ames gives quite the best por- 
trayal of a silly English lord we have ever 
seen. Never once does he overact nor ex- 
aggerate and his performance entitles him 
to high praise. 

Herbert Yost is also entitled to high 
praise for his work. He Is a very clever 
light comedian and he and Mr. Ames are 
responsible for most of the real laughs. 

Ljiy CahUl did good work as Sylvia. 

Joseph Herbert gave a very unfunny 
performance and Edwin Forsberg and 
Charles Mason overacted their respective 
roles. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 

Tribune— Only mildly amuting. 

Herald— Polite but pale farce. 

Sun — Almost burUtque — Suffert from lack 

- of finish. 

Times— Mediocre farce unevenly played. 

World — Uproarious in Us /aw. % . 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 



_^a»- {754c NEW YORK 

^^TK OUOT THUTBKai tMUCAOH M II— ri 



. Founded la USS by Frank Queen 
Published by the 
CLIPPER CORPORATION 

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Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLA.ND W. VAUGHAN. EDITOR 
Paul C. Sweinhart, Managing Editor 

NEW YORK, JANUARY 17, 1917 



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Pasting of Buffalo Bill 

The death last week In Denver, Col., 
of Wm. F. Cody, marked the passing of 
a man who, as Buffalo Bill, was prob- 
ably one of the most unique characters 
the show world has ever known, or pos- 
sible ever will know, for the conditions 
under which he became famous can never 
exist again and without those same con- 
ditions the opportunities which went to 
make Buffalo Bill could not arise. 

Bill Cody's early fame as a scout and 
the fact that he killed thousands of buf- 
faloes to furnish meat for the construction 
gangs K>f the first transcontinental railroad 
were used by Ned Bnntline, the writer of 
frontier life, as a basis for hia Buffalo 
Bill stories, the most popular of their 
kind. Thus was Buffalo Bill christened. 

It was the same Ned Bnntline who 
wrote. The Scout of the Plains, in which 
Buffalo Bill made his entree into the show 
business, playing the character of "Buffalo 
Bill." This was in the early TCa. 

In the early 80*9 he conceived the idea 
of teaching the youth of America what 
the old western frontier was like, and this 
he did by bringing the frontier life to the 
very doors of his patrons. The high esteem 
in which he was held by Washington 
officials enabled him to obtain the aid of 
the C. S. Government in securing Indiana 
for his proposed show, which he opened 
in 1883 in Omaha, Neb., as "Buffalo Bill's 
Wad West Show." 

Aa its popularity grew, so grew the 
fame of Buffalo Bill, and he finally saw 
the day when he was as popular in En- 
rope as in his native land ; when bis name 
was a by-word in households in the four 
corners of the earth. The name of Buffalo 
BUI had become one of the beat known 
in the world. 



ANSWERS TO QUERIES 

B. P., Chicago. — The midgets you men- 
tion were married April 16, 1916, in Madi- 
son Square Garden. Joseph Frances Short 
is four feet two inches tall and Elsie 
Reineking just four feet. The bridegroom 
weighed 78 pounds. Both were performers 
in Barnum and Bailey's Circus at the time. 

• • • 

Acbobat. — Lu-Lu, the European gym- 
nast, was one of the early vaudeville per- 
formers to receive a big salary in this 
country. She was paid $500 in gold per 
week for an extended engagement at Nlblo's 
Garden In the early TO's. 

• a • 

J. W., Baltimore. — "Arrah-Na-Pogue" 
was first acted Sept. 30, 1872, at the The- 
atre Comique, this city, and in it Larry 
Tooley and Johnny Queen danced the barn- 
door reel. 

» • • ■ 

"Cibccs." — Until his death in England 
last March Harry Hemmings was conceded 
to be the oldest clown in Europe. At the 
time of his death he was 84 years old. 

• • • 

0. V. B., Boston. — WaHack's Theatre, at 
the corner of Broadway and Thirteenth 
St., was first opened Sept. 25, 1861. 

• • • 

B. W. M., Worcester. — 1. G. I*. Pox was 
born in 1825 in Boston. 2. Chas. K. Fox 
was born in 1833 in the same city. 



STOCK IN MANCHESTER 

Editor, TUB Nrw YosK ClJFRR: 

Dear Sir. — The Wadswortb company, 
one of the finest stock combinations of its 
kind that ever showed in Manchester, 
closed its brief season of ten weeks to- 
night, when they presented for the last 
time Harry Holllngsworth's four act 
comedy dramas of western life, entitled, 
"The Coming of the Law." 

It is regrettable, but nevertheless a fact, 
that Manchester is an oddity when it 
comes to things theatrical. 

If our audiences get something for 
nothing, all well and good bat, if we have 
to pay, well that is quite another story. 

Neighboring cities have stock combina- 
tions of their own — of which they are justly 
proud — proud of them because they give 
to them the support which they rightly 
deserve and simply because they recognise 
merit and a good thing when they see it 

Not so with Manchester, however. Her 
theatrical education if one may be per- 
mitted to say it, has been sadly neglected, 
because she apparently doesn't know what 
she really wants in that line. Serve as a 
near company, and they will receive the 
plaudits of the multitude. They dine and 
wine the members, and make much of 
them; but when a real company with 
artists, endowed with any degree of thea- 
trical talent and skill, presents itself, they 
pass it by with something like cold dis- 
dain. 



jpMMMMimHIIMIIilMIl 



Correspondents Wanted 

THE CLIPPER 
Wishes Live, Wide- Awake Representatives 

EVERYWHERE 

NEWSPAPER MEN PREFERRED 



usiimiffliiiiiiiijn"niaiiiiini*jiiitiiiiiwn!ii!iijiiiii3iia^iiiiiiiJKi(m 



F. W. P., New York.— Richard Harding 
Davis died April 11, this year. Yes, be 
wrote "Benson's Folly." 

• • • 

O. G. H.— "After Dark" was first acted 
in America Nov. 2, 1868, at the Old Bowery 
Theatre. 

» « • 

F. P. H., Cincinnati. — The Hippodrome, 
Zanesville, O., reopened April 22 with pic- 
tures. 

• • • 

F. W. P., Washington. — The stock at 
the Lyceum, Washington, opened April 10. 

• • • 

S. S., Philadelphia. — Gilmore's Concert 
Garden, this city, opened May 29, 1875. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Hardie and Von Leer produced "The 
Fast Mail" in England. 

S. Cronheim was arrested for giving 
Sunday shows in Hoboken, >". J. 

The Kiralfy home on West Washington 
Square, New York, was destroyed by fire. 

Julias P. Witma_-k was with the City 
Directory Co. 

Mark Murphy was with "CDowd's 
Neighbors." 

Wm. J. Scanlan was removed to Bloom- 
ingdale Asylum. 



Managers and other members of the pro- 
fession must live, aa well as the rest of as, 
and there is no reason, except Indifference, 
why this, the Queen City of New Hamp- 
shire, cannot give support to a stock com- 
pany and make it a permanent feature of 
our city, something to point to and say, 
"This is our company, how do you like 

ur* 

The Wadsworth company was composed 
of members, who were artists in their 
various line of endeavor, each and every 
one, and it is the writer's opinion that it 
will be a long, long time ere Manchester 
again sees their equal. 

They have gone, but there are a few 
loyal theatrical fans who will not forget 
them. Manager Ornstein did hia best. 
G. E. Wagkkb. 
Marckesteb, N. H., Jan. 13. 



WHY THEATRE DRAUGHTS? 

Editor, The New York Cllpfzb: 

Dear Sir: — In these wintry months I 
often wonder whether some of oar theatre 
managers are in partnership with under- 
takers or doctors. I refer, to their otter 
carelessness of the health of their patrons, 
in that they provide no screen, or other 
protective agent, to keep out cold draught 
which comes in at the door where the 
ticket taker stands. 

Aabox Hopkins. 



RIALTO RATTLES 



PRESENTED "THE FLAME." 

While a theatre out in Indiana waa still 
burning, the manager rented another and 
started a show, attracting part of the 
crowd that had gathered. It's too bad he 
couldn't have had the one in which the firs 
took place repaired in time to get 'em 
coming out of the house he rented. 



SOME GTJTI 

Washington, D. C, will get to know the 
name of Sid Rankin better than Woodrow 
Wilson if the "Qayety Booster" doesn't 
ran ont of type printing his name. Five 
signed stories on one page is going some. 



DO YOU USE THIS ONE? 
He: Can't you see a joke t 
She: I'm looking at one, now. 
If you don't use this gag in your act, 

it's time you did. No vaudeville double 

in one is complete without it. 



OH YOU FATIMA! 

Sada Wander takes exception to the way 
we inadvertently spelled her name recent- 
ly. She thinks that "Selda Wands" looks 
too much like a brand name for a Turkish 
cigarette. 



ONE WAY TO DO IT. 

Ernest Richardson, chief electrician at 
the Royal Theatre, gives orders to his 
subordinates by wireless. Visitors to the 
back stage will thus avoid hearing some 
h*rsh words. 



TIS A SECRET. 

Will Morriaey and Clinton pleas* stand 
up and explain what they were doing In 
Albany Christmas when they had engage- 
ment to play Troy? 



WANT A CIGAR? 

Don't say that we told you so, but 
there's a box of 'em in the top right-hand 
drawer of Joe Michael's desk. 



LEW DID IT. 

Mentioning record jumps, one might refer 
to that of Lew Fields, who went from the 
ridiculous to the sublime. 



PERPETUAL MOTION. 

Rothapfel resigning. 

Monntford taking the "Twentieth Cen- 
tury." 



VAUDEVILOSOPHY. 

Some acts knock their andiences so cold 
that they become too frosen to applaud. 



A THIRTY-NINE MINUTE ACT. 

Moore ft Moore kept on doing more and 
more. 



HE WANTED TO DO RIGHT. 

Harry Steinfeld, the theatrical lawyer in 
the Fltsgerald Building, saw the sign 
"William Faveraham, Getting Married" the 
other day and, hurrying over to Tiffany's, 
sent the actor a handsome silver set. 



HE TOLD THE TRUTH. 

Julian MItchel Is deaf. So is Fred Nice, 
a member of "Miss Springtime." 

The other day Nice was late for re- 
hearsal and MItchel took him to task. 

"I didn't hear the can," replied Nice. 

"Don't tell me that," replied MItchel, 
"you can hear just as well as I can." 



\2 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 




BERLIN 



SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



Lowmx, Eng., Jan. 6. 

The result of the Snookerspool handicap 
lit the Vaudeville Club is awaited with 
much interest. Sam Mayo and Alf Hur- 
ley are favorites with many of their fellow 
. lii-nibers, but some of the "dark horses" 
lave shown sufficient strength to make the 
i licking of the winner no easy task. 

Alfredo, "the vagabond violinist," has 
been booked by the I. V. T. A., Ltd., for a 
tour of their theatres in South Africa and 
he will sail June 2. 

The first production of "London Life," 
under Ernest C. Roll's direction, will 
occur Jim. 15 at the Oxford. Rehearsals 
have been going on for more than a fort- 
night. 

The Christmas season found every the- 
atre in London open with the exception of 
tin' Opem House in Covent Garden. At 
a number of the theatres there are two 
attractions, one of which is seen at the 
matinees and the other at the night per- 
formances. Business at the various houses 
is good nt all performances and the 
natural question is, "Has London sufficient 
theatres?" And this, too, with the awful 
war going on. 



The delay in the building operations on 
the new music bail to take the place of the 
Hippodrome, which was destroyed by fire, 
inis cansed E. H. Rostock to change his 
house policy for the time being. Until the 
completion of the new house, vaudeville will 
be* presented at Rostock's Palace, in con- 
junction with the pictures which now 
form the sole attraction. 



A special matinee will be given next 
Tuesday at the Alhambra in aid of the 
Lord Kitchener Memorial Fund for dis- 
abled officers and men of the Navy and 
Army. Oswald Stall and Messrs. Gross- 
uith and Laurillard have charge of the 
entertainment. 



"The Maid of the Mountains.'" which was 
so well received at its recent production nt 
the Prince's, Manchester, hns been 
accorded the stamp of approval by several 
London critics and it is due for a presenta- 
tion here at the earliest possible date. 



Eva Elwes is a prolific playwright. 
There were three of her plays produced on 
Boxing Night, viz. : "The Cottage Girl." at 
the Hippodrome, Nnneaton : "A Mother's 
Prayer." at Lowestoft and "The Fisher 
Maid of Old St. Malo," at Barnsley. 



Alfred Butt, beginning last Monday, has 
instituted Monday matinees, which will be 
given every week- during the run of 
"Vanity Fair," in addition to the regular 
Wednesday and Saturday afternoon per- 
formances. 



Mariam Lewes, who has been substitut- 
ing for Lily Bray ton in "Chu Chin Chow," 
at His Majesty's, is nnder engagement to 
Sir George Alexander for his forthcoming 
production of "The Aristocrats" at the St. 
James. 



Chas. Kasrac and company in their act 
"Buffet des Falls" are playing their fourth 
tour of the Moss halls. This week they 
played the Empire, Cardiff. 



John Henderson, whose recent sudden 
death in Leicester shocked his many 
friends, was producing the Leicester Christ- 
mas pantomime when be was stricken. 



"Saturday Afternoon," the new number 
which Alfred Butt has added to "Vanity 
Fair," at the Palace, acts as a vehicle for 
the introduction of eccentric dancing by 
Mile. Regine Flory and Jan Oy-rs. 



Jessie Millward has concluded her- fall 
tour in "The Rosary" ; will after a few 
weeks' rest, begin ber spring tour. She 
starts out at the end of January, and is 
fully booked to the middle of June. 



Fitz-Allen is playing Abanazar in 
"Aladdin" at the Borough Theatre, Strat- 
ford, his second consecutive year. 



Ernest Dottridge's new production in 
five scenes, "My Son Sammy" will have 
a company of thirty, headed by Arthur 
White. The premier will occur February 
2C at the Palace, Oldham. 



J. W. Cragg. founder of the famous 
Cragg troupe of acrobats, announces his 
intention of retiring from active work at 
the end of this year, after fifty-five years 
before the public 



(•aye Gordon is principal boy in "Babes 
in the Wood" at the Theatre Royal, 
Brighton. The company moves to the 
Pavilion, Glasgow, on Feb. 5. 



The Saxnnica Quartette, which plays 
the Hippodrome. Northampton, next week, 
will be at the Granville, Walbam Green, 
week of Jan. 15. 



Wilfred Essex, late Lieutenant of the 
Roynl Fusiliers, who was invalided after 
twenty months' service, is working on the 
Syndicate Tour. 



The Mareella Sextette play the Empire. 
Mexborough. next week and follow, Jan. 15, 
for a week at the Palace. Eckington. 



The Sisters Sprightly are playing the 
Moss Empress Tour with big success in 
Fred Karno's revue, "All Women.'* 



Griff, the down Johnnie, plays the 
Hippodrome, Aldershot, next week and is 
at Exeter the week following. 



Miss Cashmore, who is now with Heng- 
ler's Circus, Glasgow, will return to the 
Hippodrome. Bristol. March 5. 



George Ross sends word that he is doing 
well in Sooth Africa. 



Winnifred Holme plays the Palace, 
Bradford, next week. 



Maxwell Carew is playing "Dame" with 
Howard and Wyndham's pantomime at 
His Majesty's Theatre, Aberdeen. 



Patti Loftus is principal girl with Ike 
and Will Scott's pantomime, "Babes in the 
Wood," on tour. 



DiacofiTs Red, White and Bine Ladies 

Cycle Sensation opens Jan. 22 at the 
Olympia, Paris. 

Marion Scott is with Barney Arm- 
strong's Cinders pantomime, at the Em-' 
pire, Belfast. 



The Lannons and Daisy Griff have filled 
in the current week at the Granville, 
Walham Green. 

Gertie Rex is principal boy with Harry 
McKelvie's pantomime "Mother Hubbard." 



The feature film Truth and Justice is 
next week at the Hippodrome, Brighton. 



Little Stanley Russell, "the boy wonder" 
played the Alhambra, Leith, this week. 



Zarmo has been engaged for the month 
of April at Parish's Circus, Madrid. 



The Madeleine Yvonne Trio played the 
Hippodrome, Nottingham, this week. 



Nellie Babbie is principal boy with 
Ernest Dottridge's "Aladdin" Co. 



Ethel Mayne is principal girl with Joe 
Waldron's "Sinbad" Co. on tour. 



Rene Ralph is principal boy with 
Gulliver's "Mother Goose" Co. 



Harry Blake hns been nt the Theatre 
Royal, Pontypool, this week. 



May Moore-Duprcz will be on the L. 
T. V. halls until March 17. 



Anderson and Xash played the Theatre 
Royal, Aldershot, this week. 



Atroy, the society juggler, is at the 
Picturedrome, Lancaster. 



Madame Walker's Juveniles are with the 
"Cinderella" pantomime. 



Vesta Tilley will make a southern pro- 
vincial tonr in the spring. 



Fred Solo and his four Solo girls, are 
■with "Aladdin" on tonr. 



"Razzle-Dazzle" celebrated its 300th per- 
formance last Monday. 



Norman Field, and his harp, played the 
Metropolitan this week. 



Barton and Ashley report success over 
the Moss Tonr. 



LONDON REVUE BY AMERICANS 

London, Eng., Jan. 13. — The next Hip- 
podrome production, which will soon be 
ready for the stage director to begin work 
an, will be American so far as music and 
lyrics are concerned, as Dave Stamper and 
Gene Buck will furnish the musical num- 
bers of the show. Their work on the Zieg- 
field "Follies," New York, was responsible 
for their engagement by the Hippodrome. 



RULING AFFECTS MUSIC HALLS 

Londen, Eng., Jan. 13. — Much uneasi- 
ness is apparent in Music Hall circles re- 
garding the scope of the proposed Govern- 
ment measures to increase the army and to 
restrict traveling facilities. It is feared the 
Music Hall business will be adversely af- 
fected from both directions, as many will 
be conscripted from the ranks of the per- 
formers as well 8? business staffs. 



RAILWAY RATES INCREASED 

London, Eng., Jan. 10. — The 50 per cent, 
increase on all railways, which went into 
effect on Jan. 1, is making itself felt this 
week for the first time, as those traveling 
last week provided themselves with rickets 
in advance -and therefore got them at the 
old rates. 



AUSTRALIA TO SEE MARKLEY 

Sydney, Auk., Jan. 15.— Frank Markley, 
the American banjoist, has "been engaged 
for the Mcintosh Theatres and is expected 
to arrive here in time to open early in 
February at the Tivoli, this city. 



NEW REVUE MAKES HIT 

Sydney, Aus., Jan. 10. — Ed. Hutchin- 
son's new revue, "The Passing Show of 
1916-17," produced for the Mcintosh Cir- 
cuit, at the Tivoli, this city, has proved to 
be an instantaneous success. 



SYLVA IN "CARMEN" FILM 

Pakis, France, Jan. 12. — Marguerita 
Sylva, the well-known prima donna, has 
just completed her engagement before the 
camera in this city, being featured in the 
title role in "Carmen." 



.HARRY HALL IN CALCUTTA 

Calcutta, India, Jan. 12. — Harry Hall, 
late of the London Hippodrome, is stage 
director for Bondmon's Variety, Ltd., for 
which company he is staging revues at the 
Empire Theatre. 



NEW YORK TO SEE "OH CAESAR" 

London, Eng., Jan. 12.— "Oh, Caesar," 
which was recently successfully produced 
at the Lyceum, Edinburgh, has been se- 
cured by option. for a New York manager. 



"TIVOLI FOLLIES" DOING WELL 

Melbooene, Aus., Jan. 14. — The 
"Tivoli Follies," are now on their third an- 
nual tour of the Mcintosh theatres and are 
outshining their work of former seasons. 



YANKEE ACTS SCORE SUCCESS 

Sydney, Aus, Jan. 11.— Belle Oliver 
and the Aerial Weavers, recent arrivals 
trom America, registered hits on their first 
appearances Here." 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




STRAND, MOBILE, 

AGAIN IN 

STOCK 

NEW COMPANY ORGANIZED 



Mobile, Ala., Jan. 13. — The Strand The- 
atre is again housing a stock company, the 
new organization being known as the New 
Strand Stock Co. 

The company permanently engaged is 
playing only royalty plays under the man- 
agement of C. D. Peruchi, "Within the 
Law" being the initial attraction. 

Recently the company playing this the- 
atre disbanded owing to a disagreement 
among the stockholders and vaudeville has 
been the policy for several weeks. 

The cast of the new company includes 
Dorothy Lewis, C. D. Peruchi, Jack Re- 
gan, Edward Clark, Don Peruchi, Camille 
Saragon, Henry Coroneas, Pearl Evans 
Lewis, Mabel Gypzene, Warren Lyle, Miss 
Lewis, Albert A. Webster, Joe Wagner, 
Ed Morgan, Fred Wilman, and Frank 
Emons. 

The management is negotiating for the 
following attractions : "The Fortune 
Hunter," "The White Sister," "Under 
Cover," "Broadway Jones," and "Seven 
Keys to Baldpate." 

Daniel S. Drago and his orchestra fea- 
ture the season's latest music at every per- 
formance. 



HYPERION THEATRE HAS FIRE 

New Haven, Conn., Jan. 13. — Just as 
the audience was filing out of the Hyperion 
Theatre, at the close of the performance 
of "Jnst a Woman," by the Poli Players, 
Wednesday night, a fire, which originated 
in the small storeroom at the rear of the 
gallery, threatened the house. Manager 
Finnegan gave orders for the audience to 
be hurried out without alarm, and within 
three minutes the theatre was emptied and 
the fire department arrived. Damage to 
the extent of $5,000 was done, and no per- 
formance was given the following day. 



BURBANK PLAYERS CLOSE 

Los Angeles, Jan. 15. — The Burbank 
Players gave their last performance last 
Sunday night, presenting "Seven Keys to 
Baldpate." It is said the historic Bur- 
bank Theatre, where the company has been 
appearing, has seen its last dramatic of- 
fering nnd the house may go into pictures. 



LEADING MAN PLANNING OWN CO. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 15. — Arnold C. Bald- 
win, who for the past thirteen years off 
mid on has been leading man of the May 
Bell Marks Co., is taking a much needed 
lest. Mr. Baldwin is making plans for 
next season for his own repertoire ■ com- 
pany ;o take to the road. 



JEWETT CO. IN NEW PLAY HERE 

Boston, Jan. 15. — The Henry Jewett 
Players are this week presenting for the 
first time in this country "Dr. Wake's 
Patient," a comedy drama in four acts, by 
W. Gaynor Mackey and Robert Ord. 



GOLD1E GRAY CO. IN JOHNSTOWN 

Johnstown, Pa., Jan. 15. — The Globe 
Theatre, a vaudeville house formerly under 
the management of L. L. Lambrenos, has 
been leased for dramatic stock by Moute 
Wilks and A. Paul D'Mnthot. The com- 
pany, known as the Goldie Gray Players, 
is under the personal direction of Pan) 
D'Mnthot and the business end of the firm 
is being handled by Monte Wilks. 

The players include: 

Monte Wilks,' leads; Edmund Barrett, 
heavies ; Earl Miller, light comedy ; B. G. 
Knabb, general business ; A. Paul D'Mn- 
thot, characters and directors : Goldie Gray, 
leads; Charlotte Mayme Clair, hearts*. 
and Leona Melville, general business. 



JACKSONVILLE TO HAVE STOCK 

Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 15. — The man- 
agement of the Orpheum Theatre has ar- 
ranged with Vernon Wallace to produce 
high class stock in this city, commencing 
Jan. 21. Mr. Wallace is to direct and piny 
some of the. leads. Maud Hollingsworth 
lias been engaged as leading lady. 



DRAMATIC STOCK IN SAN DIEGO 

San DrEGO, Cal., Jan. 13. — Edward H. 
Dowel] and Julia Gray opened Sunday at 
the Little Theatre, "The Spendthrift" be- 
ing the initial attraction. In their sup- 
port are Fanchon Lewis, Maurice Chick, 
Monica Lee and Ernest Winters. 



"CRINOLINE GIRL" IN MILWAUKEE 

Milwaukee, Jan. 15. — Manager Nie- 
meyer, of the Shubert Stock Co., is put- 
ting on "The Crinoline Girl" this week, 
for the first time in stock. His leading 
man, Harry Mintura, will play the Julian 
Eltinge role. 

WILKES CO. IN VANCOUVER 

Vancouver, Can., Jan. 13. — At the 
Empress Theatre, Monday, Tom Wilkes 
brought his Seattle company, opening with 
"The Spendthrift." "The Song of Songs" 
is underlined for next week, to be followed 
by "Outcast." 

CO. TO OPEN TOLEDO IN APRIL 

Toledo, O., Jan. 15. — The Melvin and 
Gates Stock Co. will come to the old 
Shubert Theatre, now known as the new 
Auditorium, about April 1. 



CO. IN MT. VERNON CLOSING 
Mt. Vernon, X. Y., Jan. 15.— The Frank 
Wilcox Stock Co. is in its last week at the 
Little Playhouse. 



ORNSTEIN WANTS TOLEDO HOUSE 

Toledo. O., Jan. 13. — Edward Ornstein 
is negotiating for a theatre here in which 
to install his company which recently closed 
in Manchester. 



LAWRENCE OPENS IN VANCOUVER 

Vancouver, Can., Jan. 13. — The Del L. 
Lawrence Stock Co. will open an indefinite 
engagement Monday at the Avenue Thea- 
tre. 

NEW CO. IN NEW BRITAIN 

Xew Britain, Jan. 13. — Walter Naylor 
is opening a dramatic stock company here 
today. 



BRIDGEPORT CO- 
GIVES NEW 
PLAY 

"UNDER SUSPICION" PRESENTED 



Briuoetokt, Conn., Jan. 1G. — Last night 
the Lyric Stock Players at the Lyric Thea- 
tre presented a play that has never before 
been presented on any stage. The piece 
is entitled "Under Suspicion" and was writ- 
ten by Fred Jackson, author of "A Full 
House." 

Frances McGrath, who is a recent acqui- 
sition to the company, and David Herblin 
capably portrayed the leading roles. 

It was recently reported that David 
Herblin would leave the company, but the 
management has evidently changed its 
mind. 

The supporting company includes Wil- 
liam Evarts, Ethel Daggett, Lucella Morey, 
Geraldine Slounc, Bernard Thornton, Wal- 
ter Marshall and Frank Peck. 

"Under Suspicion," it is said, has been 
accepted for production by a Xew York 
manager, and will most likely see Broad- 
way shortly. 



FAVORS QUARTERLY LICENSE 
Spokane, Wash., Jan. 11. — When the 
question of whether city theatre licenses 
shall be paid annually, semi-annually or 
quarterly, was up before the mayor and 
commissioners, John Hoppe, one of the 
proprietors of the American Theatre, where 
the Wilkes company is appearing, asked 
the privilege of quarterly payments. Mr. 
Hoppe gave as his reason the fact that 
stock companies do not operate in the 
slimmer and should not pay licenses while 
dark. 



LEWIS CO. OPENS IN KANKAKEE 

Kankakee, 111., Jan. 12. — The Lewis 
and Oliver Stock Co. has opened here for 
an indefinite stay. The company includes: 
William II. Dill, director: Madge Carson, 
characters; Frank Morris, comedian, and 
Mrs. Frank Morris, ingenues. 



ENID MAY JACKSON MARRIES 

New Bedford, Mass., Jan. 13. — Enid 
May Jackson, leading woman of the New 
Bedford Players, was married recently at 
Brockton to Warren O'Hara, manager of 
the company. 



WALLACE CO. MOVES TO BUTLER 

Butler, Pa., Jan. 15. — The Chester 
Wallace Players closed their engagement 
in Sharon and have opened here at the 
Majestic Theatre for an indefinite run. 



RUTH LECHLER IN BROCKTON 

Brockton, Mass., Jan. 13. — Ruth Lech- 
ler, formerly with the Alcazar Players, 
Portland, Ore., is now playing leads with 
the Hathaway Players here. 



BAYLEY CO. IN BELOIT 
Reloit. Wis., Jan. 11.— The J. Willard 
Bayley Stock Co. has opened an indefinite 
engagement at the Majestic Theatre. 



KITTY KIRK CO. ROSTER 

Portsmouth, O., Jan. 15. — The com- 
pany supporting Kitty Kirk, which opened 
Inst week at the Sun Theatre, includes: 
Lawrence Sullivan, comedian : Wallis Rob- 
erts, director; Edwin Kerr, -heavies ; Rich- 
ard Cast ilia, characters and comedy ; Will- 
iam Winterhoff, leads ; Ollie Minell, sec- 
ond business; Isabelle Arnold, ingenues; 
Miss Aimes, general business; E. S. Hot- 
listen, carpenter: Herbert Goulet, scenic 
artist and Harry V. Winslow, business 
manager and personal representative for 
Miss Kirk. 



CIRCUS FEATURES FOR STOCK 

Paterson, X. J., Jan. 13. — Wilson 
Brothers, of the original "Polly" Co., Da 
Blake's Dog and Pony Circus, and Mad- 
ame Lazie's white menage horse are special 
features with the Winifred St. Clair Stock 
Co. production. "Polly of the Circus." 



WINIFRED ST. CLAIRE ILL 

Paterson. X. J., Jun. 33. — Winifred St. 
Claire was taken ill' with grippe before 
the opening perforiniuice of ."Polly of the 
Circus," at the Empire Theatre lost week, 
and it was with great difficulty that she 
was able to appear. 



TAGGART TO LEAVE SPOONER CO. 

Lawrence, Mass., Jan. 15. — Ben Tag- 
Bart, who hits been playing leads with 
Cecil Spooner Stock Co. since it opened at 
the Colonial Theatre, closes Saturday 

night. 

GSELL BACK ON BROADWAY 

Henry Gsell left the Fifth Ave. Stock 
Co., Brooklyn, Saturday night and has re- 
turned to Broadway to begin rehearsals 
foe a forthcoming production. 



JOE PAYTON CLOSES COMPANY 

Joe Pnyton closed his repertoire com- 
pany December C in Newburgh, N. Y., and 
has gone to Mt Clemens, Mich., for four 
weeks for his health. 



BROWNE JOINS ST. PAUL CO. 

St. Paul, Jap. 12.— Victor Browne ia 
the new leading man at the Shubert The- 
atre, opening last week in "It Pays to Ad- 
vertise." 



LEADING MAN MARRIES 

litis Angeles, Jnn. 12. — Irving Pichel, 
leading mnn of the Little Theatre Co. here, 
and Violcttc Stitt Wilson were married re- 
cently in Riverside. 



PEARL STEARNS PLAYING LEADS 

Beloit, Wis., Jan. 12. — Pearl Stearns 
is now leading lady of the .1. Willard Bay- 
ley Stock Co. She was formerly second 
business woman. 



EARL SIPE IN SANITARIUM 
Earl D. Sipe, manager of the Winifred 
St. Claire Stock Co., is at Billy Muldoon'a 
White Plains resort, recuperating from the 
grippe. 

THREE NEW RELEASES 

"Gambler's All," "Rio Grande" and "A 
Pair of Silk Stockings" are recent release* 
for stock. 

(Continued on page 21) 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 




BIG SHOWMEN 

TO CONVENE 

FEB^20 

VITAL MATTERS TO BE DISCUSSED 

February 20 has bean officially set as 
the date of the convention of the Associa- 
tion of Outdoor Showmen of the World, 
which will be held in the Florentine Boom 
of the Congress Hotel, Chicago. 

The Windy City will be the Mecca for 
all the prominent ontdoor showmen of the 
country on that date for, besides the con- 
vention of the Showmen of the World, con- 
ventions of the National Trotting Associa- 
tion, Showmen's League ot America and 
The Fair and Exposition Managers are 
also scheduled. 

Chief among the important matters to 
be taken np at the Chicago convention of 
the Outdoor Showmen of the World will 
be the election of officers to serve for the 
ensuing year and the adoption of by-laws 
for the organisation. 

Albert B. Kiralfy, secretary of the as- 
sociation, is bnsy compiling data and In- 
formation concerning the grievances of the 
ontdoor showmen which win be placed be- 
fore the convention and used as a bases 
to decide what the principal work of the 
new organisation shall be. This material 
Is being compiled by an extensive cam- 
paign of inquiry directed to all the ont- 
door men of the country and asking them 
to record their personal experiences. 
Kiralfy declares their chief grievances 
seem to be against fake attachments, ex- 
cessive licenses and high railroad rates. 

A plan win also be discussed and in all 
probability carried ont whereby a sub- 
sidiary organisation of the association win 
be formed in each State . to handle and 
settle local matters, bnt be st all times 
responsible to the main body. It is believed 
that such a plan will do much to facilitate 
matters and that these local bodies will 
be able to understand and deal with local 
conditions far more satisfactorily than 
could the bigger organisation. 

The New York State County Agricul- 
tural Societies are being asked to pledge 
their aid to the association. Frank P. 
Bpellman, president of the Ontdoor Show- 
men, will address the Society on January 
18 at Albany. He win appeal to them 
to use their influence with the legislature 
of New York State with regard to fairer 
license legislation for the outdoor show- 
men. 

Two United States Senators hav» been 
converted to the cause, according to Spell- 
man, and it is expected that a bill will 
soon be introduced in Congress classifying 
circuses and other outdoor shows under 
the Interstate laws. Such a law would 
nullify the state laws, which are, in so 
many cases, unjust and would be an 
effective way of eliminating the license and 
and "shako down" evil. 

A newspaper campaign is now well un- 
der way with Charles H. Thompson, an 
experienced newspaperman in charge. 



MILLER BROS.' TO BE BIG SHOW 
The Miller Bros. Enormous Shows wQl 
be one of the big shows the coming year. 
The show will be operated by the Great 
American Shows, Inc., which also owns and 
operates the Great American Shows. The 
officers of Mffler Bros. Enormous Shows 
are J. F. Murphy, president; Sam Mffler, 
vice-president; Harry Mffler, secretary, 
and Morris Miller, general manager. This 
wffl be a twenty-car show and wffl play in 
the Bast and in Canada, opening near New 
York City May 5. J. F. Mnrphy is now 
in St Louis where he ia completing ar- 
rangements for the purchase of the car 
equipments, while Morris Miller is in New 
York getting the shows lined np. The 
show wffl have fifteen paid attractions, 
four rides, a uniformed band and several 
sensational free attractions. A number of 
legitimate concessions will be carried. J. 
F. Mnrphy win manage the Great American 
Shows, while Morris Mffler wffl be in 
charge of Miller Bros. Enormous Shows. 
The Great American Show wffl play their 
established territory opening the season in 
Sumter, S. C, March 17 under the auspices 
of the Shriners. Both shows wffl be 
booked by General Agent Felix Blel. 



GRAHAM LEAVES HOSPITAL 

Providence, B. I., Jan. 16.— Clint A. 
Graham has left the Good Samaritan Hos- 
pital. Cincinnati, and returned here, prac- 
tically recovered. He had been confined 
in the hospital as a result of injuries sus- 
tained when a wagon fen on him while 
acting as trainmaster with the Sparks 
Circus. 

SAVED FROM SUNK STEAMER 

Norfolk, Vs., Jan. 13. — A report has 
reached the winter quarters of the 101 
Ranch Show that Elwood Moore, Frank 
Tilton and others of the 101 Show were 
on an H?ngH«h steamer which was sunk 
recently, bnt that all were picked up by 
an American boat and are dne in Norfolk 
Monday. 

PERFORMERS PRACTICING ACT 

Galveston, Tex., Jan. 12. — Jerry D. 
Martin, of the Bailey Bros.' Show and 
Bobby Zenero, of the Christy Hippodrome 
Show are practicing a new double trapeze 
act which they promise to come ont with 
next season. They have signed up with 
the Christy Show. 



CHAUTAUQUA ASS'N DISSOLVES 

Terse Haute, Ind., Jan. 13. — The Paris 
Chautauqua Association dissolved' Wednes- 
day. After paying all claims, about $500 
remaining in treasurer's hands was divided 
among twenty-five stockholders. 



TULSA TO HAVE FREE FAIR 

Tulsa, Okls., Jan. 13. — This city wffl 
have a free fair Sept. 10-14 according to 
the announcement of Secretary J. J. ilc- 
Connell, of the Tulsa County Fair Asso- 
ciation. 

ORTONS ANNOUNCE OPENING 
O kt o n v iix e, la., Jan. 13. — From the 
quarters here of the Orton Bros. Circus 
comes the announcement of opening April 
28 in Adel, la. 



BUFFALO BILL 

HITS LAST 

TRAIL 

2S.0OO HONOR HIS MEMORY 

Dekvek, Colo, Jan. 14. — The most im- 
pressive funeral ever held in Denver took 
place here today when more than 24,000 
persons thronged the Capitol to do final 
homage to Colonel William F. Cody, bet- 
ter known as "Buffalo Bill." Their tribute 
seemed to silently say that the name of 
"Buffalo Bffl wffl ever be remembered in 
homes and tepees, in woods and wilds, in 
theatre, park and "white top" realm so 
long SB history is written and record made 
of the bravery and fearless deeds of man- 
kind. 

While the flag Sew at half mast over 
the Capitol dome, thousands upon thou- 
sands of mourners gathered to honor the 
remains of this grizzled knight of the 
plains. The mourners represented every 
type of person, all sincere in their tribute 
to the memory of Buffalo Bill. There were 
soldiers from Fort Logan, governors of two 
States, army officers, legislative representa- 
tives, fraternal organizations, Grand Army 
veterans, old Indians, one-time scouts, 
women and children. 

The crowd became so thick that it was 
necessary for the police to hold it back In 
order to make way for the family and 'pan- 
bearers to enter the Capitol, where the re- 
mains of the famous circus man lay 
adorned with badges of the Legion of 
Honor and the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, while his coffin bore the inscription: 
"Colonel William F. Cody, 'Buffalo Bffl.'" 
Still, the crowd gathered until ' the 
mourners extended more than a block, shiv- 
ering in the cold wind while waiting for a 
chance to enter the Capitol and pass by 
the casket. 

That his big-heartedness was not forgot- 
ten was evidenced in the tender words of 
parting that were spoken over his remains. 
"Goodbye, old partner," "Goodbye, Bffl," 
were some of the tearful adieus. 

When the funeral procession started 
through the downtown streets, led by the 
city policemen, thousands followed the body 
to the Elks' Home where the funeral serv- 
ices were held. 

The Colorado National Guard, the Pio- 
neers' Society, the Elks and the Grand 
Army of the Republic constituted the 
guard of honor at the coffin. Following the 
family in the procession was a delegation 
of Knights Templar from North Platte, 
Neb. Following marched an imposing ar- 
ray of cowboys and Indians. Two of the 
cowboys led Buffalo Bill's old horse, Mo 
Kinley, riderless and with Cody's pistols 
hanging from the saddle-horn. 

Johnny Baker, who was Buffalo Bill's 
closest companion in his adventurous enter- 
prises for many years, accompanied the 
family. 

His body will be placed to final rest in 
a rock-hewn vault at the summit of Look- 
out Mountain, at Golden. 



WANT LA DREWS RELATIVES 

Friends of Pete Gebhard, known pro- 
fessionally as Paul La Drew, who died 
recently in Los Angeles, are anxious to 
locate his relatives, or persons who may 
know who they are. Any letters concern- 
ing him can be addressed to John E. 
Ogden, Continental Hotel, Los Angeles, 
CaL During the season of 1016 he was 
connected with tie C. A. Worthams Great 
Alamo Shows and the Cole Brothers World 
Shows. 



PANAMA FAIR CLOSES 

San Diego, Jan. 10. — The Panama- 
California International Exposition dosed 
officially at midnight, Jan. 1, with speeches 
by Mayor Rolph of San Francisco and 
other prominent Califomians. Madame 
Schnmann-Heink sang at the midnight 
hour when taps was sounded and the lights 
went ont A number of the largest exhi- 
bitions wffl remain in the buildings until 
time to ship to the Gulfport Exposition. 



GAINESVILLE PLANS ANNUAL FAIR 

Gainesville, Ga., Jan. 13. — An effort 
is being made by a number of represen- 
tative citizens to make the county fair 
here a permanent organization. The asso- 
ciation wffl either buy or lease grounds 
sufficiently large to hold a fair and it wffl 
be made an annual event. 



MRS. REISS ORGANIZING SHOW 
Etam, 111., Jan. 13.— Mrs. Nat Reiss 

announces that she is reorganizing the Nat 
Reiss show for the coming season and win 
open late in April near Chicago. She has 
already booked several good attractions. 



IOWA FAIR ELECTS OFFICERS 

BttBUROTOR, la., Jan. 14. — The election 
of officers of the Tri-State Fair resulted 
in the following: Geo. S. Tracy, presi- 
dent; F. J. Riling, vice-president; Geo. H. 
Holcombe, secretary; Wm. Hunt, J. L 
Jones, L. E. Bishop, Henry Koestner, How- 
ard Mathews and Wm. Bougert, directors. 



CIRCUS EMPLOYE FOUND DEAD 

LttAVENWOBTH, Kan., Jan. 13. — Robert 
Hfflman, an employee of George Roy, man- 
ager of the Honeymoon Trail with Parker's 
Greatest Shows during the past season, 
was found dead in bed at the Elmo Hotel 
here recently. 



SHEESLEY BACK IN PENSACOLA 

Pensacola, Fla., Jan. 13. — Capt, J. M. 
Sheesley has returned here after several 
weeks' absence. He brought with him 
enough flat cars, baggage cars, etc., to be 
added to the rolling stock to bring the 
equipment up to thirty 



VA. FAIR CIRCUIT HOLDS MEETING 

Roanoke, Vs., Jan. 16. — The Virginia 
Fair Circuit is holding its annual meeting 
this week at the Ponce de Leon Hotel. 



AUTO CIRCUS OPENS MAY 15 

Frank P. Spellman, president of the 
United States Circus Corporation, has an- 
nounced that .his .circus wffl open its sea- 
son May 25. 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



CHICAGO 



FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES 

Phone Rudolph 5423 



IS 



ONE-NIGHTERS 

ARE COMING 

BACK 

GOOD SHOWS DRAW BUSINESS 



"TURN TO RIGHT* IN CHICAGO 

The "Tarn to the Bight" company or- 
ganized recently in New York opened an 
engagement at the Grand Opera House 
Sunday night. In the cast are Ralph 
Morgan, Joseph Byron Totten, William 
Foran, James H. Huntley, Philip Bishop, 
Robert Tabor, Charles W. Goodrich, Mabel 
Bert, Jessie Glendenning, Helen Collier, 
Dorothy Betts and Maude Fox. 



WHITE RAT WAR 

PUT CHICAGO 

ONMAP 

ACTORS WATCH ACTIVITIES HERE 



While a considerable percentage of the 
one-night stand shows which went out this 
season have had to come in, many have 
proved winners. 

At the opening of the season the pro- 
ducers of one-nightera miscalculated the 
strength of the movies. They had been 
misled by stories that movie houses were 
closing from lack of patronage, and they 
jumped to the conclusion that the film was 
dying. 

In this conclusion, which was probably 
the offspring of the wish, they saw an in- 
crease in the demand for one-night dra- 
matic and musical shows, and as a 
natural sequence there were many more 
shows of the one-night class that started 
out from Chicago this season than ever 
before. 

Many of them were hastily thrown to- 
gether, poorly written, poorly cast and .in- 
sufficiently rehearsed. As a consequence 
some had to fail. 

When, finally, the managers came to 
their senses and realized that the movie 
was not dead and that there was no ab- 
normal demand for "one-nightera" they 
began the weeding-out process and now 
are beginning to reap the benefit of this 
move. 

E. W. Rowland and Lorin J. Howard 
have one of the most successful shows 
ever sent out of Chicago in "Which One 
Shall I Marry?" written by Ralph 
Thomas Kettering, press agent for Jones, 
Linick & Schaefer. One company of this 
is touring the International circuit and 
another is in the one-night stand cities. 
That firm is to send William Anthony 
Maguire's "Everyman's Castle" to the 
one-night stand cities late this month. 

Robert Sherman has The Girl Without 
a Chance" on the International circuit 
and two companies in the one-night stands. 
The Eastern show is doing a remarkable 
business in smaller cities. All three com- 
panies are doing well and will make Sher- 
man something like $26,000 this season. 
Karl Hewitt is managing the Western 
show and is doing fine work. 

Gaszolo, Gatts & Clifford are opening a 
show called "The Kataenjammer Kids" In 
the one-night stands Jan. 27. That firm 
wfll also produce "Keeping Up With Iia- 
r.ie," at a "loop" theatre this Spring and 
■The Child Unborn" at the National in 
Chicago Jan. 21. 

GaakeQ & HaeVitty have a new show by 
Howard McKent Barnes, with the title, 
"The End of a Perfeet Day," which opens 
on the Thielen time, niinoia, this week, 
playing three days at each town, which is 
unusual. ^^^^^^^_^ 

WALTER DONALDSON HERE 

Walter Donaldson, newly acquired staff- 
writer for M. WItmark & Sons, paid a one- 
day visit, to the Chicago office last week to 
acquaint the boys with Us at -t number, 

"Maryland." 



WOMAN IN POUCE ROLE 
J. Edmund Davis, offering "The In- 
grate," now has a woman playing the part 
of the police investigator, Cora Merrill 
(Mrs. J. Edmund Davis) having sssumed 
the role of the reformer. The skit has bad 
a very successful season. 



TO REVIVE "JOSH SPRUCEBY" 

Ed. Rowland has organized a company 
to take out "Uncle Josh Spruceby." Judge 
Kennedy of Indiana is to return to the 
stage and play his original role. It Is 
being given time by James Wingfield. 



LINICK VISITS NEW YORK 

Adolph Linick. treasurer of Jones, Linick 
& Schaefer, left on the Twentieth Century 
for New York last week, to attend Adolph 
Zukor*s twentieth wedding anniversary. 



SCHWARTZ VISITING HERE 

Lonesomeness for bis wife, one of the 
Dolly sisters, playing at the Olympic, 
brought Jean Schwartz, the composer, to 
Chicago last week. 



PEARL SILVERMAN IN DENVER 
Deztveb, Colo., Jan. 11. — Mrs. Pearl Sil- 
verman, widow of Gene Silverman, well- 
known Milwaukee showman, is spending 
the Winter here. 



ANNIE DOUGLASS OX 
Annie Ryan Douglass is confined to her 
rooms at 748 N. Dearborn Ave. with 
rheumatism and would like to bear from 
friends. 



CECILLE ELLIOTT JOINS BUBS 
Cecille Elliott, who was recently mar- 
ried to Bid Schaefer, has joined George 
H. Bubb's "Ikey and Abey" show. 




ROSIE MACK DIVORCED 

Roaie P. O. Smith, known under the 
stage name of Roaie Mack, has been grant- 
ed a decree for divorce against her hus- 
band, Franklin Smith, by Judge Denis E. 
Sullivan, of the Superior Court. She was 
represented by Attorney Bereznlak. 



The recent trouble between the managers 
and the White Rats has been of great 
benefit to Chicago in that it created a con- 
dition for which this city has long been 
striving. It has given Chicago the en- 
viable position of the vaudeville center of 
the country, at least temporarily. 

New York has always been the center 
of things theatrical and when Harry 
Mountford and James W. Fitspatrick estab- 
lished White Rats headquarters in Chi- 
cago, the eyes of the vaudeville managers 
throughout the country were immediately 
turned in the direction and vaudeville play- 
ers are watching with interest all that is 
happening here. 

Because of v its geographical situation, 
Chicago was chosen as a vantage point for 
the organisation in handling affairs which 
touch the entire country. 

The quarrels between the White Rata 
and the managers originating in this city 
have given it added prominence in the eyes 
of the vaudeville world and today vaude- 
ville artists are looking toward Chicago 
rather than New York for all vaudeville 
activities. 

The campaign waged by the Vaudeville 
Managers' Protective Association, of which 
G. S. Humphrey, Chicago representative of 
the U. B. O., Is a real power against the 
White Rata* organisation, has naturally led 
vaudevillians to expect trouble, and with 
all these factors at work Chicago, for the 
present, is enjoying the distinction of 
claiming the interest of all the vaudeville 
world. 



MEMORIAL FOR MRS. NOLO 

Fred Niblo, star of "Hit-the-Trail Holll- 
day," inspected the new American The- 
atrical Hospital last week and was so 
highly pleased with the arrangements that 
be purchased a room dedicated to the mem- 
cry of bis late wife, Josephine Cohan. 
George M. Cohan's sister. 



McNAB MAKING GOOD 

Howard McNab. who gave up acting 
some time since to become manager of the 
Victoria Theatre in Logan Square, is doing 
well in his new capacity, as George H. 
Webster says the house is well managed 
and is making money. 



SANDERS MANAGING ORPHEUM 

Earl Sanders, well known in Chicago 
booking circles, came here late last week 
to assume charge of the Orpheum Circuit's 
Western office. Charles Hammerslaw, 
former local representative, baa resigned 
and is contemplating an extended Eu- 
ropean trip. 



REDGATE WITH FEIST 
Bob Redgate, one of the landmarks of 
the music publishing game a few years ago, 
returned to the fold recently as a pianist 
on the Leo Feist Western staff. 



STORK VISITS YAGLES 

Merle Yagle, who strikes the keys for 
the Chicago office of Joe Morris, is a happy 
father, his wife, Edith, having presented 
him with an eight-pound baby girl last 
week. They have named the new arrival 
Dorothy. 



THIS TEAM IS WELL BOOKED 

Carlita & Howland, In their new act, 
have been booked by Joe Sullivan for twen- 
ty-eight weeks on the Association and 
United Time, opening January 10 at 
Kenosha, Wis. 



MAKING A HIT IN BURLESQUE 
The Morette Slaters, who are this sea- 
son with the Sporting Widows burlesque 
company, are making a hit playing parts 
and doing their musical specialty. 



STYLE SHOW FOR STRAND 

Hamilton Coleman will put on the Style 
Snow at the Strand in Chicago February 
5-9, and James Henschell will provide a 
twenty-piece orchestra. 



DIVORCE FOR LILLIAN BIGELOW 
Dollle DeVere, In private life Lillian D. 
Bigelow, has obtained a divorce from her 
husband, Fred C. Bigelow, a vaudeville 
actor. 



MALEY AND WOODS CLOSE TOUR 

Maley and Woods are just completing a 
tour of W. V." M. A. time, playing in Du- 
buque and Cedar Rapids, la., last week. 



HOBART IN CHICAGO 

Harvey Hobsrt, the Omaha agent, was 
in Chicago last week, having his headquar- 
ters with Col. F. J. Owens. 



DALE DEVEREAUX IN CHICAGO 

Dale Devereaux and her mother have re- 
moved their borne from Columbus. Ohio, to 
this city. 



MILTON WEIL'S WIFE ILL 

Mrs. Milton Well, wife of the publisher- 
plugger, is confined to her bed with diph- 
theria. 



HOUDJNI 
Breaking Through The New York 



ED WEBER WITH TANGUAY 

Ed Weber was installed as personal con- 
ductor for Eva Tanguay during her Chi- 
cago engagement. He also wrote several 
numbers of her new repertoire. 



JDf MATTHEWS ILL 

J. C Matthews, Chicago head of the 
Pantagea Circuit, is critically in at Ma 
home. 



FRANK CROSBY IN HOSPITAL 

Frank Crosby, the drew agent, U at the 
American Theatrical Hospital. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 





SINGERS' PAY FROM 

PUBLISHER DISCUSSED 



The Data When This Practice Started 

Go« Back About Thirty Years; 

Pay Now Enormous 

Since the paying of singers by popular 
music publishers has assumed proportions 
so large as to make enormous inroads into 
the reserve fund of many of the houses, 
the question of just how long this prac- 
tice has been in force is a frequent topic 
of conversation. 

The general impression is that it dates 
back about fifteen years, but a perusual 
of the old files of the Clipper show the 
first record of a publisher paying a singer 
a stated sum each week for the introduc- 
tion of a song is more than twice that. 

In the Gwppek's issue of Jan. 25, 1887, 
almost thirty years ago the following 
article on the subject was printed: 

"It is well understood that some music 
publishers pay minstrel singers to use their 
songs. Now, then, will it pay a profes- 
sional singer to use a song he doesn't par- 
ticularly fancy just because he obtains a 
little revenue from it? 

"Is it not likely that a sensible singer, 
with a business head, would naturally use 
and continue to use, only such songs as 
please himself and the audience, even if 
no financial inducement were offered him? 

"It seems entirely reasonable to suppose 
that a song that did not take would be 
eschewed in a hurry despite its original 
monetary value. 

"Therefore, the-pay-if-you-sing system 
has its grievous defects." 



A FEIST NOVELTY SONG 

A new novelty song just issued by the 
Leo Feist house is "Keep Your Eye on the 
Girlie You Love," written by Howard 
Johnson, Alex Gerber and Ira Schuster. 
The enthusiasm the new number is arous- 
ing among the vaudeville audiences indi- 
cates that it is another success. 



NEW PLATZMANN OFFICE 

Eugene Platzmann, who made the mus- 
ical arrangements for scores of the biggest 
song hits is now located in the Exchange 
Build ins. No. 145 West Forty-fifth Street, 
where he has an office with the Art Music 
Inc., 



NEW WENRICH SONG 

Percy Wenrich. whose "Tulip and the 
Rose" and "Sweet Cider Time" broke many 
records for large sales, has another hit 
prospect in "Silver Bay," which he and his 
clever wife, "Dolly" Connolly, are introduc- 
ing in vaudeville. 



PAYTON IN NEW YORK 

Tom Payton is in- from Chicago and 
bas a temporary office in the Princeton 
Hotel representing the Forster Music Co. 

Assisting him is Raymond Walker, with 
a fine bunch of songs. 



HAWAIIAN SUNSHINE 

The strum of tbe nkalele never figures 
in it for a moment and yet it is the big- 
gest, newest success among ' Hawaiian 
songs. It is "My Hawaiian Sunshine," 
by L. Wolfe Gilbert and Carey Morgan, 
the publication of Jos. W. Stern & Co. 
The elimination of the ukalele does not 
mean, however, that the Hawaiian instru- 
ments are entirely left out of this beau- 
tiful little song. Instead the author has 
"worked in" the steel guitar, which is the 
one Hawaiian instrument that produces 
the real melody among the Island musicians. 
The steel guitar is the Pacific instrument 
that is alone in its class — in which it is 
like "My Hawaiian Sunshine" which is 
equally alone in its class. 



"MY LITTLE GEISHA" 

"My Little Geisha," a well written little 
song by Adeline Ingram, is the latest pub- 
lication from the Monarch Music Publish- 
ing Co., of Chicago. 



BOXER A SINGING HIT 

Charley (Kid) Thomas, a well-known 
boxer, was billed to fight Patsy Kline at 
the National Athletic Club last week, but 
was prevented from putting on the gloves 
at tbe last moment owing' to an injury to 
his eye. Thomas stepped into the ring 
as a matter of course, and the crowd, de- 
termined to have him do something, called 
for a song. Thomas, who can sing almost 
as well as be can box, obliged readily. The 
song he sang was " Twas Only an Irish- 
man's Dream," and his invigorating ren- 
dering made a big hit of what already it 
a big hit. The song is published by M. 
Witmark 4 Sons. 



A RECORD WEEK 

Ben. Bornstein, professional manager 
for the Harry Von Tilzer Music Co., has 
just closed a record breaking week for his 
house. During the past seven days the 
Von Tilzer songs were featured in thirty- 
two theatres in Greater New York. In 
order that there might be no question as 
to tbe number, Ben. took Mr. Von Tilzer 
around to tbe theatres with him to hear 

fh»y w all. 



JEROME HAS TWO 

"Turn to the Right" and "Erin is Call- 
ing," both songs published by tbe William 
Jerome Publishing Co., have responded to 
the firm's strenuous campaign for the past 
two months and are now rated among the 
leaders. 

"Mississippi," introduced by and re- 
stricted exclusively for Frances White, 
continues to be the song sensation of the 
East. 



MRS. CASTLE. COMPOSER 

Mrs. Vernon Castle, dancer and movie 
star, has discovered that she possesses tal- 
ent for musical composition and bas just 
placed with the Waterson, Berlin & Snyder 
Co. a waits song entitled "Patria," after 
her latest serial picture. 



A RAG CLASSIC 

Of course, there is a classic in the world 
of coon shouts. It is "Pray for tbe Lights 
to Go Out," by Tunnah and Skidmore. A 
song that came out of the West and 
scored heavily wherever it was heard. It 
"bas everything." That's all. 



THE WITMARK QUARTETTE 

There is something unmistakeably satis- 
fying and satisfactory about a quartette, 
no matter what tbe combination. But a 
quartette like tbe house of M. Witmark & 
Sons just now possesses is all that and 
more. For it's a quartette of the liveliest 
and livest song-hits that ever made har- 
mony together. Performers galore are fea- 
turing one or other of them, and many 
boost two or more in their act. That is be- 
cause each of the four songs stands alone 
in a class by itself, and each class bas as 
many good points as its fellow. Number 
one of this quartette is the Weslyn-Vander- 
pool ballad, "The Way to Your Heart" — 
one of the best examples of a popular bal- 
lad' written for years. This number is fea- 
tured by every act that knows a good thing 
when it hears it, and that means legion. 
Number two is " 'Twas Only an Irishman's 
Dream," a novelty in songs that really de- 
serves that description, with as sweet a 
melody as memory ever retained. 
"O'Brien Is Tryin* to Learn to Talk 
Hawaiian" is the third, besides being one 
of the cleverest funny songs ever published 
in America. It has the distinctive merit 
of a capital tune to set off its mirth-pro- 
ducing story. Lastly, there is "I'm Going 
Back to California," a march-song that is 
carrying all before it. 



WITMARK DANCE PROGRAM 

The annual subscription dance of the 
New Rochelle Yacht Club last week 
proved what an excellent, varied and at- 
tractive dance program can be made up 
of Witmark publications almost exclusive- 
ly. The program on this occasion con- 
tained twenty different numbers, and no 
less than fifteen of them were publications 
of M. Witmark & Sons. They included 
the following: Fox-trots, "The Hot Dogs' 
Fancy Ball," "When the Major Plays 
Those Minor Melodies," and "So Long 
Letty;" one-steps, "111 Wed the Girl I 
Left Behind," "The Eyes of Heaven," 
"Take Me to My Alabam,'" "There's a 
Long, Long Trail," "O'Brien is Tryin* to 
Learn to Talk Hawaiian," and "I'm Going 
Back to California;" waltzes, "Somebody 
Loves You Dear," "Goodbye, Good Luck, 
God Bless You," '"Twas Only an Irish- 
man's Dream," "Kiss Me Again," "Turn 
Back the Universe," and "The Way to 
Your Heart." All these are new and "live" 
numbers and each of them represents a 
big popular song-hit from the famous 
Witmark catalog. 



A SONG ROMANCE 

"She Comes From a Quaint Little Town 
in Pennsylvania" and visited China. Van 
& Schenck, playing at the Century Thea- 
tre, fell in .love with her and wrote her 
to "Come Back" (Let's Be Sweethearts 
Once More) "My Little China Doll" but 
Harris's advice to her was, "Let Him Miss 
You Jnst a Little Bit" (And Hell Think 
More of Yon). She only replied, "It's a 
Long, Long Time Since I've Been Home" 
and "All I Want is a Cottage, Some Roses 
and You" because "You Came, You Saw, 
Yon Conquered," and all I asked him was 
to "Love Me Little, Love Me Long" and 
that* a "The Story of a SouL" 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



She was slightly grey about tbe temples. 

Her eyes were faded. Cheeks were drawn. 

The rouge puff had helped. 

She forced a smile through thin lips. 

She was poorly dressed. 

And alone. 

People busied themselves around her. 

Pianos and players were all playing. 

No one offered to wait on her. 

Yet a few short years ago she was a sen- 
sation. 

An asset for a publisher. 

They fawned and blithered over her — then. 

She stood unnoticed for five minutes or 
more. 

With thin, ungloved, red-chapped hand 

She gathered her skirts. 

"They gotta nifty new rag in here. 

And, Gee! they treat you swelL" 

Said two fur-trimmed-high-booted-flappera. 

As they passed her on the stairs. 

A brilliant man. Fine speaker. Excel- 
lent memory for facts, figures and faces. 
Good company and a real New Yorker. 
Has a splendid library of fine books. You 
wouldn't think he had it too,' would you? 
But there it was, staring right out at you. 
It was called "Raise your own chickens. 
New York is a ready market." 



Theodore Dreiser, the well-known nov. 
elist, is a brother of the late Paul Dresser, 
the family name being Dreiser. Which 
gives us a chance to say that Paul Dresser 
was the greatest song writing genius since 
Stephen Foster. 



It took seven years for a letter to reach 
Toledo, having been mailed in New York 
in 1910. If you don't believe that's possi- 
ble try it on the gink who said 'TH-give-it- 
to-you-next-week. 



A, b, c, d, e, f, g; 

Notes of sweet sim-pli-d-tee- 

Take them away? Oh, my, Oh, met 

Where would our songwriters he? 



Nearly three million copies of "A Perfect 
Day" have been sold. And sad to relate 
all the imitations haven't been written yet. 



Can you imagine being handicapped with 
a name like "Fofo"? Caruso did it to his 
son. He should worry, eh? 



John D. Rockefeller's favorite song must 
be "I know I got more than my share.*' 



Gone but not 
("Bill") Redmond. 



forgotten. — William 



No new Peace songs have been announced 
for the past twenty-four hours. 



"BILLY" MAHONEY ILL 

"Billy" Mahoney, song writer and mem- 
ber of the vaudeville team of Brady and 
Mahoney, is in the Catskills recuperating 
from a recent nervous breakdown. He 
hopes to be able Jo resume work within the 
next month. 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




EIGHTY-FIRST STREET 

(UdHili) 

Angie Weimers and Walter Burke, in 
number one spot, put the audience in the 
right humor for the rest of the show and 
played through this difficult position as if 
they were on the last half. They offer 
novelties, songs and dances, all of which 
are cleverly done, an old-fashioned cake 
walk making a big hit with the audience. 
They took three bows — and some flowers. 

Adelaide Bootbby, with Charles Ever- 
dean at the piano, proved a talking and 
singing comedienne of more than ordinary 
ability. She was also billed as a whistler, 
but attempted little in this line. She 
opens in characterizations, portraying the 
impressions that might be stamped on the 
mind of foreigners coming in past the 
Statue of Liberty. She does four char- 
acters, French, English, Italian and Irish. 

Then comes a Yankee patriotic song, 
unraveling the thoughts of an old-timer, 
who believes that Uncle Sam is still there 
with the punch in the red game of war. 
An imitation of a dame looking at the 
movies sets the house laughing, and 
brought the team back for an encore. 
This was a burlesque on an illustrated 
song, pictures being thrown on the screen. 
While Miss Boothby was singing about the 
onion crop in old New Hampshire, Ever- 
dean was getting some laughs by order- 
ing and receiving a beer. This travesty 
knocked 'em cold. 

"The Cure" was in number three posi- 
tion. It is a domestic comedy in one act 
and is hackneyed, despite the fact that the 
author, John B. Hymer, has made a good 
effort to get away from the conventional 
by putting in a surprise punch at the 
finish. Mrs. Clifford, Doris Hardy, is 
jealous of her husband, a doctor, Ralph 
Locke, because he is increasing bis trade 
by having most of the women in the neigh- 
borhood visit his parlor. The wife uses 
the customary third woman for a trap, be- 
fore which she had a tubing installed that 
led to her own room. The close shows that 
the butler had put her husband wise to 
the tube, and that all his talk had been 
for his wife's "benefit." She is not al- 
lowed ''in" on the secret,' even at the finish. 

The cast of this one-act play, including, 
besides Ralph Locke and Doris Hardy, Ida 
Stanhope, Jane Cavanaugh and Walter 
Moye, is an exceptionally clever one, all 
five parts being well done. 

Wm. S. Hart in "Truthful Tulliver" 
filled the intermission. 

Arthur Dunn and the Beaumont Sisters, 
in "Props," opened the second half. They 
have some new back-stage gags in this 
sketch and also get laughs through the 
contrast in size of Dunn and the two sis- 
ters, both being head and shoulders higher 
than the little comedian. They close in 
one, doing a burlesque on a Salvation Army 
aggregation. - ,. 

Merian's Swiss Canine Actors held down 
the last spot, going through their routine 
with no person on the stage visible. These 
nnimala do their bits in a serious manner, 
never dropping on all four feet or pausing 
in mid-stage. Two or three of them got 
some hard falls when sleds, in which they 
were riding down a runway, were blocked. 



SHOW REVIEWS— Continued 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

The grippe having overcome a number 
of Harlem residents a good many of the 
regulars were missing from this theatre 
Friday night, most notable of all being 
Manager Harry Swift, in whose stead 
Treasurer Charles Workman acted. An 
exceptionally attractive and entertaining 
bill was the offering and its value was 
liberally attested to by the cordiality of 
the audience. 

The opening turn was Elliott, Elliott & 
Lindsey, a novelty acrobatic and hand- 
balancing act. Their routine is excep- 
tionally good, especially the band-balancing 
stunt done by the straight man, with six 
cigar boxes placed upon a table. The 
comedian might curb some of his so-called 
funny antics, as they retard the speed of 
the act 

In the second position were Bud & 
Nellie Heim, who offered a quaint rural 
comedy. Bod, who portrays the "simp 
rube," in the opening does a recitation, 
which should be revised somewhat, for the 
material is a bit old and has been used 
so frequently by acts of this type that it 
is no longer novel nor appealing. 

Flo Irwin & Co. presented "Looks," a 
comedy playlet, which scintillates with hu- 
mor throughout, most of it being supplied 
by Miss Irwin. 

Then came the first installment of "The 
Great Secret," a motion picture serial, 
which was followed by Sol. Levoy, with bis 
illustrated songs. 

Arthur Angel & Co. presented a com- 
edy skit entitled "A Real Soldier." The 
soldier part of the act is explained by the 
appearance of two men in military uni- 
forms, one portraying the volunteer of 1916 
and the other the type of soldier who fought 
the "War of the Rebellion." 

This and bits of dialogue here and there 
are the only things that would cause one 
to believe that the act follows the billing. 
Most of the dialogue is "culled" from other 
vaudeville acts. The finish is a military 
song participated in by the two men and 
the woman, the "limnv of which is a sure 
fire applause getter. The old man hears 
the strains of martial music, and grabs his 
knapsack and gun, marching off to join' the 
colors. 

Meridith and Snoozer offer one of the 
.nost novel and interesting canine nets pre- 
sented in vaudeville. The dog displays 
unusual intelligence in doing some of the 
feats called for by his master. A little 
white kitten used in the act does many 
cute stunts also. 

The show closed with "A Holiday in 
Dixie," an aggregation of eleven colored 
performers, who perform every possible 
antic and stunt for which darky entertain- 
ers are noted. 



twenty-third st. 

(Last Half) 

Okita and Kiyo, the opening team, have 
little to offer, practically depending on 
the business in which the girl is placed in 
a box and swords are supposedly run 
through the box from the corners and 
sides. 

Welton and Lea, man and woman, found 
it hard going in number two position dur- 
ing the first part of their turn, their gags 
hardly raising a chuckle. They did better 
with their songs, receiving two bows. 

Wayne, Marshall and Candy finally got 
things started, two of the three coming 
on stage from the audience, following an 
announcement by a girl that the turn 
would have to be cancelled. 

Duffy and Daisy, a man and a woman, 
received two bows for their work on 
bicycles. The man is a laugh getter and 
could easily build up this part of the act 
to advantage. 

Mabel Johnston, billed as the world's 
leading lady ventriloquist, walked away 
with the honors. There is nothing high- 
brow about her routine. The audience 
stopped the show a number of times to 
applaud. 

Fagg and White, in blackface, appeared 
as a man and a woman — although both 
were men. The exposure pleased the 
crowd, the two getting several bows. Con- 
sul, the master of monkey-land, went 
through his usual entertaining routine, 
helping himself to the applause on nu- 
merous occasions by starting it. The 
three Dolce sisters, a singing trio, pleased. 

Frank Terry, the English comedian, held 
down the position next to closing and was 
called back for an encore. Tuscano 
Brothers, clever battleaxe throwers, closed. 



GRAHAM QUITS VAUDEVILLE 

James E. Graham of the vaudeville 
team of Graham and Porter has joined 
the photographic staff of the Quality Film 
Co. 



HAMILTON 

(Last Half) 

Jolly Johnny Jones, the slack wire art- 
ist, opened with his novel offering. His 
comedy accessories, such as the walking 
stick, whieh is converted into a step- 
ladder, and the woman's stocking, both 
helped greatly in scoring numerous laughs. 

Lewis & Norton, with their chatter and 
patter, came next- This act is well as- 
sembled, and its variations of dialogue, song 
and dance makes it an appropriate offer- 
ing for any neighborhood bill. 

Kubelick, eccentric to the degree of hav- 
ing his violin mounted on stands, offered a 
pleasing turn in the third spot. 

Then along came "Ward 22," billed as 
"The Greatest Laugh Dispenser in Vaude- 
ville." These performers were martyrs in 
the White Rat rebellion at Oklahoma City, 
showing allegiance to the managers. De- 
spite the fact that their material was 
brusque and crude, the act, by its grotesque 
delineations of character, had the audience 
in spasms of laughter. 

Mack & Vincent held the next to closing 
spot, with their group of songs and piano- 
logue. The show closed with the "Act 
Beautiful," which scored the bit of the 
bill. 



AUDUBON 

(Last Half) 

This bill, for the most part, is composed 
of acts formerly seen on big time. 

The Rondas Trio opened the show and 
presented a bicycle act second to none of 
its kind. 

Brown & Jackson are still getting laughs 
out of their old material. Their suffrage 
talk — with which they open — hardly got 
ovei on Thursday night, but from then on 
their act went big, until the closing num- 
ber. 

"Woman Proposes," by the late Paul 
Armstrong, is well written, well staged 
and well acted. It played to a re- 
sponsive audience Thursday night and 
proved to be the most popular playlet pre- 
sented at this theatre for some time. 

Clifford & Wills have a very original act 
and pnt their' stuff over in a way all their 
own. They had no trouble. in scoring big. 
The man impersonated a cocaine fiend in 
.•• way oh unique and clever as has ever 
l.een seen on the variety beards. These 
impersonations are usually more or less of- 
fensive, but this was too artistically done 
to get anything short of a big haud. Their 
Hawaiian closing song went over big. 

Nat Carr got a big reception upon his 
entrance and kept the audience laughing 
with his repertoire of exclusive songs. 

Arthur Bemardi. who linn appeared be- 
fore the King of England, the Shah of 
Persia and others of equally high rank, 
appeared before the residents of the Wash- 
ington Heights' region in the closing po- 
sition. His clever protean talents were ap- 
preciated and got over with much more 
success than the average closer. 



NATIONAL 

(Last Half) 
Xazimova's picture, "War Brides," was 
the attraction at this theatre, which made 
the audience stand three and four deep at 
Thursday's matinee. The feature left a 
rather depressing impression upon the au- 
dience, and Stetson & Huber, who opened, 
found the initial spot even harder than 
usual as a result. Even under ordinary 
conditions their act should not be used at) 
an opener. Their old jokes and hackneyed 
business fell rather fiat at the beginning of 
their act. The dancing is fair and it was 
this part that got over. 

Leonard & Louie always please with 
their acrobntic novelties and earned big ap- 
plause for an act of that style. They 
should have appeared in the first spot- 
Harry First A Co. presented a playlet en- 
titled "A Matrimonial Feat." Although 
the plot is old and shallow, First's Hebrew 
characterization, appealed to the Bronxites, 
and he never played to c more appreciative 
audience. 

Lou Anger has some very fuonj ma- 
terial which he gets off like a master of 
the game. 

The Breen Family closed the bill and 
did everything from dancing to juggling. 
The "nut" of the four is particularly 
worthy of mention. The yonng fellow, who 
does considerable dancing, is careless In 
his appearance. There is no reason for bis 
.lancing in his shirt-sleeves or for his neck- 
tie not meeting his collar. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



NEW ACTS— Continued 



"AN INNOCENTBYSTANDER" 

Theatre — Jeferttm. 

Style — Crook itetch. 

Time — Ttcmty-one mimutat 

Setting — Special Kencry. 

"An Innocent Bystander" la * skates 
which requires the service of a company 
of lix persona — four men and two 
women. The special set represents the 
Day and Night Bank on Fifth Avenue, 
and a sidedrop showing the intersecting 
street. 

The story tells of the experiences of 
a judge from a small town visiting New 
York. He and his friend reach the Day 
and Night Bank. The friend eaten and 
the Judge stays outside to get the air 
and read of a case in the newspaper 
which tells of an innocent bystander 
being arrested the night before and the 
action that follows is a duplication of . 
the story in the paper. 

The wife of a crook determines to go 
straight and draws her savings out of 
the bank so she can go home. The hus- 
band appears and tries to force her to 
be bis dupe. He tells her to bump into 
an old lady as she comes out of the 
bank. She refuses, but accidentally 
does the very thing she is asked to do. 
The old lady drops her parcels, includ- 
ing a pocket book, containing $6,000 
and valuable papers. The crook picks 
it op. A policeman is called. The crook 
puts pocketbook in his wife's coat 
pocket, she puts it into the judge's 
pocket. The wife is searched by the 
officer*. The girl transfers the pocket- 
book to her husband's pocket and the 
judge is searched. Of course it is found 
on the crook and the curtain drops as 
the judge hands his card to the officer. 
The Sketch is wsll conceived, well 
written and all in all is above the 
average crook playlet. 



WEBSTER & CO. 

Theatre— Bovaf. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting; — House. 

"The Double Exposure" is the name of 
the vehicle used by John Webster & Co. 
and called on the program "a romance 
of the studio." The author is Wlllard 
Mack. 

A studio scene. They are ready to 
take a picture, but must wait for Jack 
Heming (John Webster), the leading 
man, who is under the influence of liquor, 
as usual. Harold De Fos makes love 
to Hemlng's wife and persuades her to 
run away with him. They do not know 
that Heming, who had been asleep in a 
corner of the room, had woke np and 
heard the conversation. 

The scene of the picture that Is being 
taken is where De Foe is supposed to be 
t.«Mn t love to Hemlng's wife and is 
caught in the act by Heming, who enters 
and shoots him. The seene is rehearsed 
several times, and, when the real picture 
is finally taken, Heming fires a real bal- 
let and shoots De Foe through the arm. 
All think it is an accident, while the 
wife, for some reason or other, forgives 
her husband, and all ends happily. 

Obviously, the plot Is weak. But the 
playlet Is well directed and fairly weQ 
acted. 



PISTEL & CUSHING 

Theatre— A Ihambra. 

Style— Blackface. 

Time — Thirteen minute*. 

Setting— One. 

Lew Pistel and O. H. Cushing, between 
whom there seems to be a foot difference 
in height, appear in a whimsicality en- 
titled, "The Stranded Minstrels." While 
very funny in parts, it is reminiscent of 
Mclntyre and Heath's "Ham Tree." 

The pair take the parts of two 
stranded minstrels. The little fellow 
blames all their troubles on the big 
fellow. When the little fellow complains 
he Is hungry, the big one explains to him 
how to eat an allagazizzle. 

He then tells the little fellow the story 
of a dead miser, whose ghost appears at 
the spot they are sitting every midnight. 
It Is then five minutes to twelve and the 
ghost appears. The big fellow sees him 
first and silently sneaks away, leaving 
hun sitting beside the little follow, who 
runs for dear life when he sees the ap- 
parition. 

The act begins with more speed than. 
It ends. The team has good material 
and makes a lot of it, but the ending 
of the act must be changed if they wish 
applause, because, as it stands, the audi- 
ence is slow to realize that it is over. 



JOE TOWLE 

Theatre — Royal 

Style— Xut tingle. 

Time — Screnteen minute*. 

Setting — One. 

Joe Towle Is dressed as a call boy 
in this act and gets a lot of fun by 
hanging up hia own cards and moving 
his piano clumsily on to the stage. He 
begins his act by starting to recite the 
Declaration of Independence and then 
talks about vaudeville in general in his 
"nut" style. He bemoans the lack of 
girts on the program, and then brings out 
a beer keg, which he uses as a piano 
stool. "Kidding" the song writers, Mc- 
carty and Fischer, who preceded him on 
the blQ, he informs the audience that he 
"will now play a number of songs he did 
not write." He also gives an impression 
of a girl pianist at a cheap moving 
picture show. His act closes with a 
snappy ragtime piano selection. 

At Monday's matinee Towle stopped 
the show at the Royal Theatre. He is 
very versatile and knows how to put over 
his stuff. Some of his lines are rather 
blue and should be »llmii»a,ted from the 
act, when It win go over big in any spot 
on any bill. _^__^^___ 

"THE MIRACLE" 

Theatre— floyW. 
Style— Jf ind-reoding. 
Time-^Fifteen minute*. 
Setting— Full ttage. 

This act is exactly like that of "Mer- 
cedes." 

The man, on the program as "A Modern 
Svengali,"— enters with "His Trilby," who 
sings "Alice Ben Bolt." 

After the song, he passes into the audi- 
ence, where songs, new or old, sjsjglsgl or 
popular, are whispered to him. Without 
a word he transmits the command, men- 
tally, to his Trilby, who sings and plays 
the selection called for. 

The act went through without a hitch. 




Thomas W. Lawson said: "Think Less of Last 
Week and More of This Week."— Criticus. . 

And hs might have added, "think more of NEXT wash." That (oca far ov ary budj . Forgot' 
the hits yon used to sing. Get to-day's and to-morrow's bits NOW. What row used to bo and 
do is f at aros tlo g. perhaps, but it's past history.— Got in on tha success si, fir ■MsneS) 



MY HAWAIIAN SUNSHINE 



that mighty bit by L. Wolfe Gilbert and Carry Morgan, if. Hawaiian, 
sufficiently different to stand 'way oat beyond other Hawaiian songs. You 
Ms genuine excellence.— And try 



eaveagh, bat it's 
" art away frees 



SHOOT THE RABBIT 



by Jim Bnrrl* and Chris Smith, who wrote "BalUa' The Jack." It has "Bulls' Ths Jack** 1 

a mile, and It has to go somo to do that. Novelty songs are hs demand, and this oao to tha 
novelty of novelties.— Of course you realize the real worth of 



SHADES OF NIGHT 



the "last-former" ballad by L. Wolfe Gilbert- Anatol Frledland and Malvfaa Franklin- Far ta»' 
d oll ah l f n IT r Dorothy Jardon It has registered the biff success of a successful career. It is utterly' 
beautiful and you know it,— the whole nation knows it. — Remember 



PRAY m LIGHTS l° OUT 



Tunnah add Skldmore's coon-shout classic Gene Greene praises It s tronjly because It made rood 
for him, and there are many more who must commend it for the same reasons-Then there Is 
that wonderful "grown-up lullaby" 



OUT ^ CRADLE r HEART 



by t- Wolfe Gilbert and Anatol Frledland. Everyone loves it because its haantiful words and 

melody reach tha hearts of even those whose hearts are not easily reached. Thorn la nothing 
eiss Just lute it.— Another perfect ballad is 



WAITING FOR YOU 



by Harold Rob* and Onofrio >SaSSSS| It is a distinctly hlsh class number, with ad unforret- 
table melody. It takes* its place with tha greatest ballads over sung.— You know 



MY OWN I ON A 



by Gilbert. Frledland and Morgan. It came to us during tha Hawaiian "craso," but it has far, 
outlived tha fad, and la still running with the leaders. A universal favorite is this number.— 
Don't forgot the best of the "blues" songs; • 



ARMY BLUES 



by L. Wolfe Gilbert and Carey Morgan. It has that indefinable something about it that pro- 
ven u still shoulders— and that force* humming .and whistling. And dumb acta should ALL 
have that instrumental hit. 



STEP WITH PEP 



by Ms! B. Kaufman. You hear it wh erev e r yea' go, and 
Wolfs CUbert will supply it to any recognixad performer. ' 



wonder. It talis Its own Story.) 



JOS. W. STERN & CO., 1556 Broadway. New York 

L. WOLFE GILBERT, Professional Manager . 
{Homtjmct-.\(a r VA West, 2&th Street) ■ 

" CHICAGO . *" B •** -— FRISCO 

tsnl.-'inu,- Hi Ne> Clark" St. E. S. Flormtina, 111 Kearny St. 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



THEATRE MANAGER FINED 

Harry Traub, a Brooklyn theatre pro- 
prietor, was fined $260 last week in the 
Court of Special Sessions for discriminat- 
ing' against the uniform of enlisted men 
of the Navy. Joseph Gottman, manager 
of the theatre, was released on a suspend- 
ed sentence. Both men had been con- 
victed before three judges in Special Ses- 
sions after six enlisted men bad testified 
that they had been excluded- from box 
seats at tbe theatre because it was alleged 
that "no decent or respectable patron 
would sit alongside of them." 



"THE LIONESS" CAST ENGAGED 
George Tyler has engaged a strong 
company to support Margaret Anglin 
in The Lioness," Rupert Hughes' new 
play. Among tbe players are Mary Bo- 
land, Jennie Eustace, Kenyon Bishop, 
Mary Bestre Mayo, Lester Lonergan, and 
George MacQuarrie. The rehearsals are 
being held under the direction of Brandon 
Tynan and the -first performance will be 
given February 1 at Atlantic City, N. J. 



ACTOR CHARGED WITH LARCENY 

Harry Andrews was brought to New 
York last week from St Louis, after hav- 
ing been arrested on a bench warrant under 
an Indictment for alleged theft of jewels. 
It Is alleged that he and Harry Osmond, 
now In tbe Tombs, entered the jewelry 
store of TJdall and Ballou in December 
and took a diamond ring valued at $4,600. 



MUNICIPAL OPERA POSSIBLE 

If tbe plans of the National Opera Club 
of America are realized municipal opera 
may be a reality. The organization held 
a meeting last week at which Enrico 
Caruso and Claudio Muzio of the Metro- 
politan Grand Opera Company were guests 
and during which the subject of municipal 
opera was the chief topic of conversation. 



K. * E. GET MARC IN FARCE 
Edgar MacGregor haa been engaged by 
Klaw & Erlanger to stage "Here Comes 
the Bride," a new three-act farce by Max 
Marcin. It will be given an early Spring 
production and will include In the cast 
William Deming, Walter Jones, Leo Don- 
nelly, Sydney Greenstreet, Maude Eburnc, 
Florence Shirley and Amy Summers. 



NEW ICE PALACE OPENS 

The official opening of the Brooklyn Ice 
Palace at Atlantic and Bedford avenues 
occurred on Monday night and was at- 
tended by a number of city officials. 
Among those who received invitations to 
the opening were Mayor Mitchel, President 
Pounds of the Borough of Brooklyn, and 
Comptroller Prendergast. 



GIRLS FORM NEW TEAM 

Ida Brooks Hunt and Catherine Hayes, 
late of Hayes and Johnson, have formed a 
vaudeville partnership and will soon be 
seen in an operetta entitled "Orange Blos- 
•obu," by Angie Breakspear and Mabel 
Norton. There will be five in the little 
company. 



THEATRICAL BALL FOR N. T. 

The next interstate theatrical ball will 
be given in New York Instead of Phila- 
delphia. Invitations will be extended to 
the general public. The date haa not been 
decided upon yet 



NEIGHBORHOOD BILL CHANGED 

When ' Gertrude Kingston resumed her 
engagement at the Maiine Elliott Theatre 
Monday night she substituted O. B. Shaw's 
playlet "How He Lied to Her Husband," 
for his "The Inca of Pernsalem." "Great 
Catherine" and "The Queen's Enemies" 
were retained on the bill. 



OPERA SINGERS GIVE RECEPTION 

Last week at tbe Waldorf-Astoria a re- 
ception was given by Mme. Frances Alda, 
Gatti-CaBazza, Enrico Caruso, Antonio 
Scotti, Giuseppe de Luca and Andrea de 
Segurola in honor of Mme. Helena Tbeo- 
dorini and Baroness d'Harmezak. 



WASHINGTON HEARS OPERA 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 1L — The Bos- 
ton Opera Company opened the grand 
opera season here tonight presenting Ver- 
di's "Aida," in Poll's Theatre. The Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Wilson are to be present 
one night of the three. 



BOROUGH PLAYERS TO PRODUCE 

Saturday night in the Brooklyn Academy 
of Music the Borough Players of the 
Young Men's Hebrew Association of Bor- 
ough Park will present a musical comedy 
by Reuben RosenBtein, entitled "Stop — Go 
Ahead." 



ACTOR'S FUND HELPING MANY 

The Actors' Fund during December dis- 
tributed $5,142.33 to relieve the needy of 
the profession. The receipts for the month 
were only $2,548.42. Tbe rand is spend- 
ing $70,000 a year to aid tbe ill and dis- 
abled. 



HE'LL PLAY U. S. TIME 

I'miADEij'HiA, Pa., Jan. 11. — John Me- 
Cormack renounced allegiance to King 
George here today at tbe Naturalization 
Bureau, declaring his intention of becom- 
ing a citizen of the United States. 



WRITES PREPAREDNESS PAGEANT 

A preparedness pageant called "The 
People" baa been written by Marion Crigh- 
ton and will be presented this month under 
the direction of Mme. Yoraka. 



WEIGHTMAN LEASES BURBANK 

Los Anoeleb, Cal., Jan. 12.— "Wild 
Bill" Weightman, Texas millionaire, has 
leased the Burbank Theatre for the produc- 
tion of musical comedy. 




^?SSr" jsrrr — — "• — ■"- — ■'■" — - — .-•V-rS-S 



SOCIETY'S THEATRE SUED 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 14. — Suit has 
been filed in the Supreme Court here to 
enjoin the Playhouse, Washington's soci- 
ety theatre, from holding dancing and 
other entertainments in the early hours 
of the morning. The complainants aver 
that theatrical entertainments are becom- 
ing less frequent and that the Playhouse 
is, in reality, a dancing palace. Sir Cecil 
Spring-Rice, the British Ambassador, who 
lives across the street from tbe theatre, 
and W. A. S. Ekengren, the Swedish Min- 
ister, who also resides on the block, are 
chief among tho*e who complain that the 
Playhouse disturbs their early morning 
rest. 



PINK BUNDY ASKS DIVORCE 

Pink Earle Bundy has filed a complaint 
in a suit for separation from her hus- 
band, George Mosher Bundy, a clarinet 
aoloist and agent in this country of a 
French manufacturer of reed instruments. 
She tells of assisting her youthful husband, 
several years ago, when he was tbe mu- 
sician in the orchestra of a "floating thea- 
tre" playing in the Middle West by acting 
as chorus girl In the company. 



FRENCH COMPOSER COMING HERE 

Charpentier, the French composer, is ex- 
pected to arrive in New York within a few 
weeks and will conduct the premiere of his 
opera, "Louise." The tentative date for 
the opening is February 10. This will 
inaugurate the ten weeks' sesson of French 
grand opera here. 



PICKWICK GETS $10,000 ORGAN 

San Diego, Jan. 12. — Fred Howe, man- 
ager of the Pickwick, is installing a $10,- 
000 orchestral organ and making a num- 
ber of Improvements in the house. He will 
show only high class feature pictures. 



HOPPER AND LACKAYE SPEAK 

Among those who spoke hut week at 
the thirty-eighth annual dinner of the Hotel 
Association of New York were De Wolf 
Hopper and Wilton Lacksye. Hopper was 
forced to recite "Casey at tbe Bat" 



JULIA ARTHUR TO AID BENEFIT 
Julia Arthur will present the balcony 
scene from "Romeo and Juliet" at the Ac- 
tors* Fund benefit performance at the Cen- 
tury, January 26. Maclyn Arbuckle will 
tell some stories. 



SISTER SEEKS M. V. GILL 

Tebbx Haute, Ind., Jan. 12.— M. Y. Gill, 
a spotlight singer in picture shows, Is 
wanted at Vincennes. His slater, Mrs. 
Fry, has some important business to trans- 
act with him. 



ERROL TO BE IN FILM 

M. S. Bentham is to present Leon Krrol 
in a two-reel comedy, to be produced by 
the Metro Film Company. The scenario 
was written by Aaron Hoffman. 



DRAMA MATINEE DATES SET 

At the Republic on the afternoons of 
Jan. 22 and 23 the American drama mat- 
inees, recently announced by the Drama 
League, will be given. 



HOUDINI 
Through Tna New York Clipper 



DON TO CONTINUE Of "FROLIC" 
Tbe contract of the intoxicated dog, 
Don, and his trainer, Officer Yokes, in 
"The Midnight Frolic" has been extended 
for a year. 




Beautiful? 

Yea. Not only beautiful, 
but rich and exquisite. 

John McCormack, one 
of tbe world's greatest 
tenors, must have 
thought a great deal of 
that new song by the 
composer of "A Little 
Love, A Little Kiss"— 



LOVE, 
HERE 

IS MY 
HEART 



and his Victor Record 
No. 64623, of this truly 
wonderful song, it one 
of the most sought-after 
records of the season. 
Proof positive that the 
public as well as artists 
appreciate good songs! 
Artists' copies in all 
keys ready 

HO KIST, lie. I^ R YE J TKew York 



*B T l ii i I St, O.O.H. 

ban numcaco 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 




MINER IN KEEN 

FIGHT FOR 

PATRONAGE 

BRONX MGRS. OFFERING PRIZES 



George Miner, manager of Miner's 
Bronx Theatre, which is playing Colombia 
burlesque attractions, has entered into a 
general competition with the other theatres 
in the Bronx to increase the attendance of 
women at the performances. Each of the 
theatres in that borough has offered un- 
usual inducements to women to attend, 
Miner in the past having conducted a 
"country Mtore night" once a week. 

But, as the women in that section were 
bargain hunters, his competitors offered 
bigger inducements, which drew away a 
great deal of the patronage. 

Miner, however, devised a scheme last 
week that was widely advertised, announc- 
ing that on Wednesday night "ten beautiful 
leather couches" would be given away. 
This drew a number of women. This 
week he distributed thirty legs of lamb, 
each guaranteed to weigh Ott lbs; 

In the meantime Manager William T. 
Keogh, of the Bronx Theatre, arranged for 
an amateur night each week in conjunction 
with the regular International Circuit at- 
tractions. Manager Egan, of the Royal, 
has also in mind several unique stunts to 
attract the women, and Manager Henry 
Loew, of the National Theatre, is also try- 
ing to devise some means to increase the 
women patronage at his house. 

Miner's Theatre has not been considered 
an exceptionally good stand for tbe past 
few years by the burlesque companies 
why.'h play the house, and various feature 
nights were inaugurated to enhance the re- 
ceipts. Among some of tbe stunts were a 
wrestling night, amateur night and coun- 
try store night These features) with the 
exception of the wrestling, have outworn 
their usefulness. 

Expecting unusual competition from the 
other theatres next week, Miner bas desig- 
nated it as "carnival week" at his theatre. 
Monday evening there will be dancing and 
skating contests. Tuesday a chorus girls' 
contest will be the feature, and Wednesday 
is designated as "gift night," when live 
chickens, tin pans and agate ware will be 
distributed. Thursday a local amateur 
contest will be held, for which cash prizes 
will be awarded,' and Friday, as usual, will 
be wrestling night. Miner promises to have 
bigger events for his patrons during tbe 
rest of the season. 



LOUISE PEARSON IN STOCK 

Louis Pearson, who was prima donna 
witb the Union Square Stock Co. for two 
seasons and left to assume a similar po- 
sition with "The Million Dollar Dolls," on 
the Columbia Circuit, returned to her for- 
mer position on Monday, assuming the role 
which was played by Bettina Sheldon, who 
will rest for several weeks. 



DANCER FEATURED IN STOCK 

Gara Zora. formerly Mile. Doveen, was 
a feature with the Kahn show at the Union 
Square, New York, last week. The com- 
pany includes Brad Sutton, George Walsh, 
James X. Francis, Norma Brown, Charles 
Collines, Slay Leavitt and Bessie Rosa. 



MORTON MEETS PRES. WILSON 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 11.— Harry 
K. Morton, who is featured with the "Bur- 
lesque Review" while playing in this city 
with his show, had tbe honor of meeting 
President Wilson and Secretary Tumulty. 
Jack O'Neal, United States Marshall, lo- 
cated at Washington, was the man respon- 
sible for tbe meeting. Harry visited tbe 
White House this morning with O'Neal. 



MABELLE MORGAN FOR VAUDE, 

Cleveland, Jan. 15. — Mabelle Morgan, 
who has been with tbe Hurtig and Seamon 
shows for several seasons as prima donna, 
and this season with the Watson and 
Wrothe Show, will close Saturday night 
at the Star, this city. Miss Morgan will 
rest for three weeks and then go into 
vaudeville. 



JOSEPHINE SAUNDERS IN STOCK 
Pittsburgh, Jan. 12. — Josephine Saun- 
ders, a well known musical comedy prima 
donna, who has been on tbe coast for the 
past two years, has joined the Victoria 
Stock. This is Miss Saunders' first ap- 
pearance in burlesque. She has an excel- 
lent voice. 



RIFE SIGNS MOLLIE WILLIAMS 
During the visit of Geo. W. Rife to New 
Tork last week, he signed up Mollie Will- 
iams t>> bead her own company under bis 
direction for the next two years. 



FRANCES FARR OUT OF CAST 

Frances Fair, of the "Pacemakers," has 
been out of the cast owing to complete loss 
of her voice. She expects to resume work 
this week. Elsie La Bergere is again being 
featured with this company in her statue 

act. . 

RIFE IN NEW YORK 

George W. Rife was in New York last 
week, and visited the Mollie Williams' 
Show at Miners', Bronx. 







STOCKHOLDERS 

OF A. B. C. 

PLEASED 



REPORTS SHOW RECEIPTS GAIN 



A meeting of stockholders of the Amer- 
ican Burlesque Circuit was held Jan. 12, 
and all those present, including four man- 
agers of companies playing the circuit, ex- 
pressed great satisfaction with the reports. 

A fact that impressed them greatly was 
the gain in the receipts at houses which 
were given over to sensational dancing or 
other warm features last season, and which 
are getting along without them at present. 

General Manager Peck called attention 
of the stockholders to one or two Western 
houses where tbe management occasionally 
tried to put over something against the 
policy of the A. B. C. officials. 

The reports showed a healthy gain in the 
gross and net receipts all along the' line, 
and tbe route as it stands at present will, 
undoubtedly, be continued. 



BANQUET FOR MAE HOLDEN 

A big event in theatricals in Brooklyn 
last week was tbe theatre party and ban- 
quet tendered. to Mae H olden by the Joe 
Haggerty Association, whose members al- 
ways welcome tbe little soubrette each 
season on her first Brooklyn engagement. 

The members first enpoyed the perform- 
ance of the Bostonians, Jan. 9, at the 
Casino, and then adjourned to tbe Plaza 
to partake of tbe banquet which had been 
arranged for 250 persons. 

Entertainment in various forms was 
given between the courses. 

Among the theatrical folks who partici- 
pated were Dan Dody, Grace Sachs, L. M. 
Bovie, Zella Clayton, Florence Mills, 
itty Dayton, Mrs. Erick Newburg, Frank 
Finney, Ethel Sadler, Rose Glenwood, 
Julia Kelly, Addie La Mont, Mrs. Frank 
Finney, John Campbell, Nicholas White, 
Howard McKeefry, Wallace Macrery, 
Michael J. Joyce, Charlie Doyle, James 
Travers, George S. Banks, Murray Bern- 
ard, Frank Pierce, Billy Harms, Louis 
Kurzwell, J. P. Griffith, Elsie Mills, Irma 
Bartoletti, Alice Saville, Anna Harris, 
Loretta North, Anna Conway, and Ida I* 
Faver. 



ENNIS GOES BACK TO FARM 

Pittsbubch, Jan. 12. — Joe Ennis closod 
at the Victoria, this city, Jan. 5, and left 
at once for Braddock, Pa., where he has a 
chicken farm. Ennis has been advertising 
agent of the Victoria for several years, and 
bas hit the old trail during the Summer 
months with the bucket and brush ahead of 
. circuses. 



ED. SMALLEY DEAD 

After a long illness, Ed. Smalley, for- 
merly with the Watson Sisters Show, died 
at Chicago, Jan. L 



SIGNS FOR FOUR YEARS 

Zella Russell will continue for four years 
to play for the J. & J. firm. 



Burlesque Notes 



Mrs. Robinson, of tbe Espanang Hotel, 
Hopatcong, N. J., where Mona Raymond, 
the Bemsteins and many other burlesquers 
spend their Summers, died Jan. 4. 



"The Margaret," at Philadelphia, con- 
ducted by Margaret Sheridan (Mrs. Billy 
Sprucer), is becoming a favorite stopping 
place for professionals. 



Santa. Claus, assisted by tbe attaches of 
the New People's Theatre, Philadelphia, 
brought Manager Frank Abbott a nice gold 
knife and a pair of cuff-links, suitably 
engraved. .■ 



Lena Daley, Harry fields and practically 
the same cast as this season will be seen 
with "The French Frolics" next season. 



The chorus girls of the Star and Garter 
show had a celebration all their own on 
New Year's Eve at Providence. 



Fred Rith, of the "Beauty, Youth and 
Folly" Company, mourns the loss of bis 
father. 



• Jessie Stoner has left for Milwaukee to- 
open with a local stock company. 



Leona Earle has replaced Doris Curtis, 
with the Ben Welch Show. 



Jack Wicks of the Comedy Four, witb 
the "Sight Seers," is ill. 



PARTY FOR BURLESQUE REVIEW 

Pittsburgh, Jan. 15. — The Live Poultry 
Men's Association of the State of Pennsyl- 
lania, .which is exhibiting four thousand 
birds at Convention Hall this week, has 
arranged a big theatre party to be given 
to Zella Russell and the members" of tbe 
"Burlesque Review" company now playing 
the Gayety. They will attend the show in 
a body next Thursday night. 



John K. Hnwley has closed with the 
'Girls of the Follies.*' 



Frances Mulroy joined the Pat White 
Show in Chicago. 

Virginia Wilson has joined the "Grown 
Up Babies" Co. 



Mildred Clare closed with the Thorough- 
breds Jan. 6. 



HARRY HOUDINI 
Breaking Through The New York Clipper 



J. & X GET VIRGINIA 

Virginia Wilson will be with one of the 
Jacobs and Jerman shows next season. 



Sam Lee mourns the death of his father. 



Jennie Ross has joined "The Tourists.' 



January- 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE— Continued 



EMMA BUNTING STILL IN TEXAS 
San Aktokio, Jan. 11. — Emma Bunt- 
ing has made arrangements with the man- 
agement of the Interstate Vaudeville Cir- 
cuit to play with her stock company half 
a week at the Majestic Theatre in San 
Antonio, making way on other days for 
the road shows. 



JACK BENJAMIN MARRIES 

Jack Benjamin, owner and manager of 
the Jack Benjamin Co., was married to 
Meda Smiea at the home of her parents, 
Jan. 7. They are now in New York City, 
where they will spend a few weeks before 
returning to their home at Salina, Kan. 



COPELANDS JOIN FOX CO. 

Rocebs, Teat, Jan. 1L — The Four 
Copelands have been re-engaged for the 
Roy E. Fox Popular Players, jumping 
from the east, where they have been 
playing vaudeville on TJ. B. O. time since 
October. 



KENNEDY WITH DALLEY CO. 

Hutchinson, Kan., Jan. 12. — Craig 
Kennedy is a new member of the Ted 
Dalley Stock Co., doing heavies in the 
absence of Richard Cramer, who was con- 
fined to the hospital for several weeks. 



PICKERTS SAO. FOR FLORIDA 

The Pickert Stock Co. left last week by 
boat to play the next three months in 
Florida. The company will return north 
in April and play parks for the Summer. 



STOCK MEMBERS MARRY 

St. Louis, Jan. 12. — Nina Fontinelle 
was married here Jan. 2 to Leo C. Dono- 
van. The bride is well known in circus 
and vaudeville circles, having been a mem- 
ber of The Three Fontinelles, tight wire 
walkers and aerial performers. She has 
been with the Fontinelle Stock Co. for the 
last eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Douovan 
will remain with this company doing leads 
and specialties. 



ROSTER OF HORNE CO. 

Akron, O., Jan. 15. — The roster of the 
Home Stock Co., playing in the Music 
Hall, includes: Geraldine Blair, leading 
lady ; Walter Baldwin, Jr., leading man ; 
Gladys Bush, Edith Bowers, Leslie P. 
Webb, Louis Lytton, John Vaughan, Geo. 
M. De Petit, Jim Swift, Lester Howard, 
Jane Ware, and Fred P. Miller. •'The 
Yellow Ticket" is being played this week. 



LODENIA COREY JOINS NUTT CO. 

Lodenia Corey closed a forty-one weeks' 
season Dec 31, with the Swain Show and 
opened Jan. 1 as leading woman, with E. 
C. Nntt's Comedy Players. 



MARION MAY HAVE MUSICAL CO. 

Mabion, Ind., Jan. 12. — Glen L. Bever- 
idge is contemplating a musical stock com- 
pany for the Indiana Theatre. 



FLORENCE LE CLERCQ IN BOSTON 

Boston, Jan. 13. — Florence Le Cleroq 
has joined the Jewett Players at the Cop- 
ley Theatre. 



PARK, ST. LOUIS, SALE HALTED 

St. Louis, Jan. 13. — The sale of the 
Park Theatre, announced for Jan. 10. was 
stopped by a temporary order of the court, 
following the filing of a receivership suit 
by the stockholders of the Park Theatre 
Co. against the president, directors and 
trustee of the company. The stockholders 
charged conspiracy to gain coutrol of the 
theatre property. 



CUTTER STOCK ROSTER 

Roster of the Cutter Stock Co. includes 
W. H. Cutter, owner; Wallace R. Cutter, 
manager; J. Bernard Hurl. Richard Foote. 
Herbert H. Power, Edward Mokelke, Fred 
Weston, Jack Raymond, Ruth Leightou, 
Grace Raymond, and Wanda Raymond. 



DE DEYN WANTS STOCK IN CAMDEN 

Camden, N. J., Jan. 13. — Severn Dc 
Deyn is negotiating to install a stock com- 
pany at the Broadway Theatre to be oper- 
ated in conjunction with his company now 
nt the Dixie Theatre, Manayunk, Philadel- 
phia. 



SHEA VISITING AKRON 

Akron, O.. Jan. 13. — Mr. Shea, of Fei- 
ber & Shea Stock Co., is spending a few 
days here with their Akron theatres, the 
Grand Opera House and The Colonial. 



PARK OPERA CO. CLOSED 

St. Louis, Jan. 10. — The Park Opera 
Co. closed its engagement last Sunday 
night. 



"BELLES" AT LITTLE ROCK 
Little Rock, Ark., Jan. 12. — The Arn- 
old & Reynolds show, "Seaside Belles," has 
opened a four weeks' engagement at the 
Kempner Theatre. The roster is: Dot 
Arnold, souhrette: Billy Kelly, tenor and 
straights ; Tom Collins, bass and comedian ; 
Jimmy Arnold, baritone ; Clyde Reynolds, 
first tenor; Billy Landis, general busi- 
ness. 







HARRY HOUD1NI 
Breaking Through The New York Clipper 

YOUNG GETS $197,790 VERDICT 

The husband of the late Madame Nor- 
dica. George W. Young, was last week 
awarded a verdict of $107,71)0 and costs 
by the jury iu Justice Shearn's part of the 
Supreme Court against the T'uitrd States 
Mortgage and Trust Company. Young sued 
the company for a share of the profits. 



BRAMAN STILL ILL 
Tebre Haute, Ind., Jan. 13. — C. R. 
Braman (Bud), well known in stock cir- 
cles and musical comedy, still continues 
seriously ill at the home of his sister here. 



RIGGS SUCCEEDS SCHOPPE 
Northampton, Mass., Jan. lo. — Sidney 
Riggs has suceeded Howard Schoppe as 
juvenile man with the Northampton Play- 
ers at the Academy of Music. 



BYBEE CLOSES COMPANY 

M. E. Bybee, owner, manager and pro- 
ducer of The Popular Bybee Stock Co., 
has closed bis show after a long and pros- 
perous season. 



DE VERE TO LEAVE DALLEY CO. 

Hutchinson, Kan., Jan. 12. — Mitty De 
Vere, comedian with the Ted Dalley Stock 
Co., is leaving shortly. 



ELEANOR PARKER IN PORTLAND 

Portland, Ore., Jan. 12. — Eleanor 
Parker has joined the Alcazar Players, and 
is playing second leads. 



FRITZ E. BOONE JOINS WOLF CO. 

Lucas, Can., Jan. 11. — Fritz E. Boone, 
recently of the Theo. Lorch Co., has joined 
the Barney Wolf Co. 

Dad's Theatrical Hotel 

PHILADELPHIA 

Fluhrer & Fluhrer 

"Always working, thank your" 



STARS OF THE BURLESQUE WORLD 



JOSEPrilNE SAUNDERS 

Leading Woman 
VICTORIA BURLESQUE STOCK 

PITTSBURG 




GEO. P. MURPHY 

With BARNEY GERARD'S 

FOLLIES OF THE DAY 



HARRY 



PATRICIA 



MANDEL and BAKER 

Straight Prima Donna 

Million Dollar Doll* 

Direction AL SINGER 



MURRY LEONARD 

Making Comical from Hebrew People 

WITH 

Blotch Cooper** Roseland GcrU 



LYNNE CANTER 

PRIMA DONNA LEADS 
ROSELAND GIRLS 

IND SEASON UNDER MANAGEMENT 
BLUTCH COOPER 



BILLY CARLTON 



Ge r m an Comedian 

HELLO GIRLS 



JEAN LEONARD 

FEATURED 

With FRED IRWIN'S BIG SHOW 
Sonhrette different from the others 

Bo mtmrngei with New Show. 



NAY McCORMACK 

With 
BROADWAY B ELLES CO. 



CORTELLI 

Playing Character* 

WITH 

SAM HOWE'S BIG SHOW 



GEO. LEON 

WITH 

MONTE CARLO GIRLS 
DOING DUTCH AND MAK- 
ING GOOD 



GRACE L ANDERSON 

PRIMA DONNA 
BOWERY BURLESQUERS 

MANAGEMENT HURTIO * SEAMON 
UM-U-U-U-M 



SQUIRREL FOOD 

Aills & Myers 

Thoee Kilted Klowna 
ASK MOLLIE WILLIAMS 



HENRY P. DIXON 

Producer 

BIG REVIEW 

Cohunbta Theatre Building. New York 



GENE 



PAY 



Alvarez and Martell 

SCORING WITH 

HARRY HASTINGS BIG SHOW 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



JEAN ADAIR 



"Maggie— Taylor Waitress" 

Keith's, Cinincinnati 

Direction Lewi* 8c Gordon 



THE CASTEELS 

A Thriller Supreme AUTO WONDERS OF THE AGE DIRECTION ALF. T.WILTON 

MOST SENSATIONAL AUTOMOBILE ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



I VAUDEVILLE STARsj 



EDWIN ARDEN 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



KATHARINE DANA'S 



UNITED TIME 



FISHER FOLKS' 



MARIE STODDARD 

The "Bud Fisher" of Song 

Direction Max Ilayc* 



TRULY 



MARTA 



SHATTUCK & GOLDEN 



Direction ARTHUR KLEIN 



IAS. 



GRACE AND EDDIE 



CONLIN — PARKS 



"Three Little Pals" 

Direction THGS. FTTZPATRICK 



KCLLEB 



ANNA 



MACK & EARL 



Dfavctto 
MAX HART 



VODEV1LLING Prtrate S«. 

» NORMAN MANWARINO 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



1 FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid ' 
U. B. O.— BIG TIME 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

M«- DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER * B1ERBAUER 



BUSH WICK THEATRE 



THIS WEEK 



MAZIE KING 

In Her Own Dance Creations 
Direction MAX HART 



J 



VAUDEVILLE FEATURE ACTS 



VICTOR 



ADELE 



FOSTER & FERGUSON 

BEAU BRUMMEL and the DEBUTANTE 

Direction G. F. BROWN-WM, HENNESSEY . 



JACK 



HAZEL 



DALY & BERLEW 

Whizzing Whirlwind Wizards 

U. B. O. Time Direction, WENONAH M. TENNEY 



KDDIE 



ROSA 



DE NOYER & DANIE 

jn Tie* Latest « OPPOSITION " ****" lJm 



L.utb P i eie fc nr 
A CeaMeaoen et Cfaaa 
MGUfc SCSNSRY 



John P. M.dSnrr 

sa4 Lfltlme- Tnew b, (Ma D* Never 
Dfcwctna GENE HUGHES aaa JO PAIOK SMITH 



FRED 
ANDREWS 



THE WONDER ACT 

NEW NOVELTY Direction JO PAIGE SMITH 



(Greeting*) 



R 



SHERLOCK SISTERS 

DIRECTION OF GEO. CHOOSE— UNITED TIME. 



HUSH! BIT OF SCANDAL 

»=FOLEY-LETUREtB 



WITH 14 PEOPLE 



ALWAYS A HEADUNER 



KLEIN OR OS. 



H NOOTRAL 

P. S.-W. Den* Mi 



»» 



We 



JOHN C PEEBLES PRESENTS 

WILLIAM SISTO 

UNITED TIME 



MAURICE BRIERRE ™* KING GRACE 
Direction ARTHUR KLEIN 



JAMES JAY J AXON 



WANTED 



-;n benefit by cenm—kehne with under- SI ™^C?? '^"S"' Slr 1 ""^ ."SI** Jt 2 
.lined, Infer-Won derired. WRIGHT, ore g?S££ «l*l£te%J^W^»uS&«w! 



Clipper. 1HM Broadway, N. Y. C 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



CIij»jt»< 




la order to avoid mistaken and to Insure the prompt delivery of the letter* advertised 
In this list, a POSTAL. CARD must bo tent requesting us to forward your letter. It must 
be signed with your full ntni and the) address to which the. letter is to be sent, and the 
Una of business followed by the sender should be mentioned. 

Please man Mow the data (or number) of the CLIPPER In which the letters sent for 
wara advertised. 



GENTS 



GFaNTS 

kmf, Dxw 

AoAnon, & 

A******Ul# sEuWi 



■Wily 
Buhly, B. 
Bart. OD. 

Ratar. Ww. 1L 

■ w ife Sam 

Baxtoot, K. a 
Buddy. BeUry 
Brrmn. Tam 

5E?"i,.V- 

Ksxfr. usrss 
Blown, T. st. 
Bran a MoCor- 

Back 
Coma. Cdv 
Qfflrcb. L. B. 
dark. Chi*. 



Atwood, CUTS 
Acker, Mabel I 
Brrhm, Kslhrm 
BUoo. Br- 1 — " 
Belmont, 
Cartoon, , 
Curiele, Ulai 

Oiannard, Tmn 
CUjtoo. Jennie 
GhtaUk, Cbenia 
Cltment. Oeoe- 
rleie 



DaBroto, Geo. B. 
u» toney, 

sVMb 

Dickson, Cllflorf 
DmlL Biny 

Dolan. W. A. 

Ilarllna. R F. 
FojTr. EMla 
ruhman. L. 

Fitias, r 

Fletcher. 
IrsBds, 




/ 



Bens' 
Thelms 



Freddie 
Osta< Karl 

Glsncetoo Rlth- 
~srd j 

Greenltaf, B. 



Boner, Brelrn 
Dorin, Edith 
D« Vsmrr. Vers 
Bonn. Floreoc* 
Daiia, Dor* 
Darling, Jeato 



Oarrtaon. Jules Lota, C C 

Banorth. C K. Lester. E. A. 

Hllllar. J. Htfntojh, Butt 

Harts, Art***- ararrkk. Barn T. 

Hootlty, J. H. Mutt, Al 

Haras, Oeo. r. aleCanon, J. H. 

ismitt . Arthor straerre, Frank 
Jctoob, Von B. 

Jones. Job U Marshall. In. 

Knar. Hsl Mllletta. BOW. 

Stag. Tbns. Moras. Jack 

Mario*. Perry Mltehal. Royal 

Kobuer. Cos*. Mobile. EdV 

Ksnaount. Chae. McLean. Dstld 

Umcfesther. Joe MUllngton, Sam 

Laatnrood, n. B. MacCurdr. Jan. 
Lslens CIrcoa K. 

Link. Harry Nlckeraon. Btanly 

LonfBln, Robert North. Frank c 

B. Ni-whsrt. Chss. 

Lsstoo, Jeremiah Ovens. Hand* 

LADIES 



on. rna 
Plica. *t alalia 



BeM. L. a 
Bar, Walter a. 
Klrhardson. Mrs. 

E. 
Bead, F. 8. 
Bolt*. Too*. 

Kbosdr*. His. 
C. I 

Bopp, rtu. 



Fosttr. Nellie 
Farourn. Onus 
Gray. Mao* 
Ooold. Madeline 

Htmter. Minnie 



Holeorarj. 
HOaVOrth, Mrs. 

C B. 
Hudson, AlleS 
Helen*. La Bell* 
Indlta. Prlooai 
Inina, Dotry 
CKotf*. Mrs. 

Jarrlt, Mrs. Win. 
B. 

King, Alms 



Ler«». 
utile. Virginia 
Landau, Mario 
Lelgb, Mabel 
Melrose. Frsnalo 
Melnott, Katelle 
Murray. Hiss B. 
Newton. Neola 
Pendleton. Hn. 

C. a. 

BoaeU*. QoatB 

Blchanjscm. Edna 



DUUHH. UBa 

Smith, fe. 
Bt Louis Am. 

Co. 
Stone, frank A. 
Steppe. Harry 
Bprswe, Tom 
Sharkey. FredW. 



Bukyaer. Beatrice 
Bobeaoa, Erba 
Bsmsay, Nay 
St Audrle. Stella 
Sapoto, Vlda 
Weller, Lima 
Smith, Mrs. For- 

tst 
Stanley, Dorothy 
B^ord. Vera 
Von Praig. Bo- 



Bylrestef. Larry 
Sharif. A. 

Stanton, Wm 8. 
Stress, Sanaa 

Sbeta, Fred 
Tomer. L. K. 
Ten, Eutaell L. 
Vinton. M 
Wallsce, Vernon 
Wlekt*. Jot M. 
irOmtr. Bldoer 
WlUon. Bjm 
Wsltham. Jaa. BL 
Warden. J. T. 
Whipple. Waldo 
Wolf. Adolnh 

Webb, LatU* F. 
Wlntaer, Bodl* 
Waldrtn, J, U 



White, Mabel 
Wlocbastrr. Edith 
Wlmmer. Stella 
Winters, Has 
Worth, JoarpUo* 
Wltinoo. Con. 



White, Paollneu. 
White, Beneta 
Warren. Band* K. 
Wlmlow, Leah 
Zumars 




Julia Dean, Frederick Trueadell, Thur- 
low Bergen, Kate Blaneke, Edwin Holt, 
George BJddell, John F. Webber, Mona 
Brans, Ellin Baker and Franklin George 
for "The Innocent Sinner." 

Harry Kelly, Irving Fisher and the Elm 
(Sty Four for "Dance and Grow Thin," 
•t the Cocoanut Grove. 

Sari Fetrass, by the Shuberts, for the 
prima donna role in "The Beautiful Un- 
known." 

William Harrigan by Elisabeth Mar- 
bury for "Love o* Mike." 

Sydney Shields by Holbrook Blinn for 
forthcorning production. 

Jeanne Eagels for "The Professor's 
Love Story." 

Gwendolyn Piers by Andreas Dippei for 
"The Love Mill." 

Edna May Oliver and the Hysons for 
"Oh, Boy!" 

Clara Blandkk for "The Wanderer." 

Maude Eburne for "Here Comes the 
Bride," 

Daieie Irving for "The Beautiful Un- 
known," 

Margaret Armstrong for "Very Good 
Eddie." 



ACTRESS SEEKS SEPARATION 

Mrs. Marion Mitchel McGowan appeared 
last week in the Supreme Court to prose- 
cute her action for a legal separation from 
her husband. David J. McGowan, whom 
she alleges had abandoned her. 



' fi? 3 "**^ ra"*3 ..»■ —■ * y 




p>~~ ^=^ "~ 



HOUDINI 
Breaking Through The New York Clipper 

STRAND GETS UNDER FILMS 

The management of the Strand Theatre 
announces that they have signed a con- 
tract with the Esaanay Film Company 
whereby the Max Under comedies will be 
presented at the Strand Theatre. 



WISE TO ENTERTAIN ASSEMBLY 
For the Social Day of the Theatre Aa- 
eembly at the Hotel Astor, January 19, 
Thomas A. Wise, Constance Collier and 
Isabel Irving will give the basket scene 
from "The Merry Wives of Windsor." 



HOLDS PLAY DOESN'T INFRINGE 
Judge Julius M. Mayer hut week handed 
down an opinion wherein be refuses to 
enjoin "Arms and the Girl" on the claim 
that it is an infringement of the copy- 
right of the novel "Little Comrade, writ- 
ten by Barton E. Stevenson. 



DEATHS 



FRED R. WREN, one of the best known 
of the comedians of a generation ago. died 
at his home In Buffalo early Friday morn- 
lntc after an lllneaa of three months. He 
was the uncle of Blanche Bates and 
Eugenia Blair. Wren had played in the 
companies of Forest, Booth, Lawrence 
Barrett, Thomas Keane and Charlotte 
Cushman. 



IN LOVING MEMORY 
of 

WILEY J. HAMILTON 

DIED 
January 17th, 1907. 

—RUTH. 



PETE QEBHARD, of Baltimore, Hd.. 
professionally known aa Paul La Drew, died 
at the County Hospital, Los Angeles, Cal., 
Dec. ZB. 

BLANCHE O'BRIEN, an old vaudevUIe 
performer, well known In the West, died In 
the County Hospital, Milwaukee, Wis., on 
Dec. 26, after Buffering; a paralytic stroke. 
She was about thirty-five years of age. 

CHARLES H. OAWLEY, an actor and 
elniter living In Bogota, N. J., dropped dead 
on the sLag-e of the Central Opera House, 
Jan. 12, while singing a solo at the enter- 
tainment of the Thomas Farley Association. 

JAMES R. FORD, a former theatrical 
manager, died last week at hla home In 
Brooklyn. He had been a police clerk In 
Baltimore until recently. 

HENRY BERGMAN, a theatrical man- 
ager, died at hla home In this city last 
week. For thirty-five years he had been 
connected with the stage and was asso- 
ciated with Henrietta Croeman. William 
H. Crane, Olga Petrova, Walter Whiteside 
and other atars. He was recently connected 
with the Metro Film Corporation and was 
a member of the Lambs Club. Bergman 
had created the leading heavy roles in *uch 
productions aa "The Price or Peace," "The 
Prodigal Son." "The Daughter of Heaven." 
"Panthea," and "The Senator." In addi- 
tion to his activities on the stage and 
screen, Bergman found time to do consid- 
erable writing and he was a contributor to 
several magaslnes. A wife and daughter 
survive him. 

MARK MURPHY, known throughout the 
country as a vaudeville comedian, died last 
week In Hew York City following an attack 
of pneumonia. Murphy was born in 
Brooklyn and first appeared on the stags 
at aeventeen. He and his wife had appeared 
In vaudeville as Mr. and Mrs Mark Murphy. 
He was sixty-two years old. 

MRS. BILLY BU8CH, known profession- 
ally as Dola De Vere. of the Busch De Vers 
Trio, died Dec. 23 at Providence, R. L Mrs. 
Busch. who was forty-nine years old, was 
born In Australia. In her younger daya 
she was a prima donna contralto. Her first 
American appearance was made at the old 
Orpheum In San Francisco nineteen years 
asro. when Manager Walters was In charge. 



West «6ta Bt. Bres 8.20. 
slats. Wed. A Sat. 2.20. 



West *2A Bt. Ere*. P. 20. 
Mala. Wed. A Bat. 
HEJfET W. SAVAGE offer* 
The New Moslcal Comedy 



ORMSBEE TALKS ON DRAMA 

Hamilton Ormsbee, of the Brooklyn 
Eagle, gave his "Reminiscences of the 
Drama" at the ninth annual luncheon of 
the alumnae association of Adelphi College 
last week. "The Drama" was the topic of 
the meeting. 



FULTON) 
"IN FOR 
THE NIGHT" 

A ISVw 8 Act Pare* by Jsm*>i RaTcrf. 

LIBERTY 
If Yon Have Read About 

$15 " a Sof aofp? HAVE A HEART 

I Look Over Our (UM) 
Styles First \Ls 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

SINGER'S CLOTHES SHOP 

Cer. 49th St.. 1604 B'tvay, Oie Fliflhl Dp 




West 43tn Bt. Bres. B.23. 

Mat.. Tbura. * Hat. 2.30. 



LYCEUM 

SPLENDID RECEPTION 

Maria Temyast, Laura Hop* Onws, 
Norma KitohoU, Henry Kolkar, W. 
Graham Browae, £os*a* O'Bri.n la 

HER HUSBANDS WIFE 



GAIETY 



THEATRE. B'wsr A Mth 

Bt. Eras, at 8.30. Mala. 
Wed. A Bat. at 3.30, 
WmCHTU SMITH SBd J0HH L. Q0LDXW 
Prasoat th* oaassa's aaoo*** 

TURN TO THE RIGHT 

By Mssara. Smith aad Haaaaxd. 



THEATER 

VonnarlT 
Candler 



af^af-kfarsri Wc.t *8th St., Pboc* Bryant ♦«, 
III K I Era. at 8.20. Mnta. Wed. a Sat. 
^'^'* m * 2.20. OUrer Moroaco's great 
lacg bins fcucces*. 8eaaoD's Ooe substantial aoccesa. 

UPSTAIRS g DOWN 

BY FatEDBfUC a* aWUatiT MATTOH 

COHAN & HARRIS 

Phone Bryant (34* 

Etc*. 8.2X1. Mats. Wed as Sat. 2.20. 

COHAN * WABSTS picut 

CAPTAIN KIDD, JR. 

A FeirctCesl Ad-ventur* l>y Rida Johtmon Toting. 

REPUBLIC 5Siv 

Ere*. 8.20. Mats. Wpl. A Bat. 2.20. 

ARTirtm HOPXINB pnaanta 

GOOD GRACIOUS ANNABELLE 

A New Plajr by Clarts Kuramfr. 



B. T. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadwar A 4Ttb St. 

Mat. Dally at 2 P. M. 

29, 50 and TOc 

Itii; Ntcbt 

1350-75 1111.60 



THEODOBE KOBLOTT 
with vxjista MJLBEOTA. 
Mrs. Tsraoa Cutis la th* 
Urn "PAIBIA." Allan 
Brooks la "Dollars aad 
Ban**," rtortnca Msota A 
Brother Frank Maors, Wll- 
lis Wotoa, Tlalat Bale, 
wrisht A BslMek, Max- 
In* Bros. A Bobby. 



nr<i AaSafafa Wnt 44th 8t - Bt **- 8 - 80 
DCaJLinS^'V Msts. Thura. A Sat. at *J» 

DAVID BBLASCO presents 

FRANCES STARR 

Za a r*fr**hln«]T new oonadj 

'TITTLE LADY IN BLUE" 



KNICKERBOCKER 



ELTINGE 



Tbeatrr, B'srar A Mth 
St. B,,.. *t P. 15. Msts. 
Wed. A Bat. 2. IB. 

Klaw A Brlanccr Manama 

DAVID BBILASCO prcaenta 

DAVID WARFIELD 

IB hla world mmwnH titer*** 

TH E IVt USIC MASTER 

Bests a woeko ahead. 

THEATR.H W. 42d'8t. Br*, at I.SO 
Mats. Wed. ai Sat. 
A. H. WOODS preaenta 

CHEATING CHEATERS 

Br MAX HAB.CIN. 

HIPPODROME 

MANAGEMENT CI1AI1I.BH tlll.UNUIIAM 
Nlchta at 8.1B. Mat. every dar, 2.1B. 

■•THE BIO SHOW" 

BTAOEU) BY R. H. BDBNSIDB 

With tb* Incomparable PAVLOWA 

NEW ICB I MAMMOTH I 100 NOVBI.T1HB 

BAI.I.BT ■ MINSTItDLiI I 1000 PEOPXJ9 

World's biggest show st lowest price*. 

HUDSON S.t^w«, 8, A S* •"■ 

KLAW A ERXANOBR preaent 

ELSIE FERGUSON 

In a new comedr of toriaj 

SHIRLEY KAYE 

Br HTJI3EET rOOTBEB. 



OEO. M* 

COHAN'S 



THEATBE. B'WAV A 4M 

8T. Bss. 8.30. Msts. Wsd. 

A Sst. 2.20. 

BXAW A EBLANOBB Managara 

henry M1LLBB presents 

RUTH CHATTERTON 

and Company. Including Broe* McRs*. la 

"COME OUT OF THE KITCHEN* 



R'war. 40 St. Bra. 8.20. 
Mata. Wed. A Sat. 2.20. 



EMPIRE 

CHABLES PBOHMAjr pr*s*nU 

A KISS 

FOR 

CINDERELLA 

J. M. BABBIE'S CBBATKST TRICMI'II. 

COLUMBIA THEATRE 

•WAY. a th STBBBT. M. T. 

LIBERTY BELLES 



MAUDE 
ADAMS 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 





Route* Most Reach This Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

Adams, Maude (Cbas. Frohmau, Inc., mgrs.) 

— Empire. New York, lndef. 
Arthur, Julia — Criterion, New York, lndef. 
Abarbanell, Una — Indianapolis, 18-20. 
"Alone at last" — Sprlngneld. Mass.. 17-18. 
"Big Snow, The" (Cbas. B. Dllllngbam, 

mgr.) — Hip., New York, lndef. 
••Ben Hut" — Hartford, Conn., 15-20. 
"Boomerang. The" (David Beasco, mgr.) — 

Powers', Chicago, lndef. 
"Broadway After Dark" (National Prod. Co., 
Inc., mgr.) — Sunbury. Pa.. 17; Milton, 
18; Bloomsbnrg, ID: Pittston. 20: Wilkes- 
Barre. 22 : Berwick, 24 ; Lansford, 25 ; 
Scranton, 2«-ir7. 
"Belle of ATe. A" (C. M. Maxwell, mgr.) — 
Smltbton, Va„ 17 ; Connell iville. 18 ; 
Union town, 19 ; Latrobe, 20. 
Collier, Wm. (H. H. Frazee, mgr.) — Long- 
acre, New York, lndef. 
Clarice, Harry Corson and Margaret Dale 

Owen — Calcutta, India, lndef. 
Cowl, Jane — Newark, N. J., 15-20. 
Clifford. Billy "Single" — Houma. Lai. 17 ; 
Morgan City. 18 ; Franklin, 10 : New Iberia. 
20 : Opelousas, 21 : Lafayette. 22 ; Alber- 
rille. 23: Welsh, 24; Lake Charles. 25. 
•'Cheating Cheaters" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 

Eltlnge, New York, lndef. 
••Come Out of the Kitchen" (Klaw & Er- 
langer ft Henry Miller, mgrs.) — Cohan's, 
New York, lndef. 
"Century Girl, The" — Century, New York, 

lndef. 
••Capt. Kldd. Jr." (Coban & Harris, mgrs.) — 

Cohan & Harris, New York, lndef. 
"CoUan Revue 1816" (Coban & Harris, 

mgrs.)— Forrest, Phils-. 15-20. 
•Common Clay" with John Mason (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — St. Pan], 14-20; Minneapo- 
lis. 21-27. 
"Canary Cottage" (Selwyn & Co., mgrs.) — 

Park Sq.. Boston, 15-20. 
Dunn, Emma (Lee Kugel, mgr.) — Thirty- 
ninth Street. New York, lndef. 
Ditrlchsteln. Leo (Coban & Harris, mgrs.) — 

•Jarrlck, Pblla, lnder. 

•'Daddy Long Legs" — Toronto, Can., 15-20. 

"Don't Tell My Wife." Eastern Co. (Tbos. 

Alton, mgr.) — Orrvtlle. O, 17 ; Mlllersbnrg, 

1»: Coshocton, 10: Dresden. 20: Zanes- 

* vllle. 22: Caldwell. 23: Pleasant City. 24: 

Cambridge, 25; Barnesvllle, 26; Bellalre, 

Eltinge. Julian (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — Mon- 
tauk. Bklyn, 15-20: Lynchburg, Va.. 22; 
Hlcbmond. 23-24 ; Newport News. 25 ; Nor- 
folk. 26-27. 

"Everywoman™ (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — 
Pueblo. Colo., 17: Canon City, 18; Hock 
Ford. 10 : La Junta, 20 : Dodge City. Kan.. 
22 : Hutchinson, 23 ; Wichita. 24 ; Newton, 
25 : Topeka, 26 ; Lawrence, 27. 

"Experience" (Elliott, Comstock & Gest, 
mgrs.)— Belasco. Washington. 15-20. 

Faversham. Wm. — Booth, New York, lndef. 

Ferguson. Elsie — Hudson. New Tork, lndef. 

Flske Mrs. (Corey * Rlter, Inc., mgrs.) — 
Broad. Pblla.. lndef. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn ft Co., mgrs.) — 
Cort. Chicago, lndef. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn ft Co., mgrs.) — 
Academy, Baltimore. 15-20; Standard, New 
York. 22-27. _. 

"Flame. The" (Richard Walton Tully, mgr.) 
— Ford's, Baltimore, 15-20 : Newark. N. J, 

"Freckles." Western Co. (Broadway Amuse. 
Co.. mgrs.) — Bellevlle. Kan., 17; Topeka, 
19-20: Frankfort. 22: Onsen, 23: Cen- 
tralla. 24 : Beattie. 25 ; Wymote, 26 ; Paw- 
nee- City. 27. 

••Freckle*. Eastern Co. (Broadway Amuse. 
I'n.. msnO — Cumberland, Md., 17: Keyser, 
W. Vu.. 18: Piedmont 19: Elklns. 22: 

Buckbannou. 23: PblHppl, 24; Rowlesburg. 
26: Union town. Pa.. 27. 

George. Grace — Plymouth, Boston, lndef. 

Gillette. Wm. — National. Washington. 15-20. 

Graham. Oscar (Oscar Graham, mgr.) — Sun 
Benito. Tex., 17 : Klncsyllle. 18 : Port 
Savara. 19: Goliad, 20; Bay City, 22; 
Ba*V Lake. 23. _ 

"Good Gracious Annabelle (Arthur Hopkins. 
mer.) — Republic. New York, lndef. 

Held. Anna — Casino, New York, lndef. 

Holmes. Taylor — Majestic. Bklyn. 15-20. 

Hodge. Wm. — Princess. Chicago, lndef. 

"Her Soldier Boy" (The Shuberts. mgr.) — 
Astor. New York, lndef. 

"Have a Heart" (Henry W. Savage. Inc, 
mcr-> — Liberty. New York, lndef. 

••nis Bridal Night," with Dolly Ststers (A 
H. Woods, mgr.) — Olympic, Chicago, lndef. 

"Her Husband's Wife" (Henry Miller, mgr.) 
— Lyceum. New York, lndef. 

"lllt-the-Trall Holllday," with Fred NIblo — 
Buffalo. N. Y„ 15-20. 

"Human Sonl, The" (J. H. Schwenk. mgr.) — 
Irwin. Pa_ 17: Waynesborg. 18; Washing- 
ton. 19 : Uniontown. 20 : Mt. Pleasant. 22 : 
Greensbunt, 23 : Homestead. 24 : New 
Castle. 25: Sharon. 26: Warren. O, 27. 

"In Old Kentucky" (Rowland Clifford. Gatts, 
Inc.. mgrs.) — Paducab, Ky.. Duquoln. 111.. 
IS: Centralis. 19: Springfield, 20: Deca- 
tur. 21 : Lincoln. 22. 

Hajoa. Mltxi (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — 

Colonial. Boston, 15-20. 
"It Pavs to Advertise" (Cohan ft Harris, 

mKTs.") — Oakland. Cal, 18-20. 
"In for the Night" (Empire Prod. Corp., 

mgrs.) — Fulton. New York, lndef. 
"Innocent Sinner. The" (John Raftery. mgr.) 

— Duquesne. Pittsburgh. 15-27. 
"Ikey and Abev (Geo. H. Bnbb. msr.) — Eagle 
Grove. la.. 17 : Jewell. 19 : Hampton. 19 : 
Waterloo. 20 : Jessup. 22 : Manchester. 2S : 
Central City. 24 ; Ana mesa. 2."i ; Maquo- 
keta. 26. 
"Just a Woman" — St. Louis. 15-20. 



"Katlnka" (Arthur Hammersteln, mgr.) — 

Memphis, Tenn, 18-21. _^ 

"Lodger, The" — Maxine Elliotts. New York, 

lndef. 
"Love o' Mike" (Elizabeth Marbnry, mgr.) — 

Sbubert, New York, 15, lndef. 
"Little Women" (Wm. A. Brady, mgr.) — 

Poll's, Washington, 15-20. 
"Little Peggy CMoore," Eaaton Co. (Na- 
- tional Prod. Co., Inc., mgrs.) — Richmond, 

Utah, 17 ; Salt Lake City, 18-20. 
"Little Cafe, The" (Philip H. Nlven, mgr.) — 
Norfolk, va, IT ; Richmond. 1 8 ; Char- 
lottesville, 19 ; Staunton, 20 ; Roanoke. 22 ; 
Blueneld, W. Va, 23 ; Lynchburg, Va.. 24 ; 
Raleigh. N. C. 25: Rocky Mount, 26. 
Maude, Cyril— AsbevUle, N. C 23. 
Montgomery ft Stone — Indianapolis, 15-20. 
"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 

mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, lndef. 
"Miss Springtime" (Klaw ft Erlanger, mgr.) 

— New Amsterdam, New York, lndef. 
"Miss Springtime," No. 2 Co. (Klaw ft Er- 
langer, mgrs.) — Tremont, Boston, lndef. 
"Merry Wives of Windsor" (Sylvlo Heln, 

mgr.) — -Park, New York, lndef. 
"Montana (Bankson ft Morris, mgrs.) — 
Midland, Tex, 17: Big Springs. 18; Ros- 
coe, 19; Sweetwater, 20; Merkle, 22; 
Abellne. 23 ; Anson, 24 ; Haskell, 25 ; Sey- 
mour, 26; Olney, 27. 
"Million Dollar Doll," Eastern Co. (Harvey 
D. Orr. mgr.)— Elklns, W. Va, 17; Oak- 
land, Md., 18; Falrmount, W. Va., 19; 
Uniontown. Pa., 20 ; Washington, 22 ; 
Waynesburg. 23; Wheeling. W. Va., 24; 
Stenbenvllle. O, 25 ; Cambridge, 26 ; 
Marietta, 27. 
"Mother Love" (A. G. Delamater, mgr.) — 

Montreal, Can., 15-20. 
Nazlmova — Princess, New York, lndef. 
O'Hara. Fiske — Standard. New York, 15-20. 
"Ob ! Oh ! Delphlne !" — Springfield, Mass, 19- 

20. 
"Only Girl, The" (Joe Weber, mgr.) — Al- 
bany, N. T, 22-24. 
"Other Man's Wife." Eastern Co. (Victor E. 
Lambert, mgr.) — Mecbnnlcsville. N. Y, 18; 
Glen Falls. 19 ; Rutland, Vt.. 29 ; Hooslck 
Falls, N. Y.. 22 : Hndson, 23 ; Foushkeep- 
sie, 24: Kingston, 25; NewburgbT 26; 
Peekskill. 27. 
Post, Guy Bates — Buffalo. N. Y„ 15-20: Lon- 
don, Can., 22 : Hamilton, 23-24 ; Kingston, 
25: Ottawa. 26-27. 
"Pierrot the Prodigal" (Winthrop Ames and 
Walter Knight, mirrs.) — Little. New York, 
lndef. 
"Pollvanna" — Hollls. Boston, lndef. 
"Potash ft Perlmutter In Society" (A. H. 
Woods, mirr. ■ — Cincinnati, 15-20; Louis- 
ville. Ky.. 22-27. 
"Robin Hood" (Walker Stevens Co, mgr.) — 
Ft, Worth. Tex, 17: Longvlew, 18: Paris, 
19 ; Sulphur Springs, 20 : Sbreveport. 22. 
Starr, Frances (David Belasco, mgr.) — Be- 

lasco, New York, lndef. 
StahL Rose (Chas. Frobman, Inc, mgr.) — 
Mobile. Ala.. 17 ; Meridian, Miss, 18 ; 
Vlcksburg. 19 ; Jackson, 20 ; New Orleans, 
La., 21-27. 
Skinner. Otis (Chas. Frobman, Inc, mgrs.) — 
Syracuse. N. Y, 17-18 ; Rochester. 19-20 ; 
Youngstown, O, 22 : Canton, 23 : Ft 
Wayne, Ind, 24; Indianapolis, 25-27. 
Sanderson-Bryan-Cawthorn — Nixon, Pitts- 
burgh, 15-20 : Cleveland, O.. 22-27. 
"So Long Letty" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — - 

Albany. N. Y-. 18-20. 
"Show of Wonders, The" (The Shuberts, 
mgrs.) — Winter Garden. New York lndef. 
"Seven Chances" — Montauk, Bklyn, 22-27. 
"Sonny South (J. C. Rockwell, mgr.) — 
Plattevllle. Wis.. 17 ; Lancaster. 18 ; Dar- 
lington. 19: Lodi. 20: Richland Center. 22; 
Illllsboro. 23: Tomab. 24; Sparta, 25: 
Vlroqua, 26 : Galesville, 27. 
'•Step Lively" — Berwick, Pa, 17 : Mt Car- 
mel. IS : Lansford. 19 : Shenandoah. 20 : 
Honesdale. 22: Mlddletown. N. Y„ 23: 
Poughkeepsle. 24 : Beacon, 25 ; Kingston. 
26: PIttsfleld, Mass, 27. 
••Sweethearts" (Chris O. Brown, mgr.) — 

Asbeville. N. C_ 26. 
Tavlor. Laurette (Klaw ft Erlanger ft Geo. 
C. Tvler, mgra.1 — Globe. New York, lndef. 
"The 13th Chair"— Forty-eighth Street New 

York, lndef. 
"Turn to the Right" (Smith ft Golden, mgrs.) 

— Galetv. New York, lndef. 
'•Twin Beds" (A. S. Stern ft Co, mgrs.) — 
Napa. Cal, 17 : Santa Cruz, 18 : Salinas. 
19: San Luis Obispo, 20; Lompoc. 21; 
Santa Maria. 22 ; Santa Barbara. 23 ; Ven- 
tura. 24 : Santa Ana, 25 : San Diego. 26-28. 
— Thelma" (Lee Orland. mgr.) — Napanee, Ind., 
17: Knox. 18: Argos. 19: Logansport 20. 
"Upstairs and Down (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 

—Cort New York, lndef. 
"Unchastened Woman. The" (Oliver Morosco, 

mgr.)— Wilbur. Boston, lndef. 
"Very Good Eddie" (Marbnry. Comstock Co, 

mgrs.)— Adelphl. Pblla, lndef. _ 

Washington Sq. Players — Comedy, New York, 

lndef. 
Warfield. David (David Belasco. mgr.) — 

Knickerbocker. New York, lndef. 
Wilson. AL H. (Sidney R. Ellis, mgr.) — 
Salamanca, N. Y, 18 ; Olean. 19 ; Elmira, 
20 : Ithaca. 22 : Syracuse. 23-24 ; Oswego, 
25: Rochester, 26-27. 
"Wanderer. The" (Elliott, Comstock ft Gest 
mgrs.> — Manhattan O. H, New York, 23, 
lndef. 
"When Dreams Come True" (Coutts ft Ten- 
nis, mgrs.) — Du Bols. Pa-, 17; Punxsa- 
tawney. 18: Clearfield. 19. 
"Yelow Jacket. The" — Harris, New York, ln- 
def. _ 
"You're In Love" (Arthur • Hammersteln, 

mgr.) — Albany. N. Y, 17. 
"Zlegfeld's Follies- — Illinois, Chicago. lndef. 
International Circuit. 



Boyer, Nancy — Somervllle, N. J, 17 : New- 
ton, 18 ; Stroudsburg, 19 ; Franklin, Fur- 
nace, 20. 

"Broadway After Dark" — Lexington, New 
York, 15-20. 

"Bringing Up Father" — Boyd's, Omaha, 14- 
20; Imperial, Chicago, 21-27. 

"Bringing Up Father" — Worcester, Mass., 15- 
20. _ 

"Come Back to Erin" — Castle Sq, Boston, 
15-20. 

Emmett, Grade — Cleveland, O, 15-20. 

Ellnore, Kate — Auditorium, Baltimore. 15-20. 

"Girl Without a Chance" — Gotham, Bklyn., 
15-20. 

"Girl He Couldn't Buy" — Indianapolis, 15-20. 

"Gua Hill'a Follies" — National, Chicago, 15- 
20. 

"Hour of Temptation" — New Orleans, La, 
15-20 ; Birmingham. Ala, 22-27. 

"Little Girl In a Big City" — Jersey City, 
N. J, 15-20. 

"Little Peggy CMoore" — Toledo. O, 15-20. 

"Mutt ft Jeff's Wedding" — Grand O. H, 
Bklyn.. 15-20. „ _. _ 

"Mutt ft Jeff's Wedding" — Memphis, Tenn., 

"My "Mother's Bosary" — Bronx, New York, 

15-20. 
"Old Homestead, The" — Orpheum, Pblla, 

15-20. 
"Pretty Baby" — Birmingham, Ala, lo-20. • 
"Peg o' My Heart" — Pittsburgh, 15-20. 
Thurston — Richmond, Va, 15-20; Polia, 

Washington, 22-27. . „„ 

"That Other Woman" — St. Louts, 15-20. 
"Which One Shall I Marry" — Walnut, Phlla, 

15-20. 

STOCK AND REPERTOIRE ROUTES 

Permanent and Traveling 

; Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass, lndef. 

American Players — Spokane, Wash, lndef. 

Academy Players— Halifax, N. S, Can, ln- 
def. 

Auditorium Players — Maiden. Mass, indef. 

All Star Stock — New Bedford. Mass, lndef. 

Angell Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.)— Park, 
Pittsburgh, lndef. 

Angell Stock No. 2 (Ike Jutras, mgr.) — 
Sbarpsburg, Pa., lndef. 

Angell'a Comedians (Blllle O. Angell, mgr.) — 

Austin, Mildred, Stock — Birmingham. Ala, 
lndef. 

Balnbrldge Players— Minneapolis, lndef. 

Burbank Players — Los Angeles, indef. 

Broadway Players — Portsmouth, O, IndeL 

Bayley, J. WUlard, Players— Belolt, Wis, in- 

Blye, Browne, Rep. Co. (Jack Moore, mgr.) — 
Newark, O, lndef. _ „ ___»• 

Bishop, Chester, Players — Grand Rapids, 
Mich, lndef. _ . _ 

Bicknell-Gibney Stock — Oak Park. LU.. ln- 
def 

Bunting. Emma, Stock— San Antonio, Tex., 
indef. 

Coburn-Pearson Players — St Cloud, Minn, 
lndef. _ , . . 

Denham Stock— Denver, indef. . 

Dublnsky Stock (Ed. Dublnsky, mgr.) — St 
Joseph, Mo, lndef. 

Dally Ted, Stock — Hutchinson. Kan, lndex. 

Demlng, Lawrence. Theatre Co. — Sheridan, 
Wyo, lndef. . _ ' 

Davis Stock (A. W. Friend, mgr.) — Coalton, 
Fa^ 15-20. _, , . , 

Elsmere Stock — Elsmere. Bronx, lndef, 

Eckbardt, Oliver, Players — Begins, Sasfc, 

Emerson Pbiyere— Lowell. Mass, Indef. 

Empire Players — Salem. Mass, indef. 

Empire Players (C. A. McTlghe, mgr.)— 
Pittsburgh. Pa, indef. _ _ 

Fifth Ave, Stock (Jacques E. Horn, mgr.) — 
Fifth Ave., Bklyn, lndef. . • •■ . . . 

Fleming. Alice, Stock — Portland, Ore., lndef. 

Gordlnier Bros. Stock— Ft. Dodge, la, indef. 

Hyperion Players — New Haven. Conn, lndef. 

Hathaway Players— Brockton. Mass, indef. 

Harper Players. No. 2 Co. (Robert J. Sher- 
man, mgr.) — Pt. Huron, Mich, lndef. 

Home, Col. \F. V, Stock — Akron. O.. lndef. 

Uillman Ideal Stock (Harry Sohns, mgr.)— 
Centralis. Kan.. 15-17; Frankfort 1820; 
Jamestown. 22-24. ___, __ 

Jewett. Henry. Players — Copley. Boston, ln- 
def. rmr- 

Keith's Hudson Theatre Stock— "Union HitC 
N. J, lndef. 

Kelly Bros. Stock — Lansing. Mich, indef. 

Knickerbocker Stock (Geo. Barbler, mgr.) — 
Knickerbocker. Phlla, lndef. 

Kirk, Kitty. Stock — Portsmouth, O, lndef. 

Lawrence. Del, Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Ludlow, Wanda, Players — Covingtoii, Ky, In- 
Lyric' Theatre. Stock — Phoentr. Ariz, lndef. 

Logsdon, Oily, Stock — Lancaster. Pa,, lndef. 

Lonergan Players (E. V, Phelan, mgr.) — 
Lynn. Mass, lndef. 

Lewis ft Oliver Stock (Jack Lewis, mgr.) — 
Kankakee, 111., lndef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. 

Mozart Players (Jay Packard, mgr.) — Elmira. 
N. Y, lndef. 

National Musical Stock (C. R. Hagedorn, 
mgr.) — Detroit Mlcb, lndef. 

National Stock (F. B. Cole, mgr.) — Minne- 
apolis, lndef. _., „ ... 

Nestell Players— Jefferson City, Mo, lndef. 

Northampton Players — Northampton, Mass., 
lndef. 

New Strand Stock — Mobile, Ala., lndef. 

Orpheum Players — Beading, Pa., lndef. 

Oliver Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace. 
mgr.» — Lafayette. Ind, lndef. 

Overholser 8tock— Okla. City, Okla, lndef. 
Princess Stock — Sioux City, la., lndef. 
Players Stock — Players. St Louis, lndef. 
Park. Edna, Stock — Tampa, Fla, lndef. 
Poll Stock — Scranton. Fa., lndef. 



Spooner, Cecil, Stock — Lawrence, Mass, In- 
dex. 
Shubert Stock — Milwaukee, lndef. 
Sbubert Stock — St Paul, lndef. _ 
Somervllle Theatre Players — Somervllle. 

Mass., lndef. 
St. Clair, Winifred, Stock (Earl Slpe, mgr.) 

— Paterson, N. J, lndef. 
Shubert ft Williams Stock — Waltham. Mas;., 

lndef. 

Sherman Kelly Stock — Ean Claire. Wis, 14- 

20; Wausau, 22-27. 
Temple Stock — Ft Wayne, Ind., lndef. 
Turner-Hammond Players (Jim Hammond, 

mgr.) — New London, Conn., index. 
Van Dyke ft Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.)— 

Tulsa, Okla., lndef. _ . , 

Wilkes Players — Seattle. Wash, lndef. 
Wilkes Players — Salt Lake City. Utah, lndef. 
Wallace, Chester, Players — Butler, Fa., lndef. 
Wallace, Morgan. Flayers— 
Wilcox Stock— Mt Vernon, N. Y, 15-20 
Williams, Ed, Stock — Omaha, Neb, lndei. 
Williams. Ed, Stock — Elkhart Ind, lndef. 
Wight Bros. Theatre Co. (Hllllard Wight. 

mgr.)— Pender, Neb, 15-20 ; Randolph, 

22-27. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

Deloy's Dainty Dudlnea (Eddie Deloy, mgr.). 

Enterprise Stock (Normand Hllyard. mgr.) — ■ 

Enterprise Stock. No. 2 Co. (Norman Hll- 
yard, mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. 

Gracey's Colonial Maids — Martlnsburg, W. 
Va. lS-^O 

Hyatt ft LeNore Miniature M. C. Co. (T. H. 
Hyatt mgr.). London, Can, tndet. 

Kilgare's Comedians — Cincinnati. O, inder. 

Lord ft Vernon M. C. Co.— Clarksburg, W. 

Linton's Musical Revue (C. B. Wilson, mgr.) 
— Paragould, Ark, 15-20: Rector. 22-27. 

March's M. C. Co.— Dover, N. J, 15-20 ; Mer- 
iden. Conn, 22-27. „__ 

"Pink Pelican, The"— Butler, Pa, 15-l"-_ 

ReUly'a, Fox, Globe Trottere — Danville, Va, 
15-20. _ , 

Sub-Marine Girls (Mereereau Bros, ™grs.)— 
Memphis. Tex, 15-20; Childress. 22-27. 

Stewart Walter J, Stock (Stewart ft Good- 
win, mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. _. , , . 
Soladar7 Chas, ft Brlnkley Girls— Lynch- 

" Subside" of Broadway" (Boyle ^oolfolk. 

mcr >— Ft Dodge, la, 14-17 : Waterloo, 

18^20: Davenport, 21-24; Galesburg, 25-27. 
Topsev Turvey Girls (Kelly ft Arton, mgrs.) 

i-Johnsonburg, Pa, 17 ; St Marys. 18; 

Emporium. 19: Benova, 20: Lock Haven, 

•>2 • Jersey Shore, 23 ; Wllliamsport 24 : 

Muncy. 26: Milton. 27. . 

Thomas M. C. Co.— New Bedford. Mass., 15- 

07 
Walker Musical ft Lady Minstrels— Klnston. 

N. C, 15-17 ; Goldsboro, 18-20 ; Greensboro. 

00.07 
Zarrow's American Girl— Andcrsonvllle, S. C 

15-20: Spartanburg. 22-27. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack FuQaaJ. 

mgr.)— Greensboro, N. C, 15-20; Raleigh, 

00.27. 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St, 7 A. M. to » P. M. 

and at Midnight with Sleepers 

II MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. 23d St 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY. E. P. Agent 

144* BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

3* inch tajm ■ * md> *2M« 

J2 inch UJ» » inch Z*J» 

34 inch li.M ! «• inch tWi 



42 inch. 



.IZLS* 



WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

145 W. 4Sth St, N. Y. 4 W. 22d St, N. Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mall Order* FQled Sum Day Received 
SS Deposit Required 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



Zarrow*« Variety Review (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 
— Mannln gton, W. Va„ 15-20; Parkera- 
bnrg, 22-27. 

Zarrow'a Passing Revue (Wm. Hill, mgr.) — 
Pittsburgh. 15-20. 

AL G. Field— BlnKhamton, N. T.. 17; Pt. 
Jervls. 18 ; Mfddletown, 19 : Ponghkeepsle, 
20 ; Hudson, 22 ; Schenectady, 23 ; Amster- 
dam, 24; Troy, 25: Albany, 26-27. 

O'Brien's, Nell — Atlanta, Ga., 17; Birming- 
ham, Ala., 18; Selma, Ala., 19; Merld'an. 
Miss.. 20; New Orleans. La.. 21-27. 

BURLESQUE 

Colombia Wheel 

Al Beeves' Big Beanty Show — Gaiety, De- 
troit, 15-20 : Gaiety, Toronto, Oot., 22-27. 
Bellman Show — Bercbel, Des Moines, Iowa, 

15-17: Gaiety, Omaha, Neb., 22-27. 
Ben Welch's— Lnmberg. TJOca, 18-20; Gaiety, 

Montreal, Can., 22-27. 
Bon Tons — Gaiety, Montreal, Can., 15-20; 

Empire, Albany, N. Y., 22-27. 
Boston lacs — Empire, Newark, N. J., 15-20 ; 

Casino. Philadelphia. 22-27. 
Bowery Burlesquers — Gaiety, Washington, D. 

C, 15-20: Gaiety, Pittsburg. 22-27. 
Burlesque Review — Gaiety, Pittsburg, Pa., 

15-20: Star, Cleveland. O., 22-27. 
Follies of the Day — Jacques, Waterbury. Ct, 

15-20 : Cohen's, Newburg, N. Y., 22-24 ; 

Cohen's, Poughkeepsle, N. Y., 25-27. 
Globe Trotters — Gaiety. Omaha, Neb., 15-20 ; 

open 22-27 : Gaiety, Kansas City, 29-Feb. 3. 
Golden Crooks — Casino, Boston, 15-20 ; 

Colombia. New York. 22-27. 
Hastings Show — Harris & Seamon's, New 

York. 15-20; OrpbeumJ Paterson, N. J., 

22-27. 
"Hello, New York"— Gaiety, St. Louis, 15-20 ; 

Columbia, Chicago, 22-27. 



HIp-Hlp-Hooray Girls — Casino, Philadelphia, 

15-20 : Hnrtlg ft Seamon's. N. Y., 22-27. 
Howe's Kissing Girls — Gaiety, Boston, 15-20; 

Grand, Hartford, Ct. 22-27. 
Irwin's Big 8how — People's, Philadelphia, 

15-20 ; Palace, Baltimore, 22-27. 
Liberty Girls — Colombia, New York, 15-20; 

Casino, Brooklyn, N. Y„ 22-27 
Maids of America — Lyric, Dayton, O., 15-20; 

Olympic, Cincinnati 22-27. 
Majesties — Empire, Hoboken. N. J., 15-20 : 

Peoples, Philadelphia, 22-27. 
Marlon's Big Show — Park, Bridgeport, 18-20; 

Colonial, Providence, K. I., 22-27. 
Merry Rounders — Columbia, Chicago, 15-20 ; 

Berche], Des Moines, Iowa, 21-23. 
Midnight Maidens — Gaiety. Toronto. Can., 

15-20 : Gaiety, Buffalo, N. Y., 22-27. 
Million Dollar Dolls — Gaiety, Buffalo. N. Y., 

15-20: Corinthian, Rochester, N. Y., 22-27. 
Molly Williams' Show — Orpbeum, Paterson, 

15-20; Empire, Hoboken. N. J., 22-27. 
New York Girls— Miner's Bronx. Xcw York, 

15-20 : Empire, Brooklyn. 22-27. 
"Puss Pass" — Corinthian, Rocbcster. N. Y., 

15-20: Bastable, Syracuse. X. Y.. 22-24; 

Lumberg, Utlca. 25-27. 
Rng Doll In Ragland — Olympic, Cincinnati, 

15-20 : Star and Garter, Chicago. 22-27. 
Roseland Girls— Cohen's, Poucbkecpsie, 18- 

20; Miner's Bronx, New York. 22-27. 
Rose Sydell London Belles — Empire, Albany, 

N. Y„ 15-20; Gaiety, Boston, 22-27. 
Sidman's Show — Star and Garter. Chicago, 

15-20; Gaiety, Detroit, 22-27. 



Sightseers — open, 15-20 ; Gaiety, K*n—i City. 

22-27. 
Some Show — Colonial, Providence, R. I., 15- 

20 : Casino, Boston, 22-27. 
Spiegel's Revue — Empire, Toledo. O., 15-20 : 

Lyric, Dayton. O- 22-27. 
Sporting Widows — Palace, Baltimore, 15-20 ; 

Gaiety, Washington, D. C, 22-27. 
Star and Garter — Grand, Hartford. Ct,. 15- 

20; Jacques, Waterbury, Ct., 22-27. 
Step Lively Girls — Empire, Brooklyn, 15-20: 

Park, Bridgeport. Ct,. 22-27. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Gaiety. Kansas 

City, 15-20; Gaiety, St, Louis. 22-27. 
Watson's Beef Trust — Casino, Brooklyn, 15- 

20; Empire. Newark, N. J, 22-27. 
Watson-Wrothe — Star, Cleveland, O., 15-20 ; 

Empire, Toledo, O., 22-27. 

American Circuit 

Americans — Gaiety, Milwaukee, 15-20 ; 

Gaiety. Minneapolis, 22-27. 
Anto Girls — Gaiety, Brooklyn, 15-20 ; 

Academy, Jersey City, 22-27. 
Beauty, Youth and Folly — Trenton. N. J.. 

18-20: Star. Brooklyn. N. Y.. 22-27. 
Big Review of 1917 — Majestic, Scran ton. Pa., 

15-20 : Gaiety, Brooklyn. N. Y.. 22-27. 
Broadway Belles — Worcester, 18-20: Amster- 
dam. N. Y., 22-23 ; Hudson. Schenectady, 

N. Y., 24-27. 
Charming Widows — Trocadero. Philadelphia, 

15-20; Mt. Carmel. Pa.. 22; Shenandoah, 

23; Wllkesbarre, 24-27. 



HEADLINE ACTS 



Cherry Blossoms— Gaiety, Philadelphia, 15- 
20; Olympic, New York. 22-27. 

Darlings of Parts — Standard, St Louis, Mo., 
15-20; Terre Hante. Ind.. 22-24. 

Follies of Pleasure — Star, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
15-20; Holyoke, Mass, 22-24 ; Springfield, 
25-27. 

French Frolics— Howard, Boston. 15-20 ; 
New Bedford, 22-24 ; Worcester, Mass, 
25-27. 

Frolics of 1016 — Terre Haute, Ind., 15-17 ; 
Gaiety, Chicago, 22-27. 

Ginger Girls — Park. Youngstown. O., 18-20; 
Penn Circuit 22-27. 

Girls from Joyland — Englewood, Chicago, 15- 
20; Gaiety. Milwaukee. Wis., 22-27. 

Girls from the Follies — Star. St Paul. Minn.. 
15-20; open 22-27; Century, Kansas City, 
29-Feb. S. 

Grown Up Babies — Majestic, Indianapolis. 
15-20; Buckingham, Louisville. Ky.. 22-27. 

Hello Girls — Olympic, New York, 15-20 ; Ma- 
jestic. Scranton, Pa.. 22-27. 

Hello Parts — Akron, 18-20 ; Empire. Cleve- 
land. 22-27. 

High Life Girls — Wllkesbarre. 18-20: South 
Bethlehem. Pa.. 22 ; Easton, Fa., 23 ; Tren- 
ton, N. J- 25-27. _ . , „ . 

Lady Buccaneers — Empire, Cleveland, O.. 8- 
13 ; Erie. Pa.. 22-25 ; Ashtabula. O.. 24 : 
Park. Youngstown, O., 25-27. 

Lid Lifters— Gaiety. Chicago, 15-20; Majes- 
tic. Indianapolis. Ind.. 22-27. 

Mllltarv Maids — Lyceum. Columbus, O., 15- 
20 : Newark, O., 22 : Zacesville, 23 ; Can- 
ton, 24; Akron. 25-27. 

Mischief Makers — International. Niagara 
Falls. 18-20 : Star, Toronto. Ont. 22-27. . 

Monte Carlo Girls— Hudson, Schenectady. N. 
Y.. 17-20: Rlngbamtou. N. Y.. 22-23; 
Om-ldu. 24 : International. Niagara Falls. 
N. Y.. 25-27. 



R. EDDIE 



TEDDIE A. 



GREENLEE and DRAYTON 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

Direction MORRIS AND FEIL 



THE NELSON FAMILY 

Vaudeville's Unique Animal Novelty 

RATS AND CATS 



DIRECTION ROSE * CURTIS 



IRELAND'S FAVORITE SON 

BARRY McCORMACK & CO. 

In "YOU CAN'T BEAT THEM," by Albert Cowles 

Direction CHAS. F1TZPATRICK 



AL 



JOE 



CONRAD ^d CONLEY 

v " ou * In Vaudeville PIANO 



SHIP AHOY, BOYS! 



SPILLING THE BEANS 



joe COOPER and H ARTM AN belle 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



TOM 



Two Boys from Italy. 



FRED 

and ARNOLD 

Playing U. B. O. Time 



F>ATE FAMILY 

in a High-Class Musical Act. U. B. O. 

LES VALDOS 

Hindu Hokum 

PETE MACK-CHI EF YOGI 

HSHER & ROCKWAY 

DELINEATORS OF THE SOUTHERN NEGRO 

BIG CH1F.F-CHAS. B1ERBAUER 

BOOKED SOLID UNTO. IS* — — 

AL HARRIS and GRACE LYMAN 

A VERITABLE PAIR 

PERSONAL DIRECTION HURTIC * SEAMON NOW PLAYING LOEW TIME 



TUDrr AaTTTC BETTER THAN 

1 rTrvH,H ALLj two pair 
Hall, Ellsworth & Merrick 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DIRECTION LEW I.BS1JK 



PENN CITY TRIO 

FRED WILHELM ARTHUR HUMBURG AL. GEORGE 

In Splaahea of 

Harmony Singing, Comedy, Dancing, and Music 
Ask any Real Agent 



HARRY 



FLORR1E 



HOLMES & LE VERE 



BOOKED SOLID 



"In Themselves" 

DIRECTION ARTHUR J. HOROWITZ 



THE ORIGINAL BOZO 

BOB A BLANCHE 

N 
D 

PRESENTING 

THE NEW JAIVITOR 



HAROLD ALICE 

LA COSTE and CLIFTON 

IN VAUDEVILLE. Direction A J. HORWITZ 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY 



IN 



a 



Jests & Jigs 1 

BY TOMMY CRAY 



»» 



BROWN and McCORMACK 

In Vaudeville 



BERT 



GRACE 



CHADWICK | TAYLOR 



America's Youngest Colored Entertainers. 



Direction TOM JONES 



MURPHY & Eddie KLEIN 

In a blend of Mirth, Melody and Music 

DIRECTION IRVING COOPER 
JAS. B. ~ STANFORD 

ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



PLAYOiC LOEW TIME 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDOftF 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



A NEW SONG OF THE "OLDEN DAYS" 



"IN THE SWEET LONG AGO 

The best (uirutM wo can give U that tiu» so ng waa w ritten by th e writers of "There'* ■ Quaker Down is Qulurtawn." 

An Oremight Sensation 

"THOSE HAWAIIAN MELODIES' 9 



99 



This m| cma be — 1 try mar AtyU el act 
Our New March Song 



» 



"THAT GIRL OF MINE 

Br WILL A. DILLON, HARRY TOBIAS, ARTHUR LANCE 
Wa have groan yon such march sons; hita aa "Orange Blossom Time in Lot-eland" and ".hut One Day." Get That Girl of Mine,'* and judge for yourself. 

"THO' PM NOT THE FIRST TO 
CALL YOU SWEETHEART 



(PLEASE LET ME BE THE LAST)" 

By BERNIE GROSSMAN and ARTHUR LANCE 

If yon use a Ballad you need this song in your act. 
Mr. Milt Sterans, our r e p res e nt a t ive, is at Continental Hotel, San Francisco, and will be pleased to teach yo- any of our numbers. 

145 W. 45th St. 
• 3 NEW YORK CITY 

MIKE L. MORRIS, GenL Mar- JOE HOLLANDER, Prof. Mgr. 

Chicago: Grand Opera House BMg. Philadelphia: 136 North 9th Street Boston: 230 Tremont Street 



JOE MORRIS IV1USIG OO 



WALTER WILSON 



ARCHIE FLETCHER 



JACK MENDELSOHN 



FAY TEMPLETON 



BmrnmnamMMmBBu^mammm 

--:•■:■ i •:•■ i'i \T^V£v.ssa an . 



SHOW PRINTERS. 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 
ENGRAVERS 



National 



PRINTING & 



NEW YORK. 



ENCRAVIMI 



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ARTISTS' REPRESENTATIVE * PRODUCER 



Palace Theatre Bid*. 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. r AUL KEITH. rYuHit. B, P. ALB EB. Vlce-Prs*. a, Cea. Mar. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



FRANK W. McKEE 

the composer of the famous "Cecile" Waltz, has written a wonderful ballad entitled 

THE MIRACLE OF LOVE 

We wish you could hear it just once because it would mean so much more than anything we could say in an ad. We are 
sure that it is the song for you and that it will "go over big" the first time you try it. It's the song for any audience ' 
anywhere, like "The Rosary." Full of melody with a fine climax. Give us your range and we shall 
gladly send you free of charge a copy of the song with orchestration. 

G. SGHIRMER, (inc.) 



3 East 43d Street 



New York 



T h o Qroa-tos* of A I I Goo. M. OoKan S o n K t 

THERE'S ONLY ONE LITTLE GIRL 

We have a wonderful double for this song — also a brand new Statue of Liberty version — that will lift the audience out of their seats. 

We also publish— "Erin is Calling"— "That Old New England Town"— and "Turn to the Right." 

?RY TIERNEY 



OUR TWO STAR RESTRICTED NUMBERS 



fc ^!8£s"' "SOME TIME" and 



f~».» ww. fiC |y|.|«s.s-l-S-S-l-P-P-l " 



Sensatjorj 



Sung ha Rack * White'. Act 



PUBLISHED BY 



Tha WILLIAM JEROME PUBLISHING CO., ""SS^jrA*™ Broadway and 47th St., Ni* York 



WANTED for COMPTON PLUMB STOCK CO. 



Send late photos. 
Address HAL. H. 



Rep. and Stock People in all lines with feature specialties. 
State real age; join on wire. Walter Boggs, write or wire. 
PLUMB, Hammond, Indiana. 

WANTED QUICK 5 CUTTER STOCKCO. 

Young, Versatile Ingenue Leading Woman. Must have appearance, ability and wardrobe. Do not 
misrepresent, as we are breaking house records and desire to continue doing so. 

PLAYS STAGED BY J. BERNARD HURL 

Send Photos, Programs, Age, Sixe. Address WALLACE R. CUTTER, week Jan. 15, Susquehanna, 
fa.: week Jan. 22, Bath, N. Y.; week Jan. 29, DansviUe, N. Y. 



Tenney 



Can yon use an act, sketch, or monologue- that win command the applause of the 
audience, the approval of the managers, the route from the office, and the salary 
yon desire. Write, 'phone or call, and let's get acquainted with each other. 
AT.T.TH SPENCER TENHZY. Putnam Bide., Suite 421, 1*33 Broadway, V. T. City. 



PARKER'S 

JUMPING HORSE, 



CARRY OS ALL 



■irii»ii«r: l .M,ri-jii|in^i 
i .- — - . - ... . , • 



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The only ski— itul portaoia Carry TJs an on the 
snarkat- And tha greatest mosey maker In the 
amusement world, writ* for facta and flam as, 

C. W. PARKER, Leavenworth, Kaa. 

OiH.8. Tyler, 8th flocr, Bessemer Building, Pitts. 
sergu. Pa. Ohsa. afdanald. Room 6. 1604 B ia a d 
-way. Hew York City. 



AT LIBERTY 

ART GRANDI 

Versatile Gen. Box. Age SO yra. HL 5 ft. 8 In., 
wt 160 Ins. Stock, Bep., or Musical Comedy Bpe- 
dalrlea. 12 years' experience. Address ABT 
GRAHDL e/e Altmayer Eotel, Findlay, Olio. 



SOMETHING NEW AND DIFFERENT 

MY LITTLE GEISHA 

Japanese Ballad with Quartette Arrangement 

Monarch Music Publishers 

M W. Randolph St, Chicago 



PAY DOUBLE 

or evens one hundred times as much, 
and you would get no better material 
than i> in 

THE NEW No. 2 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN 

PRICE S l.OO 

u.ritTT-s BuXLETXaT Bo. t contains IT 
SCREAKTHO atONOLOGTTES. For Hebrew. 
Irish, Black and White race. Dutch, 
Tramp, Wop. Female and Stump Spee ch . 

10 GREAT ACTS FOB TWO KALES. Duo 
act an applause winner. 

S BOABIXO ACTS FOB HALT AJTD IX- 
scav.w They'll make good on any bill. 

88 BlTBX-rTBS PARODIES. On all of 
Broadway's latest Song Bits. 

A COMEDY ■»""" EntlUed "ANXIOCS 
TO GET RICH." It's the FUNNIEST 
SKETCH in Vaudeville. 

atcSALLTS KEBET JUBBXAKLS. Con- 
sisting of six corking FIBST PABTB. end 
Inx with a screaming Finals. "NOT 
OuTXTT." 

A TABLOID OOaCEDT ASD BTTRLXSaTjX, 
entitled "IT'S VOCE WIPE": also hun- 
dreds of Cross-Flre Gaga and Jokea sad 
sddltiensl Comedy Surprises. Reme mber 
the price of afcNAIXY'8 BULLETIN No. 
2 is only OBTE DOLLAR par espy, with 
money-back guarantee. 

WM. McfiALLT. 81 L 12Stfc Sl. New Tor* I 



24th Year. Summer & Winter. Now Fourth Month. TuLut, Old*. 

VAN DYKE AND EATON STOCK CO. 

WANT— "STOCK PEOPLE"— ALL LINES 

Pianist (Union) Man to play small parts. Bosnia Artist to play parts. Mag ComptsU Company for 

"tent" show opening In April, vaudeville acts te double, privilege men. concessions, boas canvas map, 

operator with picture machine and novelty feature.. (Jlmmle James, and Jame W. Street, write.) 

Address "Grand" Opera Hoaae — Tulsa, Oklahoma. 



THE CLEANEST ACT ON THE BOX 

•JOE TOWLJE 

•topped the show at the ROYAL last week (Jan. S) and is at the COLONIAL 
this week (Jan. 15) 

LEO FITZGERALD. VaudwvflW Broker 



CENTRAL TRUNKS 

26 in., sil.50; 28 In.. S14JJ0: S2 In.. 113.50: 38 In.. 114.50: 40 In., »10.0O. Cirrus Trunk*. 34x18x18, 
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of 83, balance O. O. D., except over 800 mils., then remit tha whole amount, 
CENTRAL TRUNK FACTORY. Est. 1864. SIMONS A CO.. 8. W. cor. Tin and Arch Streets. Philadelphia. 



SPECIAL Al>JlVOUl\JCEMElVT 
JEANETTE DUPRE. Inc. 

124 w. 4Str. St. New York 

Gowns, Lingerie, Furs 

ADELE, late Flit h Ave., wUI show SMABT HATS and HAND BASS 



VAUDEVILLE SPECIALTIES, REVUES, etc. Produced By 

CHARLES BARON 

110 W. 48th St., New York 
Sab Producer tt Tn. Brnadwar Rswaw* at Black Cat, Havana. Cube. 

PETERSON, FIELDS and MORRISON 

Delineators of Mc*dera Melodies 



SONGWRITERS 



*»■ *****— atoaaaia** fl'IfHal UM. *dk*J, FAA, fA. f- • mw ataaa. cxafaU^aaa sasM ■ I !■ I — ■ _. ^TTT^Tl 

rr46DiMraaa<r Mbr^Maala. ST AST SIGHT. *-* m — *j — h ^Z^^SZtf^™ TEEi^ ^°*™m 

r^ICKERBOCKER STUDIOS,i27 Gaiety Theatre Building, fl. T. City 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



U. B. O. CIRCUIT 

III TOSK CITY. 

Palace— Koaloff Ballet — Montgomery ft Perry — 
Jasper. (Six to fill.) 

Colonial— Regal ft Bender — Herbert's Doge— 
Shields — Remple Sisters — Primrose roar — Peacock 
Aiier. 

Alhambr* — McSbane ft Hathaway — Leo Beers — 
Dunedln Duo — Cnaa. * Fannie Uaber — "Girlies' 
Gambol" — Joe Fanton ft Co.— Once DeMar. 

Bivs nlrt e Mrs. Gene Hughes— R. * a. Dooley 
—Fay Templeton — Muriel Window — "Creation" — 
Blossom Seeley ft Co. — Moran * Wiser. 

Royal — Leipzig — Adams ft Murray — Cycling 
Brunettes. 

BROOKLYN. 

Bnshwick — Budlnoff — Bob Albright — "What 
Happened to Roth?" — FlavUle — Batter Bros. — 
Brenmu it Powell— Nina Payne at Co. — Florrle 
Mlllersnlp — Mrs. Taos. Wblffen — Clark ft Bergman 
— Jam. J. Morton, 

Orphenm— Pinkie — Cartmell ft Harris — Benee 
Florigny — Bonlta ft Heam — Willie Weaton — Frank 
ft Toby — Valerie Bergere Co. — Bert Melrose — Marie 
Nordetrom — Sevan Bracks— Tack Wilson ft Co. 
ATLANTA, A. 

Forsyth— Chick Bale— Four Paldrons— Ed. Mor- 
ton— WlUlng, Bsntley ft Willing. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Keith's— Lloyd ft Brltt— Edwin George — Gygl ft 
Tadla — Marx Bros. — DeForeat ft Kesraa — Mllo — 
Victor Motley ft Co.— Mosber, Hsyea ft Moaber. 

BIB-MINQHAM, ALA. 
Lyric (drat Halt) — Wclae Troupe — Broadway 
Bevue. (Laat Half) — Dong Pong One ft Haw — 
Venlta Gould — Conroy ft O'Donnell — Weston ft 
Claire. 

BUFFALO, BT. Y. 
Shea.' a — Dooley ft Huge) — Br Ice ft King — EUna 
Manaey — Wilfred Clark ft Co.— Terada Bros. — 
Dare Eotb — Albertina Baach. 

BALTIMORE, MB. 
Maryland — Minnie Allen — Dully ft Daisy — Hunt- 
ing ft Francla — Moon ft Morris — McCarthy ft Pay — 
"Sport In the Alps" — Jas. Canon ft Co. 
CLEVELAND, OHIO. 
Keith's— Lovenberg Sisters — Lew Holts— Julie 
Ring ft Co. — Leach Wallen Trio — Merrlan'a Dogs 
— Bddle Foy ft Co. 

CTNCTNNATT, OHIO. 
Keith's— J. O. Nugent ft Co. — Cbaa. L. Fletcher 
—Three Alex— 8hattuck ft Golden — Will Oakland 
ft Co. — Br* Tanguay — Australians Crelghtona. 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

Xeith'e— Frank Crnmlt— Page. Back ft Mack— 
Valentine ft BeU— Nevlns ft Brwood. (Last Half) 
— Skipper, Kennedy ft Beerea— Oscar Lorraine — 
Cecil Weaton ft Co. 

CHARLOTTE, N. O. 

Fledmont — Herbert OermaJn Three. (Laat 
Half)— Oaach Slaters— A. * O. Terry— Ethel Mc- 
Dooongh — Win. Ebba. 

COLUMBUS. OHIO. 

Keith's— "Prosperity"— Kelly ft Qalrin— Frank 
LeDent^Ieck ft Besala Morgan — Julian Rose — 
Three Bennett Slaters— Majhew ft Taylor— Alaska 
Trio. 

CHARLESTON. S. O. 

Academy (Pint Half)— LewN ft White. (Last 

Half) — Fern ft Davie — Kantnfn Jsps. 
DAYTON. OHIO. 

Keith's "At toe Party"— Capt. Anson ft 

Daughter — Edwin Arden ft Co. — Toner ft Norman 
— Blcknell — Bolger Bros. — Dainty Marie— Mlreno 
Bros.— Swor ft Avery. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Temple — Bradna ft Derrick — Marshall Montgom- 
ery — David Saplrateln — Belle Kaker — Wilson ft 
McNallys— Hooper ft Marbnry— Plstel ft Cnablng. 
ERIE. PA. 
Colonial— Wm. ft Marie Cutty— Marie Stoddard 
— Dan Bnrka ft Girls— Avellng ft Lloyd— Hyman 
Adler ft Co. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Empreei— Nan Halpcrln — Barley ft Barley — Onrl 
ft Dolly — Shannon ft Annla — Loula Hardt — Dugen 
ft Baymond — Dyer ft Pay. 

HAMILTON, CAN. 
Temple— La Palerlea — Msck ft Walker — Six Mu- 
sical Noraee — Donovan ft Lee — Donnolly ft Doro- 
thy — Clairmont Broa. 

INDIANAPOLIS, DTD. 
Grand — Al Herman — Werner Amorla Troupe — 
Jesn Adslr ft Co. — Klrby ft Borne — Poor Danubea 
—Wood ft Wyde— Ponalllo Slaters— Marble Oems. 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 
Xaith'a (Pint Half)— Kltner. Taylor ft McKay 
—Ward ft Van — Three Bobs. (Laat Half) — Pour 
Entertainers — Carlisle ft Romer — Boaer'a Comedy 
Pets. 

KNoxvrr.T.E, nrs. 

Grand — Skipper. Kennedy ft Reeves — Oscar Lor- 
nine — Cecil Weston * Co. (Laat Half) — Frank 
Crumlt— Page. Hack ft Mack— Valentine ft Bell— 
Nevlns ft Erwood. 

LOUISVILLE, XT. 
Keith's— Bensee ft Balrd — Gordon ft Bice — Cole, 
Russell ft Davis— Penton ft Green— Delay Jean — 
Three Jahna — TravlUa Bros. 

MONTREAL. CAS. 
Orphenm — World Dancers— Geo. M. Bosener — 
Three Hlckey Broa. — Ona Clayton Co. 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 
Priaeaaa (First Half) — Done Pong Gue A Haw 
— Venlta Gould — Conroy ft O'Donnell — Weston ft 
Claire. (Laat Half) — Welse Troupe — " B roa d way 
Bout," 

PROVIDENCE, B. L 
Keith's— The Demaeoe— Nelson Waring— Hamil- 
ton ft Barnes — Harry ft Eva Puck — Maeart A 
Bradford— Chan. Olcott— Mildred Macomber. 
, PITTrlBURGH. PA. 

Davie— Markm Weeks — America Pint— The Bhar- 
rocka — Whitfield ft Ireland — Clark A Hamrttnn, 




T> srTT.«TlrTr.pTrT«, pa. 

Keith's — Jnllns Tannen — Kerr ft Weston — Ellis 
ft Bordonl — Geo. Roseoer— Jordan Girls — Watson 
Sisters — Adelaide ft Hughes — Rath Bros. — Wm. 

Gaxton ft Co. 

ROCHESTER, H. Y. 
Temple — Musical Johnstons — Moore ft Haagcr — 
Elaa Byan ft Co. — Poor Hollowayi — Van ft Bell — 
Scarploff ft Vavan. 

ROANOKE, VA. 
Roanoke (Pint Half)— Gasch Sisters— A. ft O. 
Terry — Ethel McDonough — Wm. Ebbs. (Last 
Half) — Herbert Germain Three. 

SAVANNAH, GA. 
Savannah (Pint Half) — Pom- Entertainers — Car- 
Rale A Romer — Boser*s Comedy Peta. (Last Half) 
— Kltner, Taylor A McKay — Ward A Van. — Three 
Bobs. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith's — White A Cavanaugb — Loney Haskell — 
Santley A Norton— Georgia Baric ft Co. — Smith ft 
Austin — "The Headline™" — Idafilas Troupe — 
Queenle Duncdin. 

TORONTO, OAK. 

Shea's— The Larneds — Althoff Sinters — Tom Ed- 
wards ft Co.— Harry Green & Co.— Will Ward ft 
Gtrla— "Five of Clubs" — Sam ft Kitty Morton — 
H. B. Lester. 

■WASHINGTON, S. O. 

Keith's— Ruth St. Denis — Baymond A O'Connor — 
Gen. Ed. Lavlne — "Night Boat" — Stuart Barnes — 
Wilis Holt Wakefield— Simmons ft Bradley. 
TOUNGBTOWN, OHIO. 

Keith's — Vlollneky— Hugh, Herbert ft Co. — Weber 
ft Dlehl — Knapp ft Cornelia — Leigh ft Jones — 
Welch's Minstrels— Conroy's Models. 
WTLMINOTON, DEL. 

Oarrlok— "Those Five Qlrla"— SkcUy ft Sanvaln 
— Dau-kla's Girls. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Majeitio— Olive Wyndbam A Co. — Allan Dlne- 
hart A Co. — Morton A Glass — Hussey A Wonley — 
Arco Bros. — Alice Lyndon Don A Co. — Ethel Hop- 
kins— Mn. V. Caatle "Patrla." 

Palace — "Bride Shop" — Sarah Padden A Co. — 
Mullen A Coogan — Sherman A Dttry— MlUlcent 
Mower— Brltt Wood. 

CALGARY. CAN. 

Orphenm — Morgan Dancers — Maurice Bnrkhart — 
Benny A Woods — Ryan A Lee — Hubert Dyer A Co. 
— Zeds A Hoot — Henry Keaoe A Go. 
DENVER. COLO. 
Orphenm — Bae Samuels— Maryland Singers — 
"Oautirr'a Toyshop" — Savoy A Brenmn — Six 
Water LilUes— "Lota A Lota of It"— M. Ughtner 
A Alexander. 

DULUTH, MINN. 
Orphenm — Musical Geralds — Misses Csmpbell — 
Harry A Anna Seymour — Pat Barrett — Freak Wil- 
son. 

SES MOINES. IA. 
Orphenm— Bert Leslie A Co.— Mr. & Mn. George 
Wilde — Brent Hayes— Llnne's Dancing Girls— Bert 
Pltaglbbon. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Orphenm — Sophie Tucker — Sarah Padden ft Co. — 
Muriel Worth A Co. — Halllgan A Sykes— Prank 
Carmen — Raymond ft Caverley — Bert Levy. 
LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

Orpheum -Nellie Nichols— Mr. A Mn. Jlmmle 
Barry — Irwin A Henry — The Volnnteera — Muriel 
Worth ft Co.— OUIe Young ft April— Eddie Leonard 
A Co. — Mason A Keeler Co. 

LINCOLN. NEB. 

Orphenm — "Dancing Girl of Delhi" — Bernard A 
Harrington — Kenny ft HoUla— Five Belgium Glrla — 
Nell O'ConnsU— Mme. Dorla— McKay ft Ardene. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Orpheum— Ollvattl. Moffat ft Claire — Emba A 
Alton — Geo. Kelly ft Co, — Lew Dockstader — Whit- 
ing ft Burt — Everett's Monkeys. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Orphenm — Laura Nelson Hall ft Co. — Ks liner ft 
Brown— WlUlama ft Wolfus — Craig Campbell— 
Cantwell ft Walker — Hayden ft Hayden. 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Orpheum — Evana Burrowes Fontaine — Ward Broa. 
— Honey Boys — Duffy ft Lorenxe — Eddie Dowling — 
Nederveld's Bsboona — Kltaro Troupe. 

HEW ORLEANS, LA. •■ 
Orphenm — Hermlne Shone A Co. — "Garden of 
Aloha"— Walter Brower— Oliver A Olp— Brltt Wood 
— Callste Conant— Beeman ft Anderson. 
OMAHA, MSB, 
Orphenm— Clown Seal— John Gelger— "Pishing"— 
Marie sltagibbon— Blgga ft Bjin— "Forest Fire"— 
Pedenen Bros. 

OAKLAND, OAL. 

Orpheam— Donohue A Stewart— Burdella Patter, 
■on — John A Winnie Hennlng — Imhoff. Conn A 
Coreene — Rooney ft Bent— Morrla A Campbell — 
Lambert A Fredericks. 

PORTLAND,. ORE. 

Orphenm— Plleer ft Douglas— Trorato — Odlva— 
Adair A Adelpbl— Myrl ft Delmar — Ines Macanley 
A Co. — Aileen Stanley. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Orphenm— Poor Husbands— Orth A Dooley— Allan 
A Howard— Dlerr— "Honor Thy Children." 
SAM FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Orphenm— Orvaie Harrold— Creasy ft Dsyne— 
WlUlng ft Jordan— Mme. Donald Ayer— Martin ft 
Fabrtnl— VaBeclta'e Leopards— Phyllis Nelbjon 
Terry— Milt Collins— Clayton White ft Co. 



SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON AND FRESNO. 
Orphenm — "Age of Reason" — Mayo ft Tally — 
Ronalr, Ward ft Parron — Sun Stanley Trio — Al 
Sbayne — Ernie Potts ft Co. — Plying Henrys, 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Orphenm — Wheeler ft Dolan — Caltes Bros. — "The 
Hyphen" — Scotch Lada ft Lassies — Rita Mario Or- 
chestra — The Lelgbtona. 

SEATTLE, 'WASH. 
Orphenm — Geo. Nash ft Co. — Mme. Chllson Ohr- 
mann — Harry L. Mason — Foster Ball ft Co. — How- 
ard's Ponies— Mlhsres — Parber Glrla. 

SALT LAZE OTTT, UTAH. 
Orphenm— Bankoff ft Girlie — Bill Prnltt— Anna 
Chandler — "Miniature Revue" — Bene rarker — Mar 
lo A Duffy — Geo. Flaher A Co. 

VANCOUVER, CAN. 

Orphennn-Beatrice Herford — Nordstrom ft Pink- 
ham— Wallace Galvln— Ames ft Winthrop— Mile. 
Leitxel— Haruko Onukl. 

WINNIPEG, CAN. 

Orphean— Tempest A Sunshine— Dorothy Jsrden 
— Carbett Sheppeird A Donoghnc — Hsllen A Poller 
—Flanagan ft Edwards— Maria Lo. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

HEW TORS CITY. 

American (Pint Half) — Three Snycopaten — 
Cummins ft Seeham— Chase ft LaTour — Florence 
Hnyfleld— storm A Manden — Nat Carr. (Laat 
Half) — Oluran A Newell — Ferguson A Sunderland 
—Clifford ft Wills — Harry Coleman — "Mimic 
World." 

Boulevard (Pint Half) — Reno — Fergnson A Sun- 
derland — "The Criminal" — E. J. Moore — Caaaon A 
Barle. (Last Half) — Cooper ft Hartman— Florence 
Rayfield — "Just for Instance" — Adrian — Boeder 
Troupe. 

Lincoln Square (First Half)— Paris Duo — Harris 
ft Lyman — Bice ft Frauds — Helen Page ft Co. — 
Percy Pollock ft Co. — Potter ft HartweU. (Laat 
Half )— Reno— White. Mollaly ft White — Sinclair ft 
Hart— Harry Flnt ft Co.— Mabel Harper— Cook ft 
Stevens. 

Avenne B (Pint Half)— Flake ft Fallon— God- 
frey, Matthews ft Co. — Putnam ft Lewis— Josephus 
Troupe. (Last Half)— Tlerney Poor— Norwood ft 
Hall— Bell Thayer Bros. 

Greeley Square (Pint Half)— White, Mullaly ft 
White — Peterson, Fields ft Morrison— EUlott ft 
Mullen — Robt. O'Connor ft Co. — Mand Moller — 
Rondos Trio. (Last Half) — Three Syncopatcrs — 
Gould ft Lewis — "Fascinating Flirts" — Harry 8y* 
del] — Josepbns Troupe. 

Delancey Street (First Half) — Oluran ft Newell 
—Williams ft Segal— Harry Pint ft Co.— Clark ft 
McCnllough— Gliding O'Means. (Last Half)— 
Brandt & Aubrey— Grlndell ft Esther— Nsn Hewlns ' 
ft Co. — Bernard ft Lloyd — Al Golem Troupe. 

National (Flnt Half)— Three Norrle Slaters— 
Sinclair ft Hart— Gould ft Lewis— Camlllc Peranni 
A Co.— Mabel Harper— Buch Bros. (Laat Half)— 
Plquo— Clinton ft Rooney — The Criminal — Will ft 
Marie Rogen — Sorority Girls. 

Orphenm (Pint Half) — Leonard ft Louie— Three 
Crelghton Olrls — Frankle Rice — Will ft Marie 
Rogers — Bernard & Lloyd — Sorority Girls — Walter 
James — Poor Dordeene. (Laat Half) — Paris Dno — 
Harris A Lymsn — Buch Bros. — Caaaon ft Earle — 
Lillian Mortimer — Mnllen ft EUlott. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half) — Clinton A Rooney 
— Chabot A Dixon — "The Harmless Bug" — Lacy 
Lima Trio — Al Golem Troupe. (Lest Half) — Stet- 
son ft Huber — Rice ft Francis — Tom Darles ft Co. 
—Nat Carr— Potter ft HartweU. 

BROOKLYN, V, T. 

Bijou (Pint Half) — Brandt ft Aubrey — Harry 
Coleman— "Mimic World." (Last Half)— Peter- 
son, Fields ft Morrison — Chabot ft Dixon— Storm ft 
Marsden — Percy Pollock A Co. — Al Bryant ft Co. 

SeKalb (Flnt Half) — Carbny Bros. — Reed ft 
Wright Glrla — "Salvation Sue" — Foster A Lovett 
— Al Bryant ft Co. (Last Half) — Cnmmlns A 
Seeham — Wayne, Warren Glrla — Hendrix A Pa- 
dula — Helen Page A Co. — Harry Breen — Gliding 
O'Mearas. 

Warwick (Pint Half)— L. Wolfe Gilbert— Ben 
Thayer Bros. (Lest Half) — Musical Chef — Maurice. 
Samuels A Co. — Howard ft Sadler— Mailer ft 
Rogen. 

Fulton (Pint Half) — Plquo— Mlnetta Dno — Grin- 
del A Esther— LaCoata ft Clifton— Harry SydeU— 
"Fascinating Flirts." (Last Half)— Three Norrle 
Sisters — R. J. Moore — Lucy Lucia Trio— "Salvation 
Sue"— Grey ft Wheeler— Four Dordeens. 

Palace (First Half) — Gray ft Graham — Six Cor- 
nelloe. (Last Half)— Flake ft FaBon— Frankle 
Rice— L. Wolfe Gilbert. 

ATLANTA, G A . 

O. O. H.— Henry ft Ltsel— Benlah Peart— Little 
Lord Robert — Armstrong A Ford — Breen Family. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Hippodrome — Jerome A Carson — Leonard ft 
Dempsey — Walter Perclval * Co. — Cadetn de Oas- 
coyne — Johnson, Howard A Liaette. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Orphenm (Pint Half)— Swain's Bats ft Cats — 
Overholt A Young Slaters — Dorothy — Burton ft Co. 
— Hoey ft Lee— Fogarty'a Berne. (Laat Halt) — 
Tyler ft St. Clair — The CromweBa — Brondell ft 
Bell— "Merry Malda of Japan" — Hoey ft Lee. 

St. James (Pint Half) — Rose Behmettan ft 
Brother— Lanrlce Ordiray— Harry McCormaek ft 
Co. — Nevins A Gordon— Welch, Mealy ft Montrose. 
(Last Half)— Hess ft Hyde— Jessie Haywood A 
Co.— BeU Boy Trio— "ParU Fashion Shop." 
FALL RIVER, MASS. 

Bijou (Ftat HaU)— Tyler ft St. Clair— "Merry 
Malda of Japan" — Bene A Mayo — The CromweBa. 
(Last Kalf)— Swaln'a Bate ft Cats— Overholt ft 
Young Slsten — Dorothy Burton ft Co. — "Pogaity'a 
Bevne." 



HOBOKEN, N. J. 

Lyrio (Pint Hslf) — Robinson ft McKlsalek — Oil 
dome — Mr. ft Mn. Phillips — Norwood A Han— 
Jack Morrlssey A Co. (Last Half)— Three Brit- 
tons— Burke, Toohay ft Co. — Three WUle Bros. 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Msjoatio (Pint Half)— Wayne ft Warren Girls— 
Hendrix ft Padula — "Just for Instance" — Adrian 
Boeder Troupe. (Last Half) — Carbray BroB.— 
Chase ft LaTour — "The Harmless Bug" — Clark ft 
McCullough— Rondas Trio. 

HEW BOCHZLLE, H. T. 

Loew'a (First Half)— P. George — Cooper ft 
Hartman— Lottie Williams ft Co. (Last Half)- 
Robinson ft McKlsalek— Robt O'Connor ft Co.— 
Mand Tiffany. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I, 

Emery (First Half)— Manola — Hess ft Hyde- 
Jessie Haywood ft Co. — BeU Boy Trio. (Last 
Half) — Rose Schemettan ft Bra. — Belle & Mayo- 
Barry McCormaek ft Co. — Nevlna ft Gordon — 
Welch, Mealy ft Montrose. 

SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 

Plaza (Pint Half)— J. Martelle — Maurice Sam- 
uels ft Co.— Caahman ft Casbman — Hop Handy ft 
Co. (Last Half) — McNeil A Pepper Twins — Lin- 
ton ft Watson— Archer ft Belfcrd — Laurie Ordnay 
Manola. 

TORONTO. CAN. 

Yonge Street— June & Inne Melba — Brent, 
Schrlater ft Hastings — Dooley ft Nelson — Four 
Chicks — "Everyman's Slater" — Cook ft Lorens— 
POnr Valdares. 

WEBTFIELTJ, MASS. 
Broadway (Flnt Half)— McNeill ft Pepper 
Twina — Alice Cole — Archer ft Belford. (Laat Half) 
— J. Martelle — Gray ft Graham — Tnrmanlan Trio. 

POLI CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 

PoU'a (Pint Halt)— "Ooldnat"— Fred Rogers— 

Lillian Kingsbury ft Co John ft Mae Burke— 

Emelina Troupe. (Last Half) — Three Singing 
Types — J. K. Emmett ft Co. -Milton ft Delong 
Slslers— KersIskc'B Pigs. (To (111.) 

PUza (First Half) — Bob Qulgtoy ft Co.— Graham 
ft Randell— Prlnca Karml. (To All.) (Last Half) 
— niche ft Clegg— "Black A Tan"— leasts ft Allen 
—"Wedding Party." 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palace (Flnt Half)— Lamb A Morton— Helen A 
Rice— CUff Dean Players — Ernie A Ernie— Clark's 
Royal Hawaiian*. (Laat Half) — The Olds — Lough- 
lln ft Went — "Lore In the Suburbs" — Val ft Brule 
Stanton — Arthur Lavihe ft Co. 

PoU'a (Pint Hslf)— Raymond WUbert— Plngree. 
Wallace ft Co. — Frankle Heath. (To fill.) (Last 
Hslf)— Dsvls ft Walker— Lillian Kingsbury ft Co. 
— Stone ft nayes — "Goldust." 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Poll's (Pint Half)— Three Singing Types — Coim- 
t**sa Nardlna — J. K. Emmett ft Co.— Stones ft 
Hayes — Keralske's Pigs. (Laat Half) — Lamb ft 
Morton — "To Bave One Girl"— Frankle Heath- 
Fred J. Ardarth ft Oo. 

Bijou (Flnt Half)— RIche ft Clegg— Davis A 
Walker— Ward ft Cullcn— Arthur Lavlne ft Co. 
(Last Half)— Bob Qnlgley ft Co. — Melody Four— 
Prince Karml. (Two to fill.) 

8PRIVOPIXLB, MASS. 

Palace (Pint Half)— The Olds— Billy Rogers— 
"To Save One Girl" — Cammlnga A ShcUy — Melody 
Poor— Fred J. Ardarth A Co. (Last Half) — 
Kmnllna Troope — Jones ft Gray — Prlnaree, Wallace 
ft Co. — Ernie ft Ernie — John A Mac Burke — Clark's 
Royal Hawallans. 

SCBANTON, PA. 

PoU'a (Pint Halt)— Welton A Maraball— Force 
A WUllams — Nine Musical Misses — Five Kantons. 
(Laat Half) — Levering Trio — Heager A Goodwin — 
Lecnard ft Wlllard — "Man Hunters." (To nil.) 
WATERBTTRr, CONK. 

Poll's (Flnt Half)— De Burg Slstera — Jones ft 
Gray — Val ft Ernie Stanton — "Love In the Sub- 
urbs" — Gene Green ft Co.— "What's the Idea?" 
(Last Half)— Orran ft Drew— Ward ft Cullcn. 
(Three to BID 

WTLKES-BARRE, PA. 

Poll's (Pint Half)— Levering Trio— Hesger ft 
Goodwin— Leonard ft Wlllard — "Man Hunters." 
(Laat Half) — Welton ft MarshaR— Force ft wii 
llama — Nine Musical Misses— Five Kantons. 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

PoU's (Flnt Half)— LongtaUo ft West— Milton ft 
Delong sisters— "Robevllle." (Laat Half)— Ray- 
mond Wllbert — Cnmmlnga ft Shelly — Gene Green ft 
Co.— "What'a the Ideal" 

Plain (Pint Half)— "Black A Tan" — Jenks ft 
Allen- "Wedding Party." (Two to flU.) (Last 
Half) — Fred Sogers — CUff Dean Players — Helen ft 
Rice. (Two to ML) 

S. & C. CIRCUIT 

awvevtvYCTrw B. D. 

Bijou (Pint Hslf) — Connen ft Huyck— Cnshman 
A Burke — Alfredo ft Pasqnale. 

CINCINNATI. OHIO. 

Empress — Sprague ft McNeece — Morris & Sher- 
wood — Harry Brookes ft Co. — Phil Bennett — HaUI- 
gan A Coombs — Kilties Band. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Miles — Gerald Mullane — Howard ft . Graf — "Fe- 
Mail Clerks"— Kerry ft McGee— Ferris Wheel 
Girls. (One to nil.) 

DEVIL'S LAKE, N. S. 
Grand (First Half)— Bassett A BaUey— Bayee ft 
England—Great Western Four. 

TABOO, H. D. 
Grand (First Half)— MeCreevy A Doyle— Axel 
Christiansen— Carr A Carr. (Last Half )— Drawee. 
Hambo ft Frisco — Cnshman ft Burke— Tudor Cam- 
eron ft Co. 

JANESVTLLE, WIS. 
Apollo (First Half)— Flood ft Erne— Black ft 
McCone— Six Royal Hoaaars. (One to AIL) 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



KSOXVUiE, TENN. 
Grand (First Half)— Ellis Hawallana — Musical 
Koebns — Creo. (Two to All.) (Last Half) — Ro- 
dero— Weston Ic YouDg — Southern & Marki — Jos. 
Flynn. (One to Oil.) 

MINNEAPOUS. KD». 

Unique (Pint Half) — Drawee, Hambo & Frisco 
— Adanac Trio— Holland & Jeanle — Tudor Cameron 
& Co. — Stoddard & Hrnee. (Last Half) — Alfredo 
& Pasquale — Bob & Beth Stanley — Mimic Four — 
"Seven Joyous Joys." (One to 1111.) 
JUlBOS CITY, IA. 

Cecil (Pint Half )— Frlckett ft Lester— Kay Law- 
rence. (One to mi.) (Last Half)— Kathleen Kla 
Vi Ya— Basset t ft Bailey. (One to Oil.) 

MAKSHALLTOWH, IA. 

Oaaiiio (Laat Half) — Howard StUIman — Trolley 
Car Duo— Salisbury Family. (One to flu.) 
OSKAXOOSA, IA. 

Orient (Last Half) — Tan Alatlne Broa.— Ray 
Lawrence — Brooklyn Comedy Four. (One to All.) 

ax. clous, xtjiv. 

Heme (One Day) — Kaney, Mason ft Shaw — A! 
fredo ft Paaqoale—Cushman ft Bnrke — The Karnzos. 

ST. paul, mm, 

Hippodrome (Pint Half) — The Mures— Three 
Harmony Kings — "Seven Joyona Joys." (Two to 
au.) (Last Half)— Prlckett ft Lester— Adanac 
Trio — Holland ft Jeanle — Axel Christiansen — "For- 
tune Seekers." 

INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 

AUSTIN, TEX. 
Hajeauo (Laat Half)— O'DonneU ft Blair— Janls 
ft West — "Petticoats" — Chief Canpollcao— Fred- 
erick V. Bowers— Scheon & Mayne — Sylvia Loyal 
ft Co. 

n 



Ksjestio— Norvells— Bernard ft Scarth— Kajyama 
—"Cranberries" — Dewltt, Barns ft Torrence. 
FT. WORTH", TEX. 

Byers (First Half) — "A Case for Sherlock" — 
Francis Dyer — Carl Boslnl ft Co. (Last Half) — 
Sogers ft Wbelan — Wm. C. Turner — Moore, 
O'Brien ft Cormack — Three Falcone. 

Majestic (Last Half)— O'DonneU ft Blair— Janls 
ft West — "Petticoats" — Chief Canpollcan — Fred- 
erick V. Bowers— Scheon ft Mayne— Sylvia Loyal 
ft Co. 

OALTE8T0N. TEX. 

Hajestlo (First Half)— Fayoea — Josephine Davis 
— Harry Girard ft Co. — Lew Madden ft Co. — Ray- 
mond Bond ft Co. — Comfort ft King— Leo Zarrell 
ft Co. 

HOUBTOH, TEX. 

KajesUo— Frank Hartley — De Lisle ft Vernon — 
McDeavItt, Kelly ft Lncy — Dorothy Brennan — Chip 
ft Marble — Bchardt ft Parker— Morln Slaters, 
JOPI1N, XO. 

Eleotrio (First Half)— Byan ft Byan— Gilbert ft 
cuyton. (Laat Half)— Levere ft Palmer— Vnyl- 
steke Troupe. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

Eleotrio (First Half)— Pettier ft Yalerlo. (Last 
Half) — Wllllnma ft Jameson— Fletcher Drlscoll 
Trio. 

LITTLE BOOK. ARK. 
aCaJestto (Fir it Half) — Jos Brennan — Adolnbo — 
"Lamont'a Days." (Last Half)— Miller ft Ralney 
— Charles Wayne ft Co. — Edwin ft Lottie Ford. 
KU8K00EE, OXXA. 
Broadway (First Halt) — B. T. Alexander — 
Rogers & Wbelan — Wm. C. Turner — Moore, 
O'Brien ft Cormack — Three Falcons. 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKU. 
I.yrlo (First Half)— Haxel Heston— Bam Hood— 
"Chin Chin." (Lsat Half) — Johnson ft Arthnr — 
Morris ft Leonard — Danbar'a Salon Singers — Rosa 
ft Aahton — Treat's Seals. 

ST. JOSEPH, XO. 
Crystal (First Half)— McClnre ft Dolly— Silver 
ft Duval — Caesar Rivoli — Orpheus Comedy Four — 
MaieerofT Troupe. (Last Half) — Lamaze Duo- 
Henry ft Adelaide— Geo. Lovette & Co. — Original 
Four. 

SAX ANTONIO, TEX. 
Majestic (Last Half)— Faynes— Josephine Davis 
—Harry Girard ft Co. — Lew Maaden ft Co. — Ray- 
mond Bond ft Co. — Comfort ft King — Leo Zarrell 
ft Co. 

TOPEKA. KAN. 
Novelty (First Half)— Cook ft Rothert— Bernl- 
vicl Brothers — "Fun on the Farm." (Last Half) 
— McClure ft Dolly — Caesar RIvoll — Malseroff 
Troupe. 

TULSA, OKXA. 
Empress (First Half) — Johnson ft Arthur — Dun- 
bar's Singers — Morris ft Leonard — Boss ft Asbton 
— Treat's Seala. (Last Half) — Monroe Brothers — 
Bertrand 4 Wolf — Leroy ft Harvey — Dickenson ft 
Deagon — "Lack of a Totem." 

WICHITA, XAX. 
Princess (First Half) — Monroe Brothers — Bert- 
rand ft Wolf — Leroy ft Harvey — Dickenson ft 
Deagon — "Luck of a Totem." (Last Half)— Her- 
tle Beeson — Murphy ft Delmar — Klass ft Walman 
-Helen Beresford ft Co. — Plpafax ft Paolo. 
WACO, TEX. 
Auditorium (Last Half)— O'DonneU ft Blair— 
Janls ft West — "Petticoats" — Chief Canpollcan — 
Frederick V. Bowers — Scheon ft Mayne — Sylvia 
Loyal ft Co. 

W. V. M. A. 

ALTON, TJX. 
Hippodrome (First Half) — Original Barretts— 
Malay ft Woods. (Last Half)— Kay ft Bell- 
lamed. 

BELOXT, WIS. 
Wilaen— Teddy ft May— Borne and Wager— "Song 
and Dance Revoe." 

CBAMPAISX, vv-T. 
Orphans (First Half)— Davla ft Kitty— Heras ft 
Preston — Franklin, Ardell ft Co.— DarreU ft Hsn- 
fordV— Slatko's Sollickers. (Last Half)— "The 
Night Clerk." 



CHICAGO, ILL. 
Lincoln (First Half) — Guy Baldwin Trio— Frank 
C Bnrton ft Co. — Lane ft Harper— James Cullen — 
Merlan's Canines. (Last Half) — Trti Oliver. (Fonr 
to fill.) 

American (First Hslf) — The Bimbos — Trlx Oliver 
— Dse ft Neville— Joe Welch — "Smart Shop." (Last 
Half)— Guy Baldwin Trio — Jordan ft Myers— 
Schwsrtz Co. — Joe Welch— Merlsn's Canines. 

Kedxie (First Half) — Three Bartos — Follette & 
Wicks— Jas. Thompson ft Co. — Cos*. F. Semon. 
(Lsst Half)— McRae ft Clegs— Mrs. Frank Farnum 
— Royal Gascolgnes. 

Windsor (First Half)— The Naughty Princess. 
(Last Half) — The Bimbos — Electrical Venus— Chas. 
F. Semon — Chief Bull Bear & Co. 

Academy (First Hslf) — Van Horn and Ammer — 
Rome and Wager — Carllta and Howaldn — Kawana 
Bros. (Last Half) — Christian Cbrlatensen — The 
Melody Maids. 

DUBUQUE, IA, 
Majeitio (First Half)— Civilisation. (Last Halt) 
Roth ft Roberta— McKay's Scotch Revue. 

Wilson (First Half)— Frawley ft West— Follls 
Sisters ft Leroy — Mrs. Frank Farnum. (Last Half) 
— Three irtartoa — Pavly Oukralnski Dancers — Elsie 
White. 

Avenue (First Half)— Chas. Mack ft Co.— Three 
Lyres— McRae ft Clegs. (Last Half)— Love ft 
Wilbur— Follts Sisters ft Leroy — Chas. Mason ft 
Co. — Chas. Wllaon. 

CEDAR RAPIDS. IA. 
Majestic (First Half)— Shirley Sisters— Elsie 
Williams ft Co. — Patrlcola ft Meyers — "On a School 
Playground. (Laat Half) — Adroit Bros.— Cervo— 
Chas. Mack ft Co. — Cooper ft Smith— Devlne ft 
Williams— Sun Fong Ling Troupe. 
DECATUK, XXL. 
Empress (First Half) — "The Night Clerk." 
(Last Half)— Davis ft Kitty— Ovonda Duo— Frank- 
lyn Ardell ft Co. — Bison City Four — Ross Bros. 
DAVENPORT. IA. 
Columbia (First Half) — "Sunny Side of Broad- 
way." (Last Half)— KartelU— Patrlcola ft Myers 
— "Women" — Bert Kenny — "Bevue Devogue." 
DULUTH, Minn. 
Grand (First Hslf)— Harris ft Nolan— "The 
Tamer" — Fitch Cooper — Billy Bouncer's Circus, 
EAST ST. LOUIS, XO. 
Erber's (First Half)— Kay ft Bell— Ismed— Gold- 
ing ft Keating. (Last Half)— Three Lyres— White's 
Circus. 

EYANSVTXLE, IND. 
Now Grand (First Half)— "The Vanity Fair"— 
Will Morris — Wm. Armstrong ft Co. (Last Half) 
— Princess Kalama ft Co. — Spencer ft Williams— 
Joeefsson Troupe. 

FT. SODOE, IA. 
Princess (First Half)— Rotbrock ft McGrade— 
Dunlap and Verdin — Dudley Trio. 

FT. WILLIAM, CAM. 
Orphoum (Last Half)— Freemont Benton ft Co. — 
Ernest Dupille— Hayasbl Japs. 

GREEK BAY, WIS. 
Orpbeum (Last Half) — McOoods ft Tate Co. — 
Taylor ft Brown— Jsmcs Cullen — "Girl in the 
Moon." 

KENOSHA, WIS. 
Virginia— Dawn June — Fargo and Wells— Pauline 
8axon. 



BIG TIIWIE 

REPRESENTATIVES 




1*2 Theatrical Lawyer 

EDWARD J. ADER 

10 So. La Salle St. Chicago 

Practice in State and U. S. Courts 



— vc-r =.- sSHg 



*5^2zz "sZr'xzz t^nnvx 




Wf*jr+»* ■**'■»££-■- -^^ J .r*— *.'^"-*':V?T **■* 



HOUDINI 
Breaking Through The New York Clipper 



PAUL DURAND 

MGR. & PRODUCER 1005 Palace Theatre Blag. 



1V1AX HART 

Room 802 Palace Theatre Bide. 



gene HUGHES <™S° SMITH jo-paige 

VAUDEVILLE MGRS. 1004 Palace Theatre Bid*. 



MAX 

VAUDEVILLE BROKER 



1001-1002 Palace Theatre) Bldg. 



PETE MACK 



Palace Theatre Bldg. 



JOHN C. PEEBLES High Clm^VmxidS'l. Act. 

JOHN L. GORMAN, ASSOCIATE Palace Theatre Bid,. 



VAUDEVILLE REPT. 



804 Palace Theatre Bldg. 



MAURICE H. ROSE and CURTIS JACK 

1102 Palace Theatre Bldg. 



STOKER — BIERBAUER 

Palace Theatre Bldg. 



HARRY FITZGERALD 



Room 902 



Palace Theatre Build rag 



LEWIS & GORDON PRODUCING CO., Inc. 

AL. LEWIS, General Manager Times Building 

MAX GORDON, Booking Manager Palace Theatre Building 



LOEW REPRESENTATIVES 



FRANK BOHM, Inc. 



Lou Edleman, Gen. Mgr. 



New York City 



MARK LEVY 

Vanderille Manager S02 Putnam Bldg. 



LOUIS PINCUS 

Artists' Represantntiwe 



Bldg. 



CHAS. J. FITZPATRICK 

VandertHle Manager 328 Putnam Bldg. 



THE WESLEY OFFICE 

Phone 4362 Bryant ' S28 Putnam Bldg. 



ABE I. FEINBERG 

Suite 504 Putnam Bldg. TaL Bryant 3464 



J 



^EZFRS GUARANTEED 
A.t.E:-LJR BEST MADE 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NATURAL HITS 

HARRY VON TILZER 



ami >»i- Avlm rac 



\\ i- . ti. ;•.;;: t!r> only "It v. • •■ natural fills vh uio ■ rn;ii Kti .'■ 
■■'•d !o>; ^..iu .\vhrl»t'r ■' a iiail.ii.1, :i nov-t-liv n '• < on > il\ ■ 



tuial :•:!> .i,-ici vyhtj ■:.;:\ the n'aiitilactiirrii ones?, arid" [hat 
i:::\ .{. a! a;- s<)jrri! a!:--!uiek on :ij:- mrfit H you ar; 

'4,- «'-nt; u .-ad we'll c!r!:">''.- !!a •••(.:- !'. \ <a" 



*T HERE'S SOMEONE MORE LONESOME THAN YOU" 



I.UU- K.U*lpj Mnvif ;1'V n.iri'V Vorf/11 



fhff Only -Natural Hav.aii.-in S'oni* Hit on -tlie Market " 



ON T H E S O UTH S E A IS L E 



i.v.-. fm ^Vhi-Us ■tloubitsloi 



Our Two Great Nnturai - Comedy Si>n'e .■ Hits 



SOMETIMES YOU GET A GOOD ONE AND WITH HIS HANDS IN HIS POCKETS AND 
SOMETIMES YOU DON'T HIS POCKETS IN HIS PANTS 



Great: fclxt r.. " V ei •*&* 



other creat songs "SWEET BABETTE", (She Always Did the Minuet), "YOU WERE JUST MADE 
TO ORDER FOR ME', 'THROUGH THESE WONDERFUL GLASSES OF MINE" 

' -.!-■■■■■■■ - ; - f . . I ' 



Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Company 



MEYER COHEN. Bui. M B r. 



222 West 46th Street, New York City 



BEN BORNSTEIN, Prof. Mgr 




!t!UUliUQUIU: IlliiUI iUlUITSJfli: 1 !!! i' :'"im-.iBnggim « 



FLORENCE MOORE 

and BROTHER 

FRANK MOORE 



Headlining at the PALACE 
this week 



Direction MAX 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



TWENTY FIVE YEARS AGO IN 1892 

HARRY VON TILZER 



? I\il>.isheei his first; sorip with AX / jH'is > Vfc'piodw^r^, , ( hpn «.«•>, >ji the '.n;*, pi 

i who arc Writing;* hits totuly wt-rc" in * knickerbockers.. V Vvit-h;.a; record oi 

competition where -ike m«-nt of thr -song aocsii tcoonO. "i -m r after y> 

and the trade. _ Docsm I .>nybody t-Kc wrjite hit*, but |-L»rr\ Vimi TiJieV ? 

at cast vour optics on Ine.'-nrsj one tiri.iw. 



ri-.tCiir.il ^«>di; .h:t^t h:il 



!y -rive yr.irs ago when ini>it oi ' ik> '.ht>\ -. 
n -cvrr. « f(ii.»I. (Iivtki* t|ay of m..uct.tr\ 
!t_ b'-camr a i>\ ivoid ■,tmoii|" the (irofcV»mn 

.icrni^i! now H vo<- -J-^'- t:Jt;i..J .. 



"JUST THE KIND OP A GIRL 



Boy», boy*, litten to the ntwi 

That will make you grab your Sunday clothei and ahine your shoe*. 
I jiut aaw the cutest bunch of joy 
That it bound to steal some mama's boy. 
When you meet tbia little girl I'm telling you about 
You'll run to Mother, and you'll about — 

Chorus: 

She's the kind of a girl 

That makes you stare, makes you sigh every time she passes by. 

Just the kind of a girl 

Whose clothes don't make you declare, Un't she a little bear. 



You'd Love to Make Your Wife** 

Lyric by Lou Klein. Music by Harry Von TUxar. 

She's so innocent; at night before she goes to sleep 
She covers up the bird cage just for fear the bird will peep. 
She's so kind and so refined she has to be alone before she'll eves change) 
her mind. 
Just the kind of a girl 

You'd introduce to your Ma, to your Sister and your Pa. 
She can turn bad men into saints; she never paints. 
On August thirty-first this little maid was so forlorn 
Because, you see, she'd dread the coming of September Morn*. 
Just the kind of a girl you'd love to make your wife. 
You bet your life. 



Lots of extra choruses that are even better. 
This song is a positive sensation. The laughs are so big that you have to wait for them, with a melody that you just can't get away from. Great for 
either man or woman. Also great double versions for boy and girl and two men. Don't overlook this sure-fire hit. 



"LI.- Best Southern Scmg Since "MY LADY LOU" 

"SOMEWHERE IN DI7<:iE" 



l.v,. I,v i:..!..ld K.lKu.ir. Mi»« by H...ry V,m T,l/.. 
This southern "iercndd- Iias an irresisUibfe swing ..iKnl will tjrt ;\n> :?>?.! 
»rars, Get a Copy.: . Tt's Another surefire hit. ...Great for duet. ^ipiarte-lte' "■" «'■" 



Harry Von Tilz e r Music Pu hi i s h in. g Coin p a n y 

MEYRR cghkn Bus. mTc. " 222' West 46th Street, New York City bos bornstein. iw Mb , 



BEN BORNSTEIN- -Prof M S r 



COME OVER, COME OVER, 

Come On Over Here — It's A Wonderful Plaoe 

THE BIGGEST COMEDY SONG SENSATION THE WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN 

Bert Williams is setting Chicago crazy with it 
Walter Lawrence in "Come Back to Erin," has all Boston humming it 
Eddie Cantor in the "Midnight Frolic" has everybody sitting up late to hear it— 

We have hundreds of extra verses 



PUBLISHED BY 



The WILLIAM JEROME PUBLISHING CO., 



STRAND THEATRE 
BUILDING 



Broadway and 47th St., New York 



THE NEW 1917 SONG SENSATION 

AT SEVEN, SEVENTEEN AND SEVENTY 

(DADDY LOVED THE SAME, SWEET GIRL) 

; By ABE OLMAN andRAYMOND EGAN : : 

A "different" song that fits any style of act. New idea with a "punch:"' Originally introduced thi. week by MARSHAL MONTGOMERY X ' P *'tw!^" C "*"■ 

BE FIRST TO GET THIS WONDERFUL SONG 

FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHERS, '"^L^bX^^^ 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



SENATE REJECTS THEATRE TAX 
Aibasy, N. Y„ Jan. 11. — The Senate 
today failed to concur in the Welsh amend- 
ment to the resolution to appoint a com- 
mittee to investigate the practicability of 
taxing the motion picture industry in New 
York State, which empowers the commit- 
tee to extend its inquiry into the whole 
theatrical business. The Senate voted to 
refer the matter to the Committee on 
Taxation and Retrenchment. This action 
of the Senate does not mean that the 
amendment of Senator Welsh is lost, but 
it foreshadows the hard fight which the 
Legislature will have if the attempt is 
made to force the whole theatrical business 
to pay a State tax on its earnings. 



GOETZ COMPANY PLAYING 

Shenandoah, Pa., Jan. 13. — The Lew 
Goetz Musical Comedy Co., opening here 
and featuring "Lost on a Hawaiian Isl- 
and," includes the following: Crescent 
Amusement Co., owners ; L. A. Goetz, 
manager; Jack Shears, stage manager; 
Mae Shears, Babe Wheeler, McCoy and 
Grey, the Clicks, Grayce Austin, Mae 
Henry, Grayce Dively, Mae Hoogan, and 
the Itice Sisters. 



FAMOUS DANCER DIES 

Mrs. Gabriel Brenauer, who was Emelie 
Kiralfy, famous more than forty years ago 
as a dancer, died Jan. 12 from pneumonia, 
after an illness of two weeks. She was a 
sister of the Kiralfy Bros, and had ap- 
peared at Niblo'g Garden forty-fire years 
ago and was a favorite dancer in "The 
Black Crook" and "Excelsior." 



PROTEST AGAINST CHILD ACT 

Tekrk Haute, Ind., Jan. 13. — There was 
a protest filed against the Alexander Kids, 
a N. V. M. A. act, last week at the Hippo- 
drome, two girls and a boy, aged four, five 
and eight years respectively, being com- 
pelled to work three shows per day. 



PHRONIA LABEAU ILL 

Mason City, Iowa, Jan. 12. — Phronia 
Labeau is ill at her home, 700 Eighth Ave- 
nue East, and would be glad to hear from 
friends. 




ADA GIBSON 

In Frad Andrews* latest novelty, 

"The Wonder Act" 



Musical Stock Wanted 

In a twin munition town of 18,000, other town 
mile away 15,000, total 33,000, draw. pop. 40.000 
within ten miles, payroll $375,000 weekly, the- 
atre seats 1,450, big stage, great stock town, 
local conditions excellent. Will bear investiga- 
tion, hustling management, terms equitable 
on percentage. Write L. C, Clipper Office, 
New York. 

JUST FROM PRINTER'S INK 

If yon want to stampede your andieoces. be 
rare and Bluff "Oh, Mister, Won't Ton Tickle 
Vet" Tliis is an applause-getter. Great for 
vaudeville, or cabaret; wonderful for dancing; It 
Is good. Tbe above sent npon receipt of 10c. 11 

orcheatrations, 25c. GEO. LEE POPE, dUtribator, 
405 Cerro St., St. Loots, Mo.; at all music stores. 

2Sc-FOR ALL THIS --25c. 

7 Sketches, 3 monologs, G Recitations, 12 Parodies 
and 200 Gags. Comic Wants, etc., with Money 
Hock Guarantee? Catalog and testimonials for 
stamp. Exclusive work done. Best references, 
reasonable prices, strongest possible guarantee! 
Stamp for reply. Interviews arranged for by 
letter only. JCA&T THAYER, 2190 Broad St., 
Providence, R. I. 

SONG FOR SALE 

Entitled "SWEET IMOGENE" 

First come, first served. Prieo $5,000. The 
reason, it's another "Sweet Adeline." Address 
SWEET IMOGENE, care of Clipper. 

Have Seven Good Lyrics 

Will double up with composer." CONKLIN, 
223 Uth Street. Brooklyn. ' 

WANTED 

For Kibble's U. T. C. Company Woman 
for Topsy, man for parts; brass; drum 
in band. State salary. WM. KIBBLE, 
1512 Tribune BIdg., Chicago, Ills. 

Lona Fendell Stock 

Wants Good Pianist 

and Specialty people; state if you double parts: 
salary. No booze. Can use good dancer. DAN 
FENDELL, Sauk Centre. Minn. 



w 



VAUDEVILLE 
CIRCUIT 

3oe DELAWARE BLDC. CHICAGO 



SLAYMAN AM 

(t Producer of :: 

0B1EYIAL NOVELTIES 



DOLLY CONNOLLY 



AT LIBERTY 

Pianist, sir lit reader and transpottrr. Rep.. 
vmiil.. tsh.. pictures. Jo in at once. Locate or 

travel. GEO. L. COTJ2CEXXE, Kidder, So. Dakota. 

LADY PARTNER WANTED 

Who can sloe; and talk to play small vanrtpvllle 
time. State ace. height, and weight. RELIABLE 
comedian. Clipper Office. 

PLUSH DROP FOR SALE 

Red Plush Cvclorama, good as new. 
Cost $560.00. No reasonable offer re- 
fused. Address MGR. OPERA CO., 
819 Spring Garden St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

BAILEY STUDIOS (Scenery) 
Troy, N. Y. 

Ton have tried the rest* now try the heat* 

Wanted-People for Repertoire 

Juvenilr leading woman; other peo ple with 
specialties write or call; state lowest. FERGU- 
SON PLAYERS. 1)7 State St.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WANTED AX ONCE 
Heavy and General Bus. Man with the neces- 
sary essentials for 3-niffht and week stand 
Rep. Co, State all first letter and send photo. 
Specialties preferred. Make salary consistent 
with the times. LA VERNA MOORE CO, E. 
B. Gallaaber, Mir.. Bcaverdale. Pa., week Jan. 
15; Salsbnrg-, Pa., week Jan. 22. 



REGISTE R YO UR ACT 

PROTECT WHAT YOU ORIGINATE. 



THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached to your material, and a certificate will be 
returned to you as an acknowledgment, and for future reference. The contribution should be 
signed plainly by the person or firm sending the same, and should be endorsed by the stage 
manager of the show or of the house where the act is being used. Further acknowledgment 
will be made by the names and numbers being published. 

Address your contributions to 



The Registry Bureau, 



NEW YORK CLIPPER, ISM Broadway, New York 



Date 

NEW YORK CLIPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 

Enclosed please find copy of my 

entitled 

for Registration. 

NAME 

Address 



When you register a play or scenario that you intend to submit for reading to any producer, 
wc will furnish a label to be attached to the original, showing that the same has been entered 
in THE CLIPPER Registry Bureau. Get the idea? 

CERTIFICATES ISSUED 

954— Jos. LaDoux— Scenario. 961— Edward Zoeller— Act. 

955— Albert E Kiralfy— Scenario. 962— Daly & Burlew— Phrase. 

956— Gus W. Schaembs— Song. 963— Fields, Keane & Walsh— Act. 

957— A Silver Bell— Act. 964— Harvey R. Denton— Act. 

958— Harry D. Gruman— Lyric. 965— C. J. Lynch— Song. 

959— Barnes & Edwins— Act. 966— Louis Zuler— Songs. 

960— Horace Haws — Song Lyric. 



AT LIBERTY 

fred— TONKIN & WARDE 



-VERNA 



Juveniles. Light Comedy. Gentuel. Hosvies. 
Height .-..ovi. w.Iuiit 130 lbs.. Age SS. 



Ingenue Leads. Ingenues. 8oubrette*. 
Height. 5 ft.. WYIgbt 118 lbs.. Age 24. Special- 
ties: Feature. High Soprano Voice. 
We Have Real Wardrobe. Permanent Stock Preferred. Photos on Request. Write or Wire. FEED 
XONXIN, Hotel Fay. E. Uth Street. Kansas City, Mo. 



\A/ A IM 



D 



Man for leads, woman for characters and general business. Prefer ones doing 
novelty specialty, that can be featured. Join on wire:' IDA WESTON RAE, 
Wilsonville, Neb., January 22 and 23. 



WANTED FOR RECOGNIZED "REP" CO. 
A-l VERSATILE LEADING WOMAN 

Must be young, good looking and have plenty of wardrobe. Other useful people write. 
Scenic Artist to play parts. State age. height and weight. Send photos, which will be re- 
turned. Name lowest salary: late programs. Ella Kramer wire. M. ANDERSON, Suite 2. 
29 Everett St., Dorchester, Mass. 



HAPPY LOU WHITNEY and 
Associate Players 

Want tall leading man, with wardrobe, ability and positively sober. Long 
engagement. People here ten years. Lowest salary first letter. Address 
WELSH AND WALBOURN, Crystal Theatre, Anderson, Ind. 



AT LIBERTY 

lor Musical Comedy, Rep. or One-nlghter, 
SINGING AND DANCING COMEDIAN, fea- 
ture Specialties. Can play anything. Age 26, 
height 5 ft. 6, weight 130 lbs. 12 years ex- 
perience. Good dresser on and off. Sober and 
reliable. Join immediately. 

GEO. W. MARKS, Perth, Ont. 


MADISON'S BUD- 

*-» f-j> qri %J _ * «i A » osefnl to • 

or, I no. lo sss&Su 

all the silt-edge comedy material contained 
therein were to be written for your exclu- 
sive use. the price would be over $3,000. 
MADISON'S BUDGET No. 10 costs Jl and 
contains 12 original monologues, 8 great acts 
'for two males and 7 for male and female, 
a bright Irish act for three people, 20 eure- 
flre parodies, 4 professional minstrel first- 
parts, a screaming tabloid comedy, entitled 
"Bare Mercy, Judge*'; also hundreds of 
nitty gags and funny sidewalk bits. Remem- 
ber the price Is ONE DOLLAR;, or for f 1.50 

I will send BUDGET Nos. 15 and 16. JAKES 
MADISON, 1052 Third Avenue, New York. 


AT LIBERTY 

AGENT 

For Rep. — One Nighter or Movie Feature 

HARRY B. BUSSING 
S Summer St. Norwalk, Conn. 


At Liberty 




After Jan. 27th. Can. Bus. Msn. Height S ft. 7V4 
In. Weight 140 lbs. Age 24. Stock or Reliable 
Itep. 

ROY MARX 


WANTED— M.rlmha mad xylophone player for 
steady engagement. Must have some appear- 
ance and musical ability. No fakers. M "tl 
read. Address by mail only. HENRY 
THOMAS, ZZ7 W. «th St, Nnr York. 


Kansas, 25)26-27. 


BILLY CARTER 

Write* plajlata sad erer/tnlac else— except sono 
—for Taaderllle.- HABXOWK TRUTHS, <U 
aid ■tawart, OUeaaw. 


HAN CELLIST WANTS POSITION in orches- 
tra or will travel with a company. State salary 
and all. Am a member of A. F. of M. CHAS. 
HESS, care Clipper. 1604 Broadway, N. Y. 



January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 





SELZNICK AND 

BRENON AT 

ODDS 

MAY SEVER BUSINESS RELATIONS 



A report current is picture circles this 
week regarding the possible severance of 
business relations between Lewis J. Selz- 
nick and Herbert Brenon in the course 
of the next two months seems well 
founded. 

The exact nature of the disagreement 
said to exist between distributor and pro- 
ducer could not be Jenrned but is under- 
stood to concern matters of business 
policy relative to Brenon's picture mak- 
ing activities. 

The causes of the friction leading up to 
the present trouble across from events 
than transpired a week or two prior to 
Brenon's trip to Wilmington, Del. Brenon 
was stricken with typhoid fever while in 
Wilmington but is reported to have passed 
the crisis. 

Bulletins from Wilmington early this 
week declare that Brenon is on the road 
to recovery, but it will he some time be- 
fore he is active again. His illness has 
naturally called a halt in matters that 
were pending, before bis departure from 
New York. 

While the friendship of Selznick and 
Brenon still retains the same cordiality 
it has for several years past, their present 
controversial relations being purely of a 
business nature, indications point to the 
paths of each taking different directions 
shortly, as far as pitcures are concerned. 



U ACTORS NEED ASSISTANCE 

So many of the actors employed at the 
west coast Universal plant receive yearly 
incomes in excess of $3,000 that it has 
been found necessary to hire a man to as- 
sist the lucky thespians in computing the 
taxable amount of their earnings. Strange 
to say, but it is a fact well known, that 
that majority of the film actors of the 
East are perfectly safe from a visit by 
the income tax collector. 



SUES MARY FOR FIVE THOUSAND 

Lawyer Samuel Field would reduce 
Mary Pickford's bank account to the ex- 
tent of $5,000, according to a suit filed 
against the actress in the County Court 
House last week. The attorney alleges 
the amount is due him for services ren- 
dered Miss Pickford between April 2 and 
June 10, 1916, and relates to the drawing 
up of contracts for engagements. 



ROWLAND MAKES A PREDICTION 

Richard A. Rowland in a recently pub- 
lished interview declares the "feature" of 
the future will be a four reeler instead of 
the popular five part affair now being 
made. Rowland is president of Metro and 
his opinion should count for something. 



METRO ELECTS OFFICERS 

But one change was made in last year's 
roster of Metro officers at the election 
Jan. 12, Louis B. Mayer, of Boston, suc- 
ceeding Mr. Fitzgerald as vice-president. 
John H. Kunsky, of Detroit, was added 
to the directorate. 



SCHENCK ENGAGES DIRECTORS 

Julius Steger and Joseph Golden have 
been signed by Jos. Schenck to direct 
the future activities of Norma Talmadge. 
Schenck will shortly produce a picture 
having Evelyn Nesbit Thaw as its star. 



BROOKLYN'S CARNIVAL 

The Associated Motion Picture Exhibi- 
tors of Long Island will hold a carnival 
and ball at Stauch's, Coney Island, 
February 1. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle 
is conducting a voting contest to deter- 
mine the popular actor and actress who 
will lead the march. 



"PURITY" THE LAST, SAYS MAYOR 

"Purity," a Mutual which bases its 
appeal on the undraped charms of Audrey 
Munson, the model, will be the last pic- 
ture featuring a nude woman shown in 
Cleveland, Ohio, as long as Mayor Davis 
holds office, according to a statement 
issued by that official last week. 



PRESS CLUB SEES "INTOLERANCE" 

The Press Club of Washington was in- 
vited to a private exhibition of "Intoler- 
ance" last week by D. W. Griffith. During 
the intermission between the first and sec- 
ond parts of the big spectacle Griffith 
made a speech, panning the would-be cen- 
sors of the country very handily. 



MARIE CAHILL FOR MUTUAL 

Marie Cahill will appear in pictures for 
Mutual. Miss Cahill has made one or 
two screen appearances before but lacked 
opportunity principally because of poor 
direction. The Mutual will feature her in 
comedies. 



HONORS FOR ANITA 

Honors are coming thick and fast to 
Anita Stewart. She has been selected to 
lead the gTand march of the New Jersey 
Exhibitors' Association ball to be held 
February 1 in Krueger's Auditorium, New- 
ark, N. J. 



DWAN GOLDWYN DIRECTOR 

Allan Dwan will not accept the post of 
director-general of Fine Arts Studios on 
the coast, but has decided to remain in 
the East and produce pictures for 
Goldwyn. He is rated as one of the best 
men in his line. 



N. A. M. P. I. TO HOLD DINNER 

The N. A. M. P. I. will give a dinner at 
a Broadway restaurant Jan. 26. Harry 
Reichenbach is chairman of the commit- 
tee of arrangements. Over 300 guests are 
expected. 



BIG PRODUCERS 

PLAN UPLIFT 

LEAGUE 

TO REFORM MOVIES FROM WITHIN 



At a recent meeting of the National 
Association of the Motion Picture In- 
dustry, called for the purpose of consider- 
ing ways and means of combating censor- 
ship and other evils that have beset the 
business since its inception, it was de- 
cided to form a body, whose chief func- 
tion will be to raise the standards of pro- 
duction. 

In other words, American film men have 
arrived at the conclusion that the best 
way to offset the activities of professional 
busybodies is to set their respective 
houses in order and reform the business 
from within. D. W. Griffith heads the 
committee appointed to form the offshoot 
of the N. A. of the M. P. I. which, when 
organized, will be called the Motion Pic- 
ture Art League. 

Among the things that will receive the 
special attention of the league will be the 
presentation of the undraped female figure 
on the screen. According to the plan of 
procedure now formulating all nudity will 
be barred unconditionally, no matter how 
well the obscenity or suggestiveneas of 
the subject may be disguised as "art." 

This ruling if carried into effect, and 
there is every probability that it will be, has 
already caused several producers more 
than a moment of sober reflection. It is 
the intention of the Art League to co- 
operate with the National Board of Re- 
view. The League will be in working 
order within a fortnight. 



PANTAGES BOOKS SERIAL 

Alex Pantages has broken the Vita 
serial, "The Secret Kingdom," for his en- 
tire western circuit. Serials look like a 
good bet for vaudeville' houses right now. 



FAIRBANKS STILL UNDECIDED 

Ever since Douglas Fairbanks quit Tri- 
angle he has been deluged with offers, 
ranging according to Bennie Zeldman, his 
youthful representative, from five to 
fifteen thousand dollars a week. Early 
this week Fairbanks had not made up his 
mind whether he would make productions 
on his own account or work for a film 
manufacturer. Artcraft's bid for Fair- 
banks' services may be accepted. 



BARRIER GOES OVER 

"The Barrier," the film version which 
Edgar Lewis completed several months 
ago, has just been shown for the approval 
of the critics. The Kcx Beach story has 
all the qualities of a sensational screen 
success. Lubin owned the rights of the 
book originally, but transferred them to 
Ben Hampton of the General Film. 



NEW DES MOINES EXCHANGE 

0. W. Jeffries has opened a new film 
exchange in Des Moines. He will operate 
under the name of the Interstate Film 
Corporation and handle the Bud Fisher 
cartoons as well as several big five reelers 
in the Iowa territory. 



PARASITES COMING BRADY-WORLD 

"The Parasites" is the title of a new 
Brady-World photoplay. It concerns, ac- 
cording to the World publicity department, 
"authors, newspaper men and women, 
artists and social climbers." 



TRI HAS ONE-REEL COMEDIES 

Triangle has twelve single reelers of 
the comic variety ready for market. Evi- 
dently Triangle is prepared for any 
emergencies that might arise. 



HUGHIE MACK LEAVES FLATBUSH 

Hugliie Mack and his comedy cohorts 
are now on their way to the coast, the 
heavy-weight comedian having bid Flat- 
bush adieu last Sunday. Mack, who 
started as an extra a couple of years ago, 
has been making rapid progress of late. 
His comedies arc in big demand at pres- 
ent. 



ESSANAY HAS TIMELY FILM 

"The Life of Buffalo Bill" is the title 
of a timely feature Essanay will release 
shortly. The recent death of the great 
Indian scout and showman has created 
renewed interest in his unusual adven- 
tures, and the company expects a big de- 
mand for the film. 



MULLEN SCENARIO EDITOR 

Eugene Mullen, who gave up the task 
of fitting Vita's stars with trustworthy 
vehicles to direct, has returned to the 
script department, this time not as a mere 
private in the ranks but in the capacity 
of scenario editor. 



GOLDWYN'S NEW OFFICES 

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation will en- 
ier its new offices this week. The head- 
quarters of the concern will be at 16 E. 
42d St., New York. Twelve pictures will 
be produced before releasing announce- 
ments are made. 



WARWICK'S NEW DIRECTOR 

Leonce Perret, famed as "the Griffith 
of France," will direct Robert Warwick'a 
next Selznick picture, "The Court of St. 
Simon." The Oppenheim novel was se 
lected by Harry Rapf, Warwick's personal 
manager, as the best of aeversl vehicles 
submitted and work on it is to be started 
at once it is said. 



COMIC OPERA STAR PRODUCING 

Maude Lillian Herri, former star of 
numerous light opera productions, is the 
financial power back of the company re- 
sponsible for "Glory," a five reeler featur- 
ing Kolb and Dill. Unity Films is dis- 
tributing the picture. 



MARY FULLER WITH LASKY 

Mary Fuller, erstwhile Universal star, 
has decided to forego the establishment of 
her own producing company for the pres- 
ent and has signed to play opposite Lou 
Tellegen in "The Long Trail," for Leaky. 



PARAMOUNT HAS ARBUCKLE 

After March 1, Fatty Arbuckle, cele- 
brated Keystone comique, will make film 
comedies under the ma na g em ent of Jos. 
Schenck, which will be released on the 
Paramount program. 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 17, 1917 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"THE GIRL PHILIPPA" 

ViUgraph. Eight Reels. 
Released as a special by Vita. 

Cast 

Philippa Anita Steteart 

Warner 8. Rankin Dreie 

Balkeit Frank Morgan 

Bitter Eila Mitt Curley 

The Countett BiUie Billings 

General Delitle .Captain Eyerman 

Gray Ned Hay 

Schmidt .Stanley Dunn 

Hoffman Alfred Raboek 

Atticot Jules Covles 

Madam ArUtne Betty Young 

Esser L. 8. Johnson 

WUdretse Anders Randolf 

Story — Wild eyed melodrama. Adaptation 
of novel by Robert Chambers. Directed 
by S. Rankin Drew. 

Action — Rambling. 

Continuity— Very badly jumbled. 

Suspense — Manufactured. 

Detail— Fair. 

Atmosphere — Fair. 

Photography— Good. 

Remarks. 

From the looks of things, this was evi- 
dently intended aa a serial. Certainly it 
contains all of the popular ingredients for 
a "continued in our next." There is the cus- 
tomary improbabilities, forced situations, 
long drawn coincidences and regulation ex- 
pedients one expects to find in "The Follies 
of Fannie" and """l" 1 masterpieces so 
dear to the heart of the pop house film 
fan. Anita Stewart seems lost when it 
comes to expressing anything akin to real 
emotion and wanders - through the eight 
reels with a set expression thoroughly out 
of accord with the action. A capable dra- 
matic instructor could do wonders with 
Miss Stewart, who is young and undeniably 
beautiful It seems a pity that she hasn't 
yet acquired even the rudiments of acting. 
As a whole, the picture will please the 
class of patrons it was made to entertain. 
Box Office Value. 

The Hearst papers have given "The Girl 
Phillipa" some wonderful publicity. It will 
undoubtedly help its drawing power im- 
measurably. Three days. Suitable for 
smaller and middle grade houses. 

"THE FOOLISH VIRGIN" 

C. K. Young. Six Seels. 
Released Dec 18 by Behnick 
Cast. 

Mary Adams Clara Kimball Young 

Jim Anthony Contoay Tearle 

Nance Outen Katherine Proctor 

Jacob Harden Edward Elkat 

Dr. Mulford Paul Capellani 

Story — Modern problem play. Adaptation 

of novel of same name by Thoa. H. 

Dixon. Albert Capellani, director. 
Action— Full of fire. 
Continuity — Smooth. 
Suspense — Cicely sustained throughout. 
Detail— Good. 

Atmosphere — Especially good. 
Photography — Excellent. 

Remarks. 

"The Foolish Virgin" is a virile photo- 
drama, capably directed and competently 
acted. The action contains numerous little 
incidents of the human interest variety 
and the story is told with a simple direct- 
ness that cannot fall to appeal to the 
average picture fan. Seenically the film 
leaves nothing to be. desired. The great 
East Side of New York and the wild 
mountain country of North Carolina axe 
both utilized as backgrounds, each being 
depicted with a fine degree of realism. 
The interiors are well staged and the pic- 
ture on the whole is expensively and at 
the same time artistically mounted. Clara 
Kimball Young gives a sincere and care- 
fully studied portrayal of a young school 
teacher * 

Box Office Value. 

Large cities full week. Smaller towns 
two to three days. 



"TRUTHFUL TULLIVER" 

Ince. Fire Reels. 
Released Jan. 7 by Triangle. 

Cast. 

Truth Tutliver IF. S. Hart 

Grace Burton Alma Reubens 

York CantreU Xorbert A. Myles 

Daisy Burton Nina Byron 

Silver Lodo Thompson Walter Perry 

Deacon Doyle Milton Ross 

Story — Human interest drama. Written 
for screen by J. G. Hawks. Locale, small 
town in the wildest and wooliest part 
of the west. Directed by Wm. S. Hart. 
Action— Full of thrills. 
Continuity— Not a break. 
Suspense — Strong. 
Detail— Right. 
Atmosphere— Perfect. 
Photography— Standard. 
Remarks. 
"Truthful Tulliver" Is a western news- 
paper editor whose propensity for print- 
ing the news regardless of consequences 
keeps him in constant difficulties with the 



lawless element of the community. The 
story is full of realism and a couple of 
dare-devil riding bits, contributed by Wm. 
S. Hart, stamps that clever artist as a 
picture star who apparently is willing to 
take any sort of personal risk in order to 
incorporate the always desirable "punch". 
The western atmosphere is great through- 
out, and the small town newspaper office 



resembles the real thing to a nicety. Alma 
Reubens plays the role of the heroine sym- 
pathetically, and Walter Ferry makes s 
small part stand out because of the fidel- 
ity of his characterization. 

Box Office Value. 
Three days. Suitable for any class of 
house. Hart's admirers will like this one. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY 

In association with 

WORLD PICTURES 

Presents 

MARIE DRESSLER 

In 

§t 



Tillie Wakes Up 

Cast JatcsasBna: JOHNNIE H1NES 

Story by MARK SWAM. 

Directed by HARRY DAVENPORT. 



>• 




!' 



NEW YORK SWEPT OFF ITS FEET ! 

JESSE L. LASKY presents 

Geraldine Farrar as Joan of Arc 

Id Cedl B. De Mille's production. "JOAN THE WOMAN." by Jeanie MaePherson 

Now Dliy !n«~to capacity audiences, twice daily at the Forty-fourth Street Theatre. New York City 
Produced by Cardinal Film Corporation. 489 Fifth Avenue. New York 




January 17, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



QUICK 



PLAYS 




Deliveries of Costumes, Tights and Wigs 

^ ______ We ^ Manufacturers niast^ted r cau.'o^ne 

"™ x ^^^^^^^^^ m Our Rental Department Co—tains Over S,000 Costumes. 

NOW READY! Jack Weber's Minstrel Joke Book 

No. 1. A Bis Hit. 25c. Postpaid 

We carry four complete lines of Make Up 

CHICAGO COSTUME WORKS S5°S-- ot-SoU^g CHICAGO, U. S. A. 
FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Books for home 
amusement, Negro _Plays,__ Paper, Scenery, Mrs. Jarley's Wax 



Works. 



Catalogue 
SAMUEL FRENCH. 2S W, 



Free! Free! Free! 

it JSth St., New York 



^Jack or the NAME 




Taylor X X Professional Trunk* 

Made for "The Mao Who Cares." 

Ask the thousands of TAYLOR TRUNK 

users sod hear their expressions of satis- 
faction. 

THERE MUST BE A REASON: 
Send Mr new 191T Catalog. 



L ,. 

I _• W. 44th Street, New York City 



C. A . TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also a few 
Second Rand Innovation and Fibre Ward- 



robe Trunks, $10 and $15. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks 
and Bal Trunks. 



Parlor Floor. 2S W. list St., New York City 



STAGE SHOES 

WOOD SOLE 
CLOGS 

Send for Catalog. 

NEELY BROS. 

729 W. Madlaon St. 
CHICAGO. 

Opp. Baymarktt Theatre. 

■•mjjfew? 




Satin slippers in stock in 
all colore. Entire conrpan- 
it?s; fitted in 24 hours. 
EvwySta0> and Street shoo 
•wflrirenieni is satisfied here. 



1554 Bum*., n. y. 




Big Time Acts 



PARODIES, etc. Catalog 
for stamp. Exclusive 
work done. Tuna for 

•tamp. Interviews arranged for by letter only. 

HAB Y THAYER. tUO Broad 8 1- . Provtdaaea. R. L 



BUILD UP YOUR ACT 

And Double Your Income 

WITH 

DEAGAN 

Almninnm Chimes 
Pizzicato Nabimbas 

Marlmb-phones 
Electric Un_-Fons 

AND OTHER MUSICAL 
NOVELTIES 

Write (or List of Show-Room Bargains. 




Da— g_ a 



J. C DEAGAN 



42— t Raves swood Ave. 

CAGO. ILLINOIS 



TIGHTS 

Cotton Tights, ray rood quality, 
a piir yOe- Worsted Tights. 
medium vdsht. $2.00 a pair. 
Worsted Tights, beary weight, 
S2.75 a pair. Imported slit 
plaited tights. In bright lea sad 
golden Brown, only $2.50 a 
pair. Slltouce Tights la all 
colors. 12.50 a pair. Heavy 75 
per cent. Imported ills tights, 
in bright red only, reduce d from 
$5.00 to $4.00 s pair. I— 1 
■lteve Shirts to match tights ; 
same price as Ughta. Orders 
(Med promptly. Clipper Catalog 
free on application. 

BERNARD MANDL 
210-212 W. MADISON ST. CHICAGO. ILL 




B B & B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

I Ply Fibre Covered 
Chicago: Marshall Field * Co. $40.00 

Send for Catalogue 
B B * B TR UNK CO, Pittsburg. Pa. 

VAUDEVILLE ACTS. ETC 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAU. Tre- 
mont Theatre. N. Y. City- 
Stamp for catalog. 



PLAYS 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any size up to 15x20 feet, 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colors. 

fLOO deposit with each order. Sch— U's Seas— c 
tudlo, Columbus, O. 



CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes, dabs, Batons, 
Guns, Wire Walkers' Apparatus and Novelties, 
Stamp for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK, 
Cincinnati. O 

NOW READY 

THE | CLIPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 
It contains the names and addresses of Man- 



agers, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agent* In New 
York. Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
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studied under Mr. Alrieue: Annette Kcl- 
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AND STOCKINGS, FANCY BRO- 
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quest. When asking for Catalogue, 
please mention what goods are wanted. 

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NEW YORK 

The Theatrical Supply Emporium 



CLOTH BANNERS 

(TYPE WORK ONLY) One Two 

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100 26x12 cloth Banners. Hat or upright. $12.00 114.00 

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PLAYS. SKETCHES 
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terms stamp. List of 
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Make Up Stamp. 
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advertisement is running. 

LAWYERS 
F. L. Boyd. Attorney, 17 N. La Salle St., 
Chicago. 

MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 

Cfias. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

MUSICAL GLASSES. 

A. Brauneiss, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond Hill. 

N. Y. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 

Howard Tuttle, 141 Burleigh St.. Milwaukee, 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

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phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
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TENTS. 
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THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., It' Washington St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 

Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St., Boston, 
Mass. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker, 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

TRANSFERS. 

Walton, 455 W. 33d St., N. Y. 1179 Greeley 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson, 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C 



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TOUPEES, GREASE 
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lit N. Ninth St.. Ph"-i-«r J -'r 



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Foil Dress , Tuxedo «•« Prince Albert Sni t » 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St.. Chicago 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodies written to 
song poems. W. H. NELSON. Astor Theatre 
Bldg.. 1531 Broadway. N. Y. 

for STRttT aid SIAGE: WEAR 

Mode to ordi-r from S". to $100 

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poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writing 
music for new authors, and assists publication. 
Send your poems or complete songs. Estab. 
1900. Suite 505, Astor Theatre Bldg., 45th and 
Broadway, N*. Y. 



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rag TxcHwtcax raaaa. srxw roex 



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FROM BECOMING THE NATIONS GRANDEST HIT 
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tn in m> tin 111 m uu m Lit m m ivi nn m m m m li 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER January 24, 1917 



VAUDEVILLE ARTISTS 

If You Want Immediate Time 
Communicate With 

ABE I. FEINBERG 

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Room 504 1493 BrOadway Putnam Bldg. 

Phone Bryant 3664 

General Manager 

NATIONAL PRODUCING CO. 

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BiinmrwriiiimiiiMiiiiiiiHmiw: inrummiMtrntitiiiiiinimnmiHiM-'W™™''"""^ HniiPri[minmnmpiit)pfl|[|||Hr)iina[TiiimiiiMiw^ 

FAY TEMPLETON 

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w.'\: !iiLr!i^w-iiu:uini!i;inmuiiiiiirinriiiiiiiiiRiii;:t^ 



MARTY BROOKS 

PRESENTS 

WITH JUST ONE LAUOH 

(From Start to Finish) 

MISS HAMLET 

By JAMES HORAN Most Novel Girl Act In Vaudeville 

Featuring "The Moving Picture Star," 

AL. FREEMAN MISS PAULINE BARRI PHIL* MORRIS 

BUS. Rep. And a Company of Heron. • BooWn B Rc «»- 

CAN USE CLEVER MALE SINGING AND DANCING TEAM. ALSO— CHORUS GIRLS — CALL— ROOM 617 COLUMBIA THEATRE BUILDING 



•2 - K r 



\:r;. ':.:''. ■. i M • 




Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 24, 1917 



VOLUME LXIV— No. SI 
Price Ten Cents 



MUSIC PUBLISHERS WIN 

BIG COPYRI GHT FIGHT 

United States Supreme. Court Sustains Law Giving Them Right 

to Collect Royalties from All Establishment* Where Music 

Is Heard. Decision Means Approximately $3,000,000 



Through a decision rendered by the 
United States Supreme Court in Washing- 
ton, Monday, reversing the opinion of the 
lower court as to the use of musical num- 
bers and scores in hotels and restaurants, 
without the permission of the copyright 
owner, more than 13,000,000 annually will 
be added to the bank accounts of the mu- 
sic publishers, authors and composers of 
the United States. 

There were two cases in which this de- 
cision was rendered. One was that of the 
John Church Co, againet the Hilliard 
Hotel Co., operators of the Hotel Vander- 
bilt, and the other Victor Herbert against 
the Shanley Kestaurant Co. The opinion, 
which was written by Justice Holmes, 
was not read, as the jurist was unable to 
attend the sitting of the Court, but is ex-; 
pee ted to be within the course of a week. ' 

In the matter of the Church Co. against 
the Hotel Vanderbilt, it w&a ' alleged that 
the orchestra in the Vanderbilt was play- 
ing a copyrighted number published by 
them, entitled "Sousa'a March, . From 
Maine to Oregon," without their permis- 
sion. They contended that the rendition 
of this music was a public performance 
for profit and, therefore, permission or 
license must be obtained from the pub- 
lisher prior to its use, in accord with the 
protection afforded by the copyright law. 
An action was brought in the United 
States District Court on this contention 
and decided in favor of the Church com- 
pany. An appeal to the Circuit Court of 
Appeals was then taken by the hotel 
company, and the lower court was re- 
versed, the court holding that, in their be- 
lief, the playing of the score at the hotel 
was not a public performance for profit 
and a violation of the copyright law, as 
no admission fee was charged. 
- Permission was then obtained from the 
United States Supreme Court to appeal 
the ruling and argument was heard in the 
case on Jan. 10. Louis J. Vorbaus, of 
House, Grossman & Vorhaus, argued the 
appeal for the Church company, and bis 
contention was that, no matter whether a 
direct admission fee was charged or not, 
as is the case in cabaret establishments, 
restaurants and hotels, an indirect fee was 
charged through the price asked for food. 



The performance was, therefore, for profit, 
and a fee shonld be paid. 

This was the main point of argument 
before the court and, according to Mr. 
Vorbaus, it is the belief that the decision 
was based on this score, as it is impossible 
to glean the substance of the opinion until 
it is handed down by Mr. Justice Holmes. 
The other action was started on behalf 
of Victor Herbert by Nathan Burkan 
shortly after the Church case and took 
the same course in the lower courts. 
Both were argued before the Supreme 
Court on the same day, on account of 
their similarity. In the Herbert case, it 
was contended that the Shanley people 

. were allowing a song entitled, "Sweet- 
heart," from the opera the "Sweethearts," 
written by Herbert, to be used in their 

-establishment without his permission. It 
is the belief of Burkan that the decision 
in the Herbert case is practically the same 
as that in the Church matter. 

The scope of, this decision can hardly 
be determined' Under the construction 
and interpretation' of the copyright law, 
permission or license must be obtained 
to use any copyright number in an estab- 
lishment conducted for profit, whether ad- 
mission fee is charged directly or indirect- 
ly,, ns long as the performance is public. 

In view of this latest decision practical- 
ly every sort of entertainment where com- 
positions, scores or songs are rendered, 
whether hotel, restaurant, cabaret, thea- 
tre, dance or concert hall will have to 
obtain permission from the publishers to 
use copyrighted numbers and pay a fee. 

For the purpose of collecting revenues 
derived through the passage of the new 
copyright law in 1009, the American So- 
ciety of Composers, Authors and Publish- 
ers was formed a few years ago. George 
Maxwell of Riccordi & Co., is presi- 
dent. This organization is patterned after, 
and affiliated with, the French Society of 
Authors, Composers and Editors which 
collects over $1,000,000 annually in 
license fees for its members. This society, 
after its organization, arranged a schedule 
of the license fee to be charged various 
establishments, hotels and restaurants for 
the use of the copyrighted numbers. The 

(Continued on faff* 4.) 



K.INSLOW LEAVES STAGE 

Stuyvesant Kinslow, formerly in the 
support of Valerie Bergere, has become a 
salesman for the National Cash Register 
Co. 



SEYMOUR AND DUPRE BACK 

Seymour and Duprc will show their act 
on the Proctor time, beginning Jan. 29, 
after a twelve years' absence from New 
York. 



LOOMIS WITH CORT THEATRE 

George Loomis has been appointed treas- 
urer of the Cort Theatre. He was formerly 
connected with the Criterion in the same 
capacity. 



IVY TROUTMAN ILL 

Ivy Troutman is temporarily out of the 
cast of "Seremonda" because of illness. 
Louise Waller is playing her role in the 
meantime. 



"SEREMONDA" FOR LONDON 

O. P. Heggie is negotiating with a prom- 
inent English star for a London produc- 
tion of "Seremonda," in which Julia Ar- 
thur is now appearing at the Criterion, 
this city. 



NIVEN ABANDONS SOUTHERN TOUR 

Philip Niven has abandoned the South- 
ern tour of his "Little Cafe" Company, 
owing to the poor business prevailing in 
the South, and bas switched to Northern 
territory. 



FLORENCE EARLE ILL 
Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 21. — A serious 
attack of pneumonia has caused Florence 
Korle's temporary withdrawal from the 
cast of "Very Good Eddie." Meanwhile her 
place is being taken by Louise Cook. 



SON FOR ROBERT PRIEST 

Robert W. Priest, press representative 
of the General Film Company, announces 
the arrival of a ten-pound son nt the Priest 
domicile iu Bath Beach on Jan. 11. The 
youngster was named Gerald Frederick 
Priest. 



AMY RICARD TO ACT AGAIN 

Amy Ricard has returned to New York 
from Spain last week, and says she intends 
to return to the stage. 



THEATRE OWNER ARRESTED 

OssnniTO, N. Y., Jan: 22.— A commit- 
tee of the Civic League saw the film "In- 
spiration" at a local house to-day and de- 
cided that it was corrupting the morals of 
the youth of this city. Accordingly Louis 
Rosenberg, proprietor of the theatre, was 
arrested. 



FORM CIRCUIT 
OF 20 HOUSES 
F0RF0LUES 

EDWARD F. RUSH HEADS PLAN 



A new circuit, to be composed of twenty 
houses in the larger cities of the country 
and devoted exclusively to productions of 
the "Follies" type, was organized this week 
witli the tiling of incorporation papers by 
"The Circuit of Musical Follies," Inc., at 
Albany. Edward F. Rush is president aud 
general manager. Harry N. Stcinfeld is 
vice-president, B. F. Kahn is treasurer, and 
Samson Friedlander is secretary. The cir- 
cuit will be ready to begin operations on 
Labor Day. 

The plan of the new organization is to 
give clean, high class shows, designed on the 
"Follies" pattern, with new idea two-act 
books, original music and sumptuous set- 
tings. Producers will be offered a full sea- 
son's, work for all shows booked, with the 
possibility of a Summer run after the reg- 
ular season is ended. The theatres selected 
in the different cities are to be of the high- 
est type and will be conducted in an up- 
to-date manner. 

Plans for the launching of the new circuit 
have been progressing for some time and 
many of the details have already been com- 
pleted. Among the latter are the names of 
the shows. Which are to be called the Lou- 
don Follies, Jolly Widow Follies, French 
Maid Follies, Broadway Follies. Ameri- 
can Beauty Follies. Parisian Follies, 
Gaiety Girl Follies, Bohemian Follies, Gold- 
en Doll Follies, Blue Ribbon Follies. Bon- 
nie Lassie Follies. Knickerbocker Follies. 
Fifth Avenue Belle Follies, High Life Fol- 
lies, Batchellor Girl Follies, Arabian Night 
Follies, French Student Follies and the 
Killamey Girl Follies. 

Edward F. Rush is well known ns one 
of the shrewdest and most capable of pro- 
ducers, big ability having been largely in 
strumental in making the Columbia Amuse- 
ment Co. what it is to-day. With the as- 
sistance of Messrs. Steinfeld, Kahn and 
Friedlander, all of whom are experienced 
iu the theatrical field, the new venture is 
hailed by many persons as having come at 
exactly the right time to win success. 

The organization of the new circuit is 
the resnlt of the increasing favor with 
which "Follies" shows have been every- 
where received 'throughout the country, re- 
ports crediting them with drawing money 
where other attractions have railed. Offices 
of the new corporation have been estab- 
lished at 1482 Broadway. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 24, 1917 



BELL TO START WAR ON 
SHOWS IN RES TAURANTS 

License Commissioner Says Establishments Charging a Cover Fee 
Are Virtually Charging Admission and That Licenses 
Must Be Procured; Action Will Follow In- 
vestigations Now Being Made 



Tbe long-waged war of theatrical man- 
agers against proprietors of restaurants 
where cabaret entertainments are being 
given, is coining to a head. 

Several days ago Arthur Hammerstein 
wrote a letter to Commissioner of Licenses 
Urorce II. Bell, protesting against res- 
taurants being permitted to give musical 
entertainments without a theatrical license, 
in certain instances charging admission. In 
reply Commissioner Bell wrote that he 
agreed that restaurants giving theatrical 
ixrrformances should be subject to the same 
regulations as theatres, and should have 
theatrical licenses. He stated that he was 
going to investigate the situation thor- 
oughly and begin proceedings through tbe 
Corporation Counsel to test the legal status 
of restaurants giving such performances. 

In a talk with a Clipper representative. 
Commissioner Bell stated that, despite a 
contrary opinion rendered by Judge Crnin. 
he feels that, under the law, licenses are 
required, and that he has under way n plan 



to test the matter out. He contends that 
establishments charging a cover fee are 
virtually charging an admission fee and, 
therefore, should be compelled to take oat 
a license. 

"As a matter of fact," said Commis- 
sioner Bell, "according to a decision by 
Magistrate Paul Krotel, it is his belief that 
even tbe singing of a song in a restaurant 
requires a license. However, I am willing 
to grant a broader interpretation of tbe 
law than that, but feel that where theat- 
rical performances are given, as is the case 
is most restaurants, a license must be pro- 
cured." 

Commissioner Bell is having inspectors 
visit cabaret places and restaurants and 
make notes of the style of performances 
given. As soon as these reports are com- 
pleted be will take action. He believes 
that, as long as the "Midnight Frolic" and 
the "Cocoanut Grove" pay license fees un- 
der the theatrical ordinances, all other es- 
tablishments should do likewise. 



FLORENCE MOORE 

Florence Moore, whose picture appears 
on the cover of this week's Clipper, was 
formerly in vaudeville with Billy Mont- 
gomery, but now has a comedy, singing 
and talking act with her brother, Frank 
Moore. They were headline!* at the 
Palace last week and Miss Moore easily 
upheld her reputation as one of America's 
leading comediennes. She has a personal- 
ity and talent that stamps her work as 
original and a natural spontaneity that 
at once puts an audience in good humor. 



BRISCOE TRANSFERRED 

Johnson Briscoe, who has been for a 
number of seasons stage manager for Mrs. 
Fiske, has been transferred by Madison 
Corey and Joseph Riter to a similar ca- 
pacity with "A Nigger in the Woodpile" 
and "A Night at an Inn," which they have 
iu preparation in association with Harri- 
son Grey Fiske. 



LADA SIGNS WITH RUSH 

Lada, who formerly danced with the 
Boston Symphony orchestra, has com- 
pleted arrangements with Edward F. Rush 
whereby she will make a tour of the prin- 
cipal cities of the country under his di- 
rc-ctiun. Mr. Rush has also signed up 
John O'Malley. the Irish tenor, for a con- 
cert tour. 

FRED DAILEY DEAD 

Milwaukee, Wis., Jan. 21. — Fred Dailey, 
:m advance agent of Katinku. died suddenly 
of heart disease here tonight. He was 42 
years of age and well known in theatrical 
circles, haviug at one time been the man- 
ager of the Marat Theatre in Indianapolis. 



BIG BILL FOR COLONIAL 

Manager Alfred T. Darling of the Co- 
lonial has prepared a bill which includes a 
big array of stars for the Mid-Winter car- 
nival, beginning Monday at this house. 
Eleven vaudeville acts have been booked. 



FIRST JAMES FILM SOON 

Arthur James' debut as a motion picture 
producer will be made Feb. 12, when the 
Metro will release on its program "One of 
Many," a motion picture made by James. 



WARREN WITH ARBUCKLE CO. 

Herbert Warren, for nine years leading 
man for Valerie Bergere, has left her act 
to join the Roscoe Arbuckle forces as a 
scenario writer and director. 



JAMES B. BRADY SERIOUSLY ILL 

Atlantic Cttt, Jan. 22. — James Bu- 
chanan Brady is reported seriously ill at 
tbe Hotel Sbelburne. Heart disease is be- 
lieved to be the cause. 



NORA BAYES EXTENDS RECITALS 

Nora Hayes will continue her song re- 
citals at the Eltinge Theatre for another 
week. 



PRESIDENT'S NIECE IN SHOW 
Margaret Vale, a niece of President Wil- 
son, has been cast for the role of Mary 
Harvey iu the new Southern comedy by 
Harris Dickson, "A Nigger in tbe Wood- 
pile." 

MUSIC PUBLISHERS WIN 

{Continued from page 3.) 
fee was graded according to the place 
where the numbers were being used and 
the style of entertainment. 

It is expected that as soon as the opin- 
ion of Justice Holmes is obtainable and 
the purport interpreted, tbe American So- 
ciety will take immediate steps to put 
into effect this system of collecting toll. 

The revenues received by the Society 
from the rendition of these copyright num- 
bers will be proportioned as to tbe num- 
ber of selections used from the various 
concerns and the proceeds divided equally 
among the author, composer and publish- 
er of the copyright article. 



KILLS SELF IN HIPPODROME 

An unidentified man, evidently a Can- 
adian, shot and killed himself in the or- 
chestra of the Hippodrome Monday after- 
noon, just before the matinee performance. 
The suicide placed the revolver inside his 
coat as he fired and the report was muffled. 
An usher saw him draw the gun and 
started toward him as the trigger was 
pulled. 



LOEW AND FOX 

BAN MOSS 

BOOKINGS 

AGENTS MUST WORK SEPARATELY 



GRANT H. BROWNE GETS GARDEN 

Grant H. Browne and associates have 
taken over Madison Square Garden, the re- 
ported price being $2,400,000. An applica- 
tion win be made for a charter for a club 
to be known as the National Sports Club 
of America. Numerous alterations in the 
building are to be made. 



KELLARD HAS NARROW ESCAPE 

Ssvaititah, Gil, Jan. 20. — Ralph Kel- 
lard, co-star with Pearl White in "Pearl 
of the Army," narrowly escaped being 
drowned while an nnder-water scene of the 
picture was being filmed here. 



POSTPONE "THE WANDERER" 

The premiere of '-The Wanderer" was 
postponed from last night at the Manhat- 
tan Opera House until Monday night. 



RICE GOING WITH "PIERROT" 

Myron Rice will accompany "Pierrot tbe 
Prodigal" when it goes on tour and Paul 
Davis will travel in advance. 



DAZEY WITH LASKY COMPANY 

Charles T. Dazey, author of "In Old 
Kentucky," has signed a contract with the 
Lasky Company, and will hereafter write 
scripts for that organization exclusively. 



All of the agents booking acts through 
the Loew offices were called into the office 
of Joseph M. Schenck, general booking 

manager of the Loew Circuit last Satur- 
day morning and given strict instructions 
.to the effect that, in the future, if they 
desire to do business through that office 
they must refrain from visiting or doing 
business with the Moss Circuit office. 

In the past, all of the Loew agents 
were permitted, in addition to booking 
acts with the Fox Circuit, to also place 
artists with the B. S. Moss offices. In 
this way an agent was able to provide 
an act with about twenty weeks' work, 
six of them being booked through the 
Moss offices. Recently, however, it was 
found that it was not advantageous to 
the Loew and Fox interests to have acts 
on their bills that were also being played 
over the B. S. Moss Circuit. 

Investigation was made, and it was 
found that most of the acts placed on the 
Moss time had already done so or were 
going to play either the Fox or Loew time 
and that these acts were being placed by 
agents who were operating as Loew & 
Fox representatives. The Loew and Fox 
heads gave the matter consideration, and 
it was finally decided that, the above 
course was the one to follow. 




RUTH ROBINSON 

Oliver Morosco is being congratulated in having so clever and experienced a leading woman 
as Ruth Robinson at the head of his productions in Los Angeles. 

Miss Robinson's first appearance at the Morosco Theatre in the title role of "Jerry** won the 
unanimous praise of both patrons and critics. Since then she has become a sterling favorite 
because of a winning personality and .exceptional technique; in addition to which natural charms 
she has added an excellent wardrobe of stunning gowns. 

For several years Miss Robinson has done excellent work as leading woman in the companies 
of well known producers in the East; her last two engagements being -with Poll's, Springfield, 
Mass.. stock company and with Keith's Company in New York. 

During her engagement at the Morosco she will be seen in many new plays and will even- 
tually be featured in one of Mr. Morosco* s New York productions. 



January 24, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



SOUTH IS RICH 

FIELD FOR 

BERNHARDT 



GETTING 85-15 SPLIT ON RECEIPTS 



WOMAN MANAGING THEATRES 

BOSTON, Jan. 19. — Mildred Champagne, 
known as a playwright and newspaper 
woman, has become manager of a string 
of motion picture and vaudeville theatres 
through New England. Her Boston house, 
which will be known as the Mildred Cham- 
pagne Theatre, was formerly the Scenic 
Temple. Id connection with ber theatres 
she will conduct a dramatic school. 



Ltnchbubg, Va., Jan. 22. — Sarah 
Bernhardt is certainly getting a good per- 
centage split throughout the South. With 
80-20 as a minimum, the famous actress 
is playing a number of houses on an S5- 
15 basis. 

The management asked 90-10 in Lynch- 
burg, but Manager Rolant T. Hamner, of 
the Academy of Music, refused to accept 
the terms. The tragedienne's manager 
then arranged to offer the "Divine Sarah" 
in Richmond on the basis of 85-15 and she 
rrtayed there at that figure, and also at 
Roanoke on the same terms, according to 
Samuel H. Jolliffe. At the latter city, 
the provision was made that 80-20 would 
prevail in case the seat sale amounted 
to a certain figure. 

Although Hamner declined to book the 
internationally known woman at 90-10, 
it has been learned that he offered to 
guarantee her $1,000. which step on his 
part was an assurance of capacity busi- 
ness. In turning down the attraction, 
Hamner showed that theatres in Lynch- 
bnrg are not operated merely to accommo- 
date the stellar lights in the stage world. 



FRANCIS WILSON TO MARRY 
Francis Wilson has announced that he 
and Edna E. Brans will be married within 
the next two weeks. Miss Brims was Mr. 
W-'lson's leading lady in "The Bachelor's 
Baby," and they have been closely asso- 
ciated for several years. 



FRANK CRANE HEIR TO PROPERTY 

Springfield, Mo., Jan. 22. — Frank L. 
Crane, actor, and son of Dr. Frank Crane, 
probably is sole heir to an estate valued at 
more than $100,000. The property was left 
by his wife, Mrs. Blanche Settler Crane. 
who was killed in a fall from the gixth 
story of a Xew York apartment in Decem- 
ber. -_ 

W. CLARK WEDS ENID MOREL 
Newark, N. J., Jan. 19. — Wallis Clark 
and Enid Morel were married here today 
and leave on tbcir honeymoon tonight. 
They are well known players, Mr. Clark 
having recently played the judge in "Jus- 
tice" and Miss Morel, now a member of 
the Gotham Film Company's stock, was 
formerly of the Mabel Brownell Company 
nt the Orpheum, this city. 




OPENING OF NEW N. V. A. CLUB 
ROOMS PR OVES A GALA EVENT 

Hundreds Throng Headquarters Saturday Night and Find Fixtures 

Comfortable and Decorations Artistic; Thirty Thousand 

Dollars Said to Have Been Spent on Place 



EDNA GOODRICH 

Euna Goodrich has again delighted theatre goers by her appearance in vaudeville. For several 
weeks she has been scoring a success in New York. . - ■ 

This beautiful actress offers so much. Her pleasing personality carries one through many 
laughs of lightsome comedy and without warning quietly leads into the big serious moments of 
dramatic situations with telling effect. Nothing has been omitted — love, comedy and drama are - all 
artfully portrayed by this charming actress. *;' 

Miss Goodrich dresses the part wonderfully in a great arrav of beautiful gowns which were 
-originated and designed by: herself and "Lucille." However, vaudeville h> soon to lose Miss Good- 
rich as she has signed contracts to produce an Edna Goodrich series of special feature films, with 
the Mutual Film Co. for a period of one year. - ■ 

Miss Goodrich's last appearance in vaudeville in New York City will be at the Colonial Theatre 
this week, after which, she starts on her tour. 



The opening of the club rooms of the 
National Vaudeville Artists, Inc., at 
Broadway and Forty-eighth Street, Satur- 
day, was a gala event in the world 
of vaudeville. From the official opening 
of the doors at 4 p. m. until the wee sma' 
hours of Sunday morn, members and in- 
vited guests thronged the new quarters. 

Although no entertainment or program 
was provided, merriment and good cheer 
prevailed, and friends greeted friends with 
whole-hearted toasts of long life to the 
X. V. A. 

The crowd even exceeded the expecta- 
tions of optimistic Henry Chesterfield. 
secretary of the organization. It seemed 
that every vnudevillian was there from 
big Tom Mahoney to little Major Doyle. 

Upon entering the new quarters, which 
occupy the entire third floor of the build- 
ing, many persons were surprised at the 
richness and coziness of the surrounding*. 
At the right of the elevator is the ladies' 
lounging room, particularly worthy of 
mention for its daintiness. The room is 
done in a terra cotta tint with a tasty 
Wilton rug upon the floor and wicker 
chairs of green and terra cotta. The 
men's lounging room — opposite the eleva- 
tor — also boasts of a Wilton rug and a 
terra cotta finish, while its wicker chairs 
are of a rich shade of blue. Both rooms 
possess mahogany writing desks and tables. 

The reception hall is artistically ar- 
ranged and possesses several comfortable 
wicker divans. 

Adjoining the men's room is a large 
billiard and pool room, while further down 
the ball is the dining room, attractively 
laid out. 

The cost of fitting up the new quarters 
is said to be in the neighborhood of $30,- 
000. The rooms were designed and fitted 
up under the personal supervision of E. F. 
Albee. 

Telegrams of congratulation poured in 
nil day and night, coming even from lands 
lis remote as Australia and South Africa. 
They all expressed good will for the 
X. V. A., and among the senders were : 
May Irwin, Lillian BuRsell. Phyllis Xiel- 
son Terry, Xan Halperin, Clara Morton, 
I. rah Xora, Mary Door, Devine and 
Williams. Allan Dinehart, Josie Flynn, 
May Elinore, Mercedes, Jack Magann, 
Irene and Bobby Smith, Guy Weadick, J. 

C. Xugent, Bert D. noward, Bessie and 
Harriet Itemple, Gus Sun, Springfield, 
Ohio ; M. W. Taylor, Camden, X. J. ; Matt 
Saunders, Bridgeport: Don P. Trent, 
Knoxville: Walter Griffith, Waterbury : 
Boy D. Murphy, Chicago; W. Dayton 
Wegefarth, Chicago; L-. S. Weinberg, Chi- 
cago; Laurence Goldie; C. C. Anderson, 
Yonkers; W. S. Buttefield, Chicago; 
August Ounge, Chicago; Finn & Heiman 
Circuit, Chicago; George C. Sackett, Chi- 
cago ; O. G. Murray, Richmond ; D. O. 
Schwartz. Chicago; Ruben & Finkelstein 
Circuit, Chicago ; . Jack Wells, Atlanta ; 
Sim Allen, Altoona; Jeff Davis, Boston; 

D. W. Maurice, Lafayette, Ind. : Engene 
Conley, Pittsburgh; C. W. Rex, Rich- 
mond, Va. ; Frank Thielman, Chicago ; Joe 



Pilgrim : Harry Daniels, H. C. Fortune, 
Atlanta : A. Vanta, Hartford : Martin 
Beck; M. Meyerfeld, Jr.; Jnmes H. 
Moore, Detroit; Mort H. Singer. Chicago: 
Sol J. Lovey, II. D. Buckley. St. Louis; 
W. B. Garyn, D. M. Graham, Charles H. 
Wilshin, Nat Sobei. 

Pauline Cook, Harry Davis, Pittsburgh; 
John P. Harris, Pittsburgh ; D. F. Hen- 
nessey, W. D. Hildreth. Frank Q. Doyle, 
C. C. Eagan, James Pilling, H. P. Byer- 
tjr. Clarence Brown, T. Lawrence OTJon- 
iii-ll. Lew Gonlding, Newark; Xate Er- 
ber, Danville; J. Buck, A. Van Aukerr. 
Syracuse: Fred Shanberger, Baltimore: 
Frank Stouder, Fort Wayne: Fred Eb- 
erts, Chicago; Lawrence Lehman, Kan- 
sas City; Tom Carmody, Chicago; Lew 
Golder, Joe Dougherty, Philadelphia. 

Harry T. Jordan, Philadelphia ; George 
Hickman, Atlanta : George Metzet. Phila- 
delphia : Ernest Morrison, Birmingham : 
J. L. Clarke, Jacksonville: Gordon Riter, 
Springfield, Mass.: J. SherriU, Charles- 
ton, S. C. ; Joe McCarthy, Bridgeport; 
Allardt Circuit, Chicago; J. F. Wallace, 
Albany ; Ernest Steward, Milwaukee ; 
J. H. Finn, Rochester; C. Wesley Fraser, 
Boston; E. M. Hart, Elizabeth; W. L. 
Dockstader, Wilmington, 

George Shafer, Wheeling: Chart-* 
Lovenberg, Providence : Arthur White, 
I iulu th ; Paul Schlossmun, Muskegon : 
Charles. E. Bray, New Orleans; H. E. 
Billings, Milwaukee ; Joseph Cone, New 
Haven ; Charles Fox, Milwaukee ; Fred 
J. Nixon-Xirdlioger, Philadelphia ; Joe 
Sullivan, Winnipeg ; Frank McGettigan, 
Portland, Ore. 

The first man to be paged by the new 
club attendants was Harry Fitzgerald, 
only to find it was one of his clients who 
wanted Fitzgerald to be sure and secure 
him a booking for next week. 

The first game of pool was held be- 
tween George O'Brien and Major Doyle, 
while Dan Dody and Hugo Morris made 
a dash for the other pool table. 

A commotion occurred when some jokr- 
ster asked a cullboy to page Harry Mount- 
ford. The boy will know better next time- 
As the evening went on the members 
seemed more drawn toward the dining 
room, and miduight saw James J. Morton 
and Tom Mahoney masters of ceremony; at 
an impromptu entertainment there. Anna 
Held and a party also made merry in the 
dining room, while Clinton and Morrisey 
put over some of their "stuff" to a critical 
audience. 

Among those present were : John <I. 
Murdock, Harry Mundorff, Pete Mack, W. 
B. Sleeper. Jack Ryan, William Sisto, 
Van Liew Trio, John Peebles, Lou Auger, 
Homer Miles. Louis Stone, Harry Ptit-k. 
Harry Bond, Eddie Heron, Roy Hodgon, 
The Gray Trio, Robert Ginnet, BothwHl 
Browne, Lew Wilson, O'Brien Harvel, 
Joe Daniels, Fred Pisano, James J. Arm- 
strong, John W. Ransoroe, Mercedes, 
Jack MeGann, Tom Mahoney, Joe Engel, 
Harold Kemp, Roland Burke Henncssy, 
George A. Herbst, Jack Apdale. Aaron 
Kessler. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 24, 1917 




RAT TROUBLE 

OVER, CASEY 

DECLARES 

MANAGERS GET HIS REPORT 



AMUSEMENT . FIRM FORMED 

Boston, Jan. 19. — A new firm known 
ay Sheedy, Mayne' and* Kollins, Inc., with 
offices at Augusta, Me., and here, and rep- 
resented by the Sheedy Vaudeville Agency, 
Inc., of 1440 Broadway, New York, has 
been formed. Lester D. Mayne will make 
lu> headquarters at the Sheedy Agency in 
New York. 



A meeting of about fifty managers of 
vaudeville theatres in the district about 
New York City was held in the offices of 
the Vaudeville Managers' Protective As- 
sociation last Wednesday afternoon, the 
purpose being to discuss the manner in 
which the controversy between the V. M. 
P. A. and the White Rats Actors' Union 
was handled. From explanations made 
by Pat. Casey and others who bandied 
the situation in Chicago and other parts 
of the country, the managers learned that 
no further trouble from Mountford and 
bis co-workers need be anticipated in the 
near future. 

It was also explained that the antici- 
pation of trouble by the managers was a 
very costly proposition, as it was necessary 
to establish offices throughout the coun- 
try to- keep acts prepared to take the 
places of those that might go out on strike, 
and that other contingencies arose which 
cost thousands of dollars weekly. 

It was also explained that Mountford, 
Fitzpatrick and their various aides, in try- 
ing to create a strike atmosphere, bad 
travelled about the country spending prac- 
tically every dollar in the treasury of 
the White Rata Actors' Union, but all 
without taking any specific action or ac- 
complishing anything that would be of 
advantage to their organization. 

From a statement read by Casey it was 
shown that every act now playing' houses 
controlled by members of the V. M. P. A., 
bad renounced any allegiance that tbey 
might have had toward the White Rats in 
tbe past. 

The managers feel that vaudeville con- 
ditions have assumed their normal aspect 
and that there is no danger in tbe near 
future of any further trouble from 
Mountford, Fitzpatrick and their aides. 
The services of the hundreds of vaudeville 
acts that have been kept in various parts 
of tbe country have been dispensed with 
:iinl in the future the local managers in tbe 
different parts of the country will handle 
the situation. 



THIS AUTHOR CAN SING 

I* Wolfe Gilbert is proving his popu- 
larity as an author through a series of en- 
gagements over the Loew houses. Last 
week at tbe American he sang three of his 
latest compositions, assisted by the young 
lady in the box. Then upon calls from the 
audience, he gave the choruses of many of 
his former successes, each of which was 
greeted with applause. There seemed to be 
no end to the string. 



CHARLOTTE PARRY FOR VAUDE. 

Charlotte Parry has a new act in prep- 
aration, which will soon be seen on the 
U.B. O. time. 



ADAIR A. SUTTER QUIT 

Adair & Sutter ended their partnership 
with Miss Sutter's recent departure for 
Chicago where she is rehearsing for a 
new play. Eddie Adair will return to the 
variety stage with his wife, Edith, in a 
skit entitled, "At the Shoe Store." Mrs. 
Adair was his original partner, but retired 
from vaudeville about a year ago. 



ACTOR SOLDIER HONORED 

Alfred Powell, an American vaudeville 
actor, is fighting in' the British trenches 
and has received a good conduct stripe for 
two years of faithful and continuous serv- 
ice. Catherine Powell, his sister, now 
playing Keith time, expects that he will 
return to America next season, when they 
will appear in a new double act 



WILL PRODUCE NEW PLAYLET 

Clarence Oliver and Georgie Olp have 
made arrangements with Ruth Comfort 
Mitchell, author of "The Sweetmeat 
Game," to produce a new playlet in the 
Spring. Mr. Oliver and Miss Olp will not 
appear in the cast, but will continue in 
their present vehicle, "Discontent." 



SHEAS DOING MUSICAL STOCK 

Detroit, Mich., Jan. 18. — Tex and Ma- 
bel Shea are in their sixth week at the Pal- 
ace Theatre, this city, presenting musical 
stock with a company of twelve people, 
having been retained, after their opening 
week, as a stock feature In addition to the 
nsual ten-act bill. 



MARDiELLI WELL AGAIN 

H. B. Marinelli, who has been serious!)' 
ill for the past two weeks, has recovered 
sufficiently to resume his business duties. 
The physicians diagnosed his trouble as 
gall stones, but did not consider on opera- 
tion necessary at present. 



ELEPHANTS RIDE IN AUTO 

Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 17. — The rail- 
road car shortage resulted in the first 
automobile ride every taken by 16-year- 
old -King and 20-year-old Basil, who, to-- 
gether weighing more than seven tons of 
elephant, were loaded on an auto truck and 
transported from St, Paul to Minneapolis. 
The novelty of their ride left the elephants 
in a highly nervous state for their acts at 
the New Palace. 



VAUDEVILLE TEAM SIGNED 

The Great International Shows have 
signed Ted and Edna May Adams, to pre- 
sent their latest production, "The $1,000.- 
000 Doll," The pair have recently been 
seen in vaudeville in a sketch calle:i 
"Ankles." 



BECK TO RETURN TO VAUDE. 

will Beck, of the former vaudeville 
team of Beck & Henny, is planning to 
return to the variety boards. He has been 
playing concerts and lyceum circuits since 
the team split several years ago. 



CHILD ILL, MOTHER LEAVES TAB. 

Uppeb Sandusky, O., Jan. 23. — Learn- 
ing of the illness of ber 18-months-old 
baby boy. who is in the care of a private 
family here, Cozy L. Walker left her hus- 
band's tabloid show at Wilmington, N. C, 
to hurry to the bedside of her child. Tbe 
baby is suffering from an attack of acute 
gastritis. 



LOWELL & DREW SPLIT 

The vaudeville team of Lowell & Ester 
Drew has disbanded. The girl la now 
appearing in "The Headliners," while 
Drew has another partner. 



LE ROY TO TOUR SOUTH AMERICA 

Servais Le Roy is making preparations 
to tour South America with his show. Be- 
sides his own company of twenty-six per- 
sons, Le Roy will carry four other large 
vaudeville nets. The tour is by special ar- 
rangement, with Richard Pitrot 



MOSS HOUSES CELEBRATING 

To commemorate his commencement in 
the theatrical business, B. S. Moss is hold- 
ing an anniversary celebration this week at 
his Prospect, Hamilton and Jefferson Thea- 
tres. Special programs have been pro- 
vided at all three theatres. 



ANOTHER THEATRE FOR PANTAGES 

Muscatine, la., Jan. 22. — Tbe Grand 
Theatre will open with Pantages vaude- 
ville next Sunday. J. C. Matthews, Chi- 
cago head of the circuit, has framed an 
excellent opening bill. ...*,'<•••■ 



TEAM HAS NEW SKIT 

Rogers & Whalen, who have been ap- 
pearing in "Dippy Dope," are discarding 
this skit for a new vehicle entitled, "Gone 
to the Dogs." 



ALLEN VISITS IN CHICAGO 

Edgar Allen, of the Fox booking offices, 
and Arthur Horowitz, left together for 
Chicago vesterdav on mutual business. 




Patsy's Patter 



A good story was handed out last week 
by Frank Kennedy, thejstage door man at 
the Palace. Every week they, have tht 
usual number of agents and peddlers of 
one sort or another at the door, who al- 
ways want to see some artist personally. 

A man called early last week selling 
embroideries, and wanted particularly to 
see Mrs. Vernon Castle. He was told she- 
bad not arrived yet. He came back two 
or three times, and Kennedy, enjoying the 
joke, advised him to get a pass at the 
front of the house from Manager Rogers. 
Out he went and back he came. 

"They laughed," he said; "I guess I 
don't need no pass." 

Then everyone laughed and explanations 
followed, but even then he went away un- 
convinced. 



You have undoubtedly heard certain per- 
formers referred to ' as having the first 
dollar they ever made — not meant in the 
light of a compliment or commendatory of 
their thrift but rather as an example of 
their "tightness." 

But Edwin George has the first dollar 
be ever made, in the true literal sense. He 
earned it at an amateur contest in Boston 
fourteen years ago. He was paid with two 
silver half dollars, and his mother has kept 
them for .him ever since. Of course,' be has 
managed to fritter away a few thousand 
in the meantime. • 



Florence Moore surprised everyone last 
week at. the Palace by stepping out of her 
comedy and singing a pretty melody as 
sweetly and demurely as an ingenue, in- 
stead' of the dyed-in the -purple comedienne 
she is. The next' minute she came out 
wearing a wedding veil and insisted on the 
orchestra putting more "pep" in the wed- 
ding music. She says there is going to be 
"pep" in her wedding ceremony or there 
will be no wedding. 



Wright and Dietrich, before they left 
town last week, made a record of "Me and 
My Gal" for tbe Victor people. This is 
the sixth record they have made for the 
same company. Their Hawaiian numbers 
are considered to be the best sellers on the 
market and rank almost as classics. 



Maybelle Lewis and Jess Feiber had 
their New York showing at the Fifth Ave- 
nue Theatre last week, for a dandy double 
which they have been doing in the middle 
west the past few weeks. ■ . . **~y ''..,■.• 



Fay Templeton is looking" for . a. black 
face comedian to work with her. She. does 
a very clever old Southern .'•Mammy ' char- 
acter that could well. -be • stretched out 
through a whole !act. .'.".•■ '" K".\ 



It will be worth the price of admission 
at the • Colonial this week to see Edna 
Goodrich's wonderful gowns. She has not 
even been photographed in any of them yet. 



DOROTHY MEUTHER 
Playing U. B. O. Time 



Earl Beeman, of Beeman and Anderson, 
and Alma Grace have cast themselves for 
the .principal roles in "The Newlyweas." 



January 24, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



I 




PALACE 

The show this week, though not looking 
-very big on paper, is thoroughly entertain- 
ing. Miller and Mack, with steps distinctly 
their own, please immensely despite their 
unusually early position. 

Jasper, late star of Cohan & Harris's 
"Young America," walked out and took 
his bow all by himself. Dixie Taylor 
speaks the introduction, and tells the audi- 
ence they see before them Jasper and his 
Master. They conld easily tell which was 
Jasper, as he was sitting down. A truly 
wonderful dog is Jasper who improves on 
acquaintance and always interests one. 

"Mrs. Temple's Telegram," offered by 
William Morris and Co. seems to have lost 
none of its amusing qualities. The audi- 
ence seemed to enjoy it as if they had 
never seen it before. Mr. Morris, a splen- 
did actor, is supported by a very fair cast, 
with the exception of Belle Mitchell, who 
plays Mrs. Fuller. She is evidently inex- 
perienced and, while she reads lines well, 
should study the art of appearing natural. 

Billy Montgomery and George Perry, 
billed as "Two Bachelors of Art," are very 
amusing and the audience liked them. 
Their talk about being bad husbands and 
paying alimony is getting old and it would 
he more becoming if Montgomery wonld 
omit the reference to a green Hawaiian 
skirt. 

Theodore Kosloff and his supreme danc- 
ing stars,, assisted by the splendid Russian 
orchestra, closed intermission. That most 
beautiful dance, "The Ecstasy of Love," 
as danced by Maslova and Kosloff, fol- 
lowed the opening "Spring" number. Vera 
Fredova has two new dances this week, 
"Russian Toy Cats," danced with Bourn- 
man to the strains of what sounded like a 
music box, and a solo number, "The Song 
of the Nightingale"— both of which are 
worthy of special reviewing. The Peas- 
ant Dance and the solos of Maslova and 
Kosloff are all more wonderful than lost 
week. 

Wilbur Mack, Nella Walker and Co. 
open intermission with a splendid comedy 
vehicle, "A Fair of Tickets." 

As a fresh but amusing, young man 
about town be fails to offend a young 
woman who knows she ongbt to be 
offended. "Well how about it," says the 
women as soon as she talks to him at all. 
"I believe you make love to every girl you 
meet" 

"No," returns Mack," I skip one once 
in a while." 

Their song numbers go over with their 
usual splendid reception and Albert 
Hockey's rendition of the "Poor Butterfly" 
ou the piano was appreciated. 

Maggie Cline, in all the glory of a 
green, tulle up-to-the-minute creation, 
sings of how proud she is to be Irish and 
how it took an Irish heart to sing an 
Irish song. Everyone thoroughly coincided 
with her and, of course, she had to throttle 
McClusky in good fashion, before she 
finished. Much credit goes to anyone who 
can close a Palace bill and hold them in 
as she did. 

Mrs. Vernon Castle in the second epi- 
sode of "Patria" went through some hair- 
breadth escapes. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on p«s* 17) 



RIVERSIDE 

"Standing room only," was the best any 
one could buy at this house for any 
amount of money, as early as 8 o'clock 
Monday evening. 

Possibly the presence of Evelyn Nesbit 
had something to do with the size of the 
audience. There is little doubt that the 
recent Thaw newspaper publicity, which 
filled the front pages of the New York 
dailies, has tended to re-create an interest 
in Miss Nesbit. Concrete evidence of this 
theory was apparent as soon as her act 
was carded. 

Joseph E. Howard and Etbelyn Clark 
are offering a dainty and refined singing 
act which is the essence of that indefinable 
something often designated as "class." 

Moran and Wiser, the hat jugglers, 
are a team hard to beat in their line. 
The comedian does not force matters and 
keeps the laughs rolling bis way with re- 
freshing regularity. 

Muriel Window, programmed as "the 
little peacock of vaudeville," lives up to 
her billing matter without any difficulty. 
Her songs, of the exclusive variety, are 
full of cleverly conceived points and ren- 
dered with the proper degree of light and 
shade that denotes the true artiste. 

Ralph Lohse and Nana Sterling in a 
gymnastic novelty were one of the most 
enjoyable acts on a bill of extraordinary 
merit. 

Blossom Seeley and her youthful as- 
sistants in a conglomeration of raggy 
songs and melodies was another act to 
find unqualified praise at the hands of a 
more than discriminating audience. Miss 
Seeley, who sings a rag song inimitably, 
recalls Artie Hall ever so slightly in the 
vigorousness of her method of delivery. 
The musical part of the act is full of gin- 
ger, the banjo player scoring a separate 
hit with one or two finely played. selec- 
tions. 

For a real exponent of syncopation com- 
mend one to Blossom Seeley who once 
seen, makes the hundreds of imitators that 
have elected to follow in her footsteps, 
look foolish. 

Mrs. Gene Hughes and company have a 
sketch in Edgar Allen Woolf's "Gowns" 
that will last a long time. The Irish char- 
acter assumed by Mrs. Hughes is very 
legitimate and is played with a sympa- 
thetic understanding of the warm hearted 
type of Celt drawn so deftly by the author. 

Monday evening, a peculiar thing hap- 
pened. Mrs. Hughes, for some unexplain- 
able reason, forgot the .lines of the role 
completely. For a moment things looked 
squally, but the comedienne recovered her- 
self and saved the scene by sheer presence 
of mind, coupled with a wit trained to 
meet just such emergencies. . 

Ray and Gordon Dbbley were. a young 
riot. Dooley is a pantomimist par ex- 
cellence and '• his partner ' cute, pretty and 
clever. How could such ' a combination 
fail to register? 



COLONIAL 

"Patria," the film serial, although billed 
lust on the program, was moved up to after 
intermission at the Colonial Monday night 
and- this place proved a good spot for it, 
although the Primrose Four, in last posi- 
tion, suffered as a result, for the audience 
began leaving early in their numbers. 

It remained for the lines of Edgar Allan 
Woolff s playlet, "The Mannequin," to carry 
off the comedy honors of the bill, besides 
giving Edna Goodrich a chance to show 
her dazzling wardrobe, her "Tiffanys" and 
her all-round versatility. 

The plot deals with a more or less lofty 
theme in a simple and whimsical manner 
and "gets" the audience at once when a 
dealer in rich woman's wear is shown op 
in his true light as a very ordinary pursuer 
of tbe elusive greenback. In fact, tbe en- 
tire French atmosphere dwindles away and 
an Irish maid, a native of Connecticut and 
a woman who is after a newspaper "scoop" 
are revealed. 

The playlet was frequently interspersed 
with applause as Miss Goodrich appeared 
from parted curtains in beautiful gowns. 
Tbe thread of the plot is easily followed 
and breaks with surprise at the close. This 
act went over big and Miss Goodrich and 
the company took half a dozen bows. 

In the initial spot, Herbert has an animal 
act that is tbe last word in variety, both as 
to the number of species used and the 
different kinds of tricks they do. 

George Quigley and Eddie Fitzgerald were 
in number two spot and their versatility 
carried them over to a good band. See 
New Acta. 

Bessie and Harriet Remple and players 
offered a sketch entitled, "Ton," which 
proved interesting, more on account of its 
novelty than anything else. While a man and 
a girl, sweethearts, are seated in a restau- 
rant and are about ready to trip over the 
matrimonial clothesline, another pair, one 
on each side of the stage with their heads 
through curtains, reveal their real thought*. 
The girl is being urged to hurry or "he" 
will get away, and the man is being held 
back by the thought of the "awful" future. 
: Regnal and Bender walk out with about 
as much "pep" as one would expect from 
a couple of barber college "studes," but 
they soon cut loose with some sure-fire 
gags and four or five acrobatic stunts that 
are seldom seen on a vaudeville stage. 

"Peacock Alley," a tabloid comedy-drama 
by Lewis Alien, followed, and gave the nec- 
essary flash for closing the first half. (See 
New Acts.) 

Van Liew Trio, in their song review, 
found it hard going with this audience. 
Their singing is only fair. 

Edna Goodrich was on next to closing 
followed by the Primrose Four. They axe 
billed as "1,000 pounds of harmony," and 
they proved entertainers of more than ordi- 
nary ability. Dressed in grey they loom 
upon the little stage like four cruisers on 
the Hudson. One of their numbers is a 
Hula, am? la uproarously funny. 



ORPHEUM 

One of vaudevilles most ancient and 
honorable customs is being duly observed 
at the Orpheum this week, in the shape of 
an "Anniversary BUI." 

At one forty-five Monday afternoon the 
entire house, with the exception of a few 
box seats, was sold out. Bert Melrose was 
the first comedy act to reach the platform 
and waa rewarded with a whirlwind of 
applause and laughs. 

Bonita and Lew Hearn were given a 
"reception" on their entrance. The burles- 
que bits went over nicely and Bonita anna; 
several numbers in a style all her own. 

Willie Weston is a native son and mora 
than one in the house was fully aware of 
tbe fact, judging by the way his efforts 
were received. Willie is getting to be 
more of a monologist every day. His talk 
is bright and well delivered, with a keenly 
developed sense of comic values. As a sug- 
gestion though : as long as Willie la using 
so much of the goody goody boy conversa- 
tion, why not include George Ivan's wbeese 
about the fellow who went to parties and 
was loved by tbe girls bnt.was sentenced 
to die at sunrise by the boys. It belongs. 

Valerie Bergere A Co. presented "Little 
Cherry Blossom" a sketch that offers the 
clever character actress numerous oppor- 
tunities for sympathetic playing. The set- 
ting of the act is high class and for atmos- 
phere quite the equal of many plays stsged 
in the two dollar houses. 

"Pinkey" and a little boy with a delight- 
ful soprano singing voice, entertained with 
unique dances and songs. The act is not 
1 framed in the conventional manner and 
constitutes a real novelty. Pinkey, as a 
Russian dancer can hold her own with the 
best in her line and exhibits unusual 
ability as a high kicker. Tbe biggest hit 
of the afternoon, incidentally, was regis- 
tered by tho boy, with a ballad rendered 
exceptionally well for one of his years. 

Cartmell and Harris are excellent step 
dancers, who have enhanced their natural 
talents with high class scenic effects. Miss 
Harris does a male impersonation at the 
finish of the turn that stands out as a 
real characterization. The old gentleman 
carried by the act, is as lively as the 
proverbial cricket and danced a step or two 
on his own account to prove it Renea 
Florigny, a concert pianists, on early, suf- 
fered from the position alloted bsr offer- 
ing. She Is a good musician. 

Frank and Tobie have a well arranged 
routine of singing and dancing, embellished 
by a wardrobe that will make them 
favorites. The Seven Bracks scored with 
tbe ground tumbling, which has placed 
their act in the standard class. The 
"Risley** work is very daring and landed 
solidly as usual. Marie Nordstrom, an 
actress with gifts of a nature seldom seen 
in vaudeville, held them every minute aha 
occupied tbe stage. The "stenographer" 
bit is a little gem. 

Jack Wilson followed the show and 
found plenty of things to travesty in what 
had gone before. Frank Hurst rang as 
sonlfully as ever and Miss Swares fills in 
acceptably. It goes without saying that 
the Jack Wilson turn made Its regulation 
enormous hit. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



January 24, 1917 



VML/ 




ALHAMBRA 

The Alhambra has hung out the Free 
List Suspended sign, although the show 
this week falls below the standard of good 
Alhambra bills. 

Too much time is consumed by "The 
Girlies' Gambol" whfch closes the vaude- 
ville bill. This is an unsuccessful effort 
to condense the "Follies'* or Winter Gar- 
den show into a vaudeville capsule. All 
t he big names are there : Gene Buck, Dave 
Stamper, Neil Way burn, Louise Ilirsch ; 
but there its resemblance to the big mu- 
sical shows end». 

If Felix Adler should neglect to report 
for duty some night, this act could not go 
on. lie is the life of the act, and the 
other twenty-three members of the com- 
pany can justly look to Adler as the 
saviour of their salaries. The audience 
on Monday night was strong for him. 
When he was on the stage, they were 
wide-awake and appreciative. When he 
was absent, they nestled back in their 
Keats until be should appear again, only 
giving a perfunctory hand to the chorus 
numbers. - 

The Dunedin Duo presents an excep- 
tionally long act for an opener. Billed 
as versatile vandeviilians, they live up to 
tbeir boast. They sing, play, walk wire 
and ride trick bicycles with equal skill. 
The audience liked their work and gave 
them a big hand. 

They are followed by Joseph McSliane 
and Arria Hathaway who perform in a 
fashion that merits them a later spot 
MiSbune has been criticized for not play- 
ing to his audience, but Monday night he 
put bushels of personality across the foot- 
lights. The Chaplin takeoff goes over 
nicely, AW the whole act spell "class." 

Joe Fanton and company in "A Garden 
of Surprises" should be next, according to 
the program, but did not appear. Emer- 
son and Brown are taking their place and 
do some very clever juggling. However, 
this is a poor spot for their act. 

Leo Beers took first honors on the bill 
with his distinctive piano act. He seems 
to enjoy his work, and the house warms 
up to him immediately. 

Claude and Fannie Usher have a rather 
weak offering iu "Pagan's Decision" but 
manage to win a big hand. This is due, 
not to the playlet, but to the hard work 
of the pair. 

Grace De Mar, a pretty girl with plen- 
ty of talent, is content to waste her ability 
tin some ordinary monologue characterisa- 
tions which are not as refined as one would 
expect from such a coy looking maiden. 
With cleaner material Miss De Mar could 
make a decided hit. 



DECATUR TO BE W FILM 

Decatur. Ills., Jan. 23. — Decatur wi'.l 
see itself as others see it, as some of it-* 
most prominent citizens are to be ill :» 
RIOTing picture film, "The Romance of De- 
catur," which is to be made soon by the 
Iludris Film Co., Inc., of New York city. 
Dr. J. C. Fisher will take the part of 
William Atherton, the father of the 
heroine in the picture. Mayor Dan Diu- 
t.een and the city -officials will appear in 
one of the 30 scenes. The whole cast will 
bo made up of local folks. 



AMERICAN ROOF 

Jimmy Flynn was an addition to the 
program here last Monday night. He 
opened the bill, and the reception accorded 
him showed how popular be is with pa- 
trons of this house. He sang three songs, 
and the audience seemed to want him to 
render double that number. 

Sundberg and Revere. international 
dancers, deserved more recognition for 
their work than they received. 

The Three Syncopntors made a solid hit 
with their ragtime singing, and for an 
encore rendered operatic selections in rag- 
time. 

Cummin and Seaham were billed as 
"two real eccentrics." and they lived up 
to tbeir billing. Their acrobatics and 
tumbling work is exceptionally well done. 

Cbnse and La Tour presented their 
mirth and melody entertainment, and well 
earned the hearty approval accorded them 
by tlie audiences. 

Marietta Craig is featured in "I. O. 
U.," a sketch by Richard Warner, which 
is presented by Jack Martin. The skit, 
has some merit but it drags, and while 
the work of Miss Craig was good, her com- 
pany of six players gave her poor sup- 
port. 

Florence Rayficld received a hearty re- 
ception on her entrance and was accorded 
much applause for ber rendition of three 
songs. Miss Rayficld has magnetism, 
pleasing personality, and knows how to 
put her material over to the best ad- 
vantage. 

Joan Storm und John Marston in their 
unique sketch entitled, "The Alibi," soon 
found themselves favorites. The sketch is 
unusual in that, during the ten minutes it 
runs, Miss Slorm does nil of the talking 
except for the word "thanks" which Mr. 
Marston says. For their curtain call Mr. 
.Marston explains that a married man 
should never attempt to argue with his 
wife when she is in the mood to talk, but 
should just keep quiet as he does. 

Nat Carr. with his Yiddish monologue, 
was the real big hit of the bill. He did 
nothing new but had the audience laughing 
from the start. 

Reno, the eccentric tramp bicyclist, 
closed the bill, and pleased with his clever 
work. 




ROYAL 

When Charles (Chic) Sale is on the 
bill, there is no doubt as to who walks 
nway with the show. This clever protean 
artist would compel the coldest of audi- 
ences to applaud, and, as the Royal is at 
all times an appreciative house, the ova- 
lion accorded Sale at Monday's matinee 
was most gratifying. 

Following close upon Sale's heels for 
popularity was Heckman, Shaw & Camp- 
bell, in "Moments Musical." Royal audi- 
ences are partial to musical acts, and this 
trio certainly knows bow to put their songs 
across. The result was that the audience 
could not seem to get enough of them and 
the applause continued until the lights 
went up for Sale. 

Venita Fitzhugh also entertained with 
song, but the audience applauded most 
sparingly. See New Acts, for review. 

The Cycling Brunettes, presenting their 
bicycle offering, "Defying Gravity" opened 
the show. Their act starts slowly but 
gains speed as it goes along, ending with 
some very original feats. 

Flo Irwin pleased in Edgar Allan 
Woolfs vehicle, "Looks." See New Acts. 

Nate Leipzig is doing the some card 
tricks he has been doing for several sea- 
sons, but pleased nevertheless. His win- 
ning personality gets him as much 
applause as his tricks. 

Geo. Rolland & Co. clean up with tbeir 
"Vacuum Cleaner" und the audience 
lttughed heartily at their nonsenBe. 

Le Ho.n & Dupreece closed the show 
in "Something Different." It is a mix- 
ture of singing and sharpshooting leaning 
mostly toward the latter. The act is far 
too good for a closer and could easily hold 
down a number four or five as a novelty 
net. The shooting is marvelously accurate